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tv   Your Questions Answered  BBC News  December 2, 2019 9:00am-10:02am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me,
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joanna gosling — the headlines a vigilfor the victims of the london bridge attack — the prime minister and the labour leader will be among those honouring jack merritt and saskia jones at a remembrance service in the city. the un secretary—general, antonio guterres, says the world must end its "war against nature" as two weeks of talks on climate change begin in madrid. travel disruption for thousands of rail passengers — as workers on south western railway begin a 27—day strike in a dispute over guards on trains. jeremy corbyn pledges to cut rail fares by a third and give under—16s free travel as part of labour's plan to renationalise the railways. and coming up in the next few minutes — the scottish national party leader nicola sturgeon will be answering your questions live — on independence, brexit and more. captainjoe root rescues england's cricketers in the second test in new zealand — he makes a double century, to leave them trailing byjust five runs.
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good morning 7 and welcome to the bbc news at 9 the prime minister will attend a vigil to remember the two victims of the london bridge attack later this morning. cambridge graduates jack merritt and saskia jones were stabbed to death by convicted terrorist usman khan. several others were injured as they tried to stop the attack before khan was shot dead by police. john mcmanus reports. saskia jones, 23 years old and described by her family as a positive influence in many people's lives. wanting to help the victims of crime, she had recently applied tojoin the police. on friday, her life was cut short, one of two people stabbed to death
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by usman khan as she volunteered at the rehabilitation conference that khan was attending. she would have stood her ground. which breaks my heart even more because she would have stood up for herself, which, i dread to think what would've happened, to be honest. so it's not fair. this world has changed. and a 23—year—old girl dying like that should never happen, it should never come to that. like saskia, 25—year—old jack merritt had studied criminology at cambridge and like her, he'd been committed to helping prisoners start a new life. among those paying tribute to him his friend hollie. jack's father david merritt has already asked that his son's death not be used to impose draconian sentences on prisoners. and last night on twitter he accused the daily mail and daily express newspapers of using his son's death to promote vile propaganda,
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later this morning, a vigil will take place at the guildhall in the city of london to remember those who died and pay tribute to the emergency services. john mcmanus, bbc news. the justice secretary, robert buckland, says it's important to reconsider the tone of the debate around reforming the criminal justice system. there's been criticism of politicians for using friday's attack as a point—scoring exercise. ido i do think we just need to pause, and get the tone of this debate right. but public protection has to be at the heart of the duty of any government and i have to put that first and foremost. we've got to get it right. there are questions to be asked about why automatic early release was indeed being deployed and why it was introduced in the way
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it was in 2008. the london bridge attacks also dominated the election debate held on itv last night. representatives from seven political parties answered questions from the audience. neither boris johnson nor jeremy corbyn took part. topics also discussed were the nhs, brexit and the climate crisis. a month of strikes has started on one of the uk s busiest train operators, south western railway. members of the rmt union are protesting over a long—running dispute about the role of guards on trains. the walkout could cause major disruption over the christmas period. south western railway say the strike is unnecessary. the un secretary—general, antonio guterres, says the world must end its "war against nature".|t comes ahead of a two week climate summit in madrid when more than 200 countries will meet to plan how the world can tackle rising greenhouse gas emissions. and now it's time for your questions answered with the snp leader nicola sturgeon with nicky campbell in the 5 live studio.
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good morning and welcome to this special election programme on radio 5 live bbc news channel. for the next hour we are giving you the chance to put your questions to nicola sturgeon, the leader of the snp and first minister of scotland. and we'll be hearing from listeners to your call programme and taking a question submitted online and on social media to your questions a nswered social media to your questions answered on the bbc. get in touch while we are on the air. you can use the hashtag bbc your questions by e—mail your questions at bbc do coded uk. or text 85058. charged at your standard message read. collars this morning drawn from across the uk, shown an interest in participating in bbc programmes. we've also asked them questions about their background and experience. this is the fourth of a series of programmes, we invite the leaders of the main political programmes to take your questions,
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so programmes to take your questions, so far we've heard from the prime minister, adam price from, nigel farage and jonathan bartley. and now the first question. nicola, should you get your wish and if we end up with a hung parliament could you behave with maturity and pragmatism and put the interests of the whole uk above your desire for another independence referendum? what do you mean, exactly. not just independence referendum? what do you mean, exactly. notjust keep pushing this independence referendum, look after the whole country rather than just scotland and try and stop brexit? good morning, leona, and thank you for calling in. yes, i will try if we are in that situation to put the interests of the whole uk at the heart of what we do. for the la st at the heart of what we do. for the last three and a half years since the brexit the snp has worked really ha rd the brexit the snp has worked really hard to make common cause with other
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parties in the house of commons to try and provide an alternative to brexit and find a way out of the [tiess brexit and find a way out of the mess that we are in. often i've had people on my own side in scotland say why do we put scotland first but i want to see the whole of the uk get the opportunity to escape the mess. a lot of what we put forward in the manifesto that we would seek to progress if there is a hung parliament are also things that are important, i think, parliament are also things that are important, ithink, to parliament are also things that are important, i think, to people across the uk, and to austerity, stop to the uk, and to austerity, stop to the welfare cuts that have been pushing more children into poverty, for example. on the question of independence, there's different views on independence in scotland and across the uk. i'm not expecting any other party leader after the election to suddenly support independence, i would love it if they did but i am not expecting
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that. you might get support from adam price. itake that. you might get support from adam price. i take that for granted. but what i simply say is that parties that won the support of the snp, the one thing i would expect them to respect is the fact it is for scotland to decide these questions commits with the people of scotland to make the choice and independence and i think it's important we have the choice of an alternative future to the one boris johnson and his like want to impose upon us but as i have always done, i will try to put forward that progressive agenda that i think it's releva nt progressive agenda that i think it's relevant to people in every part of the uk. you need to have leveraged which is your best opportunity is a corbett minority government, clearly, you won't have any dealings with borisjohnson, you made that perfectly clear. i think if we end up perfectly clear. i think if we end up with forestry is more likely to get independence because i would vote for it to get a white there will be more of an impetus in one sense. that's an interesting point, leona. practically more chance of a referendum underjeremy corbyn, that's the point you're making, it's a very well—made one.
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that's the point you're making, it's a very well-made one. it is people have said this to me and about a borisjohnson premiership, have said this to me and about a boris johnson premiership, don't have said this to me and about a borisjohnson premiership, don't you secretly want these things because it might make independence more likely and more popular? he is your dream come true, isn't he, old etonian, even more so than david cameron. i think as leona has demonstrated borisjohnson cameron. i think as leona has demonstrated boris johnson winning this election would undoubtedly make the case for independence even stronger but the point i was going to make, i don't want these bad things to happen. i didn't want brexit to happen, i don't want boris johnson to be in downing street and we've got an opportunity because in scotland the snp is the challenger in every single tory held seats we have an opportunity next week on the election day, to play our part in dry to stop boris johnson. you need jeremy corbyn to do better than he is at the moment according to the opinion polls, some opinion poll say he might not achieve, that school with those and the interpretation of
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them, there is a narrowing. what's your advice tojeremy corbyn in the last two weeks of the campaign? do you need him to do better? you know, lam leaderof you need him to do better? you know, i am leader of the snp. it's a tough enoughjob i am leader of the snp. it's a tough enough job leading your own i am leader of the snp. it's a tough enoughjob leading your own party in an election campaign. i think other parties have to take their own decisions and look after themselves. the h would make and keep making is whatever the opinion polls say, and there has been a narrowing in the uk in the last few days, whatever they say, it's not inevitable, people will decide the outcome of the election, and how they vote next week. so we can stop borisjohnson getting a they vote next week. so we can stop boris johnson getting a majority but people have to get out there and vote for the party most likely to do that and in scotland, that is the snp. obviously, i that and in scotland, that is the snp. obviously, lam that and in scotland, that is the snp. obviously, i am the snp leader, i would say that but factually we are the party that can stop boris johnson in scotland and that's why i would say to people who don't want him to be deciding our future is get out there and vote snp. leona, thank you. have a good day. here's megan, the beautiful and busy isle of skye. during the summer. we have to
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say, that's another matter. what would you like to say? hello, my question is basically brexit has left us in a real limbo. i'm wondering how you can guarantee a push for scottish independence wouldn't do the same and leave us with a lot of u na nswered and leave us with a lot of unanswered questions? good morning, what's the weather like in sky this morning, is it nice? it's quite nice. excellent. beautiful. place. look, that's a really good question it's one i get asked a lot and the answer i will give you is that i don't think we should allow the mess that has been made at the brexit process to lead us to assume that all change has to be like that. i oppose brexit but there was nothing inevitable about the mess it's become. that has been because in advance of the brexit referendum, people weren't honest and frank about the implications, there was no real prospectus put forward about the detail of what brexit would mean, you had that lie on the side of the bus and
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not much more. then, after the referendum, there was still no planning, theresa may had all her red lines that contradicted each other, no one ever levelled with people about the implications and the trade—offs and compromises brexit would entail. go back to the independence referendum in 2014, people had different views but there was a detailed prospectus, some of the compromises were set out in advance. you are the compromises were set out in advance. you are never the compromises were set out in advance. you are never clear in the currency situation. i think we were clear, actually, that's one of the examples, the yes campaign, it wasn't entirely popular with everybody on the yes side, we said we would propose a currency union, trade—offs, compromises in that but be put forward the detail in advance of people had the clarity about what they were voting for and i would always wa nt they were voting for and i would always want that to be the case when people came to choose independence, they had the detail to inform that decision. megan? yes, do you feel as well that there is an independence
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referendum to come around this time there would be more answers for us than there were in 2014?|j there would be more answers for us than there were in 2014? i would endeavour to give people the answer is that they were looking for as far asi is that they were looking for as far as i possibly could. i did that in 2014, i would do that in the future. the one caveat i would inject is that whether scotland is independent or not, whether the uk is in or out of brexit, the future is never entirely certain, things happen that you can never foresee in advance and i think you can never foresee in advance and ithink again, you can never foresee in advance and i think again, there's got to be frankness about that. fundamentally, i would apply this to people '5 lives as individuals, fundamentally, you are better able to navigate like 's uncertainty if you are in charge of the decisions that enable you to do that. being independent is not a guarantee that the country won't have rocky times and ups and downs, nobody can promise that. but it means we are in charge of how we get through those as opposed to having borisjohnson, string being pulled
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by nigel farage, making decisions for us. if boris johnson wins this election, government back to the point leona may come if he wins the election, you have looked at every possibility no doubt, if he wins, does that not leave independence deadin does that not leave independence dead in the water for a while? no, i don't think it does. you are probably going to ask me, if i end up probably going to ask me, if i end up in that scenario, i will set out then andl up in that scenario, i will set out then and i intend to cross that bridge. why don't you do a catalan and have an unofficial referendum. it doesn't lead to independence in catalonia is the proof of that and i've have great sympathy with the position the independence movement is in there, obviously. some of their leaders are serving right now lengthyjail their leaders are serving right now lengthy jail sentences. that's not going to happen. i hope not, i'm not anticipating it! but the point i'm making is not in the business of simply having an independence referendum, i want scotland to become independent so a process that leads to that has to be legitimate,
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has to be accepted and the short answer to your question, why not do answer to your question, why not do a catalonia, catalonia is not independent which demonstrates that kind of process doesn't necessarily ta ke kind of process doesn't necessarily take you where you want to be. another four or five years of a conservative government under mr johnson, they are not going to all ofa johnson, they are not going to all of a sudden say go on, you know that's the case. i love how contrary to all the evidence we had since he became prime minister everybody thinks borisjohnson became prime minister everybody thinks boris johnson will stick to his word on anything. let me cross that bridge if i come to it. we are in an election campaign. people in scotland had the opportunity to try to avoid us being in that situation by voting in a way that helps to ensure borisjohnson by voting in a way that helps to ensure boris johnson is by voting in a way that helps to ensure borisjohnson is not calling the shots, a week on friday, the day after the election. that's what i'm going to focus on. i'm going to do everything, not my pan in as we say in scotland, to avoid borisjohnson getting a majority and i would encourage everybody who doesn't want borisjohnson to decide encourage everybody who doesn't want boris johnson to decide the future to get out there and
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vote to reduce the chances of that happening. so more televised debates, you can knock a few other people ‘s pants on. robert in glasgow. hello. good morning, good morning first minister. the question i would like to pose, nikki asked it already for me, if westminster were to refuse a second independence referendum, where would that leave us legally? would be my question. it's a question that i get asked a lot and lam question that i get asked a lot and i am probably going to frustrate you in thati i am probably going to frustrate you in that i will get dragged into the whys and wherefores of that because we are in an election campaign and i wa nt we are in an election campaign and i want to focus on trying to stop borisjohnson getting a want to focus on trying to stop boris johnson getting a majority. suffice to say i've thought through all of these things, we will look at all of these things, we will look at all options if we get into that situation. i've made very clear it has to be a legal, legitimate process if we want it to lead to independence. but the more, particularly in advance of the
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election, we talk about what happens if we get into that situation, we almost legitimise the right of boris johnson to block an independence referendum. he doesn't have that right, morally, it's not for westminster politicians to decide whether or not scotland becomes independent, it's where the people of scotland morally is one thing. that's never been tested, i accepted the need to have that proper legal process but actually, in point of fact, it's never been tested in court exactly what the position would be. but politically, and a politician so perhaps it's not surprising i say this, but let's get the political solutions if we can and the first step in this is to try to make sure the borisjohnson is not calling the shots the day after this election. if you don't want to make up for whatever reason on friday the 13th of december and turn on your television to pictures of borisjohnson walking on your television to pictures of boris johnson walking back through the door of downing street, then in scotland, get out and vote snp because that's the way to stop it and then we move on to have
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control of the kind of future we want and the kind of country we want to be. robert, thank you. finlay in carlisle, hello. good morning. my question is why it's being in the eu going to benefit an independent scotla nd going to benefit an independent scotland considering it's likely we'll only have six meps among 750. good morning and thank you for phoning in. an independent scotland would have more meps than we dojust now, based on countries of similar size, i think i'm correct, if my memory is correct in saying we would have double that of course the european parliament is one of the institutions of the european union, an independent scotland would have a commissioner and be at the top table in the european council as well. people ask me sometimes and it's on the face of it, i think a legitimate question, why do you want to be independent of the uk but be part of
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the european union? my answer is that these two things are not the same. every memberof that these two things are not the same. every member of the eu is an independent country, france and germany, spain, portugal, all of these countries are independent but they come together in the eu to cooperate and collaborate on the big issues that in the modern world, individual countries can't do on their own. how long would it take for scotland to rejoin? i'm not going to sit here and put a specific timescale on that because it would bea timescale on that because it would be a process of discussion and negotiation. two years? for years? six years? you must have gained it. i'm not going to do that brexiteer thing of making things up as i go along to make it easier to answer your question. we would have a process of discussion and its fairly crucial. absolutely but i wa nt fairly crucial. absolutely but i want to focus first on scene if we can stop scotland being taken out of the eu in the first place and if that happens and may become independent, everything that i have gathered from conversations
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and discussions i've had across europe, is that scotland would be welcomed with open arms, it would not be, in fa ct with open arms, it would not be, in fact there's people within the european union are on record, people who are expert on these things are on record as saying it would not be a lengthy process. have you spoken to angela merkel about this? no, i haven't spoken directly to her about this. when you think about this logically, the european union, since the moment it was established in former guises, has existed to enlarge itself, trying to enlarge itself, why would it not one scotland, that complies with all the rules and regulations to be part of it? of course, there would be a process to go through but there is nothing to suggest that would be a lengthy process or an overly complex process. frictionless border with england? process. frictionless border with england ? that process. frictionless border with england? that is what i absolutely want, independence doesn't create borders and i don't want borders, i wa nt borders and i don't want borders, i want to keep trading with the uk, i think it's in the uk 's want to keep trading with the uk, i think it's in the uk '5 interest to keep trading with scotland, there is no reason that shouldn't be
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the case but i also want scotland to keep trading within the european single market which is eight times the size of the uk. we shouldn't be forced to choose between these, we should be able to be built. finlay, are you still with us? how are you going to vote if there is a second independence referendum?m vote if there is a second independence referendum? ifi did have a vote in carlisle i would vote to stay in the uk. all right, there's a wee bit of work to be done anew by nicola sturgeon. of course there is. thank you very much. thank you very much, finlay. what if you lose a second independence referendum, it's legitimate question. don't come on mate, there is every single political ramification and implication and potential consequence. if you lost, how long before you could have another one? i'm not planning to lose and i don't think ...ij another one? i'm not planning to lose and i don't think i know you're not. i don't know the answer to that question. i am one politician. i am
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to that question. i am one politician. lam not to that question. i am one politician. i am not planning to go anywhere soon. but you know, i'm not going to be around forever. i don't get to decide what the future of scotland is, that's for people in scotland is, that's for people in scotland to decide, it's not for me any more than it is for boris johnson to set this far and no further or you know, this is what ...the further or you know, this is what the template at the moment is once every six years. you know what? if brexit hadn't happened, but it hasn't happened yet, but of the vote hadn't happened with scotland voting to remain and facing being dragged out against a bill maybe we wouldn't be talking right now about having another independence referendum quite in this timescale. but you can't dictate as a politician what the future of the country is, it's for people to decide that and people should have the choice. right now, if we don't get the choice of independence we are on a path where our future outside the european union governed by borisjohnson our future outside the european union governed by boris johnson with all of that entails, that is decided for us, it is imposed upon us and whatever our future is, and it's up to people to decide whether
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that is an independent country or not, it should be decided by us. the opinion polls are tied at the moment. nicola sturgeon with this, it's 9:23am, the bbc news channel on radio 5 live, a couple of quickfire questions, john in london who will scotland have as head of state if you were to get independence? just following that. the queen, is the policy of the snp. the queen, is the policy of the snp. the current policy. you said recently that i think there is a debate to be had about the longer term future of the monarchy. what's your contribution to that debate?” support current snp policy, i was asked that question in the context of the prince andrew situation. and i was more talking about, which, actually, the royal family seem to be having this debate as well about the size and shape of the royal family in future so my position is, i support current snp policy and i said ina i support current snp policy and i said in a moment ago, i won't be around forever so i can't dictate
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that forever, i don't dictate snp policy anyway, that's my ...” support current snp policy doesn't sound like a huge endorsement of the queen. i am absolutely, i am a supporter of the queen, i think she does an absolutely fantasticjob, i think years, decades of public service been exemplary so i'm very worn about that. 0k, service been exemplary so i'm very worn about that. ok, let's go for another one, alison tweets using the hashtag, how biased is the bbc?” don't think the bbc, i don't think bbc journalists don't think the bbc, i don't think bbcjournalists are bias, i think in the independence referendum i think there was an institutional issue, almost come up with the bbc, to some extent. i don't think it was down to individuals orjournalists. but it felt sometimes as if the bbc was on one side of the debate but that then, i hope things have moved on from that. journalists should never be partial, i don't think
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it should be partial, i don't think it should bea be partial, i don't think it should be a case of them trying to do any favours to the independence because, i think it should be a case of quality, impartialjournalism i think it should be a case of quality, impartial journalism and i think it should be a case of quality, impartialjournalism and i have great respect for bbc journalists because i think by and large, they do a good job. what do you mean by institutional bias? out of that manifest itself and how does that come to be? i think i would exclude largely bbc scotland from this but i remember doing interviews in the latter stages of the independence referendum, where some of the network correspondence came to scotland to cover it and it was almost as if they hadn't been keeping up and you are having to go back to square one on issues that people in scotland were very informed about and i think there was also, andl informed about and i think there was also, and i say, i don't think this was also, and i say, i don't think this was in the mind of individual journalists but as an institution there was a sense of the bbc in its place and role and status in the british media, felt that its own future was somehow caught up in the independence referendum but i don't
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think it's particularly seemly for politicians to spend a lot of time criticising the media. we've all got our views on the media, we get frustrated at times. the media is there to hold us to account and whether we always like it, whether we always feel comfortable with it, that's a fundamentally important job ina that's a fundamentally important job in a democracy and i think politicians by and large, should seek to avoid criticising the media. nicola in lanark, good morning. good morning. you can say what you want to nicola sturgeon but go easy on the bbc. good morning nicola. good morning, nicola. can't wait brexit proof the nhs for scotland? a question and a very timely question, and the answer is i think we can. i think brexit poses a very real threat to the nhs, in a whole range of ways. brexit will make it harder to attract people from elsewhere in europe, there is a lot of european nationals working in our nhs. brexit harms the economy and lowers tax revenues then obviously that's less money to be invested in the nhs.
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but one of the big worries is this idea of the nhs perhaps being on the table ina of the nhs perhaps being on the table in a trade deal with donald trump. where it's opened up to private competition for us drug companies push up the price of medicines. the snp have proposed and i would hope all parties would support this, we've proposed an nhs protection bill which explicitly stops the nhs being on the table in any trade discussions. and would also give the scottish parliament, the welsh assembly, the northern ireland assembly if and hopefully it will be up and running again soon, effectively the power of veto over trade deals if they were against our interests so we will put that forward after the election and i hope all parties, if the tories are serious and mean what they say when they deny the nhs would be on the table, thenl they deny the nhs would be on the table, then i don't see why they would not support it. thank you. sheila in edinburgh, good morning. good morning. my daughter was in
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hospital recently in edinburgh. the department seemed understaffed and the doctors and nurses stretched to capacity. what will you do to improve staffing in hospitals? i've got the treatment time guarantee promises that you protein as well. you haven't got a shining record in the nhs but to answer sheila ‘s question. sheila, thank you for your question. sheila, thank you for your question and my best wishes to your daughter. thank you. the nhs is under pressure, it's under pressure in scotland, england, wales, northern ireland, across much of the world, as demand rises of the population ages which is a good thing. we are investing in our nhs in scotland, we invest more per head of population than elsewhere in the uk. you get more per head of population, don't you? we choose to invest, we've reformed the tax syste m invest, we've reformed the tax system in scotland in order to invest more. we also have more staff per head of population since the snp took office, there's been about 13,000 more staff working
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in our health service, i'm not saying they don't work under pressure because they do, day in and out. on the waiting times, we are, because of that rising demand, we are working ha rd that rising demand, we are working hard to improve performance in waiting times. which is why we are investing more, we've done a lot of reforms, integrating health and social, so we are focused very hard on meeting those challenges. and we got a waiting times improvement plan in place right now, the other scotland report, or that scotland does the report into the nhs every year and does the report into the nhs every yearand in its does the report into the nhs every year and in its most recent, it said more people were being treated within those waiting times targets than was the case a year before so there's work to be done, i would be there's work to be done, i would be the last to say otherwise but we've got a real focus on making sure that we are making the investment, doing the reforms that are about meeting the reforms that are about meeting the rising demand. are the targets
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too ambitious? 90% of patients should have had the treatment within 18 weeks of being referred in september, the standard achieved by 76.9% of patients, performance declining from 77%. if i could just add to that, i read recently there are over 4000 nursing posts unfilled in scotland, how can that gap be closed to support nursing staff to stay in the profession at the moment? sure, i'm not sure about the 4000 figure, there is a vacancy rate thatis 4000 figure, there is a vacancy rate that is pretty consistent with what's been in recent years, sometimes it will be slightly higher, sometimes slightly lower but the figures i've given you for the numbers of staff extra that are working, these are actually ones in post so there are more staff than has been the case previously. and one of the things that's been debated in the selection elsewhere in the uk is about trying to increase nurses through bringing back the nurse bursary, the bursary that student nurses get which was taken that student nurses get which was ta ken away by that student nurses get which was taken away by david cameron, we never abolished it in scotland, we
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ke pt never abolished it in scotland, we kept it so that people have been able to attract more nurses into nurse education which is an important and a good thing to do. going back to nikki's question about the targets being too ambitious. no way be my answer to that. i think you've got to aim high and you've got to keep working to meet dermot meet those targets. interesting in england the debate now is about whether they abolished the targets. i don't think we should. they are hostage to fortune. they make life difficult politicians like me but i think it's better that we have strict targets in place. that we are working to meet because if you don't have those targets in place, the danger is you do less well so i'd rather have a tougher time as a politician working hard to meet those targets and actually take the pressure
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off thank you very much indeed. on the subject of the health of people in scotland, looking at these figures is so depressing, the country's drug death rate is three times that of the uk as a whole, higher than that reported for any other eu country. i think estonia is second in the table. the rest of the uk is quite a bit further down. more than 70,000 drug deaths the us in 2017 but the rate of population is marginally lower than scotlanddeath, obesity rate, right at the top of the rate, the murder rate in renfrewshire and inverclyde, made a great 1.3 per 100,000 ahead of new york, ahead of new york, head of london. but perhaps properly the finger pointed
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at any government that has been in for a long time and you have pointed out the tories for their social problems, been in for ten years and not done anything about it. you have beenin not done anything about it. you have been in for 13 years. on your point about the murder rate, violent crime is at about the murder rate, violent crime isata about the murder rate, violent crime is ata14 about the murder rate, violent crime is at a 14 year plus low in scotland from a viole nt is at a 14 year plus low in scotland from a violent crime is at a low, it has reduced since we have been in office faster than crime generally. that's not complacency. we need to continue to drive those figures down but crime has been falling in scotland. i will come but crime has been falling in scotland. iwill come back but crime has been falling in scotland. i will come back to drugs ina scotland. i will come back to drugs in a second because it's an important issue. some of the other issues you mentioned about the public health challenges, that have roots that go back a long way. we have ta ken roots that go back a long way. we have taken some really radical action to try to get ahead of some of these things. you've been in power for 13 years of these things. you've been in powerfor13 years in of these things. you've been in power for 13 years in scotland. just to reiterate the point, kameni failings in public health of the tories, you are the first to point
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the finger at them. i'm taking responsibility here and i'm going to tell you the things we have been doing. if you take alcohol misuse in scotland which has been a problem for a long time, we have become the first government anywhere in the world to introduce minimum unit pricing for alcohol. it is early days but the early indications of thatis days but the early indications of that is that it is having an effect and alcohol consumption is starting to go down. we have taken tough action to try to tackle obesity, for example. so we are taking the action to help deal with problems that have roots that go back a long way that can't be solved overnight but we are actually doing the work needed to turn the tide on these things. on theissue turn the tide on these things. on the issue of drugs which is a big issue right now, again, some of this, not all of it, but some of it has its roots in the 19805 when scotland had a higher rate of drug use. a lot of drug users are getting older. they have multiple health problems. that'5 older. they have multiple health problems. that's one of the reasons. it is not the only reason but one of
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the reasons why drug deaths have been rising. incidentally, although the rate in scotland is higher, your right to point that out, the number of drug deaths have been rising elsewhere in the uk. so we are doing a lot of work again trying to deal with that. we are investment in drug treatment services, we have a task force looking at some of the additional thing5 force looking at some of the additional things we need to do. crucially, it is taking a lot of advice from people who have lived experience of drug use. i should say thi5 experience of drug use. i should say this is not me pointing the finger anywhere else, this is largely the responsibility of my government. but drug5 law is still in certain re5pect5 reserved to westminster so we are respects reserved to westminster so we are seeking the transfer of more power. one of the things glasgow city council has said, backed by experts, it wants to do is establish a safe consumption facility to try and reduce some of the harm associated with drugs but under the current law we cannot do that. so there is a whole range of things
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being done here to tackle these problems. raj in glasgow, sorry to keep you. good morning. hello, nicola. iam keep you. good morning. hello, nicola. i am from perth college, actually. which college? perth college. my question is, how will i be impacted after brexit as an immigrant living in scotland? firstly, thank you for being an immigrant living in scotland. i think everybody who chooses to come to scotland to make a contribution to scotland to make a contribution to our country does is a huge honour andl to our country does is a huge honour and i think we should be hugely grateful to you for that. i hope brexit doesn't impact on you because i want people who have chosen to make scotland their home to be able to stay and to continue to make a contribution but i fear for the impact of brexit on the reputation
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of the uk as a welcoming place and we know the government in westminster wants to reduce immigration which has big implications for scotland. our own population over the next 25 years isn't growing as fast as we would wa nt isn't growing as fast as we would want it to. all of the growth in our population is projected to come from immigration. so as well as immigration, i think helping to make usa immigration, i think helping to make us a stronger and more diverse society, we really need people to come and work in scotland in order to make sure we have a working age population that is rising. i will do everything i can to make sure scotland is, and is seen to become a welcoming place for people who want to come and live there. my message to come and live there. my message to people in europe and across the world is scotland is open for business. please think about coming and living in scotland and making contribution. you are very welcome. thank you very much, some quick fire questions at 9:37am. ian has asked, if you were living in england, which party would you vote for and why? let's put you in a labour
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lib dems marginal. which way are you voting? i think marginal. which way are you voting? ithink i'd marginal. which way are you voting? i think i'd have to take the fifth amendment on that. the fifth amendment on that. the fifth amendment is not allowed on this programme. i'm not a fan ofjeremy corbyn's labour party. why? i think a labour party right now, given everything the tories is doing to this country, should be streets ahead. so is that lib dems? i was going to say i have real issues with the lib dems' previous coalition with the tories, jo swinson voted for austerity, welfare cuts and the bedroom tax so i don't know. you are in the same boat a lot of people are in in the selection and we see this again and again and again, notjust anecdotally. people are going to have to make a choice, the least worst option, the devil and the deep blue sea and all that. what i would say is if you are in a constituency where the tories hold itjust now or the tories have any chance of holding it, vote for the party that
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is best placed to get rid of the tories or keep the tories out, that would be my advice to people in england. when are you going to turn off the oil taps? firstly, england. when are you going to turn off the oiltaps? firstly, we have the most ambitious emissions reduction targets anywhere in the world and we have a lot of work under way. 75% of scotland's electricity already comes from renewable electricity. we are in the transition away from fossil fuels and it must accelerate. we can't turn off the taps right now because if we did we would immediately become more reliant on imports of oil and that would actually have a higher carbon intensity. we also need to make sure the transition is a fairand ajust need to make sure the transition is a fair and a just one. there is lots ofjobs a fair and a just one. there is lots of jobs dependent on a fair and a just one. there is lots ofjobs dependent on oil and gas in scotland and we need to have a transition away from that that gets people into other employment. that's why we set up a just transition. how long is a just transition? we are governed and guided by the targets we have set. we have set a target of net zero emissions by 2045, that's
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five years ahead of the uk target. we have a target of a 75% reduction in emissions by 2030 because the advice of the experts is that we have got to front—load all of this work, so we are guided and governed by those very ambitious targets we have set. and unlike other governments, including the uk government, we include aviation emissions, shipping emissions and that we don't rely on international credits. so we have made this very tough for ourselves but rightly so because it's so important. you say you are greener than greener than green. the scottish greens, this is an issue coming up more and more, the scottish greens have called on a moratorium on new fish farms, they call environmental concerns, and called a recent report by the scottish parliament's called a recent report by the scottish pa rliament‘s environment committee that aquaculture industry would cause irreparable damage if these concerns are not addressed. are you happy with the status quo? we are working
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on a new regulatory framework for aquaculture and salmon farming. it is an important part of our economy and as first minister i can't disregard the jobs dependent on that and the value it brings to the scottish economy. but it must be consistent with our environmental obligations, which is why, you mentioned the scottish parliament committee, which why we are taking forward the recommendations there to make sure it is appropriately regulated and i think that's the right and responsible way to proceed. at 9:41am, you are with the bbc news channel and bbc radio 5 live. some more quick fire questions. i did the living in england one, which party would you vote for? and i dodged it! typical politician! colin says why would i vote for the snp and not labour in scotla nd vote for the snp and not labour in scotland to stop the conservatives being voted back in? in every conservative seat in scotland, the snp is the main challenger, labour doesn't have a chance so if you want rid of the conservative vote for the
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snp, it is the best and only way to do it. and genuinely we are in an election, and i'm never complacent, but labour is miles behind. labour isn't in a position of being able to win in scotland. if you want to make sure that we get rid of the tories and have the strongest possible voice for scotland, voting snp is the way to do that. jeremy corbyn is a great man of principle, isn't he? i don't think he is. over the years he has been consistent, voted the same way because of what he believes in and often against his party and people like him for that. it is easy to do that when you are not in a position of influence but looking at him as the leader, he has voted against trident his whole life but now that he is lewd and potential prime minister he thinks we should renew trident. evil in your party standing up to keep the monarchy, they are no doubt against that but it's in the party manifesto. they are free to speak out but on brexit we have jeremy corbyn who won't even tell us whether he is for or against brexit, whether he would vote leave or remain in a future referendum.
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you can't aspire to be prime ministerand you can't aspire to be prime minister and not tell people where you stand on the biggest issue of the day. so actually, i think since he's been labour leader as opposed to campaigning from the backbenches this man of principle has actually been shown to be anything but on many issues. then in london, good morning. good morning. it is all yours. good morning. i can the snp assure the safety of trans—and. .. tell us about what has been said by some of its members. the wonderful pride celebrations this year in edinburgh, two campaigners were branded as misogynistic for marching for trans rights and we have a blossoming gender critical movement on twitter which sees lots of young trans people affected by things said there, there is the women's pledge to set up by the snp which many members of the snp haven't gone on
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to sign as they see it as a little more than an unregulated petition. you say in your manifesto you want to streamline it and make it less to sue for trans people to be recognised in their acquired gender. so can you address the point from then? thank you for calling in. i'm a big supporter of trans rights and trans people should have the ability of living with who they are and not have the stigma that has dogged them in the past. i've had so many conversations in particular with young trans people that convinces me we have got to tackle that stigma and tackle transphobia. there is a lot of transphobia in society, not just in scotland but more generally right now. i am also a lifelong feminist andl right now. i am also a lifelong feminist and i am passionate about women's rights and i do not believe that those two things need to be... isa that those two things need to be... is a transphobic to say that women's
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refuges, swimming pool changing rooms, women's prisons should be reserved for biological or born women? i was going to come onto the act. the reform of the gender recognition act is about making the process of legally changing gender, as you said a moment ago, less intrusive, less bureaucratic less traumatic for trans people. it doesn't change the situation with single sex or a women only spaces. that is governed by the equality act which we are not proposing to change. you don't need a gender recognition certificate to access women's only spaces right now. the point is i am a supporter of trans rights and a supporter of women's rights and a supporter of women's rights and a supporter of women's rights and i think it is incumbent on people like me to demonstrate that those two things aren't and
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needn't be in tension and competition and we have made a commitment to reform the recognition act which we will do and we will bring forward a draft bill in the near future to hopefully let people see the detail of what we are proposing and crucially what we are not proposing and try and get to a position on this issue where there isa position on this issue where there is a greater understanding and a cce pta nce is a greater understanding and acce pta nce of is a greater understanding and acceptance of these different positions. there is a great movement of feminists who think this is misogynistic and who think that their rights are being trampled on here. do you respect their position? lama here. do you respect their position? i am a lifelong feminist. i would not be proposing something or arguing for something that i thought was, to use your terminology, trampling over women's rights. i've spent a lifetime campaigning for women's rights and women's equality and that's the point i'm making. i'm not dismissing the concerns that women have. part of the reason we have said we are bringing forward
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d raft have said we are bringing forward draft legislation is to try to allay those concerns and set out very clearly what we are and what we are not doing. but i've also seen and heard too many experiences on the pa rt of heard too many experiences on the part of trans people to ignore their lived experience either. i believe in trans rights. as i say, i'm a passionate believer in women's rights and my responsibility is to try to do what i can to create a scotland where everybody feels accepted for who they are unable to be who they without discrimination, stigma or a fear that their rights have been trampled over. that's not easyin have been trampled over. that's not easy in the context of this debate. in many areas. but that for somebody in my position is an important responsibility and one i am determined to live up to. hello, george. good morning. what is your question? will an independent scotland remain in the common fisheries policy, bearing in mind that a nation that does not control
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its own waters is not independent or sovereign? thanks for your question, george. the snp argued against the common fisheries policy almost for the entirety of its existence. we have put forward proposals for reform of the common fisheries policy and we would continue to do that if we are in the european union as an independent country. we do believe it is important to have greater control over scottish waters. but we also know it is important, this is where the whole brexit argument falls down. and i the fishing industry and the fishing communities are being, in many respects, sold a con by the conservatives because yes, control over our own waters, being able to land more fish is important, but being able to process the fish is important and having the people to work in our fish processors, many of whom come from other european countries and then having the markets to sell our fish into the most important as well, and all of these things matter. and that's the position the snp
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would always argue for. what is your view on this, george, when it comes to brexit and the scottish fishing industry? where are you on this?” am in the brexit position. we have had 40 yea rs am in the brexit position. we have had 40 years of promising to reform and fisheries policy. even whenjohn major was prime minister, the snp said they would lead us down princes street with eric salmond in the front. we marched down the back streets of edinburgh and we are still wondering in the back streets. we arejust still wondering in the back streets. we are just completely lost here.” absolutely understand your frustration, george. for voices in the scottish fisheries federation, can become a scotland's fastest growing economic sector within ten yea rs if growing economic sector within ten years if the uk leaves the eu common fisheries policy on schedule. these are the great opportunities of brexit. i think our fishing industry has a bright future and
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i accept my responsibility to work with the fishing industry to make sure that's the case. but i do fear that as has happened so often in the past, we are going to have the conservatives selling out our fishing industry. the political declaration boris johnson has already agreed already ties up the future of fishing with a wider trade negotiation already paving the way to trade that away. how do we have sole jurisdiction over our coastal waters within the european union? i believe the common fisheries policy should be fundamentally changed and reformed but i think there is an over simplicity and what the conservatives are saying in terms of we just come out of the common fisheries policy and everything is rosy because all of these other things the fishing industry needs these things to prosper are at risk. i'm nota these things to prosper are at risk. i'm not a supporter of the common fisheries policy. i never have been and the snp never has been but we must be honest about what we need in overall terms for the fishing industry to prosper and thrive
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in. asi industry to prosper and thrive in. as i say, it used to be the tories have called the fishing industry expendable in the wider interests within the european union and i fear that's what the tories are gearing up that's what the tories are gearing up for all over again. might that be a bit of input you might have into the deal thatjeremy corbyn might negotiate with the european union if he were to win because he will have ajeremy corbyn he were to win because he will have a jeremy corbyn deal and remaining? we will always stand up for the interests in the fishing industry. would you like to have somebody negotiating with jeremy would you like to have somebody negotiating withjeremy corbyn to make sure you get that?” negotiating withjeremy corbyn to make sure you get that? i would want to make sure the interests of the fishing industry were paramount and thatis fishing industry were paramount and that is a commitment i would make on behalf of the snp. should scotland behalf of the snp. should scotland be at the table? scotland should be at the table the whole time rather than being shut out by westminster and fishing is an example of the particular interests we have that mean we should be much more represented. goodness me, look at the time, it is 9:52am, leader of the time, it is 9:52am, leader of the snp first minister nicola sturgeon is with us until 10am
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on 5 live and the bbc news channel answering your questions. you can get in touch while we are on air using #your questions. you can text and call. let's go to martha in edinburgh. i have here, you are a labour member. yes, but i'm interested in the snp's environment policies. my question is particularly about north sea oil. the snp claim scotland as a global leader in tackling climate change. however, obviously scotland is one of the biggest producers of oil in europe. in the snp's manifesto there is no date for stopping oil extraction and no mention of transitioning away from oil at all. how is this compatible with your net zero greenhouse gas emission targets by 2045? firstly, martha, thank you for your question. i don't claim scotland as a world leader, it is a statement of fact. most international experts at the un call scotland a world leader. it is not
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the case there is no mention of this in our manifesto. we talk about ring fencing. i mentioned earlier on why you can'tjust fencing. i mentioned earlier on why you can't just switch off oil production overnight because it would actually be counter—productive to what we are trying to do. but in terms of that transition away from fossil fuels, there is a very significant proposal in our manifesto. we are saying the office for budgetary responsibility which says there is £8 billion of oil revenues predicted over the next few years, we have said that should all be earmarked into a net zero fund which helps to accelerate that transition away from fossil fuels to renewable energy, so there is a lot that we are saying there. that transition has to be accelerated. scotland again is leading the way here. ithink scotland again is leading the way here. i think i said in a moment ago, 75% of our electricity already comes from renewable sources. we need to make sure we are emulating their performance when it comes to how we heat our homes. do you fly from edinburgh to london?” how we heat our homes. do you fly from edinburgh to london? i do sometimes but i've been trying to do
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that less and get the train as much as possible. just as quick from edinburgh to london in many ways. as possible. just as quick from edinburgh to london in many waysm many ways it is quick and much more pleasurable way to travel as well. i took the train to london last week. we'll have to change how we do things and people like me in particular. nicola, my main concern is how climate change is being pushed onto, the burden is pushed onto individuals when we need large—scale change, and how are we going to make a just transition for oil workers and their families at this time? we have set up a just transition commission which the trade unions are involved in to advise us on how to do this in no way that doesn't leave people behind. i agreed with the point you made at the start of that question. yes, individuals have to think about changing behaviour but if you look it isa changing behaviour but if you look it is a relatively small number of companies worldwide that are responsible for the vast bulk of emissions. so industry has to play a leading part in this, governments have to lead by example, because if
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we don't do that we are not going to convince individuals to make the changes in their lives. i'm not sitting here saying there is not much more scotland needs to do. if we are to meet these targets we all have to up ourgame. we are to meet these targets we all have to up our game. i do think in scotland sometimes, this probably exists across the party boundaries, we should take a bit of pride in the fa ct we should take a bit of pride in the fact the rest of the world sees us asa fact the rest of the world sees us as a global leader and that should motivate us to keep doing more. there is a picture on the bbc website this morning of a whale found off the western isles, fishing tackle inside it were really disturbing. it is, yes. let's go to, let me see, who is next? mark in portsmouth, good morning, mark. my my question to nicola is what would happen to the navy bases if scotland got independence? and you would be in charge of the security of scotland? as with any other independent country, many independent country, many independent countries across the world a re
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independent countries across the world are similar in size to scotland or smaller. we would have our own armed forces, we would have our own armed forces, we would have our own armed forces, we would have our own navy, air force and army and we would be able to invest in conventional forces. the army footprint in scotland is smaller now than at any time in 200 years because conventional armed forces investment has been cut and there is a disproportionate spend on nuclear weapons so scotland would defend itself in the same way other small countries defend themselves and we would continue to have scottish armed forces and we usually value the contribution armed forces make across the uk. wouldn't the ships come back south, all the submarines? in terms of nuclear submarines? yes, would they leave scotland ? in terms of nuclear submarines? yes, would they leave scotland?” in terms of nuclear submarines? yes, would they leave scotland? i would wa nt would they leave scotland? i would want to see nuclear weapons leave scotland. obviously that has to be done safely so there has to be
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careful thought given to the timescale in which that was to happen. but may be a point we agree to disagree on. i've got and always have had a real moral opposition to nuclear weapons. nuclear weapons, if they were used, would kill tens of millions of people and wipe out swathes of civilisation. we don't countenance chemical weapons any more. i don't think we should have these weapons of mass destruction. but wouldn't it be a big blow to jobs in scotland? in fast lane where trident is based just now, in my view would become the conventional naval base so it would still sustain employment because there is a lot of employment because there is a lot of employment there but it would be a conventional naval base and not a nuclear naval base. —— faslane. that kind of facility is much more releva nt kind of facility is much more relevant and important in terms of how scotland, which is a maritime nation with a big coastline, is much more relevant to how we properly defend ourselves and nuclear weapons. but with
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the government sent ships to scotland? in order to be built? there is no reason why not. we have two shipyards on the clyde that have some of the best expertise anywhere in the uk. so when contracts are put there, and we have not had quite the same amount of work there as promised a few years ago, but nevertheless it is important. but that work goes there not because the uk government is doing these shipyards a favour, it's because it's the best place in the uk to build the ships because we have the best expertise. thank you very much indeed. we only have 20 seconds. donald trump is coming, if you were at a function where he was as first minister, and the president, would you shake his hand? i'm a polite person and i would shake his hand, i've always said as first minister if i had to meet him i would meet him but i'd be blunt about his policies. thank you for joining us this morning.
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hello, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. a week and a half to go until the general election and we ve come to north berwick in east lothian on the firth of forth to talk to voters and ask if what happened in london bridge on friday is going to influence the way they vote. meanwhile, in an hour's time the prime minister will be attending a vigilfor the victims of the london bridge stabbings jack merritt and saskia jones have been named as the two people killed by convicted terrorist usman khan. saskia jones' tutor from cambridge university has paid tribute to her we cold her saskia 100%. the last timei we cold her saskia 100%. the last time i had communication with her was a week ago, i said you are still 100%. she wrote back and said yes, i just read your comments, yours and olivia ‘s comments and they brought a tear to my eye. the political row over who's to blame for the release

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