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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  February 1, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's wednesday. it's 9am. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this evening mps are likely to take the historic step of voting to trigger the process of the uk leaving the european union. it's a big day for voters, it's a big day for politicians and we're going to hear more of this. england has saved herself and will i trust save europe and the united kingdom by her example. i personally shall be voting with my conscience, content in this vote and when we see what unfolds here after as we leave the european union, i hope the consciouses of other members of parliament remain equally content. in an exclusive interview, we'll talk live to 18—year—old chelsea cameron from dundee who's written an open letter to her drug addicted mum
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and dad thanking them for not being there for her as she grew up. she says it made her ambitious, independent and determined to succeed. herfirst interview, exclusively at 9.15am. e—mails telling you to do the right thing or snooping? internet providers are contacting those of you who've downloaded and shared material illegally. will it stop you breaking the law? let me know. hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until iiam. throughout the morning, we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories. we are going to talk about rail fares and how confusing the system is with some trips costing more if you buy different tickets. operators are now planning an overhaul. send us your examples of baffling fares.
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use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. mps will vote tonight on legislation that would allow the government to formally start the process of leaving the european union. mps debated the issue for nearly 12 hours yesterday and will have more discussions today. the government is expected to win despite opposition from some. our political correspondent chris mason reports. heading home into the winter's night after nearly 12 hours of debate. midnight in westminster with another afternoon of discussion to follow today. this is a debate with fire and passion. with some long speeches. and some very short ones. the speaker: drjulian lewis. thank you, mr speaker. in my opinion, the people have decided, and i'm going to vote accordingly.
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laughter. that eight second speech best sums up the mood of mps however they voted in the referendum. this is a process that needs to be triggered. we need to do it soon and the public of this country expect us to do it. but not everyone is convinced. the new government have acted as though the vote in the referendum gives them carte blanche to engineer the most extreme kind of arrangements for the uk leaving the eu. she is one of a few dozen labour mps who could vote against starting brexit, but ministers are confident they'll win easily because many mps who passionately campaigned for remain will support starting the brexit process, even if they're irritated by the claims of some. please don't mock our intelligence by pretending we're going to sign a suite of trade deals on day one of leaving the european union. and mps return here this morning
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to pick up where they left off. we will talk to various mps throughout the programme about that. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. train operators have promised to overhaul what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system. trials aimed at cutting red tape, and making it easierfor passengers to find the cheapest fares, will begin in may. our business correspondent ben thompson reports. same journey, different prices. buying train tickets is notoriously complicated and confusing for many and so now the government is to trial a new, simpler system, one that should make it easier to find the cheapest fares. the new trial will begin in may this year on trains between london, sheffield, edinburgh and glasgow. it will reduce the number of confusing ticket options. the rail delivery group, which represents train operators,
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says the changes will mean passengers are offered the best price every time regardless of whether they book in a station or online. it's quite complicated to find which place to buy them from and they have varying prices. a wide range from £10 to £76 for the journey i do. it is quite confusing to know which ones to take, especially like, off— peak and peak hours. the trial should put an end to what's known as split ticketing, where passengers divide theirjourney into single shorter trips using cheaper tickets. out of date options and discounts will also be removed from ticket machines. the clearer ticket vending machines will never replace trained helpful members of staff, so we need to make sure that train companies ensure that ticket offices remain open and that there are staff there who can talk you through the different options, advise you on what is best for you. the train companies themselves
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have welcomed the trial, blaming government rules built up over decades for stopping them selling more flexible tickets. but critics say the trial doesn't go far enough after above inflation price rises came into force in january alongside strikes and delays affecting many parts of the rail network. let's speak to alexandra mackenzie who is at king's cross station in london. what are people there making of the changes? there seems to be something going on. we have been hearing over the tannoy that the station is being evacuated. so all of the exits that ican evacuated. so all of the exits that i can see around me, there are a lot of people leaving the station, but at this stage we don't quite know what's happening. it hasjust at this stage we don't quite know what's happening. it has just been announced that people are to leave the station, but we were here earlier to speak to passengers about the new ticketing scheme. the ticketing scheme that we have at the
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moment, it has been with us for the last 30 years and politicians and rail companies have said it is out dated and it is too complicated and it is time for a change so that's what we were asking passengers about here earlier. some of them said they we re here earlier. some of them said they were quite happy with things as they were. other people said no, it is way too complicated. they seem to have trouble knowing whether they we re have trouble knowing whether they were getting the best value for money or whether they knew when a ticket was peak or off—peak. the one main thing that they did speak to me about was the cost of tickets. almost everyone said that theyjust felt rail travel was too expensive, but they did speak to me about split ticketing which most people i spoke to had had at least tried and i'll give you an example. if we wanted to go on give you an example. if we wanted to goona give you an example. if we wanted to go on a journey today, a return journey, from cornwall all the way up journey, from cornwall all the way up to wick, on an advanced return ticket, we would pay around £300. but someone who did their research
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and was doing split ticketing i understand could get six tickets between cornwall and wick and they could pay as little as £80 for that. soa could pay as little as £80 for that. so a very big difference. that's just one example and we'd love people to get in touch with their examples as well. all the usual ways of getting in touch, thank you. presdent trump has nominated a conservativejudge, neil gorsuch, to fill a vacancy on the us supreme court. if confirmed, the 49—year—old will become the youngest person to fill the position in a quarter of a century. some democrats say they'll oppose him because of his attitudes towards women's and workers‘ rights. 0ur washington correspondent, david willis has more. in the hands of this man, even an appointment to the top court in the land has the feel of a reality tv show. today, i'm keeping another promise to the american people by nominating judge neil gorsuch. donald trump had brought the top two contenders for the job to washington in order to keep his prime—time tv
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audience guessing, only to tell this federal appeals courtjudge, "you're hired." judge gorsuch has outstanding legal skills, a brilliant mind, tremendous discipline, and has earned bipartisan support. at a9, neil gorcuch is the youngest nominee to the supreme court in more than a quarter of a century. his appointment is for life. standing here in a house of history, and acutely aware of my own imperfections, i pledge that if i am confirmed i will do all my powers permit to be a faithful servant of the constitutional laws of this great country. judge gorsuch‘s conservative ideology is closely aligned to that of the man he has been nominated to replace, justice antonin scalia, who died just last year. the choice of neil gorsuch is a gift to those who voted for donald trump. his conservative views could tip the balance of the supreme court on such key issues as abortion,
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voting rights, and religious equality. the system for recovering cash from overseas patients who use the nhs is "chaotic" and ministers should "get a grip" on the issue, says a report by mps. the public accounts committee is calling for more to be done by the nhs to identify and charge people from overseas. the department of health says the amount recovered from foreign countries has more than trebled in three years. police say a 16—year—old vietnamese boy has been found hiding in bushes in dumbarton, after escaping from traffickers. the teenager is thought to have been trafficked to russia before being brought to scotland. he was found by a member of the public two weeks ago. police are appealing for information. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. thank you very much. let me read
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some messages from you. thank you. 0n brexit matt on facebook says "today we get to see how many mps from all parties put the interests of the european union above the british people's decision to leave the european union." and this tweet from james who is very much looking forward to hearing chelsea cameron in herfirst broadcast forward to hearing chelsea cameron in her first broadcast interview in about five minutes time. chelsea has written an open letter to her drug addicted parents to thank them for effectively not being there for her as she was growing up. james said as someone struggling with his addiction this will be fascinating listening. clearly, an old head on such young shoulders. we'll talk live to chelsea in five or six minutes time. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now with will. ryan mason on the road to recovery.
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he fractured his skull and it looked awful. what has he been saying? we're glad there is a happy ending. ryan mason was released from hospital on monday, but he released a statement for the first time to say that he's lucky to be alive. that he would like to thank everyone for their support. this was nine days ago at stamford in a game between hull and chelsea and ryan mason is only 25 years old. it was a collision with gary cahill, a clattering of heads and ryan mason was stretchered off to applause at sta mford was stretchered off to applause at stamford bridge, but he then spent a week in st mary's hospital in london and that led to quite a few worrying moments. there were reports on the night that it might even be life threatening. thank goodness that's not the case. we don't know if ryan mason will play football again, that's not been confirmed. his manager said that he's confident he will make that full recovery to actually go on and resume his
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career. such an important playerfor hull as well. he's 25 years old, an england international and he is their record club signing and hull bottom of the pra0k, they've sold jake livermore, i would be amazed if he plays football this season. there has been no official confirmation or anything to contradict that. he will play, but the main thing, victoria, he's out of hospital and he made this statement saying that he's lucky to be alive and he's all good. a group of mps who make up the sport committee want to talk to lord coe again about the russian doping scandal. remind us why and what are the odds on him turning up again? well, yeah, they've asked lord coe to come in and speak to the select committee again. this is damien collins the chairman of the select committee and lord coe, you will remember he gave his evidence, he came and spoke to damien collins in december 2015. this was all surrounding this russian corruption
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in athletics and at the time lord co said he wasn't aware of any corruption in the sport. well, since then, there has been evidence that surfaced in a panorama documentary lastjune surfaced in a panorama documentary last june where a surfaced in a panorama documentary lastjune where a former athlete, david bedford said that he sent this e—mail to lord coe, before december 2015, this is back this 2014, saying that he had this evidence about an athlete called lilia, a russian athlete called lilia, a russian athlete and he had sent the attachments. well, lord coe is saying he didn't open the attachment because he was on holiday abroad and he forwarded the e—mail on. so it is a kind of he said, she said. the select committee just want to know who said what? and they want it explaining. they want to know how much he knew before he had received this e—mail and of course, because he told the parliamentary select committee that he wasn't aware of specific allegations. he is still
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saying there is no discrepancy between what he said then and what they know now, but damien collins says he has to come in and clear it up says he has to come in and clear it up and saying that athletics is in a precarious place at the moment and it needs its leader, the president of iaaf lord coe, to come in and clear this up. thank you very much. now most of us have memories of moments when we are growing up, those firsts like getting exam results, prize giving, trips away and having your family around to be there. chelsea cameron is 18. she is going to read us an open letter that she wrote to her parents — both drug addicts — about how they missed all those moments. but instead of being angry, she is grateful to them as she says it has made her independent, ambitious and determined never to take drugs. this week her dad was sent to prison for burglary.
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take a few minutes to listen to chelsea, she's going to read her letter. i know you are comfortable about that, but first of all explain a little to our audience about your life growing up. i had a relatively normal childhood growing up, that i was aware of my parents taking drugs and some criminal behaviour they had been involved in. my parents definitely loved me and still do, and care about me, but maybe not enough to sacrifice drugs and to prioritise us in their lives. but really i'm not here to go into detail about the things that happened negatively in their lives, i want to be a positive role model to other young people who are going through a similar situation. what kind of drugs were they using?|j through a similar situation. what kind of drugs were they using? i am aware they were taking valium,
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possibly heroin, and other drugs they picked up on the street. what do you recall was unusual compared to most other parents about their behaviour? i think children are aware of a lot more than adults probably think they are sometimes they were completely incoherent or just not able to focus on what you we re just not able to focus on what you were saying, slurring their words and things like that which was traumatic as a child. sometimes you would see them fighting in the street and dealers hammering on the door? i saw lots of situations where my parents were in the street fighting with others orjust other situations where maybe violence was brought to our home and things like that. what was that like for you? it was difficult as a child because naturally i love my parents and i still do and i know they care about
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me, but there were things i may be missed out on in my childhood that maybe my friends have opportunities to do. just a little bit of normality that was missing in my childhood. i think you took your younger brother to his first day at school because your parents were not capable of doing that. unfortunately my mother was not able to be there. my my mother was not able to be there. my dad did come up with us and we took my little brother to school that day, but that was really a big step for me. i was young, maybe only 14, and my little brother went to his first day of school and i took him there and communicated with the staff and try to organise that for him, which may seem like a negative experience, but i am thankful for that opportunity. me and my little brother have a great bond and that has developed the experiences we have had in ourfamily.
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has developed the experiences we have had in our family. would you please read our some of your letter. yes, of course. thank you. thank you for teaching me that taking drugs ruins lives, breaks families apart and gives no want a quality of life when living. i will be eternally grateful for this lesson you have taught me which is a message that stuck by me to this day and always will. i have never and will never have a desire to take harmful su bsta nces have a desire to take harmful substances through your example. thank you for teaching me to be ambitious. your example showed me that no ambition for education or success is harmful and leads to a lot of self worth. life is all about choices and i did not need to make the same ones you did. remember that time we forced dad into watching hannah montana, but there is a lying in one of the songs that says, life is what you make it, so let's make it rock. life has turned out for me
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what i have chosen to make it. you both can make your lives rock as you make your chances. thank you for making me not easily embarrassed. you have both made choices, sometimes very public, allowing eve ryo ne sometimes very public, allowing everyone i associate to know what you are like. that has given me the opportunity to speak freely and openly about how i am and how my life has been growing up. in school i try to have an all clear ego that an altar ego. i made myself something that i was not associating with the harsh truth of our lives. the thing that kept me sane was thinking people did not know the truth. they probably did, but i brainwash myself into thinking that they did not. thank you for teaching me that life is unfair, people disappoint you and there is nothing you can do about that. thank you for
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not being there to wave goodbye as i jetted off to uganda on a trip of a lifetime. thank you for not being there when i got my first exam results to say well done. thank you for not being there when i got the position of head girl. thank you for not being there when i stood in front of hundreds of people to speak at my prizegiving. you have given me the greatest lesson of how to be independent. you have both allowed me to bea independent. you have both allowed me to be a more patient and tolerant person that i could have ever imagined. dad, i see you off, person that i could have ever imagined. dad, isee you off, but person that i could have ever imagined. dad, i see you off, but i hope you have a greater insight into the type of person i am. mum, i hope you are well and i hope you are a bit better now. i hope you know i am trying to be a good person. i hope one day you will wake up and realise there is so much more that the world has to offer you and when that day comes, please come to find me so we can enjoy live together. i will show
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you some nice restaurants and if you are lucky i will take you to germany one day. until then i will dream of what my life might be like with pa rents to enjoy what my life might be like with parents to enjoy it with. wow, that is really powerful and very moving. what is upsetting is to say life is not sunshine and rainbows. we know that, but you know it at such a young age and that makes me very sad. there are lots of negative things that come into people's lives possibly not through their own circumstances. what i wanted to do was to allow people to see that they could choose positivity, no matter what circumstances they were in, and have joined what circumstances they were in, and havejoined in their life no matter what circumstances are. society tells you if you parents live a certain way, or if you live a certain way, or if you live a certain lifestyle, it is destined
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that you live like that. my hope is to show other young people that they can choose exactly what they want their life to be. they can choose joy, their life to be. they can choose joy, happiness and positivity, no matter what the circumstances. what kind of a response you have had?|j kind of a response you have had?” have had incredible responses. so many people in similar situations have said, this has helped me, it has made me know that it is ok to talk about how you feel, not to bottle it up and to know they do not have to fall into that pathway. not just with drugs, a lot of people have contacted me with any negative situation they have had in their lives and it has made them realise that you can choose to be positive. because a negative has happened in your life, that does not determine your life, that does not determine your attitude, you can be positive and continue to be happy. is it young people, kids, middle aged people contacting you ?”
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young people, kids, middle aged people contacting you? i have had a lot of different people, a lot of young people and older people who may be did not know my circumstances before or who had known my parents. they had reached out to support me and allowed me to know that i have helped someone by showing them the letter as well, which was my desire. you talk about the period of time when you were younger when you felt you had to hide what was going on at home. as a young person you are very easily embarrassed and you want to try and be this person that seems perfect and your life is perfect and everything flows nicely and no one needs to know anything negative about your life. i kept that persona for a long time and i bottled it up. i felt like i wanted to shed the letter because it was time for me to speak about how i feel and to tell others that it is time for them to speak about how they feel as well.
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although i do not know them, i can support them and they can come to me for any advice as a friend and supporter. at 14, in the middle of high school, you stopped living with your parents. where did you go?” lived with various family members and friends. that was on the recommendation of social workers? yes. what did they say? they said my dad was not able to care for us any more. he was in a bad place with his difficulties and it was the best for my brother and i to move away from that. i have had continuous support from family and friends who have taken me in and show me a level of ca re taken me in and show me a level of care that was not necessary for them to give me, that my parents would have given me, but they have continued to support me and i am extremely grateful for it. this is
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not an extremely grateful for it. this is notan angry extremely grateful for it. this is not an angry letter. you are not publicly shaming your parents. you mean it. this is thank you. i am absolutely not here to criticise my pa rents absolutely not here to criticise my parents or to put shame upon them. asi parents or to put shame upon them. as i have said, i want other young people to know that they are not alone. there are other people facing these difficulties and to try and have a positive spin on things. we live in a society that is full of negativity and chaos and lots of trouble going on. when we get to a place in our lives where we can choose to be positive and happy, it is the best thing for our own well—being. is the best thing for our own well-being. how do you think you have achieved exam success, becoming head girl? the trip to uganda was so important to you, how have you done it? i have had so much support from other friends, teachers and family
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members that have really allowed me to choose to go down that path. 0pportunities to choose to go down that path. opportunities are coming my way, the opportunity to be the head girl, to try hard at school, to have the opportunity to go to uganda, and i grabbed those opportunities with both hands and i did things that will enrich my life hopefully. your mum, who you have not spoken to for over a year, has given a quote to the daily mail today. over a year, has given a quote to the daily mailtoday. is it over a year, has given a quote to the daily mail today. is it ok if i read it? yes, that is fine. no child should go through what chelsea did and live that kind of life. i am ashamed and upset that my behaviour andi ashamed and upset that my behaviour and i am so sorry. i am so proud of her. it is nice to hear that response from my mum and i will continue to love and support my pa rents. continue to love and support my parents. they have not made the best choices, but everyone makes bad choices, but everyone makes bad choices and i want them to know that
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iam choices and i want them to know that i am there for them if they want to reach out to me. i will be involved in their lives as much as i can. what was your reaction when your dad was jailed this week?” what was your reaction when your dad was jailed this week? i was not surprised, but we have a great relationship, i get on with him very well and i will continue to support him my whole life for anything that he needs. these are messages from our audience, may i he needs. these are messages from ouraudience, may i read he needs. these are messages from our audience, may i read them? yes. chris says, what an inspirational young women. ian says, what an amazing young woman chelsea cameron is after such a troubled childhood. good luck to her in herfuture. a lovely lady. chuck says, chelsea is an exceptional lady. bolivia, what an exceptional lady. bolivia, what an inspirational and incredible girl, and she has chosen the life she wants to live. mehdi says, well done young lady. clare says, wow,
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what an incredible young woman, she will go far. ellie says this on twitter, i am listening now, what an inspiration. thank you very much. it is true. thank you. do you forgive your parents? absolutely, absolutely. no matter the choices they make, i continue to forgive them. iam they make, i continue to forgive them. i am thankfulfor the opportunities they have given me to become an independent person, to choose good pathways. maybe if my childhood was different, i would not have had the opportunities i have now to be independent and ambitious and to have the drive i have. i will be eternally grateful for that. you are only a teenager, do you know what you want to do? not entirely, see what opportunities come my way, i guess. i wish you lots of luck. thank you for talking to us. thank you. if you want to get in touch
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with chelsea cameron and us, you can send us an e—mail. still to come: this evening mps will vote on the bill that would allow theresa may to trigger article 50 and formally notify the eu of the uk's intention to leave. we'll be speaking to three mps here in the studio. some internet providers are warning customers their illegal downloads have been tracked. it's a controversial move and some experts believe it has come too late to be an effective deterrent. we'll talk about that in the next hour as well. in the bbc newsroom here's a summary of today's news. mps will today vote on legislation that would allow the government to trigger article 50, starting the process of leaving the european union. it would see the start of two years of formal negotiations with eu member states. the government is expected to win the vote, despite opposition
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from labour rebels and the snp. train operators have promised to overhaul what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system. trials aimed at making it easier for passengers to find the cheapest fares will begin in may. the first routes affected will include crosscountry, virgin trains' east and west coast services and east midlands. donald trump has nominated a conservativejudge from colorado, neil gorsuch, to fill a vacancy on the us supreme court. if confirmed, the 49—year—old will become the youngest person to fill the position in a quarter of a century. some democrats have said they will oppose the choice. david cameron tried to have the editor of the daily mail sacked during last year's eu referendum campaign, the bbc has learned. the paper's owner said the former prime minister had asked him to "rein in" or dismiss paul dacre, who was strongly pro—brexit. a spokesman for mr cameron said he "did not believe he could determine who edited the daily mail." the leader of france's national front party, marine le pen, could have her mep‘s salary cut
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in half today as a punishment for misuse of eu funds. the european parliament had given her until midnight to return £250,000 it says she mis—spent on the salary of a party official. ms le pen says she won't give the money back. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. i cannot tell you how many messages we've got for chelsea cameron. alice says, "i'm blown away by chelsea's mindset. what an inspiration." maggie, "a an amazing young woman with great coping mechanisms. " bernadette says, "0mg, what a wonderful and beautiful attitude to life." stevie says, "you've got me welling up at my desk at work. james says, "choice. the heart of it all. so moving a testimony. i'm looking in the mirror long and hard." another viewer says, "please hug
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this girl. she is amazing." another viewer says, "day time tv never makes me cry. " viewer says, "day time tv never makes me cry." another viewer says, "thank you, chelsea, you reminded me at 57 to make good life choices." we did hug! here's some sport now with will perry. good morning. chelsea have extended their lead at the top of the premier league after a 1—1 draw with liverpool. david luiz put them ahead at anfield and although liverpool equalised and chelsea missed a penalty, but antonio conte's side are now nine points clear after their closest rivals stumbled. hull city's ryan mason said he was "lucky to be alive" after returning home from hospital. mason fractured his skull in a challenge with chelsea defender gary cahill. he has thanked everyone for the "overwhelming support" given to him and his family. england's cricketers will be looking to finish a disappointing winter tour of india on a high today. their last hope of a series win lies with the final t20 in bangalore after
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they lost the test and one day series. lord coe has been asked to meet mps again after e—mails seem to confirm he did know the details of doping allegations in athletics, four months before they became public. coe says he was not aware of the specifics. i will have more for you at 10am. the brexit debate will carry on in the commons this afternoon, after a late—night session where mps delivered passionately held views on the uk's divorce from the eu. and tonight they will vote on the legislation giving the government the go—ahead to trigger article 50. the bill is expected to pass this test in spite of opposition from the snp, the liberal democrats and some labour rebels. and one tory. norman smith joins us now outside parliament. another big brexit day. what's going to happen later norman? that's a question i put to one leading anti—brexit campaigner and he said we are going to lose. the people opposed to brexit are going
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to lose. if you want to boil it down to lose. if you want to boil it down to one basic reason, it is because most of them, the overwhelming majority of them accept the result of the referendum. they may not like it. in fact, they don't like it, but they accept the people have spoken. so, yes, there will be plenty of arguments still over the details, whether we're in the single market, what sort of immigration rules we have, whether mps should have a vote before mrs may agrees a deal, but on the fundamental question — mrs may wins and mps tonight will vote to begin the process of leaving the eu. soiam begin the process of leaving the eu. so i am the breaks tiers are on a roll. some were comparing it to henry the fifth's speech to british troops to the battle of waterloo. have a listen... the instruction of the british people have to be carried out. that's what we will do.
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ifi carried out. that's what we will do. if i may say once again those famous words of william pitt england has saved herself and will i trust save europe and the united kingdom by her example. and all those many good things that europe, we are told, has given us, the great news is, we can decide to keep them for ourselves! all those good laws we will keep. all those employment protections, we will agree to continue. and the day that we leave the european union, it will bea we leave the european union, it will be a great day. stirring stuff. i don't think i have seenjohn redwood getting so animated, but contrast that with ken clarke, the only tory who is going to vote against triggering this bill beginning our departure from the eu. now he was actually applauded at the end by some 0pposition mps, but have a look
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at the two tory sitting behind him sort of indifference. i personally shall be voting with my conscience content in this vote and when we see what unfolds here after as we leave the european union, i hope the consciences of other members of parliament remain equally content. so mr clarke the only conservative who is going to vote against this. what about the labour party? well, vic, you'd like to say it is a car crash, but it is worse than a car crash. you'd have to look away. the blunt truth is labour are split from top to bottom on the issue of europe from the shadow cabinet, through the parliamentary party through the constituency parties and through ordinary labour voters and it is not something you can blamejeremy corbyn for. it is much more profound and it is hard to see how the two sides can mesh together again and
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you know yesterday in the commons there were labour mps sniping at each other. i've got a couple here. first, kate howey having a go at those of her colleagues who were sort of deriding people who voted for brexit on the ground they didn't really understand the issues. take a look. people didn't know what they we re look. people didn't know what they were voting for. they voted to leave, but they didn't know what that meant. they didn't understand it. it really is patronising and it is part of the reason why so many people voted to leave, that they we re people voted to leave, that they were fed—up being treated as if they knew nothing and that those in power knew nothing and that those in power knew more than them. it's not clear whether the prime minister frightened the european commission by her threat to devastate our tax base and in consequence all our public services, but she successfully frightened me. ido but she successfully frightened me. i do not believe, not for one second, that that is what the british people thought they were voting for. so, for now, mrs may's
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plans for brexit are on course. the only other thing i would say vic, this place often, you know people view it as dull and dreary. actually yesterday, you know, it was at its best. we had really passionate convincing speeches on both sides and you know, if you want to take a look at the best of parliament then i would suggest maybe having a look at the debates today because it's quite stirring stuff. cheers, norman. earlier i spoke with labour's shadow foreign secretary and former brexit secretary emily thornberry. she told this programme the party's stance on brexit was a tough one to make. it's a very difficult decision. we campaigned to remain in the european union. we are great internationalists. we wanted to stay in the eu. but the referendum was a serious thing. we asked people to make up their minds what they wanted to do and they decided that we had to leave. and so, you know, we are internationalists and we like europe but we are democrats, more than anything else. and so we have our instructions from the british public
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and we're going to leave the european union but, you know, not necessarily the way the tories want to. the tories have got a whole bunch of contradictory ideas about what it is that they see as ourfuture in europe, the worst one being that they will go for low taxes, deregulation, getting rid of people's rights, getting rid of environmental rights, all that stuff. we're not having that. so we will be fighting them all the way in order to make sure that we get the sort of economy at the end of this that maximises jobs and living standards. do you understand your labour colleagues who say, look, my constituency voted to remain in the european union, i am going to do what my constituency, what my voters want to do, so i'm going to vote against triggering article 50 today? oh yeah, no, i do understand. listen, 75% of my constituents voted to remain in the european union. but we're a national party. as a national party you don't pick one side or another, you speak on behalf of the whole nation.
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and kind of weirdly, like, the contradiction within the labour party, the fact that we have people who want to stay and we have people who want to go actually, we reflect the country. and it's up to us to step up and say 0k, we're leaving but let's make sure that we get the best possible deal because we don't trust theresa may to get the best deal. what will happen to those labour mps who vote against the majority, the will of the people, and vote against their boss, jeremy corbyn? well, i think those who are in front bench positions will have to stand down because the labour party, we have had many, many discussions. we've come to this decision together. are you expecting to lose more frontbenchers then? well, who knows? i'm not making any predictions. i mean, i've had lots of conversations, i do understand, i completely respect where people are coming from and i'm sure that everybody does. nobody says this is hard stuff. but it is in our country's interest that the opposition does not turn its back on democracy, that we go ahead with what we have been told. but we've got to help the government, to make sure we get the best possible deal.
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what do you say to those who say it's a bit richjeremy corbyn with this three line whip because how many times did he vote against his own party leadership? hundreds and hundreds. he's well aware of that. he's aware of it, what does he say? is he not a hypocrite? he's not a hypocrite, he's now leading a national party and we have a national position that we've come to collectively and that's the decision and we're going ahead with it. let us talk now to conservative mp kwasi kwarteng who voted to leave the eu and who will vote for triggering article 50 tonight, and labour mp heidi alexander who voted to remain in the eu and, despite orders from jeremy corbyn, will rebel and vote against the bill tonight. why? well, i actually think that we have to take this decision in what each individual believes to be the national economic interest. your boss doesn't think that though? what jeremy corbyn thinks, what the whipping arrangements for me is not as important as what my conscience
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tells me and what i think is best for the country. every mp... what's going to happen to you after you have rebelled? i am a backbench mp. i need to look at what the big key issues are. i don't think that when people voted last year to leave the european union that they were voting on the issue of coming out of the single market. are you expecting a lot of vitriol online after your vote tonight or not? i haven't had much so far to be honest. i experienced a lot of vitriol last summer when i decided to resign from the shadow cabinet as the shadow health secretary. what i'm doing is what i believe to be in the national economic interest and i think that there is a fundamental question about democracy here as well, democracy didn't start or end on 23rd june. if i canjust finish democracy didn't start or end on 23rd june. if i can just finish this point. sorry, go on. it is important. in the conservative
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ma nifesto, important. in the conservative manifesto, page 72 reads that a conservative government would safeguard british interests in the single market. the word, "single ma rket" single market. the word, "single market" weren't on the ballot paper in the referendum on 23rd june and then we have a prime minister where no vote has been cast about her becoming the leader of the tory party, determining what brexit looks like and! party, determining what brexit looks like and i actually think that more people than just the prime minister, should be involved in having a say about what that looks like. well, she had a big statement there and i know lots of things that she said andl know lots of things that she said and i disagree. firstly, you accepted the referendum. you voted for a referendum as i understand. what's the point in having a referendum if you ignore the result? it is not some sort of advisory committee. it's 33 million people casting a vote. there was a clear decisive result and all this triggering of arle 50 is implementing the result of that vote. now, iunderstand implementing the result of that vote. now, i understand in your constituency, the majority of people
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voted to remain. sol constituency, the majority of people voted to remain. so i do understand that, but i think once you've committed to a referendum, you as a politician, you should honour the result. i mean, ken clarke is in a very good position because he didn't wa nt very good position because he didn't want a referendum and he voted against it. you voted for it. there were circumstances under which i could have voted to trigger article 50, but theresa may took that option off the table for me when she made that speech in lancaster house. what if no good deal is reached ? lancaster house. what if no good deal is reached? we are out the single market. i do not understand what it means to leave the eu and be in the single market. people talk the norwegian arrangement, in that instance you do not have any control over freedom of movement. you have to accept it. we are subjected to world trade organisation tariffs, import licences, customs checks, a whole load of bureaucracy, not to
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mention the tariffs. the tariffs are quite low. they are not free. most of it will be eliminated through currency of it will be eliminated through currency fluctuations. you make it sound so simple. it is simple, people are trying to complicate things. david cameron appeared on the andrew marr show when he was prime minister, do you remember? yes, ido prime minister, do you remember? yes, i do remember. a lot has happened. they were trying to frighten the wits out of people that if we voted to leave the eu, we would leave the single market and he said that on more than one occasion. people were not frightened by their threats and george osborne's punishment budget and they were clear eyed and voted to leave. collea g u es clear eyed and voted to leave. colleagues of yours to do the airwaves... i don't remember. they did. 0wen paterson said only a madman would leave the single
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market. he was not head of the campaign. if you allow me to finish. we had nigel farage who the broadcasters could not get off the television. he was claiming that countries such as norway do pretty well outside of the european union. the debate that led up to the referendum was misleading and sometimes toxic. it inflamed the situation rather than informed people. i respect the result of the referendum, but i do not respect... you do not respect it enough to trigger article 15. you could argue that people have already voted to trigger article 50. there were circumstances under which i could have voted to trigger article 50. when theresa may said she was pulling as out of the single market, when she said she was prioritising reducing immigration over our
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national economic interests, and when she threatened our closest geographical neighbours with in effect a trade war, i was ashamed of what the british prime minister said on that day. do you think the public should have a say on the final deal? it depends what the final deal is? why does it depend on that? there is not a deal, there is nothing to vote for. i think we are getting ahead of ourselves. i am for. i think we are getting ahead of ourselves. lam not for. i think we are getting ahead of ourselves. i am not frightened of a second referendum. if theresa may comes back with what she and you considered to be a good deal, that should be put to the people?m considered to be a good deal, that should be put to the people? it will be put to parliament. what about the people? i am be put to parliament. what about the people? lam not be put to parliament. what about the people? i am not sure, be put to parliament. what about the people? lam not sure, i do be put to parliament. what about the people? i am not sure, i do not think that is necessary. they should not have a say? let's see what the deal is. it may well be that people wa nt deal is. it may well be that people want to decide. it is not up to me. either way, i think we are leaving
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the eu,i either way, i think we are leaving the eu, i think the either way, i think we are leaving the eu, ithink the people either way, i think we are leaving the eu, i think the people who want to stay in the eu are deluded if they think a second referendum will overturn the result of the first one. i was not suggesting that, but do you think the public should have a final say on the deal that theresa may comes back with? at the very least members of parliament should have a meaningful vote on that. what about the public? yes, i do. yes, i do. on monday we're holding a special programme looking at the state of the nhs. we'll be looking at the problems it's facing and asking your help for solutions. if you work in the nhs, a doctor, a nurse or a consultant, or you're a patient with recent experience, we'd love you to take part in the programme. it's in central london on monday february 6th. email victoria@bbc.co.uk. to register your interest and one of our team will be in touch. if you're watching tv on your laptop, or a film in the cinema or buying music online
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you'll be familiar with this message... so if you choose to ignore that warning and continue to download your favourite tv series illegally or share music without paying for it, you can now expect to receive an e—mail detailing what you're up to, in the hope it will stop you doing it. it's part of the government's attempt to crack down on piracy. this scheme purely focuses on people sharing files from one computer to another. the idea is that people will change their habits if they know their activity is being monitored by the big internet providers like bt, virgin media, talktalk and sky. let's talk now tojohn carr, who is a member of the uk council on child internet safety. he advises the government about children's use of technology and safety online. and marianne grant,
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motion picture association's representative in the uk. they both feel these "educational e—mails" will crack—down on piracy. and mark chapman from the pirate party who does not believe they will. why not? because, firstly, how many people when you receive an e—mail from your internet service provider does not go into your deleted folder? the idea that people do not know that what they are doing is illegal, that these educational e—mails are giving them information about alternative providers that they can use, legal streaming services, the idea that people do not know that they already exist is ludicrous. why do people infringe copyright and download movies and films illegally? the idea that piracy is about theft is one of the more misjudged ideas. internet
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piracy tends to be about access. 0fcom said that for every £16 that normal users pay for use, digital download pirates pay £26. they are positive to the creative arts. why do people do it? because they want to watch the latest film as soon as it has happened. if it is a us release of a new series and it is not out in the uk, they will do it? explain to mark what that costs the film industry and how much this is an issue for the film industry. film industry and how much this is an issue for the film industrym isa an issue for the film industrym is a huge issue for the film industry, notjust music and games and other parts of the industry. music, 150— and other parts of the industry. music, 150- £200 and other parts of the industry. music, 150— £200 million in a year is lost to piracy. about the same amount of money is spent in making new music. literally the music
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industry could be doing twice as much as what it does with new artists if it was not losing that money. that is an example in real terms. in your analogy, money. that is an example in real terms. in youranalogy, maybe i could correct a couple of things. first of all, e—mails are triggered by people sharing files online, but they do notjust by people sharing files online, but they do not just talk about file sharing. secondly, if the internet service providers are not honouring people on their networks, the copyright holders will send notices. and they send the e—mail to the user. we do not want people to feel that their activity online is being looked at. if you got an e-mail saying, we notice you have been sharing this file illegally, would you stop doing it? i would. i would not do in the place. you can see the point i am making? we are doing more
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than that. we can say, there are consequences to your behaviour and some of those are a loss to the industry, but it is also a loss of jobs, a loss to the innovators and the creators trying to make something. it is the time people invest in making what they do. last night, at the costa book awards happened and i heard the winner this morning and he said, it took him 50 years to plan the book. he said it had been in his head for 50 years. that is what we are dealing with. everyone is a fan of something, so when everyone understands that better, which is what we want to say with these e—mails, they say, i did not think about it that way. in some cases it is theft. john carr, it is not clear to me how many e—mails you will need to get before some
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sanction is imposed. are there any sanctions or is itjust hope people will change their behaviour? as far asi will change their behaviour? as far aslam will change their behaviour? as far as i am aware it is about drawing attention to people that they are breaking the law. a lot of parents who are the account holders in these situations have no idea that their kids are up to this kind of thing and what they are doing is unlawful. i hope these e—mails will trigger a conversation between parents and their children who might be ripping off films, music or whatever. there are off films, music or whatever. there a re two off films, music or whatever. there are two reasons why i am interested in this as a child protection person. 0ne in this as a child protection person. one is it is a very bad idea for young people to be encouraged to believe to think that stealing or behaving unlawfully is permissible or is cool, or is something you can get away very easily with. secondly, some of these piracy websites that kids are going to our awful and
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disgusting places, full of adverts for prostitution, drugs, we just do not want young people going to these places to begin with. a question from hugh who is watching, please clarify the difference between downloading and streaming? are they both illegal? they can be, it depends from where you are streaming infrom. depends from where you are streaming in from. it is the source of the content. there are lots of legal places to stream from and legal apps that you can be using on your tablet and phone, but there are illegal ones because the content is not licensed. do you accept the point there will be parents who will not know what their child is doing and it might be illegal and it would be useful for the parents to get one of these e—mails? useful for the parents to get one of these e-mails? i accept there are pa rents these e-mails? i accept there are parents who do not know what children are doing on the internet and it is a big issue that society has not yet tackled properly. the
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fa ct has not yet tackled properly. the fact you are targeting some parents in this, but not all, that is a conversation we should be having just wider than the people who these e—mails are going to. just wider than the people who these e-mails are going to. which is why we have the rest of the campaign which has been running for over a year, so which has been running for over a year, so we are. which has been running for over a year, so we are. we have an ad that has been viewed about 12 million times. we have lots of different videos and assets that have been produced talking about different areas in the industry with creatives. we have been trying to reach people where they are in the place they like and these e—mails are just another tool in that toolkit to help us get that message out. thank you all very much for coming on the programme. still to come: could a computer be able to read to the mind of a patient experiencing locked in syndrome. that is when somebody is conscious, but they are unaware that they are
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able to communicate. we will talk to able to communicate. we will talk to a woman who recovered from locked in syndrome and i will be due some more of your incredible messages to chelsea cameron who was on the programme earlier. she read her open letter to her drug addicted parents. you are so admiring of her and i will read some of your messages in the next hour. we have got the latest news and sport, before that, the weather. this weather front will clear away and we have drier and brighter interlude with a few showers before more rain and strengthening winds arrive from the west. it is a mild start, temperatures not lifting that much from where they are now. 0vernight we lose this front and the second one moves eastwards and then the next system comes in from the
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west, producing heavy rain and strengthening winds. temperatures between 7—10. we are not anticipating problems with frost. tomorrow rain moves from the west to the east, but the main feature will be the wind. it will be a windy day wherever you are. gail is out towards the west and into the irish sea and up to scotland. temperatures are in double figures, but it will not feel particularly hello. it's wednesday. i'm victoria derbyshire. 18—year—old chelsea cameron from dundee wrote an open letter to her drug addicted mum and dad thanking them for not being there for her as she grew up. she has told us in herfirst ever interview that while normality was missing from her childhood, her parents‘ absence had made her ambitious, independent and determined to succeed. life is not sunshine and rainbows
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and thank you for teaching me that life is unfair. people disappoint you and there is sometimes nothing you and there is sometimes nothing you can do about that. a lesson well learnt from the both of you. guy says, "what an inspirational young woman. i sat here and criedment" laura says, "amazing bravery. heartfelt thank you to her drug addicted parents. what an inspiring girl." you can watch the full 15 interview with chelsea again and read the full letter by going to our programme page. mps are likely to begin the process of leaving the process of leaving the european union tonight. we're likely to hear more of that in the commons. england has saved herself and will, i trust, save europe and
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the united kingdom by her example.” personally shall be voting with my conscience, content in this vote and when we see what unfolds here after as we leave the european union, i hope the consciences of other members of parliament remain equally content. police in los angeles have made 500 arrests and rescued more than 50 women and girls in their biggest ever operation to find young women forced into prostitution. we have exclusive access to the lapd‘s major anti—trafficking operation. we find minors every day that were out here working. what sort of ages are these? we had them as young as 11 and all the way to 17. 11 is the youngest that we had though. and she was being forced to sell herself... yes. 0n the street? 0n the street and online as well. have you ever been confused when buying train tickets? train operators are to overhaul
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what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system to ensure that you, the passengers, pay pay the cheapest possible fare. good morning. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. mps will vote tonight on legislation that would allow the government to trigger article 50, starting the process of leaving the european union. it would see the start of two years of formal negotiations with eu member states. the government is expected to win the vote, despite opposition from labour rebels and the snp. train operators have promised to overhaul what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system. trials aimed at cutting red tape, and making it easierfor passengers to find the cheapest fares, will begin in may. our business correspondent ben thompson reports. same journey, different prices. buying train tickets is notoriously complicated and confusing for many so now the government is to trial a new, simpler system, one that should make it easier
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to find the cheapest fares. the new trial will begin in may this year on trains between london, sheffield, edinburgh and glasgow. it will reduce the number of confusing ticket options. the rail delivery group, which represents train operators, says the changes will mean passengers are offered the best price every time regardless of whether they book in a station or online. it's quite complicated to find which place to buy them from and they have varying prices. a wide range from £10 to £76 for the journey i do. it is quite confusing to know which ones to take, especially like, off— peak and peak hours. the trial should put an end to what's known as split ticketing, where passengers divide theirjourney into single shorter trips using cheaper tickets. out of date options and discounts will also be removed from ticket machines. the clearer ticket vending machines will never replace
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trained, helpful members of staff, so we need to make sure that train companies ensure that ticket offices remain open and that there are staff there who can talk you through the different options, advise you on what is best for you. the train companies themselves have welcomed the trial, blaming government rules built up over decades for stopping them selling more flexible tickets. but critics say the trial doesn't go far enough after above inflation price rises came into force in january alongside strikes and delays affecting many parts of the rail network. donald trump has nominated a conservativejudge from colorado, neil gorsuch, to fill a vacancy on the us supreme court. if confirmed, the 49—year—old will become the youngest person to fill the position in a quarter of a century. some democrats have said they will oppose the choice because of his attitudes towards womens‘ and workers' rights. the system for recovering cash from overseas patients who use
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the nhs is "chaotic" and ministers should "get a grip" on the issue, says a report by mps. the public accounts committee is calling for more to be done by the nhs to charge people from overseas. the department of health says the amount recovered from foreign countries has more than trebled in three years. police say a 16—year—old vietnamese boy has been found hiding in bushes in dumbarton after escaping from traffickers. the teenager is thought to have been trafficked to russia before being brought to scotland. he was found near 0vertoun house in dumbarton by a member of the public two weeks ago. police are appealing for information. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30am. thank you very much. 0verwhelmed with the messages for chelsea cameron. sarah says what an amazing young woman and a shining example of positivity and hope to share with others. another viewer
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says, "please hug this mature young woman from me. she amazed me with her attitude towards life." joanne says, "i'm moved to tears. chelsea, you are a wonderful, inspirational young woman." you are a wonderful, inspirational young woman. " there you are a wonderful, inspirational young woman." there are reams and reams of these. thank you very, very much for those. if you're getting in touch, use the hashtag victoria live. here's some sport now with will. antonio conte said he was "proud" of his chelsea players, for the "personality" they showed against liverpool at anfield. the 1—1 draw left chelsea nine points clear at the top of the premier league. they went ahead at anfield, through a david luiz free—kick. georginio wijnaldum equalised for liverpool. diego costa had the chance to give them an even bigger cushion, but he had his late penalty saved. it's
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important to draw against a really good team. but it's important to continue this way and to try to increase our points in the stable and it is important to see ourselves. with chelsea dropping points, arsenal could have narrowed the gap, but their title challenge is disappearing once again. they were beaten 2—1 at home to watford. younes kaboul and troy deeney scoring within the first 13 minutes. arsenal are third, level on points with tottenham, who drew 0—0 at sunderland. the title, you can only have a chance if you win your games. so let's respond well. before the game i knew and we prepared the game in a conscientious way, but we have to
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learn from tonight and respond well. hull city's ryan mason says he's "lucky to be alive" after returning home from hospital. mason fractured his skull in a challenge with chelsea defender gary cahill and had surgery the same night. he's not put a time—frame on his recovery but has thanked everyone for the "overwhelming support" given to him and his family. the funeral of former england manager graham taylor will take place later in watford, home of the club where he enjoyed his greatest success. taylor died last month at the age of 72. thousands are expected to turn out and pay their respects at st mary's church. england's cricketers will be looking to finish a disappointing winter tour of india on a high today. their last chance to win a series rests in bangalore, with the final t20 international. despite losing the test and one day series, joe root believes there are positives to take away. we've got a lot in place to make us a very formidable side especially in
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twe nty20 a very formidable side especially in twenty20 cricket because we've proven twenty20 cricket because we've prove n we twenty20 cricket because we've proven we can perform at that level and across the others as well. we are building forward and making massive strides in one day cricket especially with the bat, scoring huge totals and we are finding our feetin huge totals and we are finding our feet in test cricket. so, it is a very interesting and entertaining time to be playing in international sport for england. and lord coe has been asked to meet mps again after emails seem to confirm that he did know the details of doping allegations in athletics, four months before they became public. coe had told a parliamentary select committee that he was unaware of the specifics of the russian doping scandal. that's all for now. i will have the headlines at 10.30am. good morning, welcome to the programme. now, it's a side of america you rarely see — its hidden in the poverty
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of the inner cities — children forced into commercial sexual exploitation. prostitution pure and simple. research last year suggested thousands of girls under the age of 18 are forced to sell themselves on the streets of the us. last night police in los angeles announced the results of their biggest ever operation to find these young people. they made almost 500 arrests and rescued more than 50 girls and young women. 0ur correspondent angus crawford was given exclusive access and spent three days with the lapd. this report does contain upsetting scenes, so if you have children in the room and you don't want them to watch, it will last for nine minutes. we find minors every day that were out here working. what sort of ages are these? we had them as young as 11 and all the way to 17. 11 is the youngest that we had though. and she was being forced to sell herself... yes. 0n the street? 0n the street and online as well. 0n the street they call "the blade", in the richest country in the world, children are bought and sold at any time of day, every day. we're looking for people
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hiding in the shadows. and you'll see, often times you'll see girls in the shadows in the corners, and they‘ re looking at the motorists in the cars and looking to see if there are males in the car. this is south central, one of the poorest, toughest parts of los angeles. sergeant brian gallagher heads the area vice unit. a car approached her, she is again moving, slowly moving northbound now. hisjob tonight, find those girls, get them off the street. stopped at imperial in the mcdonald's parking lot. uniformed officers have followed a car and forced it to stop. they recognise the driver. he has a passenger. it's cold. she's shivering. it's four o'clock in the morning and a routine patrol of the vice squad here has pulled over a car driven by a man they know is a pimp. when they stopped it, a young woman got out of the car
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and they're concerned about her. she says she's 19. the police fear she's being exploited. they call them romeo pimps, it's kind of like a dating "hey, i need you to do this for us so we get a little bit more money and we can have a life and live happily ever after". the tattoos on her leg and neck are a giveaway. she's been branded with the name of her pimp. almost all the girls have been marked like this. police gently start to tease out the information they need. it turns out she's been reported missing by her parents. officers hope they can persuade her to leave this life and get home. my cousin grabbed me and the way home from school. next thing i know i'm in a different city. america is slowly waking up to the reality that thousands of children across the us are being sexually exploited her money. i'm 12 years old. 12. years.
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0ld. i was actually groomed from a very young girl. and at one point in my life i thought that this is as good as my life is going to get. jessica still has her pimp's tattoo. put to work on the street from the age of 11, now she helps other exploited children. you know, our kids are being picked off left and right. to be bought and sold and to make someone else money, it's kind of like our kids are seen as something to sell, like a cup or a piece of paper. they're not seen as human beings, like, this is, this is something that is actually taking over the united states very rapidly. which is why california has launched this state—wide operation, the biggest of its kind ever to take place here. so far they've arrested hundreds of adult prostitutes but their real aim is to find the children who are forced to work on the streets. and when they find them, they treat them very differently. these girls are 16 and 17.
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they're arrested like all the others and taken to the police station. but they don't end up in a cell, instead they are led to the soft room. no bars, no locks, it's a place of safety with specially trained police and social workers. a place where a child can talk. the soft room is really to put the victim at ease. make them understand that we are treating them as a victim and not as a suspect and that anything they did tonight was not going to be treated as a crime and what we really want to do is save them, bring them to a safe environment so they can get the resources they need and we can also get to the bottom of who is doing this to them so we can bring that person to justice. so this is about help, not punishment? absolutely. it's day two of the operation. we ride along with another vice unit, this time in compton, once notorious for drugs and gang violence. 0n the main street in broad
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daylight women are already looking for customers. easy to spot, they are detained. and processed. here police, social workers and anti—trafficking experts work together. some of the women are released with a warning. 0thers, multiple offenders, are taken to jail. in a holding area they come face—to—face with their customers, what they called johns. if it looks harsh, it's meant to be. a deliberate tactic, shame used as a powerful deterrent. few of the women though are able to leave the life. just 18, caught for a second time, treasure. she started on the street in middle school. raped. somebody pulled a knife out on me, a gun, tried to rob me. those are just a few things that happened to me. but you were a child when you first started doing this? yeah. this is never long term from you.
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this has never been long—term. are you really going to get out? yeah. iam. soon. hello? is this crystal? yeah. hi, how you doing? good. are you available for an out call? crystal is in for an unpleasant surprise. the collar is an undercover officer. prostitutes openly advertise online, some are children, even on mainstream websites. how much forjust sex? half an hour of sex? awesome. how long until you can be here? they are setting up a sting in a hotel room. the undercover officer will be in one room. while next door an entire team is getting ready. they wait, they listen. when the officer has the proof he needs, they go in. police department, turn around and keep your hands behind your back for me.
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this time it's an adult. she thought she'd go home with $140. it's not her first offence. she may go to jail instead. so why is she here? just listen. i have no food. my life is falling apart. this is the only thing i can do to survive on these streets right now. i'm a father, you know, and you have a heart for these people, you know? if you don't you're in the wrong profession. police department, lapd, stand up for me. 0k, she's in custody. it is often young, vulnerable people that are pulled into this lifestyle. i hope and believe that in time that this will get better.
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in south central, on the blade, it's the final night of the operation. it's cold, but the prostitutes are still working. forced to bring money to their pimp everyday. to their pimp every day. continuing westbound, through denver, it looks like she was texting on her phone. despite years of experience, brian gallagher is still horrified by what he finds. what alarms me is how big the problem is and how little people know about the problem. in fact, even us as law enforcement, how little we know about how big and deeply rooted this problem is. this is like crack cocaine in the 80s. young girls being sold out here, the difference between a young girl and crack cocaine is she can be sold 10 times in one night, a piece of crack cocaine can be sold once. during the three days police across the state
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arrested almost 500 people. as the sun comes up, the work seems never—ending. chill out. relax. children forced to work the streets turn into women who know only this, a life of violence and exploitation. could a computer be able to read the mind of a patient in a locked—in state — conscious,, aware of everything that's going on around them, but unable to communicate, not even through blinking? a group of scientists in switzerland believe they have achieved this by measuring the blood flow in the brain of four patients
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when they were asked a series of basic yes or no qtns. of basic yes or no questions. one man was able to refuse permission for his daughter to get married. the daughter got married anyway. the patients when asked if they were happy — all answered yes. ican be i can be sure by asking them several hundreds of questions when i and the family know the answer, like trivial questions. london is the capital of france or england? i ask them hundreds of questions of this kind and where we know the answer and when the patient is able to give the a nswer when the patient is able to give the answer in 70% of the cases correctly, i can ask them, are you happy? are you happy with life, do
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you have pain? are you happy with life, do you have pain? in 2010, kate allatt became "locked—in" after suffering a stroke. she's now a motivational speaker, stroke activist and author, and is in our sheffield newsroom. nice to see you again, how are you? very good. how are you? very good. tell us about being locked in after a stroke. i had a stroke at 39 and when it happened it was like a pneumatic drill going through my head. it was so loud. it was not painful, but the noise was horrific. i was taken to hospital and put in a coma for three days. when i woke i could not move a single muscle. i was drowsy and so on, but within days i became aware of myself and my environment, so i knew what was going on around me, but i could not
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communicate to anybody around me through a digit or a blink or nothing. i was in that state for two weeks. what is it like? you can hear everything and are aware of everything and are aware of everything and are aware of everything and you can contribute? it is absolutely horrendous. we have seen films about having conversations about people turning life—support machines. people and people talking about you as if you are not there. very fearful about what is happening with the life machine and whether it will be turned off. the leg cramps, the board, the anxiety, missing my kids. it was terrible. the reason it changed for me was my friends used to come and visit me and if my head was pointed towards the door, i saw them visiting me and i used to weep them visiting me and i used to weep the silent tears. they knew before even the doctors did, who thought i
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was vegetative, that i was not. in fa ct, was vegetative, that i was not. in fact, it is estimated that 20—40% of patients are considered vegetative and misdiagnosed. anyway, they came in and cobbled together a letter board and they said to me with the very small blink that i had, blink once for no and twice for yes. it was very once for no and twice for yes. it was very slight. 0ne once for no and twice for yes. it was very slight. one was pointing and one was writing down. the very first word i spelt out which took 20 minutes was sleep. my very perceptive friend jackie said, cannot sleep? i blinked twice. . then she said, at night? i blinked twice. i was still locked in, then she said, at night? i blinked twice. iwas still locked in, i had to live like that for five months, but at that point my world open and idid not but at that point my world open and i did not have to live in my own
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body alone any more. if you put together every christmas, every birthday and the moment you hold your first newborn, that is how euphoric i was. it was unbelievable. that is an incredible description. we can only imagine for these four patients were scientists have looked at the activity of their brain cells and realised the oxygen levels in their blood to change the colour of their blood to change the colour of the blood, they peered into their brain to detect the blood plasma colour and asked them the questions and worked out from the change of the colour whether they were saying yes or no. i think this technology is phenomenal. it is a basic human right for quality of life for any person, anywhere, whether they are locked in for two weeks, 20 years, a month, whatever, to be able to communicate and not to be assumed to
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be vegetative because it is more convenient. it is terrible not being able to communicate when you can understand everything going on around you. i think this technology and the technology of doctor 0wens in ontario about brain mapping through a cap for people like this is phenomenally important. it is absolutely essential. tell our audience how you have managed to come back from that stroke being locked in and your general recovery. ican locked in and your general recovery. i can tell you i am not a locked in and your general recovery. i can tell you i am nota medic and a lot of people scratched their heads when they looked at my scans and where i have come from until now. i have never given up. i am not saying i tackle like this positively in every respect of my life, but i was written off and i worked so hard
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intensively, frequently, repetitively, even before i knew that theory on it. i used to obsessively 300 times a day practice moving my digits more. it was such an obsession. i was a 70 miles a week fell runner and i was used to ha rd week fell runner and i was used to hard work. i had rehab and the support of my family, but beyond that i had some very big luck, which was a game changer for that i had some very big luck, which was a game changerfor me. but i was in rehab and they described me as someone who pushed them harder than they pushed me. that is quite telling from a rehab unit. kate, thank you so much and thank you for coming on the programme. it is really good seeing you looking so well. thank you and good luck to you as well. thank you and good luck to you as well. on monday we're holding a special programme looking at the state of the nhs. we'll be looking at the problems it's facing and asking your help for solutions. if you work in the nhs, a doctor, a nurse or a consultant,
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or you're a patient with recent experience, we'd love you to take part in the programme. it's in central london on monday february 6th. email victoria@bbc.co.uk. to register your interest and one of our team will be in touch. the parents of missing toddler madeleine mccann say they‘ re disappointed that portugal's supreme court has thrown out their libel case against a former detective. goncalo amaral had published a book alleging the couple were involved in their daughter's disappearance during a family holiday in 2007. the court's ruled the allegations are protected by freedom of expression laws, and aren't abusive. let's speak to brendan de beer works for the portugal news and has been covering the disappearance of madeleine mccann for the last ten years. what does this ruling mean? well, it
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finally puts that case to rest i guess. it has been ongoing for some time. being a supreme court ruling, thatis time. being a supreme court ruling, that is the final ruling in the matter. there are suggestions this morning in portugal that goncalo amaral might consider lodging a cou ntercla i m amaral might consider lodging a counterclaim against kate and gerry mccann, saying he suffered losses as a result of the litigation over the yea rs. a result of the litigation over the years. this was something mentioned by his lawyer in 2015 when they won the initial review. that could be potentially where we go next in this case. we know that the former detective had to pay kate and gerry mccann something like 12 million euros, £1 million. does that mean they will have to pay him back or what? as far as i know, i do not think money has changed hands yet. i do not think with all this going on
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in the courts and every appeal that has been lodged, i do not think the ruling was definitive. as it stands now i do not think any money needs to be paid back to him. however, he might lodge a counterclaim. financially it could be pretty ruinous for the mccann family? yes, but we have seen with this particular ruling now that the portuguese chords are pretty relu cta nt portuguese chords are pretty reluctant when it comes to making settle m e nts reluctant when it comes to making settlements and damage claims. several other cases in portugal, the amounts very seldom are extremely high. in the uk you are accustomed to getting huge pay—outs. in portugal that is not customary. i guess the value of money perhaps is a bit higher and what might be considered a huge sum, a small sum in the uk, is considered a big one here, so i do not think it is
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potentially ruinous. it could maybe be five or six figures. i am sure thatis be five or six figures. i am sure that is what the claim could be for, but whether or not that happens is a different story. thank you very much. still to come: high levels of violence. ten suicides in three years. a chronic shortage of prison officers. all this is revealed after an inspection at exeter prison. we'll speak to an officer who spent two weeks inside the prison. train operators are going to radically overhaul what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system. we'll find out what it could mean for passengers. with the news, here'sjoanna gosling in the bbc newsroom. mps vote tonight on legislation that would allow the government to trigger article 50, starting the process of leaving the european union. it would see the start of two years of formal negotiations with eu member states.
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the government is expected to win the vote, despite opposition from labour rebels and the snp. train operators have promised to overhaul what they say is a "baffling" ticketing system. trials aimed at making it easier for passengers to find the cheapest fares will begin in may. the first routes affected will include crosscountry, virgin trains' east and west coast services and east midlands. president trump has called on the us senate to speedily approve neil gorsuch's nomination to the vacant seat on the supreme court. if confirmed, the 49—year—old will become the youngest person to fill the position in a quarter of a century. democratic senators have raised questions about his attitudes towards women's and workers' rights. a tunisian man has been arrested in germany suspected of recruiting for islamic state. the man was arrested in frankfurt where he is alleged to
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have led an is cell that was planning an attack in the country. that's a summary of the latest news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. here's some sport now with will. chelsea have extended their lead at the top of the premier league after a 1—1 draw with liverpool. david luiz put them ahead at anfield although liverpool equalised and chelsea missed a penalty. antonio conte's side are now nine points clear after their closest rivals failed to win. hull city's ryan mason says he's "lucky to be alive" after returning home from hospital. mason fractured his skull in a challenge with chelsea defender gary cahill. he has thanked everyone for the "overwhelming support" given to him and his family. england's cricketers will be looking to finish a disappointing winter tour of india on a high today. their last hope of a series win lies with the final t20 in bangalore after they lost the test and one day series. and lord coe has been asked to meet mps again after e—mails seem
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to confirm he did know the details of doping allegations in athletics, four months before they became public. coe says he was not aware of the specifics. i'll have more just after 10am. 11.30am. we know what you mean. high levels of violence. ten suicides in three years. staff unrest and a chronic shortage of prison officers. all this is revealed after an inspection at exeter prison. it comes after recent disturbances at lewes, bedford, birmingham and swaleside prisons, and a record number of prison suicides nationally. the government has promised more than £100 million for 2,500 more officers, the chief inspector of prisons‘ verdict is that the situation at exeter isn't going to get better any time soon. let's talk to mark fairhurst from the prison officers' association. in the last two weeks he has spent time in exeter prison to compile
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a report into health and safety there. andrew neilson is from the howard league, which campaigns for prison reform. so how bad was it, mark? well, i'm pleased to announce that exeter has turn the corner since that inspection in august 2015. i'd like to commend the staff and indeed the management for the effort they've put into that. when i visited the regime was stable. they had an excellent violence reduction project in place and they were doing the best they could with the resources that were available. so everything is fine at exeterjail, you say now? well, it is not fine. they still have their difficulties. it's quite obvious when you walk around that there is a chronic shortage of staff. they‘ re there is a chronic shortage of staff. they‘re due to get 13 new staff. they‘re due to get 13 new staff in the next couple of weeks, but they need more if they‘re going to provide a constructive regime for prisoners. 0k. to provide a constructive regime for prisoners. ok. you say they've turned, you‘re pleased to announce they have turned things around since that inspection in 2015. there have been ten suicides in the last three
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yea rs been ten suicides in the last three years at exeterjail. they have not really turned things around, have they? what happened at exeter echoes what is happening throughout the entire prison estate. so they haven‘t turned things around? suicides are at their highest level throughout the estate, as were assaults on staff. the only way you‘re going to fix that is by recruiting more staff and giving staff the tools they need to do the job and keep themselves safe.” understand, but they haven‘t turned things around then? well, they have since that inspection because the regime was stable. relationships with prisoners were very good and they were taking swift action whenever there was violence against staff on the landings. why did ten people die then? why were ten people able to take their own lives? well, u nfortu nately, able to take their own lives? well, unfortunately, as in exeter, with the rest of the estate, we haven‘t
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got the staff to care for the vulnerable who are presenting themselves with mental health problems. you know, we want to sit down with them. we want to care for them, but we simply haven‘t got the resource to do that. andrew, do you accept that things have turned a corner at exeterjail? i haven't been at exeter recently. but i'm prepared to accept that things have improved. 0ne prepared to accept that things have improved. one of the most concerning things about the report is inspectorate were expressing a lack of confidence that things could improve and what is concerning about thatis improve and what is concerning about that is as you say, people have taken theirown that is as you say, people have taken their own lives and that means lives are at stake. things have to improve. exeter is in many ways a typical local prison, overcrowded, facing a transient population of prisoners in and out, going to the courts, but at the same time, inspectors did find that the problems it was facing at the time of the inspection were worse than comparable prisons. but on another level, it is a typical prison and
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the problems are across the prison estate. they are systemic, i don't think they are a responsibility of any one particular staff group. we need to look at the system as a whole and solutions that can provide an answerto whole and solutions that can provide an answer to this. something which you have been campaigning on for as long as i can remember, decades. are you failing? well, i think the howard league is getting its message through louder than we have in many years because of all the stories that we have seen in the media that you alluded, the riots and disturbances and the escapes, the deaths, prisons are regularly in the news and regularly, i think higher up news and regularly, i think higher up on the political agenda than they were. but what reform have you achieved? well, we have achieved reform on particular groups, children for example, the number of children for example, the number of children in prison reduced by two—thirds in recent years. but the numberof two—thirds in recent years. but the number of adults remains very high andl number of adults remains very high and i think it is true that we need more staff and resources that
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supplying is one side of this, but the other side is demand and that's the other side is demand and that's the numberof the other side is demand and that's the number of people we're putting in prisons like exeter, a prison designed to hold about 320 prisoners is actually holding under 500. when you put that kind of pressure alongside problems with staffing and resources, then you're going to get these huge problems. it is a toxic cocktail. thank you very much. thank you. we‘ve received a statement from the ministry ofjustice which says, "the chief inspector has highlighted the dedication of managers and staff at hmp exeter who have been working hard to provide a decent regime despite considerable operational pressures. i‘m confident that together with these extra resources the governor will be able to fully address the recommendations in this report and significantly improve the performance of the prison". another chance to hear some of
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18—year—old chelsea‘ cameron‘s letter to her drug addicted parents. thank you for not being there during her childhood. she told us this morning that although there was no such thing as normality when she was growing up, her parents absence has given her the strength to really make something of her life. so we‘ll play you another extract before the end of the programme. frank rosier, a world war two veteran who took part in the dday landings more than 70 years ago, has died. the 91—year—old, who served as an infantryman with the 2nd battalion, gloucestershire regiment, was in the second wave on gold beach on d—day. 0n armistice day in 2015, frank came on the programme and shared some of his memories withjoanna and explained why armistice day was so important to him. my generation, you could say, are the last link with the first world war veterans because it was our dads and our uncles who fought that war. i have very vivid memories of my two uncles who both lost a leg and my own dad who was wounded
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in the war in the ankle. i remember them quite a lot and i also remember the lads that i left behind in normandy. they were very young boys and i still never forget those boys that i fought with. so remembrance day, 11/11, is very important to me. 0ne story that is never really told is that by 1942 we were a small nation population wise and we were running out of men, so they lowered the recruiting age to 17 and a quarter. that is where everybody at that age volunteered. i would go as far as to say more than half the armed forces in those days were volunteers. consequently, we volunteered at 17 and a quarter and then after training, by the time we got to d—day, the eldest among us would be in their early 20s. and to think that really we got through it, and i had many instances of the comradeship with the fellows that i was with, we helped one another,
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and the british army, i don‘t know if these boys agree with me, had a wonderful weapon called humour. the ability to laugh at situations gets you out of trouble time and time again. but leaving those young boys, there are 14 of my platoon who lie in the cemetery, and i go over there and i still cry because i live the life they never had. the youngest was 19 and the eldest was 24. 14 in my platoon, two out of 30 men. others were killed elsewhere. but quite a lot were in the infantry platoon who did not survive the war. in fact, i came home wounded. very few of us got through the war unhurt. many were wounded and went back again. there is a lot to think about these days. also i spent four years in hospital in the plastic surgery unit and i always think of those lads
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who i was with. the same age, who lost two legs, they were badly burned. how did they get on in life? what happened to them? there is a lot to remember. i do not know if the others agree with me, there is an awful lot to remember. frank rosier, veteran of the d—day landings, speaking to us in 2015. frank has, sadly, died at the age of 91. many of you who travel by rail regularly will think it‘s about time. train operators have finally promised to overhaul the ticketing system, which even they admit is "baffling" and can lead to inflated fares. they‘ll start trials of a new system in may, to simplify things and make sure you pay the cheapest possible price for your journey. anthony smith is the chief executive of the independent watchdog
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transport focus. tell us about the situation now? fa res have tell us about the situation now? fares have built up through privatisation and things have been added on top of each other. it turned into a topsy—turvy mess. added on top of each other. it turned into a topsy-turvy mess. have you got any ludicrous examples? you can find fare ifs you book through the train ticket line and if you do a split ticket, the break the journey into different parts and you can reduce the fare. passengers are baffled, so hopefully this morning we‘re seeing the start of a rail ticketing revolution.” we‘re seeing the start of a rail ticketing revolution. i wonder what they will do so we always know that we‘re getting the cheapest fare then? it is about information. so you can make an informed choice, if you can make an informed choice, if you have got clear information in front of you and you can see that‘s the cheapest fare, that is the restriction that is go with it, if you can only use it on one train or something, but these are pilots so we will be watching carefully what happens in the pilots. right, 0k. why hasn‘t it happened before now?
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it isa why hasn‘t it happened before now? it is a such a big one. it is one of thoseissues it is a such a big one. it is one of those issues that nobody had the courage to tackle because it got so big and the situation has got so bad, the government, the train companies, everyone recognises that we have got to have a go at this and sort it out. what are you an independent watchdog of? we look after the interests rail passengers and road passengers and bus passengers, our views are heard. have you had success? we have had lots of you can ses in improving the way that penalty fares are imposed on passengers and we have got this review on the table. years of pressure, review on the table. years of pressure , yea rs review on the table. years of pressure, yea rs of review on the table. years of pressure, years of lobbying, years of research and finding out what passengers really think led to this day. so it is good. i mean, i might be wrong, i might be being too cynical, it is not going to end up denting the private identitiesed rail companies profits, is it? they‘re not going to make it, so they don‘t make as much money? they‘re not going to make it, so they don't make as much money? no, that‘s a good point. nobody will wa nt that‘s a good point. nobody will want the rail industry to be losing
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money, therefore, there will be win, and there will be losers in these types of trial and we‘ve got to watch carefully because there are government regulations built into this which are old—fashioned and they don‘t really work anymore, but they don‘t really work anymore, but they provide a basic level of protection. we don‘t want to sweep that away without us knowing what‘s happening. we don‘t want to leap in the dark. there are some amazing routes, we get on the train and see why can‘t the rest of the system be like this and there are shockers. if you judge and there are shockers. if you judge a country by its railway system, how would you describe britain? a country by its railway system, how would you describe britain7m a country by its railway system, how would you describe britain? it is goodin would you describe britain? it is good in parts. long—distance services, people really like them. people who can get hold of advance purchase tickets, they can be good value for money. for your average commuter, it doesn‘t feel like good value. a lot of investment is being made, but that‘s causing pain as stations are rebuilt and the track is redone. it feels like not very good value for money at the moment. a word with stephen hammond, hello. it has been true for a while back if
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you knew how to negotiate the system, you would find the best fares. but this is good news for the consumer who will know the fair they are being offered is the best fare. however, the devil will be in the detail. why has it taken so long? they have done a number of things over the last few years to simplify the system, but not enough. they have made presentation easier, but not enough. this is the government saying and the rail companies agreeing to ensure that the consumer gets a better deal, that it is obvious and in front of them. they are not in it to lose money? there isa group are not in it to lose money? there is a group of fares on which they lose money already, regulated fares that go up every year. the real
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problem is network rail and unless the government bears down on those costs, that then can be passed through to the consumer and that is the real task. i know it through to the consumer and that is the realtask. i know it was through to the consumer and that is the real task. i know it was last minute, but we appreciate it. stephen hammond and anthony smith. we‘ve had loads of responses to an interview we did earlier with chelsea cameron. she‘s 18 and has written an open letter to her parents — both drug addicts — about how they missed all those moments when she was growing up. the letter is a thank you letter thanking them for making her choose the right path, as she put it, for not getting into drugs, for seeing what a lack of ambition can do to your life and how harmful it can be. she read most of the open letter on
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the programme a little earlier and because of the response from you, we thought we would play a bit of it again. thank you for teaching me to be ambitious. your example showed me that no ambition for education, work or success is harmful and it leads toa or success is harmful and it leads to a lot of self worth. your example showed me life is about choices and idid not showed me life is about choices and i did not need to make the same ones you did. remember when we forced dad into watching hannah montana? there isa into watching hannah montana? there is a line in one of the songs that says, life is what you make it, so let‘s make it rock. life has turned out for me what i have chosen to make it. thank you for teaching me to not be so easily embarrassed. you both have not made the best of choices, they have gone pretty public, allowing everyone i associate with to know what you are both like. that has given me the opportunity to speak freely and openly about who i am and how my
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life has been growing up. up until my third year of high school i had an alter ego. people did not need to know the circumstances i was in and if they found out, i would die on the spot because i made myself something i was not. the thing that kept me sane was thinking people did not know the truth. they probably did, but! not know the truth. they probably did, but i brainwashed myself into thinking they did not. thank you for teaching me life is unfair, people disappoint you and there is nothing you can do about that, a lesson well learned from both of you. tag you for not being there to wave goodbye as i‘d jetted off to uganda on a trip of a lifetime. thank you for not being there when i got my exam results. at you for not being there when i got the position of head girl, thank you for not being there when i stood in front of hundreds of people to speak at my prizegiving. thank you for not being there when i
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needed you. you have given me the greatest lesson of how to be independent. you allowed me to be a more tolerant and independent person i ever imagined. dad, i hope you have a greater insight into the type of person i am and the things you have taught me. ma‘am, i hope you also know me a bit better now and know i am trying to be a good person and always will. i hope one day you will wake up and realise there is so much more that the world has to offer you and when that day comes, please come to find me so we can enjoy life together. i will show you some nice restaurants and if you are lucky i will take you to germany one day and until then i hope you realise what life might be like with pa rents to enjoy realise what life might be like with parents to enjoy it with. wow, that is really powerful and very moving. what is really upsetting is you say
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life is not sunshine and rainbows. we know that, but you know it at such a young age. that makes me very sad. there are lots of negative things that come into people‘s lives not through their own circumstances, and what i wanted to do was to show people they can choose positivity no matter their circumstances, choose to have joy matter their circumstances, choose to havejoy in matter their circumstances, choose to have joy in their life no matter what happens. society sometimes tells you what your fate is. if your pa rents tells you what your fate is. if your parents live a certain way, what if you let a certain lifestyle, it is destined to live like that. my hope is to show other young people they can choose exactly how they want their life to be. they can choose joy, their life to be. they can choose joy, happiness and positivity no matter what the circumstances. what kind of response have you had? incredible responses, so many people have contacted me in similar
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situations who have said, this has really helped me, i have been in the same situation, it has made me realise it is ok to talk about how you feel and to know they do not have to fall into that pathway. not just with drugs, a lot of people have contacted me with any negative situation they have had and it has made them realise you can choose to be positive. just because something negative has happened in your life, that doesn‘t determine your attitude and you can be positive and happy. is it young people, kids, middle—aged people?” is it young people, kids, middle-aged people? i have had a lot of different people, a lot of young people and older people who did not know my circumstances be for. 0r people who had known my parents and they have really reached out to support me and allowed me to know i have helped someone by sharing the letter as well, which was my desire. you talk about the period of time
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when you felt you had to hide what was going on at home. absolutely. as a young person you are very easily embarrassed and you want to try and be this person who seems perfect and your life is perfect and everything flows nicely and no one needs to know anything negative about your life. i kept that persona for a long time and bottle it up. ifelt like i wa nted time and bottle it up. ifelt like i wanted to share the letter because it was time for me to speak about how i felt and to tell others it was time for them to speak about how they felt as well. although i might not know them, they can come to me for any advice they might need as a friend for support. at 14, in the middle of high school, you stop living with your parents. where did you go? i lived with various family members and friends. that was on the
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recommendation of social workers. yes. what did they say? they said my dad was not able to care for us any more and he was in a bad place with his difficulties and it was better for my brother and i to move away from that. i had continuous support from that. i had continuous support from family and friends who loved me so much and took me in and they have shown me a level of care that was not necessary for them to give me, that my parents would have given me, but they have continued to support me which i am extremely grateful for. chelsea cameron. you can watch the full 15 minutes interview with her again the full 15 minutes interview with heragain and the full 15 minutes interview with her again and share it by going to our programme page. get that share on facebook, twitter and everywhere. so many messages from you. e—mail from yvonne, "chelsea is an amazing young woman. i would be proud to
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call her my daughter. i wish her every success in her life". e—mailfrom margaret, "i‘ve never responded to a tv programme before but wow what a fantastic positive role model for anybody of any age — i am 71. i wish the very best future for you chelsea. you deserve it. what a fantastic, positive role model says what a fantastic, positive role model sastohn. pat, what a fantastic, positive role model says john. pat, i what a fantastic, positive role model sastohn. pat, iam what a fantastic, positive role model sastohn. pat, i am so impressed and deeply moved by the bravery, courage and compassion shown by this lovely young women. my own family has been affected by the nightmare which drug addiction brings. it is hard to have a normal life when one of your family has to face each addicted today. thank you, chelsea, not only because your family still have your love, but because of the young people who might turn to the relief of drug use which could so quickly turn to a life without opportunity, a life outside normal society, a life of
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shame and pain. what a outside normal society, a life of shame and pain. whata girl, outside normal society, a life of shame and pain. what a girl, god bless her. this is from helen. like the rest of your audience i was blown away by chelsea cameron. she isa blown away by chelsea cameron. she is a total inspiration. i am currently writing a musical with two award—winning script writers about another inspirational, real—life character. i am a composer and songwriter. but i would like to dedicate one of the songs from it to the wonderful chelsea cameron. how amazing is that? helen, we could not get in touch with you to talk on the programme. that is an amazing idea, we will make sure that chelsea knows what you want to do. that is fantastic. 0n on monday we are going to look at the nhs and look at all the issues it is facing right now and look at
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your help for solutions. if you work in the nhs, whatever role at all, or have recently been treated on the nhs, or someone you know has, we would love you to take part in the programme. it is in london this monday on february the 6th. e—mail us to let us know you are interested in coming along and we will be in touch. thank you for your company. have a good day. by by the end of the night the next the area of low pressure starts to push in. but everywhere will be pretty mild tonight. that is the deep area of low pressure to the west of ireland on thursday with packed isobars. it will be wet and windy in a nutshell. very windy across the irish sea with gale force winds. a little bit of brightness developing across the south west during the day. most of the temperatures are double figures. this is bbc news.
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the top stories developing at 11am: mps vote today on the legislation that will give the government the go—ahead to trigger article 50, the formal process of leaving the eu. i‘m ben brown at westminster, where we‘ll be following the brexit debate as it unfolds today. a tunisian man suspected of planning an attack is arrested after more than 1,000 german police carry out security raids in the state of hesse. president donald trump has nominated colorado federal appeals court judge neil gorsuch for the us supreme court. he has outstanding legal skills, a
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brilliant mind, tremendous discipline and has earned bipartisan support.
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