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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  March 7, 2020 5:30am-6:01am GMT

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21 passengers on board a cruise ship of california have tested positive for coronavirus. the ship was denied entry to san francisco and will now sale to a non—commercial port were all 3500 passengers and crew are expected to have tests. no warplanes have been reported to have been flying over the syrian province of idlib as a ceasefire appears to be holding for now. on the ground there have been some classes, 15 people are reported to have been killed in fighting between government forces and islamist militants. the former brazilian footballer, ronaldinho, has been arrested in paraguay after he attempted to enter the country with a false passport. he and his brother were allegedly given false passports when there plane touched down.
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last month was the wettest february ever recorded in the uk with storm after storm sweeping the country. in east yorkshire more than 80 homes in snaith and cowick still can't be reached and the water is taking a long time to recede. our correspondent danny savage has been speaking to some of those affected. much of the water hasn't gone away. people are still dealing with the consequences. if we had been stood in the spot at the peak of the flood we would have probably been a foot of water above our heads at the moment. seven foot deep here? at least. people like mike who's had flood water in their homes for four weeks now. we are on a septic tank system here, the system backed up, and so although we have been able to live in the house we are very
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careful about how many times we flush the toilet or how many times we get a shower or whatever. the water was so deep in his garden even the treehouse was underwater at one point. and it's notjust homeowners affected by the floods, it was farmers as well. this was a vast greenhouse full of lettice. for days it was underwater. so the whole crop has been ruined, all the glass has been broken, that means a huge bill for the farmer who owns all of this. residents who were so desperate to protect their homes they built their own flood barrier. it worked for a while, then the water got through and ruined more homes. in nearby east cowick, you still can't get to some houses. it's draining away, but only slowly. a few days ago we visited mick in his flooded bungalow. the water here has gone, now comes the plan for the future. we are trying to get a caravan on the front lawn so we are here on site but you will move into a caravan in the front garden. we are hoping to. that will not be much
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fun for six months. better weather is coming. across the road, tony talked to us a few days ago. his insurers have told him not to move his furniture, but they won't be here for another week. it's getting wet upstairs now, damp, because there is all this rubbish in the bottom. and they don't want you to move furniture and things out? no, nothing. millions of litres a day still need to be pumped out of this landscape to erase the great inland lakes of yorkshire. now on bbc news — it's time for the travel show. this week on the travel show, we are injerusalem. where this week on the travel show, we are in jerusalem. where i this week on the travel show, we are injerusalem. where i go under the streets of the city to discover its ancient treasures. look at this. they also get my coffee cup bread in jerusalem's albanian quarter. they also get my coffee cup bread in jerusalem's albanian quarter. two people are disturbing you. you have got to watch yourself. that sounds
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right. we watch the transgender traveller who found freedom in india. and london's originalfast food. anyone fancy some pie and mash? it's a city that is home to the world's three major monotheistic faiths, drawing on more than 3.5 million tourists a year. and, of course, it is the diversity of
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ancient monuments, civilisations, and architecture that everyone finds so and architecture that everyone finds so compelling about jerusalem. and architecture that everyone finds so compelling aboutjerusalem. and history just keeps on so compelling aboutjerusalem. and historyjust keeps on giving, because every day, even now, new discoveries and secrets are being revealed and, in fact, one of the world's most significant and controversial excavations is taking place right underneath my feet. hello. nice to meet you. welcome, welcome to the city of david. hello. nice to meet you. welcome, welcome to the city of davidm hello. nice to meet you. welcome, welcome to the city of david. it is the most spectacular place to be in israel. let's go take a look. frannie is a guide in his is excited about the excavation of what was the pilgrimage road 2000 years ago. about the excavation of what was the pilgrimage road 2000 years agom these are all original steps that we are walking up. it was discovered by accident after a water pipe burst on the road above it during a snowstorm in 2004. we are about to have a big climb. let's do it. up we do it. the
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pilgrimage road runs to temple mount. it has almost been totally excavated now, and this is what they discovered. paving stones in almost pristine condition. so we are now walking on original 2000 year old limestone streets that was the centre of all ofjerusalem. limestone streets that was the centre of all of jerusalem. this is the original limestone? original. perfect as if it was walked on it yesterday. it was in the 19th century that activists first twigged that the ancient city of david wasn't actually within the old city walls ofjerusalem, wasn't actually within the old city walls of jerusalem, but wasn't actually within the old city walls ofjerusalem, but here, further south. but why is it so significant anyway? so the city of david is pretty much ancient jerusalem. it is thejerusalem sta rts jerusalem. it is thejerusalem starts as the capital of this area, 3000 years ago, which means everything thatjerusalem 3000 years ago, which means everything that jerusalem is 3000 years ago, which means everything thatjerusalem is today pretty much we can learn about it,
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whether it is politically, religiously, culturally. this former car park is where more incredible discoveries have been on earth, from the roman and by xanthan periods and before. it will become the visitors centre when the work is complete on the pilgrimage road. as we go down we're back in time. astonishing. when you see all these delays were pretty much going back thousands of yea rs. pretty much going back thousands of years. you have a house right down there, just below us, it is from 586 bec -- bce. there, just below us, it is from 586 bec —— bce. these columns are the roman period. we are only a couple of metres up. it is really so small. you are actually walking up and down. you are walking up and down through time. it is still a few yea rs before all through time. it is still a few years before all this will be completed, but in the meantime tourists are helping to uncover the past. archaeologist frankie schneider regularly supervises groups of visitors that they help to trawl through the debris. at first she gives them advice on what to
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look for. so, let's grab a bucket and see what we can find here. ok, let's go. all the buckets we are sifting from today come from the pilgrimage road. what might this be? a tooth? yes. let's look at that. this is a first for me. i'm holding a 2000 year old tooth. most days teams of volunteers and tourists turn up and sift through an amazing amount of debris. people often find coins. most of our coins are made out of bronze, so they are going to be green, round, flat, and cruddy. first you will find out whose picture is on it and what the date of the coin is. like the ones we found with pontius pilate's picture on it. he was the appropriate tour. and infamously, or famously...
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infamously as the one who condemns jesus to die on the cross. i'm going to give you one more piece to throw into. as a seasoned archaeologist, how comfortable is frankie with the excavation happening underneath people's homes was loi have seen them down there working and they have a whole method for how they drill into an area they are going to go into, how they put framing inside of there and take the dirt out. it isa of there and take the dirt out. it is a secure tunnel. was the project tea m is a secure tunnel. was the project team insists most safety is the thing, that isn't how every body especially among the palestinian committee, who live above the city of david site. local residents say cracks and sloping like this to dozens cracks and sloping like this to d oze ns of cracks and sloping like this to dozens of houses have been caused by the excavation, complaining it's slogan during an earthquake. nonetheless, the israeli supreme court rejected those claims ——
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saying it's like. as with many issues injerusalem, saying it's like. as with many issues in jerusalem, there saying it's like. as with many issues injerusalem, there are two quite different stories being told. aziz, travel writer and guy, offers the alternative palestinian version. they met him at damascus date. jerusalem has many layers. underneath us is a road from the second sanctuary. from the second century, going on here? yes, it is from the old market. he feels it is important to recognise here in the market in the old city local arab families have been here for generations. aziz‘s company —— tourist company gives the chance to experience an alternative experience to what is in front of them. the whole building was actually underwear we are standing now. and for here, given the chance, he thinks there could be a whole different type of tourist route in jerusalem. the city of david will
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tell you the jewish jerusalem. the city of david will tell you thejewish story, which is legitimate, and is important to be told, but it doesn't really tell you the story of the palestinian residents there, or the islamic groups that have lived injerusalem as well. so if you come tojerusalem and go to the city of david only, you will hear one narrative, a single narrative, and that's not fairtoa single narrative, and that's not fair to a city that has so much history, so most diverse history, it has jewish history, history, so most diverse history, it hasjewish history, it has christian history, it has muslim history, and each of those has multiple histories as well. an arab traveller said travel makes you speechless, but thenit travel makes you speechless, but then it turns you into a storyteller. and the best way to visit a place is talk to those shopkeepers, talk to the people you meet on the street, everybody here is willing to talk to you. ask them a question, ask them about their stories, the stories of their shops, how long have their families live here? talk to the people who live in the city and you will find so much more. and that's exactly how aziz
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found out about this next discovery. he is saying 2000 years of history. down here is 2000 years of history? you've got to take me down. i'm taking you down. wow. look at this. welcome to underground jerusalem. aziz, tell me, what are you saying down here? what is down here? this is probably around the time of the crusades. there are very few people who have seen this. we didn't know this existed, 1.5, two years ago, so it is an amazing thing which you see right now. and in terms of levels of history, you are saying this is the crusades, beneath here... there is another level. and this is not only under this restaurant, this exists everywhere in the old city in jerusalem. hong liu stories to be told. —— whole new stories to be told. —— whole new stories to be told. here's is there are, in
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jerusalem, any excavation is going to be both amazing and controversial at the same time. but for followers of three of the world's major religions, curious tourists, and lovers of history alike, the fact is this city will always be a draw. and if you are thinking of coming here, here are some other things you may want to see or do. the country has more than 60 national parks and reserves to take your pick from, but why not had to tim uppal down in the south? there have created 54 kilometres of bike paths divided into several levels from beginner to extreme tracks stop you can also hire extreme tracks stop you can also hi re bicycles extreme tracks stop you can also hire bicycles for the whole family while you are there. for something a bit different, head to the negative desert this aprilfor bit different, head to the negative desert this april for israel's largest hibi festival. the festival ta kes pla ce largest hibi festival. the festival takes place over five days with lots
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of dancing, meditation, music, and yoga. and, finally, did you know israel is home to the world's only theatre company comprised entirely of deaf and blind actors? they are based in jaffa, just search for the theatre company. the performances are told through speech and sign language and cues are given to the actors by a drumbeat so they can feel the vibrations. still to come on the travel show: how a trip to india transformed a life. and it's a british institution, london original‘s fast food, pie and mash. so don't go away! now, you may have heard
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reading tea leaves. right now i'm in the armenian quarter in the old city injerusalem the armenian quarter in the old city in jerusalem and i'm the armenian quarter in the old city injerusalem and i'm going to meet a lady who is a specialist in a local custom of reading coffee, and it's free. hello. good morning. how are you doing? very well. you're most welcome. you are going to show me my i will do my best, sir. little by little, it's not whiskey. it's beautiful. we will wait. ok? now we can see, see? could you see this mouse? e-mails? the shape of a mouse? e-mails? the shape of a mouse? of the head, the body and tail. yeah, ok. a mouse in a cup,
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that means somebody will have something stolen. maybe his wallet, maybe his house, anything. you will do it. when? any time. here you can see everything is white, everything is clear. moneywise you are a little bit short for business? right? that is very true. ok. everything is fine, everything is clear. i can't see anything bad. i want to buy into this. i believe in this. this is good. i enjoyed that. you enjoyed it? i believed it! laughter 0h, laughter oh, dear, dear, dear. and now in the latest of our series about people who travel differently, for sue
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pascoe, ever since she transitioned from being a man to a woman, she has found it difficult to gain a cce pta nce found it difficult to gain acceptance while travelling, until thatis, acceptance while travelling, until that is, she went to india. they say travel is good for the sole and it certainly is. —— soul. it is broadening my horizons and i've a lwa ys broadening my horizons and i've always loved travel. my name is sue pascoe. i love the travel experience andi pascoe. i love the travel experience and i happened to be a trans— woman. so travelling now as sue, i am at peace with myself was not in the past when i have doubled, often i was so in my head dealing with my own problems that i didn't always see the beauty around me. it's like the difference between listening to things in stereo and seeing things
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in 3d. the leaves, the trees, the sounds, so much more of me is in the here and now that all my senses see things differently. my travel choices, and i think about them quite carefully, one of my trips abroad was to go to india. and going through heathrow was really difficult. there were comments, there were nods, there were things i overheard, somebody saying look at that man in that dress. and i wanted to shrink away. i got on the plane andi to shrink away. i got on the plane and i felt really low. to shrink away. i got on the plane and ifelt really low. the
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stewa rd esses and ifelt really low. the steward esses we re and ifelt really low. the stewardesses were brilliant. i was ona ba stewardesses were brilliant. i was on a ba light and they were really, really nice. —— flight. but passengers around me weren't. and i could overhear quite a bit of the conversation and it wasn't really pleasant. it was, what is this person doing in this part of the cabin with us? and it was... not at all pleasant. and so i laid down and put the blanket over me and just shut the world out. i got off the plane in india and i could not believe and understand or could have comprehended the difference in the way that i was welcomed. i got off the plane, and before i got through
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the plane, and before i got through the baggage hole, people were coming up the baggage hole, people were coming up to me, putting money in my hand and wanting their picture taken with me “— and wanting their picture taken with me —— baggage hall to stop and i couldn't understand this. and it kept on happening. and what i learned was that in indian culture, i was being regarded as someone who was semi— divine. and that was my moment when i decided that i'd found one place in the world that no matter if everywhere else didn't accept me as sue, here was a place where i could be sue. today, travelling as a woman with a trans pastis travelling as a woman with a trans past is culturally significant for me. and seeing how different
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societies act towards trans people is fun. the biggest thing that i have on my face today is a smile. and when you interact with people with a smile, your whole experience is different. now, finally this week, long before the cheeseburger, it was here in london that a more british fast food was invented. we are talking about this and chips, this is pie and mash — a symbol of this is pie and mash — a symbol of this of beef pie, served with a liquor sauce and fresh parsley. you will often find this in the pie shop that. the working class because of the city. they are fighting for survival and working families are working hard to keep this cockney classic alive. the difference between a good pie and a bad pie?
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good ingredients first, if you haven't got that, it is trying to make a silk purse out of sale's year, which doesn't really work. so you must have good ingredients and then you have to make it properly —— sow‘s ear was that you have to make it as it should be, so it has 20 of me, a nice drop ofjuice in it and good shortcrust pastry. and then bakeit good shortcrust pastry. and then bake it properly in a bloody good other than, bob's your uncle, you'll end up with good pie. —— good oven. offering cheap but wholesome food in london since victorian times leading the charge with two immigrant families, both from victorian times —— immigrantfamilies. families, both from victorian times —— immigrant families. they expanded their empire and honestly century and a half layers of their pie shops are still in business today —— half
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are still in business today —— half a century later. after hundred and 50 odd years, a good, solid basic meal. there no additives or or anything. the pie shops quickly became a hub for many people in communities where life could be tough. and it is still a kind of home from home for some of the regulars whose families have been coming here for generations. this is one of the customers coming in now, he's been coming in for a good 40—50 yea rs. he's been coming in for a good 40—50 years. i have grown here and i've seen every shop here he built. i'm 76 and i'm glad to see everyone come in again. over the past 25 years, the fortunes of this part of london have changed. the docs shut and more traditional industries disappeared. new, high—tech businesses, start—ups and developers moved in. pity prices and developers moved in. pity prices and bread sword and many locals moved away. plus, new immigrant
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communities have brought their own tastes and flavours and taken on the humble pie. —— property prices and rents sword. these to be just a chicken shop, fish and chip shop and pie shop. now the competition is almost limitless. all of our portions of the pie have gotten smaller. 25 years ago there were close to 60 pie and mash shops in london, now there are barely 20 left. all of which have defined new ways to adapt to survive. we now do av -- ways to adapt to survive. we now do av——a ways to adapt to survive. we now do av —— a vegan pie so they can come in with theirfriends, av —— a vegan pie so they can come in with their friends, which is nice. social media has done a lot in spreading the magic of pie and mash around the world and now brings tourists looking for a slice of traditional, old working—class london to places like cooks and
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manzer‘s, hopefully ensuring the survival of many years to come. so many years. as a youtube video about this place. the whole process about how the pies i made, so that would be really nice. —— pies are made. i'm grateful this place has been open for so long. we came all the way from singapore to try this traditional, blue—collar english food. it needs a missal and star when you can have home—made pay —— missal and star when you can have pie like this and a big dollop of mashed? we have had people from the four corners of the world and they come in and go oh, joe! can we have a picture with you? and some of them have come straight from the airport — it's unreal, absolutely unreal. look at the jews coming out of that! savage those spuds, give them a rinse please. bob's your uncle.
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and that is all we have time for today. join us next week when... adi ta kes a today. join us next week when... adi takes a look back at some of our best trips and adventures this year on the show. so catcher is that if you can. but until then, from me and the rest of the travel show team here injerusalem, the rest of the travel show team here in jerusalem, it's the rest of the travel show team here injerusalem, it's goodbye! hello. on the plus side, the weather's not going to be as bad as it's been on some recent weekends but,
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then again, it will still be windy and it will be wet at times. this area of low pressure will feed in these weather fronts over the weekend, especially during saturday/saturday night, and then behind this cold front on sunday, it will feel a bit colder. there will be some sunshine again, but there will also be some heavy showers. so, for the weekend, then, it will be wet at times, certainly not all the time. it's going to be blustery throughout but we'll also get to see a bit of sunshine, more especially by sunday. now, temperatures are on the up after an early frost by the time we get to saturday morning, particularly where we've got some cloud towards the north and west of the uk, and some outbreaks of rain from those weather fronts i showed you a second ago. any early sunshine in east anglia and the south—east will be short—lived. and eastern parts of the uk could well see a bit of patchy rain at times, but the afternoon stays largely dry. there will be outbreaks of rain towards wales and western areas of england, but it will turn heavier and more persistent through northern ireland and especially across some southern and western parts of scotland on through the afternoon. it is going to be windy. gales through the irish sea and some coasts here could be up to 50mph gusts. these are your wind gusts for you. and we are going to see rather misty
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and murky conditions developing with poor visibility for some around coasts and hills, especially in the west, on what will actually be a milder day. but then again, it's cloudier, it's windier, and for some of us, it's wetter. and overnight saturday night, sunday morning, the rain does move south. now, before it clears from southern and western scotland, there could be some problems here from high rainfall totals in some of the higher ground, up to 70mm, coupled with snow melt, so that could bring flooding in places. a much milder start to sunday but with cloud and outbreaks of rain around. that clearing the south—east early on sunday morning and behind that, lots of showers moving through, but not a washout of a day because there will be some sunshine. but catch a shower on sunday, it could be heavy, thundery, some hail. some snow over the higher hills in scotland and still very gusty winds as well, and it is going to feel a bit colder on sunday because remember, there has been a cold front that's moved on through.
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and just to give you a flavour of things into the start of next week, the detail not yet set in stone but it does look like an area of low pressure — yet another one — coming into the uk and that does mean more wind and rain. a few locations then into next week to give you a flavour of things. it starts wet and then it turns showery after that. in most places, it will turn a bit cooler as well as the week goes on. that's your forecast.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a second person in the uk has died after testing positive for coronavirus. the number of cases across the country has risen to 164. 21 passengers on a cruise ship off san francisco are told they have the virus. around 140 britons are on board. all passengers and crew will be tested for the coronavirus. those that need to be quarantined will be quarantined. those that require additional medical attention will receive it. scotland women's six nations match with france in glasgow has been postponed
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