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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 1, 2018 12:00pm-12:45pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at midday. labour distances itself from some facebook groups set up by jeremy corbyn supporters after anti—semitic comments were posted. comedian eddie izzard joins labour's ruling committee after a senior party official is to resign. the heavyweight boxer anthonyjoshua beats new zealand's joseph the heavyweight boxer anthonyjoshua beats new zealand'sjoseph parker with a unanimous when. ifi with a unanimous when. if i was retiring on this high, i would be, like, yes, iam the man, but i have got to defend my throne again ina but i have got to defend my throne again in a few months so i am kind of balanced and we are still hustling. pope francis calls for reconciliation in the middle east and singles out the conflict in the yemen. and also coming up, the royal air force is 100 years old today. we will be live at biggin hill wait a fly past is due to take place.
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and hugh edwards discusses the events to mark the 100th birthday of the raf. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. labour has sought to distance itself from some facebook groups set up itself from some facebook groups set up by itself from some facebook groups set up by supporters ofjeremy corbyn after it emerged members have posted anti—jewish, violent and abusive comments. the sunday times says it has uncovered over 2000 offensive messages. labour says it did not run the groups or have any official connections with them, and it has strict rules preventing discrimination. earlier, lord
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carlisle told me the leader leadership needs to take action. i think it demonstrates thatjeremy corbyn is not to be trusted as a potential leader of this country. there are much better people available, and the labour party is in trouble because of his weakness in dealing with this matter and that ofjohn mcdonnell. and this is not just about anti—semitism, it is about racism of all kinds. it is unacceptable in whichever political party it appears in. the same would apply to any other party. this is not a plan to destabilisejeremy corbyn, save where he deserves to be destabilised. jonathan blake is with me. how much more pressure does this put on jeremy corbyn? it is more bad headlines for labour at the end of a very difficult week where it has been seen to grapple with this issue of anti—semitism. there was a protest outside parliament earlier this week when
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those angry with jeremy corbyn‘s initial response to a post on facebook, and there was a counter demonstration where supporters of jeremy corbyn, many of whom claim these accusations are being exaggerated or used to destabilise him. what we are seeing here is the level to which some people who claim to be supporters ofjeremy corbyn are engaging in online abuse. as you mention, some of it is misogynistic, racist and threats of violence as well. but the party very clearly stating that these are facebook groups that are not official labour party facebook groups and they are not connected formally to the party in any way. labour is also saying thatjeremy corbyn‘s staff and john mcdonnell‘s staff did not see or engage with any of this material, pushing back against the sunday time's claim in that respect. but it is damaging and it shows again that
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in pockets of the labour party, particularly in these groups online, there are people who are using unsavoury, to put it mildly, language and tactics to further their cause. and then it comes about their cause. and then it comes about the action taken over those specific groups, irrespective of the connections or lack of two labour party? many people are waiting for that and jeremy corbyn has said many times that he does not condone or support anti—semitism and in fact he has been a staunch critic of it. he has been a staunch critic of it. he hasissued has been a staunch critic of it. he has issued a statement after statement this week, he has apologised and promised to tackle the problem, but for many people in the problem, but for many people in the party that has not been enough. pope francis has used his easter message to call for dialogue on the korean peninsula and peace in syria. thousands of people gathered in rome in bright sunshine to hear him speak
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from the balcony of the adjacent basilica. he said the power of the christian message gave hope to the deprived, including migrants and refugees, who were so often rejected by what he called today's culture of waste. his message included a call for peace across the world. translation: today we implore fruits of peace across the entire world. beginning with the beloved and long—suffering land of syria, whose people are worn down by an a p pa re ntly people are worn down by an apparently endless war. this easter, made the light of the risen christ illuminate the consciences of all military countries so that a swift end may be brought to the carnage in course. that humanitarian law may be respected and that provisions be
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made to facilitate access to the aid so urgently needed by our brothers and sisters while also ensuring fitting conditions for the return of the displaced. the pope began his address to an audience of thousands from that balcony of st peter's basilica. translation: dear brothers and sisters, happy easter. jesus is risen from the dead. this message resounds in church and the world over, along with the singing of hallelujah. jesus is lord, the father has raised him and he lives forever in our midst. theresa may has used his easter
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message to praise the character of those affected by last year's terror attacks in the uk and the grenfell tower fire. the attacks in the uk and the grenfell towerfire. the prime minister said she had seen for yourself how they drew strength from those around them. 0ver them. over the last year, britain has faced some dark moments, from the terrorist attacks at westminster bridge and london bridge, at manchester arena, at finsbury park and parsons green, and the fire at g re nfell tower. and parsons green, and the fire at grenfell tower. i and parsons green, and the fire at gre nfell tower. i know and parsons green, and the fire at grenfell tower. i know from speaking to the victims and survivors of these terrible events how vital the love and support they have received from their friends, family and neighbours has been to them as they begin to rebuild their lives. in the bravery of those facing adversity, the dedication of our emergency services and the generosity of local communities, we see the triumph of the human spirit. a man has been arrested after a
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nine—year—old boy from northern ireland died in hospitalfollowing a hit—and—run in tenerife on thursday. the boy was leaving a shopping centre with his family when the collision happened. he died in hospital on thursday. the car was found abandoned a few miles from the scene. the foreign office says it is providing assistance to the family. the first of two aircraft carrying expeued the first of two aircraft carrying expelled russian diplomats home from the united states has arrived in moscow. the second aircraft is expected later today. 60 russians we re expected later today. 60 russians were sent home by washington in response to the poisoning of a former russian spy in britain almost a month ago. earlier, a spokeswoman for the russian foreign ministry blamed the uk and the us for trying to sabotage the upcoming football world cup by implicating moscow in the incident. ceremonies are being held today to mark exactly 100 years since the raf became the world's first independent air force.
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became the world's first independent airforce. it was became the world's first independent air force. it was formed by the merger of the army's royal flying corps and the royal naval air service. between them they had fewer than 200 aircraft at the start of the first world war. a number of events a re the first world war. a number of events are being held across the country. those events, as you can see them live at biggin hill wartime airfield, are preparing for a fly—past, which is due to take place in the next few moments. we have timed this rather well as we see the engines revving up. with me is the aviation historian paul beaver. he is going to guide us through the events that you are going to witness at biggin hill. before we do that, just a word on the significance of today. it is a very significant day. the raf is 100 years old. the army and the navy tried to claw the
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budget back in the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. it is significant because it demonstrates where britain is in the league table of air forces. britain is in the league table of airforces. we britain is in the league table of air forces. we might britain is in the league table of airforces. we might have a small airforces. we might have a small airforce, we have a very airforces. we might have a small air force, we have a very efficient air force, we have a very efficient airforce, pound air force, we have a very efficient air force, pound for air force, we have a very efficient airforce, pound for pound, both in weight and airforce, pound for pound, both in weightand in airforce, pound for pound, both in weight and in money. the taxpayer gets a really good deal out of what we do. because, i think, gets a really good deal out of what we do. because, ithink, it gets a really good deal out of what we do. because, i think, it is all about professionalism. it is all about professionalism. it is all about people. that is what the raf does. it gets technology but it has the people to make it work. take us back 100 years, what did we have prior to this coming together? we had the royal flying corps, which was an army formation, and we had the royal navy air service, and they we re the royal navy air service, and they were quite successful in operations early on in the first world war but
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then there was that terrible time in 1917 and the other time, which was really what caused the formation of the raf, the air defence of great britain just wasn't up to what the army and the navy could do. it needed an independent force who fought in the third dimension, the air. and they created the air defence when london was being bombed nightly. and also, the government said, we ought to take our own step to make a strategic air force that can bomb at range, so you had these two things that are called the trench doctoring, after the person, major general trenchard, he became a marshal of the raf, we follow his doctoring to this day. it is still aboutair doctoring to this day. it is still about air defence and it is still
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about air defence and it is still about independent strike capability, which the government is using, we are in 21 countries at the moment. this is the busiest time the raf has had in its history since the second world war. you would not believe it but we are working every aeroplane. what is interesting about what you we re what is interesting about what you were saying at the start of that observation is the significance of aviation in world war i, because we obviously are well aware of what the role was in world war ii and that is partly what we are witnessing now at biggin hill in the next few moments, but in world war i this was very important as well. but this was new. in1908, important as well. but this was new. in 1908, the navy said they would have to aeroplanes, by 1910, winston churchill had got involved. he did not understand how it worked, he understood what the effect would be. he said we have got to take steps to
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have an airforce, so he said we have got to take steps to have an air force, so when he became the ministerfor war and have an air force, so when he became the minister for war and air, have an air force, so when he became the ministerfor war and air, he is the ministerfor war and air, he is the one who drove through, along with the south african general, along with lloyd george, a lot of political power behind creating the royal air force. it has had its moments, even then, because people we re moments, even then, because people were not sure, just for the war, should we create it? it was not until august 1919, the uniform i am wearing now became a reality and the rank structure that we have. we are just watching the scenes from biggin hilland we just watching the scenes from biggin hill and we saw an aircraft moving offa hill and we saw an aircraft moving off a moment ago to give you a sense off a moment ago to give you a sense of what we are about to witness. two spitfires and a harry kane, they are going to fly over the airfield, ——
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macro hurricane. quite a moment for alan scott and mary ellis. alan scott is an ambassador for the royal air force benevolent fund and he has been flying, this is not the first time he has been back in a spitfire, and he is there at the end of the runway, he is being flown today by darren griffiths, a former raf pilot, the chief pilot of the heritage hangar at biggin hill. we saw earlier there is a hurricane there. and there is clive denny in another spitfire. but can you imagine, if you are mary ellis, mary ellis is 101, she is the last remaining of 166 women who flew and delivered spitfires and other
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aircraft. she flew individually 400 spitfires during the second world warand she spitfires during the second world war and she still fits into her uniform and she is still there. she comes to any event she possibly can. and you have got alan scott, he joined the airforce in 1941 and was a fighter pilot throughout the second world war. what i love about him is that he still carries on today. it is a family business, the raf. there are a few million of us around the world and that includes our compatriots in places like canada, new zealand, australia and poland, because of the battle of britain, they all come together in this fabulous sort of a minded family. and you don't have to be a
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pilot, it is the ground crew, the air traffic is, the engineers, it is all part of the same family. i am fortu nate all part of the same family. i am fortunate enough to have flown aeroplanes, i am fortunate enough to have flown spitfires. i am particularly delighted that biggin hill should be dislocation because, of course, that was perhaps the signature airfield of the battle of britain. it was created in 1936, it was a fighter station for almost the whole of its life before it went to civil aviation. but if you look there at the aircraft, the closest one to us is a hurricane and that is an interesting aircraft in itself because it was built in canada, converted for aircraft carriers, and
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has now been restored and brought back into life as a memorial and it isa back into life as a memorial and it is a memorial now to the squadrons which flew from biggin hill. here is the mark nine taxiing. this is a two seekers spitfire we can see. it was originally a single seater fighter. it train or the irish pilots in the 50s and 60s. and it gives people a chance to see
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what it is like. you can do a victory roll, you can take your aeroplane up and fly over kent, and biggin hill is exactly the right place to do it. you can see london, you can see why there is an airfield defending london. just look at it. the spitfire which is behind the harry kane —— hurricane, and the cou nty of harry kane —— hurricane, and the county of kent. what does it feel like to pilot these aircraft? there is an adage that is absolutely right, you don't climb into a spitfire, you put it on. it is such a beautiful aeroplane, it is light on the controls. before i started flying, i was told that battle of britain pilots were told to think into a turn. if you yank the controls, you are over at controlling the aeroplane, it is
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gentle. mary ellis told me once that flying a spitfire is dead easy, it is the landing bit that catches people out. and sometimes the take—off as well. people out. and sometimes the take-off as well. they are both quite important! in the air it is fine. there is another adage which says, the merlin, the spitfire closest to us, and the hurricane the back, there is another adage that india, the spitfire is a lady, on the ground she is a bit of a pitch. you don't finish landing a spitfire until you are you don't finish landing a spitfire untilyou are in you don't finish landing a spitfire until you are in the bar and you have your second point in your hand, because it is such a feisty aeroplane. but that is what a fighter is. they were beautiful but they were designed to defend the uk, to shoot down bombers, so they aren't machines of war, but they are nevertheless beautiful. and they
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we re very nevertheless beautiful. and they were very good at that endeavour at that crucial time. one of the things when churchill did when he became prime minister on the 10th of may was to create the ministry of aircraft production. the battle of britain started and we had 19 squadrons of spitfires and more of the hurricane. we tend to not give the hurricane. we tend to not give the hurricane, it is not as illustrious as the spitfire. there was a spitfire fund that people contributed to, there was not a hurricane macro fund. it was half a generation on. it was a far more modern aeroplane than the hurricane. we saw a very smooth take—off. you know better than i do. it was very smooth. he is an absolute pro. he
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has survived aircraft crashes in spitfires so he is a man who knows his spitfires. it is really a rather nice aircraft. it was a canadian aircraft during the second world war. it has seen action. which so many of the restored aeroplanes these days haven't. so it is a popular aeroplane. the merlin starting up. rolls—royce merlin. an engine developed to... it is probably the most beautiful sound. it does have that wonderful per as it starts up. it is a 27 litre, 24
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valve engine. it is a big aeroplane. we will stay with these pictures. thank you very much for the time being. we will be able to show you that fly past in the next little while on bbc news. certainly preparations for red in the last few moments. thank you very much for the time being. before we do that, let's check on the weather prospects. hgppy happy easter. today is still looking the dry day of this easter weekend because we have got some rain on the way. this is how it looked in guernsey this morning. the sunshine will fade as this mass of cloud sta rts will fade as this mass of cloud starts to rolling of the atlantic. in the meantime, a fairly quiet picture and it should continue to be quite dry and bright for many parts of scotla nd quite dry and bright for many parts of scotland and northern ireland. the sunshine fades in the southend west head of the cloud and we still have showers in eastern areas in
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particular. looking wintry over the hills in northern england. it will be brighter and sunny spells in between. the winds are lighter than yesterday so for most of us it will not feel as chilly as it has done so far this easter. but there will be some snow showers in the north. there has been a cold start. through the evening and overnight, it turns a little bit more destructive, potentially. we have got the heavy rain risk on saturated ground, so the risk of localised flooding, but eventually it will turn back to rein in the south as we head towards the morning. but let's follow that system northwards. the hills seeing several centimetres of snow fall so it is going to settle with temperatures close to freezing and we will again have a cold night in the north. for the early hours of easter monday, pushing its way into northern england, we could see five or ten centimetres of snow across the pennines. eventually, some snow
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initially for northern ireland will turn back to rain but a problem with rain with the river is being quite high and more heavy rain to come. the rain itself could give a lot of localised flooding, spray and standing water. but the snow, with lots of people potentially on the roads, the end of the easter break, could be very destructive. there are warnings on the website. snow is a big issue as we go through monday and into tuesday, eventually becoming confined to the far north of scotla nd becoming confined to the far north of scotland by the end of tuesday. but most places will be into the milder atlantic air. temperatures in their teens across england and wales. heavy showers to come and with low pressure sat across us through the middle of the week, it continues to look unsettled. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. britain's largest teaching union is warning that a growing number of children with special needs are being left without suitable school places. last year, more than four—thousand children with the most severe needs
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were not offered places. the union has accused the government of "starving" local councils of funding. but the department of education insists that local authorities now have more money for every pupil, in every school. 0ur education correspondent marc ashdown reports. like all schools, here in south gloucestershire, the aim is to offer every child a place in the classroom alongside their peers, but the reality is a growing number of the most vulnerable pupils seem to be disappearing from the system. government figures show that in 2016, 1700 children government figures show that in 2016,1700 children in england government figures show that in 2016, 1700 children in england with special educational needs or disability did not have a school place but last year that figure more than doubled. more than 4000 children are now without a place. can you imagine the torment a parent goes through? those increase in
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numbers is something the government needs to look at really seriously and then used to be a huge cash injection into the budget immediately. local authorities are allocated money to spend on many with special needs. recent figures suggest there was a £400 million shortfall in funding last year, which unions say has led to dozens of councils asking for permission to read their wider schools budget to meet costs. so schools already struggling with tight budgets, it is an added pressure. it would be really sad to me if i ever got to the point where i had to say we could not take children with additional needs for financial reasons. i suspect there are schools and trusts who are looking really closely at the level of need a child comes in with and the amount of funding that will be attached to that and make a really difficult decision. this special needs teacher in south london is worried about the longer—term impact on the lives of vulnerable children. the danger for
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our children is that they disappear from society. that they will come to a school to a certain extent, they will then be able to access the wider community they live in. the department for education says it is investing a further £270 million over the next two years to ensure every child has the best opportunities regardless their needs. the comedian, eddie izzard, who hasjust been appointed to labour's governing national executive committee, has said the the party must stamp out anti—semitism and rebuild relations with thejewish community. the previous holder of the post stepped down yesterday, following accusations she offered support to a council candidate accused of holocaust denial. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is here. eddie izzard taking thisjob on eddie izzard taking this job on at a difficult time for the party. yes, and he has said these are not the circumstances he had hoped tojoin's labour‘s national executive
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committee but he is coming on board to replace christine shawcroft, who has acknowledged she became a destruction after initially offering support to that council candidate who was accused of holocaust denial. but eddie izzard has said it is an important time for labour, that it will stamp out the stain of anti—semitism from what he says is a minority of members. he says it has no place in the party and he hopes people can unite around the platform of hope thatjeremy corbyn has built. it has been a very difficult week for labour. more accusations of anti—semitism in the sunday times today. posting comments from facebook groups set up to support jeremy corbyn. labour say they are not official labour facebook groups or connected to the party in any way. some say the leadership has not gone far enough but others say the problem is being exaggerated. the bishop of salisbury has described the poisoning a russian double agent sergei skripal and his daughter yulia as an act of violation.
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in his easter sermon in the city's cathedral, the right reverend nicholas holtam said following the attack people had experienced anxiety, puzzlement and anger — and the community was onlyjust beginning to get back to normal after what had been a "very strange" four weeks. the governor of the russian region where more than sixty people were killed in a fire at a shopping centre last sunday has resigned. aman tuleyev says one of his own relatives died in the disaster. the fire prompted protests by residents who accused the authorities of corruption and failing to enforce fire safety rules. ceremonies are being held today to mark 100 years since the raf became the world's first independent air force. it was formed by the merger of the army's royal flying corps and the royal naval air service. 0ur correspondent robert hall is at stow maries in essex. robert. if view more significant places to
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be on this very big milestone for the raf standard stow maries. they have been turning back the clock to the days and the years where pilots we re the days and the years where pilots were pioneers and aircrafts were still proving their worth. just take a look at stow maries, because back in the first world war, this was a base for the british fighter squadrons defending london against the zeppelins, this afternoon, there will be a symbolic changing of the flag, here. to the flag of the royal air force. as well, we have seen a church service at saint clement danes. the raf sees this as twofold. firstly, to commemorate, and secondly to inspire and look forward. it's tremendously important
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to the country that we get the right people involved in aviation, and develop the side technology engineering and maths initiative by the government. we need to have a strong air force the government. we need to have a strong airforce for the government. we need to have a strong air force for defence in the uk. it is worth remembering that right in the beginning of 1917, 1918, when people are recommending the formation of the raf, there was great scepticism and perhaps the raf proved its worth. the british boxer, anthonyjoshua, has won his heavyweight title unification fight in cardiff against new zealand'sjoseph parker. the judges unanimously declared him the winner on points after twelve rounds. he now adds the wbo belt to his wba and ibf titles. david 0rnstein reports. he is one of the biggest stars of british sports, but that star to
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continue rising, anthony joshua british sports, but that star to continue rising, anthonyjoshua must keep winning, and with each opponent comes danger. go joseph parker! never before had reigning heavyweight champions met on these shores, but with two unbeaten record on the line, this turned into a cagey contest. though on the line, this turned into a cagey contest. thouthoshua was the aggressor, joseph parker stood firm, and the britain would go the distance for the first time in his career. the referee was criticised for how often he stepped in, get the judges unanimously ruled injoshua's favour. he now has three of the four recognised world championship belts, nobody has held all of them at once, thatis nobody has held all of them at once, that is the aim. i think by 2018, it is or is it time to capture all the belts, and we are one away, now. so, a night that didn't quite deliver the drama that so many want to see full was no less significant for anthonyjoshua on his rise towards
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sporting greatness. joshua's breakthrough came at the london 2012 0lympics, he turned professional a year later, and preferred tonne collected first major title with victory over charles martin, beating fatimid pitch at welland ‘s... victory over charles martin, beating fatimid pitch at welland 's. .. you will see the good, the bad, the ugly and long may it continue, i think. i'm not done. i have got a lot left in me. i should be around for a long time. ominous for his rivals, tantalising for his fans, joshua's sties burning brighter than ever. at is all for now, the next is on
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bbc 0ne one is at 535. have a good afternoon. hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. it is 12:36pm. labour has sought to distance itself from some facebook groups set up by supporters ofjeremy corbyn, after it emerged members have posted anti—jewish, violent and abusive comments.the sunday times says it's uncovered more than 2000 offensive messages. labour said it didn't run the groups or have any official connection with them and it had strict rules prohibiting abuse and discrimination. earlier i spoke to the crossbench peer lord carlile who criticised how the labour leadership is dealing with this crisis. i feel very sorry for those very able labour frontbenchers in i feel very sorry for those very able labourfrontbenchers in both houses of parliament, some of whom i know, who are deeply embarrassed by what has been happening. i am afraid
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i think it demonstrates thatjeremy corbyn is not to be trusted as a potential leader of this country. there are much better people available, and the labour party is in trouble, because of his weakness, in dealing with this matter, and that ofjohn macdonald. in dealing with this matter, and that of john macdonald. just in dealing with this matter, and that ofjohn macdonald. just on labour's specific point with regards to mr corbyn and mr macdonald's officers, labour has told that move one in either of those officers has seen, posted or endorsed anti—semitic or abusive messages. i just want to make that clear as we continue the conversation. how much do you say, a member of parliament can determine some of the minority unsavoury elements who might end up supporting them? well, political parties have complex and very clear disciplinary procedures. those disciplinary procedures. those disciplinary procedures. those disciplinary procedures mean that every party has the power to investigate and if appropriate,
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expel members of the party if they are behaving inappropriately. the labour party has a great tradition of being an anti—racist party, from the leadership ofjohn smith onwards. if you look at what tony blairand onwards. if you look at what tony blair and gordon brown used to say about these issues, nobody could be less racist than those two former labour leaders and prime ministers. and yet, it all seemed to be falling apart, now. because of a rather relaxed and negligent leadership. i go back to the mural and cartoon. what on earth wasjeremy corbyn thinking when he did not condemn that out of hand? it contains the classic anti—semitic blood libel. yet, he apparently didn't understand it. what confidence can we have in a potential prime minister like that? jeremy corbyn has of course in recent days, and i mention in the composition that would just fade out, been very exposed it in his condemnation notjust of racism, but
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specifically of anti—semitism as well. so, aren't backed what more do you say he should be saying? -- on that what would you think you should be saying? look what labour mps have been saying. they don't accept it. it is too little, it is too late. there are very senior people in the labour party who do not hold these views and a lot of that it is these. they would have condemned them out of hand in leadership. christine shawcross would not have spent two or three days deciding whether she should be replaced. she would have been out immediately, if there had been out immediately, if there had been a real determination right at the top of the labour party to root out those kind of racism. this is not just about anti—semitism, it is about racism is of all kinds. it is just unacceptable, in which ever political party it appears in. the same would apply to any other party. this is not an attempt to destabilisejeremy this is not an attempt to destabilise jeremy corbyn, this is not an attempt to destabilisejeremy corbyn, save
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where he deserves to be destabilised. crossbench peers, lord carlisle. as we've been hearing, britain's anthonyjoshua has secured his third major boxing world title with victory over new zealand'sjoseph parker in cardiff. joshua now needsjust one more belt to be crowned the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. a short while ago i spoke to gareth davies, sportswriter and boxing correspondent at the daily telegraph and asked him about his view regarding anthonyjoshua's victory. it was a comfortable win, but i think, as he himself admits, and indeed his coach admits, he still is a work in progress, and because he won the world title in 2016 when there was an opportunity, he is probably three fight ahead of where they want him to be. in other words, probably a year and a half in advance of where he would like to be, so we do see frailty on him and weaknesses in him, even though he is
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a17 weaknesses in him, even though he is a 17 under half stone adonis. the referee, i think cast a pall over the flight. it was cagey, as a report said, it was very cagey, chess match for the first half of the fight. joshua controlling it, mainly behind his big jab. when they two wanted to go into battle, the referee just wouldn't let them fight. it was like watching an amateur bout in the olympics. he did not let them clinch or tie—up, so the fight really never in lightened. there are still question marks about anthonyjoshua even there are still question marks about anthony joshua even though there are still question marks about anthonyjoshua even though he is undefeated in 21 fights and holds three of the belts, now. it seems strange to focus on those given what he achieved, so what would you point to to use your words, those frailties and weaknesses?” to to use your words, those frailties and weaknesses? i think you should have gone in for the finish. i think he should have
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dominated more, and i think he should have gone into rage when parker was clearly exhausting towards the end of the fight. he was an exhausted fighter towards the end. it wasn't an emphatic performance in terms of the statement of his power as a boxer. yes, he looked to put in a better boxing performance, but this is heavyweight boxing. it is all about not out. it is all about drama. these are the big men with big punches, and i do think that both tyson fury, who commented overnight, who of course beat wladimir klitschko back in november 2015, to scatter all these belts, and john terry wilder, they weren't worried about the performances last night. how likely is a fight between these two now, do you think? there is a reason why all four belts have not
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been won by anyone. there is huge boxing politics as well. different tv companies, promoters of course,... joshua's ones the deontay wilder fight. i suspect it would ta ke wilder fight. i suspect it would take a long negotiation, and it would not surprise me if you'd fight someone else, fast, and recede deontay wilder may be at wembley stadium in the middle of next year. that was gareth davies of the daily telegraph. now on bbc news, the royal air force is celebrating its 100th anniversary. air chief marshall, sir stephen hillier, has spoken to huw edwards about the events taking place to mark the air forces centenary and the challenges and changes ahead. stephen, to be chief of the air
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staff is amazing at any stage, but to be in this position at the centenary year is a special privilege indeed. how does it strike you? exactly as you describe. it is an enormous privilege. i am really proud to be in command of the raf, but in this year in particular, our 100th anniversary year, and the 31st chief of the air staff, and i really feel that connection with our history, and our heritage and our tradition. what i've tried to say to be buddies here about this either the goods of the air force, and about its place in modern british society? we have got three things. we wa nt society? we have got three things. we want to commemorate that rich history, and our heritage and our traditions, and all that sacrifice and courage that has gone on in the last 100 years, but we also want to celebrate what the royal air forces doing today, busy and operations, defending the united kingdom, protecting our interests here and
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overseas. we want to inspire, as well. the raf has also been a young service with youth and technology and aspiration at its heart, and we wa nt to and aspiration at its heart, and we want to inspire the next generation towards the ideals of the royal air force, and indeed to realise the aspirations. in practicalterms, because it is a celebration, what have you got planned? the big event is clearly going to be here in london on the 10th ofjuly. we will have the service at westminster abbey, a parade down the mall, and a big fly past, as well. that will be a tremendous day. the essence of area 100 is notjust that single event. it is events across the nation. we have a major programme of engaging with young people, from the ages of nine to 15 primarily, and
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aiming to really inspire them through the launch platform of the raf. how do you propose to engage with young people? raf. how do you propose to engage with young people ?|j raf. how do you propose to engage with young people? i think we start from a real advantage. the royal air forces at the forefront
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