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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 5, 2020 10:30pm-10:45pm BST

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with teams of 20 players and 12 coaches and medics. stadiums will be split into three distinct zones — red, amber and green zone. now, the tunnel and the pitch will form part of the red zone, and only a maximum of 105 people will be allowed here, after temperature checks. that's considerably fewer than usual and means there won't even be ball boys or girls. well, here on the bench, players will sit two metres apart. and out on the pitch, there will be water breaks midway through each half, where players will drink from their own bottles, and balls and cornerflags can also be disinfected. it was initially proposed that neutral venues should be used, mainly to stop fans congregating. but brighton and others felt strongly they should be allowed to play at home. now it seems they have largely won the argument. i think the most important thing is, please stay away from the stadium. you know, we've been given the opportunity to play out our remaining games in our own venues, notjust brighton
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fans but all football fans. the games are live on tv. you've got an opportunity to watch them. please stay away and give us the best chance of finishing this season on the field and safely. the government initially said players should take wage cuts. then they were called upon to lift the nation's spirits. many players voiced concerns, particularly those from a black, asian and minority ethnic background. but abandonment would have cost clubs hundreds of millions of pounds. there are champions to be crowned, and, of course, relegation to be decided. natalie pirks, bbc news, brighton. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night.
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it is now time for us to take a first look at the national and international front pages in the papers. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me is the political writer and academic, maya goodfellow — and the deputy political editor at the daily mail, john stevens. let's take a look as some of the newspaper front pages around the world. the daily telegraph says german
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prosecutors are investigating whether the prime suspect in the madeleine mccann case was responsible for the abduction of a missing german girl eight years later. the guardian reports political leaders are under pressure to rethink rules on face masks after the worldhealth organisation advised that simple coverings are inadequate for the public and said that over—60s shouldwear medical—grade masks. the times says sunday trading laws in the uk will be suspended for a year and cafes and pubs will be given fast—track approval to serve food and drink outside under plans to boost the economy. the daily mail says borisjohnson is drawing up a ‘great recovery bill‘ to slash red tape and help get the economy moving again. the international version of the financial times reflects on reflects on the latest figures on the us economy — it says stocks rallied and treasuries slid sharply after us employers unexpectedly added 2.5m jobs, surprising investors and fuelling hopes that the biggest economy was beginning to recover from its coronavirus shock.
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the independent picks up on donald trumps comments abour george floyd — as he spoke to the media about the us ecenomy — saying he hoped mr floyd was "looking down" and "saying this was a great day". and the japan times reflects on yesterday's memorialfor george floyd — reporting the prominent us civil rights activist, the reverend al sharpton telling mourners it marked a reckoning for america over race and justice, demanding, "get your knee off our necks." so, let's begin. we will look at the ftc, we will start with the story from the us that the economy has added 2.5 millionjobs. we talk that the economy has added 2.5 million jobs. we talk aboutjobs, 2.5 million newjobs, i would guess in this case they are not newjobs, just the orjobs that people of god back when they were let go in march, presumably. yes. there's been a major problem in the us thinking about the impact of coronavirus, have people do not have health
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insurance, and incredibly high death rate in america and this major financial issue about people's lack of security and employment and people losing theirjobs, resulting in incredibly high unemployment and while it is positive that there is these jobs, not necessarily new jobs, there's also a conversation that needs to happen around with those jobs look like, the quality of those jobs look like, the quality of those jobs look like, the quality of thosejobs come those jobs look like, the quality of those jobs come up that pay around those jobs come up that pay around those jobs come up that pay around those jobs and economic recovery and we talk about in the macro in reaction to to talk about the impact on peoples lives and making sure that any kind of economic recovery wherever in the world is notjust going back to the same business as usual. it seems that it's going to look like in america in the coming months in the american election coming up most of things may change. weather an economy could to switch off and then switch on again and almost get back to where it was in march and as you say, the quality of
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thejobs, march and as you say, the quality of the jobs, summer and hospitality education and john, an economist to switch off and on without lasting damage? surely not. one of the concerns has been whether we get one of the concerns has been whether by the strange things is donald trump saying that there was a great day for george floyd and when you dig into the figures of the unemployment numbers and it has gone down for 14.7% of 13.3% for the total population and among the african—american community, there has been a rise in unemployment from 16.7% to 16.8% and donald trump's comments to seem completely bizarre thing to say. were you wanting to
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say something there? yes, i agree withjohn say something there? yes, i agree with john assumes say something there? yes, i agree withjohn assumes these say something there? yes, i agree with john assumes these figures, say something there? yes, i agree withjohn assumes these figures, and ijust think it is pretty important for him to be saying this and the week after he's been talking about deploying the army against protesters, being given at this the prime minister who went some was taking a knee and the manager should fire him. some of these people, including the president who were criticising the black lives matter protests across the us and also taking place in the uk, as well as elsewhere in the content these protests a nd elsewhere in the content these protests and so to invoke george floyd in this particular moment and in this particular way is absolutely disgusting. staying with the economy, but moving to the uk now and sticking with the ft for the moment, no sign of budget as they start a stimulus plan and the daily mail says that the idea of the
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arguments that the chancellor wants to wait until the problems facing the economy are clear before making irreversible spending commitments. he seems quite eager to dampen down what is coming so we are expecting some sort of in the first week of july and just point to god and saying that don't expect this to be a massive thing, the big measures that we are going to take will come and later in the autumn and they will not come now. but, i think we are still going to see some sort of change is quite interesting that the article is saying that one of the big announcements is that boris johnson let the cat out of the back end ofa johnson let the cat out of the back end of a press conference when he wants to give volume people of the opportunity of apprenticeship and thatis opportunity of apprenticeship and that is on the essential announcements and he slightly ruined that one. the chances under pressure
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kind of, will he be giving them national insurance holiday, these are big tickets that may have to wait later in the year. when we are talking but the us economy that you wa nt to talking but the us economy that you want to know him about the quality ofjobs and want to know him about the quality of jobs and among want to know him about the quality ofjobs and among those 2.5 million a map similar questions for the reddish potential recovery. yes, i think the short—term and long—term questions about what this will look like and some of the short—term financial measures, we really need to be having a discussion on how we treat people and so we know, one of the major things that we talk about during this pandemic is that key workers, or people that have been dismissed as low skill workers. we have ca re dismissed as low skill workers. we have care workers in the pay is absolutely appalling in terms of the rate of pay per hour in the work thatis rate of pay per hour in the work that is being done is incredibly crucial to society you find in a lot of those jobs, crucial to society you find in a lot
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of thosejobs, a crucial to society you find in a lot of those jobs, a significant portion of those jobs, a significant portion of people come to the uk on migrant income and do that work. and there's a big discussion on how we value people, the quality of the jobs they have, the pay, the conditions and instead of reproducing these kind of binary narratives that are treating some people as skilled and important as other people is low skilled would actually be can see, it is the supermarket work, the delivery drivers, the care workers were all doing incredibly important work and are not re—numerator that sufficiently, i don't think. the talk about the economy, boris budget to fire up the uk talked about the political editor of the daily mail, tell us about this one. alongside the budget or the many budget, whatever you want to call it, the government is looking at what they call a great recovery bill and they quite seem to like these big fancy names, remember we quite seem to like these big fancy names, rememberwe had the quite seem to like these big fancy names, remember we had the great repeal bill with theresa may after
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brexit and so the idea is that you cut red tape, you make life easier for businesses to help their economic growth as we pull out of the coronavirus crisis. but ministers quite often say they want to cut red tape but is actually quite difficult to do it. some are suggesting that it may be for restaurants and cafes who want to put chairs and tables outside where the coronavirus doesn't spread as well and we don't have to pay a fee to local authorities they'll be a lot easier for businesses to make those adjustments to get back to normal. is picking up on the point of red tape, sometimes assisted with expediting the ability to put chairs on streets, but other times red tape isa on streets, but other times red tape is a for safety regulations which is something that in previous governments, when they have come undone of a very serious consequences. and yes that does the point i was making that ministers, they have the red tape challenges and they asked apartments on how
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they can give rid of red tape in the find that quite a lot of it is in place for a good reason. but boris johnson seems to challenge his ministers to look at things differently to make life easier for businesses. we will stick with the idea of the economy and move up right now. the new york times, the international has on its front page a story from amsterdam, sex workers on furlough and talking by the easing of regulations and a lot of professions will be able to start going back to work but sex workers have been told to wait until september and my good and no more their lives are very much affected. this is really highlighting enough of the support of sex workers at a time where they're not able to work and there has been this kind of
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volunteer fund whereby i think it is around 400 people have applied to this, $45 and one of the people interviewed of this article says that i am surviving on my savings, but not if i can do that it what it means is that people are forced to choose between trying to protect themselves and trying to go back to work and try to find work in ways that are very difficult at this particular time, particularly if this profession and i think this highlights every specific issue that deserves some attention but it does highlight a problem for a lot of people and if they are able to go back to work and there's no financial support for them to do that, the need to be a safety net to ensure that everyone can stay safe and no one falls the cracks, society should be there support everyone in this moment of crisis and beyond. should be there support everyone in this moment of crisis and beyondm isa this moment of crisis and beyondm is a bizarre story that they have not only been, they have not been ignored by this but they have been told to stay away until september
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but some for financial reasons, but secretly are going back to work and they simply way to live. to regard they simply way to live. to regard the lockdown and we've got the plans and. that is very interesting points, everyone had the same went to lockdown and unless you're going forfood or medicine. everyone has a slightly different way of coming out of lockdown and hairdressers are quicker or slower in their garden centres, i've been keeping tally on who does what and what industry? centres, i've been keeping tally on who does what and what industry7m very ha rd to who does what and what industry7m very hard to do. in germany, she is being updating me on the different steps that have been taking and there are a lot of different reasons for this but i also think it is to
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do with the death rate and it is to do with the death rate and it is to do with the death rate and it is to do with women move into lockdown and i would say that it makes a quite surprised that the front pages there are reports that unfortunately today, we reached a number of 40,000 deaths in the uk at least according to the government figures in the uk and suggesting that there may be more. this is incredibly concerning because that means that we are the second country in the world to reach over that figure and we are talking in numbers that can be incredibly cold and dehumanizing but that is 40,000 people, that's more than the combined death rate of the whole of europe. it makes sense that it's happening slowly differently but it's happening it at quite a fast pace

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