Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 7, 2020 9:30am-10:00am BST

9:30 am
the east coast of england as well. some rain around pushing out of northern england, down towards the midlands, into southern england, eastern wales as well. some of these showers could be potentially heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. and you will notice that breeze today for many of us, gusts of wind about 20 to 30 miles per hour, but certainly stronger than that down the east coast of scotland. so it'll feel quite chilly for the likes of aberdeen, down towards newcastle as well. 10 or 11 degrees here. further south and west, though, in those sunnier spells, 19 or 20 celsius likely. one or two heavy showers across the south of england, wales, just lingering into this evening, might hear the old rumble of thunder. they should fade away quite quickly and then it's mainly dry with clear spells tonight and a fairly chilly night, especially across the northern half of the uk with those clearer skies, temperatures down into the mid—single figures. many of us in double figures further south. but monday's weather fairly quiet due to this ridge of high pressure in charge, that stays with us into tuesday. by the end of tuesday, the next area of low pressure moves in from the north west,
9:31 am
basically a window of drier, quieter weather for a couple of days on monday and tuesday as well. still one or two rogue showers down the east coast and for wales and the south—west of england on monday, a few sharp showers building through the afternoon. could be some hail mixed in with some of those as well. temperatures still a little below par for this time of year, between about 11 to 18 celsius by monday afternoon. tuesday, a similar day, again mostly, dry light winds, sunny spells as well. so it'll feel that little bit warmer by the time we get to tuesday with temperatures just starting to creep up — between around 13 to 19 celsius on tuesday. more wet weather into the far north—west by the end of the day. and we could still do with some rain after a very dry spring. we are going to see it through the middle of the week. we've got an area of low pressure developing across the uk pushing its way south. quite a lot of isobars around that developing area of low pressure. so not only quite wet, but quite windy, especially in the south from midweek onwards. and then things do turn a little bit drier and also a bit warmer as we head towards next weekend. bye— bye.
9:32 am
9:33 am
this is bbc news, the headlines: thousands of people in cities across the uk have demonstrated in soldiary with anti—racism protests in the united states. a small group of protesters became violent towards police officers, injuring 1a of them. the head of the police federation in london said the protests shouldn't have happened amid the pandemic. thousands of people, i understand fully what they want to protest, but the circumstances are so different at the moment they should not be there.
9:34 am
huge protests against the death of george floyd have continued taking place across the united states — all of them peaceful. in washington, thousands gathered around the white house in the biggest demonstrations there for 12 days. the coronavirus pandemic is a "devastating blow" for the world economy, according to the world bank. its president david malpass warned that billions of people would have their livelihoods affected by the pandemic. brazil says it will no longer publish total numbers of cases and deaths from coronavirus, after their death toll passes 311,000 and in a week's time, places of worship in england will be opened for individual prayer. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us today.
9:35 am
joining me is senior reporter at the sunday times, rosamund urwin, and features writer at the independent, james rampton. welcome to you both. thanks mike for being with us from your rooms full of books. —— thank your rooms full of books. —— thank you very much. starting with the sunday times which reports the prime minister's ordered a swift easing of coronavirus lockdown measures to avoid the possible loss of three millionjobs. the paper also features an image of a man who joined anti—racism protests in central london, prompted by the killing of george floyd in police custody. a striking picture a horse fronts the daily mail. the animal bolted through a crowd of people in central london as protesters clashed with police at the anti—racism rally outside downing street.
9:36 am
it clashed with the traffic light. also covering the london protests is the independent which has an image of demonstrators gathering in london — despite warnings about the risk of coronavirus infection. but the papers leads with the story that up to ten million people could be on nhs waiting lists by autumn. boris johnson has ordered ministers to speed up the construction of new hospitals as he prepares to relaunch the conservatives‘ domestic agenda — reports the sunday telegraph. in a different story, the paper says police across europe are reviewing unsolved child disappearances to see whether there is any link to the prime suspect in the abduction of madeleine mccann. christian b is the man who german police suspect murdered madeleine mccann, the sunday mirror leads on the story. it also features an image of the boxer anthonyjoshua who attended yesterday's black lives matter protest
9:37 am
in his home town of watford. and the sunday express writes boris johnson wants to fix britain's brexit withdrawal deal — with sources close to the uk's chief negotiator saying the agreement had ‘unfair defects.‘ so let's begin. rosamond, why don't you get us going with the mail on sunday, the dramatic picture of the horse that ended up riding less, police also after its rider hit a traffic light in that central london demonstration. yes, a very powerful image. however, ithink demonstration. yes, a very powerful image. however, i think there has been some criticism of this front page this morning because people feel as important as that element is, and covering what was an accident that occurred there, it has taken away from the other message of what the protesters are arguing. i
9:38 am
think it is important, you can fill both huge sympathy for the police officer who was injured in this protest a nd officer who was injured in this protest and that the same time, think that all of the points raised by the protesters are fair ones. i think one of the issues in the coverage, further in in the paper, it feels like it is focused on a minority who are violent instead of a peaceful majority who are understandably protesting about things they care about deeply. james, a debate on whether these predators should go ahead, we've had from the health secretary, the police federation, we have still got the right to say, we should not be breaching social distant in this way. absolutely, and i understand the structures from the authorities but equally i understand the desire of people to go in protest. this issue has caught the public imagination like few others in
9:39 am
re ce nt imagination like few others in recent times. i had a friend who was there yesterday and she said during there yesterday and she said during the day, rosamund points out, the day was very peaceful, there was a sombre but passionate arms fair, people did observe social distancing, there was a sense of respect to one another, respect i think it's a very important word in this case. i absolutely understand both the police's point of view, that it both the police's point of view, thatitis both the police's point of view, that it is dangerous perhaps risky for the community to protest but sometimes there are issues that people there are more important than anything else, and maybe this protest sparked by the unlawful killing of george floyd is one of those things. rosamund, if we go onto the observer front page, they have anthonyjoshua, the boxer, in his hometown of watford demonstrating, that's a placard that, silence is violence. he was saying that racism is a virus that is spread across the world. yes,
9:40 am
absolutely. we have had lots of powerful interventions, both celebrities and some politicians. the difficulty i think with describing it as a virus is it makes it look something that infects you and you do not have a choice on it. i think what we need to challenge at the moment, and we talk about this, we saw this with anti—semitism, it was regularly described as a cancer, ido was regularly described as a cancer, i do not love that language because i think what we need to challenge, although he has a right to pick any words he likes about it, clearly, i think what we have to challenge is the natural state of affairs and we have got to say this needs to be challenge as the injustice it is. i think that was a powerful intervention, i personally might not pick that word but as i say, he has the right to pick any word he likes. james, staying with the observer, going on to the covid—19, that headline is the prime minister been told to dump the rhetoric and plan
9:41 am
for a new wave of covid, that is the fear that they could be a second spike of infections. absolutely, i mean, authorities from the nhs are saying that he should dump the chief political rhetoric, they are saying that is really a need now to have an honest and open debate about it, which they feel has not ta ken place debate about it, which they feel has not taken place thus far. it does throughout so many questions about the common's response. i know we keep banging on about this but we have the highest death toll in europe. but it wasn't, as boris johnson inappropriate describe, i think, a mugger that attacked us unknowingly. we had several weeks notice, first from china and then the terrible events happening in spain and italy. what was boris johnson doing when he took ten days off at a crucial time? why did he miss the first five cobra meetings about this crisis? this really throws up all these questions. i
9:42 am
absolutely agree that the nhs is on the button here, saying we have to prepare for a second wave and the fear is if the government continues to be shambolic as it has been so far, we will be absolutely devastated by it. rosamund, how worried are you? we hear the r rate is hovering around one, maybe in some areas like the north—west on the south—west above one, how worried are you about another spike of infections? if they do happen, there should big local lockdown is to deal with them, rather than another nationwide lockdown? i think it is really worrying. even in london when we were seeing the vilest decline, it has dramatically jumped back up, the number. the latest figures were not that far off one and they were just under 0.5. we can see there is an impact has already this lockdown easing and it has not eased and that many ways
9:43 am
yet. i think it is really interesting, that is a massive contrast between the observer front page on the sunday times front page, they are focusing on the economy and we say have this nightmare job situation, they have a balancing act here as the question of what we prioritise, health or the economy. there is an interesting line in the observer story, one of the things they are raising as you need this public health campaign. i think it has been quite weak at the start of the outbreak as well, now it is tailing off. they are saying what we need now is that to boost flu immunisation this winter, if you have that double whammy of coronavirus coming back and the usual flu outbreak that you would expect in an orderly winter, it varies year to year obviously, but it can be very serious. if you have those two things, the nhs could become over one. one thing i think has been the dilemma neglected, they come and have sent the hard way at
9:44 am
the nhs means they have not become overwhelmed, they are all exhausted as well. i talked to so many doctors and nurses and all of them say the same thing, which is they have worked extraordinarily hard, we rightly applaud them for, but you cannot keep working at 100% the entire time. i do think one thing that we are really building up is how on earth are we going to expect them to handle a second wave if we hit that, because already that will have impact on the mental health, on their physical health and it isn't a great thing for a workforce. james, rosamund summed it up, the balancing act between trying to keep the infection rate down and try to re—triggered the economy, the sunday times leads on that, swifter lockdown easing, they have got a very interesting paragraph. i will
9:45 am
be dead. they say borisjohnson stepped in to order ministers —— mark i willjust read it. they say he stepped in that failure to reopen the hospitality sector could cost up to 3.5 millionjobs. and boris johnson replied," christ!" it is such a striking crate. it does highlight the classic he is stocking at the moment, there is lots of horrible jargon that is coming out, the job apocalypse now, save some basics, the six ministers who are trained to rescue the summer and the idea that there will be a bloodbath injobs if they idea that there will be a bloodbath in jobs if they do not idea that there will be a bloodbath injobs if they do not reopen pubs, restaurants, bars, hairdressers, driving instructors, weddings, all
9:46 am
of these things are on hold at the moment and having a cataclysmic effect on the economy and goodness knows, i have got a daughter who is just graduating now, during her final is at home, what the jobs market will be for her come the autumn, idread market will be for her come the autumn, i dread to think. it is absolutely catastrophic filly affected the economy and my say it is only going to get worse. rosamund, the impact on the nhs and terms of waiting list. according to the independent‘s front page, up to 10 million on an nhs waiting list by the autumn, do think that is an accurate prediction? this is the other point to make about the death toll. we are talking about the death toll. we are talking about the death toll. we are talking about the death toll of over 40,000 people and people estimate that it is higher because some of that is undercounting. there are secondary does, which people wander back from the beginning. i can remember talking to a gp right at the beginning of this crisis and he said one of the things that is going to become a massive, have a massive
9:47 am
effect on the population's health is things like late cancers diagnosis, the waiting list, more than one in six people in england that they sing that will be waiting for nhs treatment. obviously the nhs has had to pull all its resources into fighting coronavirus and handling coronavirus patients and has not been able to, understandably, to perform tasks that it would normally expect to. at the end, they are saying that, the experts say they must ration ca re levels, i the experts say they must ration care levels, i think that is a hard—hitting prediction there that the population will be very worried to read. james, the sunday telegraph, they go on, the prime minister is going to make a big speech in the next three weeks, doesn't say when, talking about speeding up his plans to build hospitals, more hospitals and also huge recruitment in the nhs, which we know is very short of staff at
9:48 am
the moment. absolutely. there are two questions say, where are they going to find the new staff, particularly if they are being so strict on people coming from other countries to work for the nhs? the other question is, ironically, the accusation that they levelled against labour in previous election campaigns, the magic money tree. 40 new hospitals, that doesn't come cheap. where on earth is this money going to come from? we are already doling out hundreds of billions of pounds, quite rightly in my view, develop the economy, the fellow scheme has been a triumph, i would say, and has saved the economy. it is still in a dire state but it would have been a write—off without that. why is this money going to come from? i do not particular in mind the idea of borrowing, and i know more fiscal conservatives felt thatis know more fiscal conservatives felt that is not, i feel they are going to have to borrow like there's no tomorrow in order to get us out of the hole and kick—start all these
9:49 am
huge projects. hsz, that is going to cost billions of pounds, where's the money coming from? i think we need to know who is going to be growing the magic money tree, i would like to know that. go on. on the 40 hospitals element, this is something that came up before in 2019 general election, and actually they were not being built at all, they were being reconfigured. i check list this morning. you always get your facts right. it is good to have a proper journalist on! this is the money to upgrade six hospitals, the telegraph is talking about bringing that forward , is talking about bringing that forward, 30 hospitals have received money to plan for building work between 2025 and 2030. not to begin any work. they are saying that could be brought forward. it is actually not 40 new hospitals. it was one of those what gill weighed things in the election where the —— it was one
9:50 am
of those weird things in the election where i kid being trotted out, but they are not actually new hospitals at all. good fact checking, rosamund. always welcomed here at the bbc. don't laugh.|j checking, rosamund. always welcomed here at the bbc. don't laugh. i feel maybe i should have done some now! in the daily telegraph, using the lockdown, too fast, too slow, public health england's inability to deliver mass testing, says the daily telegraph? i am not going to criticise the tories, shock horror, it is interesting story in the telegraph that it may have been some bureaucratic foul up and an argument between php and the government about he was responsible for testing according to the telegraph, p he refused to take a nap
9:51 am
responsibility. this policy says it was not until the 17th of april that the offices for national statistics with tours for taking that over. that was a huge time like that, several weeks of severe death toll and massive chaos within the nhs, when there was no testing and tracing, which we all acknowledge is the only way out of this crisis. that was not happening for so many weeks because of a bureaucratic argument. again, when it comes to the inevitable public enquiry, there will be massive questions to be asked about that and without sounding too daily mail, heads will roll. i will not comment. sounding too daily mail, heads will roll. iwill not comment. rosamund, the sun on sunday, the other big story, one of the other big stories has been the investigation into madeleine mccann‘s disciplines and what looks like a breakthrough in this, the suspect is in prison in germany. the sun on sunday have got
9:52 am
an interesting angle on that, a woman who says she escaped from the madeline mccann suspect. yes, they have got an interview with her, spread across, double spread inside. essentially she is saying that he befriended her, but there are some real classic tabloid lines here. his eyes chilled me to the bone and that he creeped her out after arriving at her remote portuguese village where he was lodging with her parents. he was working nearby, just after madeline mccann‘s disappearance. the terrible news from madeline mccann plasma cannons is that clearly the german police are saying they absolutely believe madeline mccann is dead —— make the terrible news for madeline mccann‘s parents. 13 years they have kongthe hope that she might be alive. this story has
9:53 am
it isa it is a story that used to be on the front pages when i became a journalist, right at the beginning and obviously it captured... it is quite extraordinary, the degree of coverage compared with other cases. but this one got, she was a photogenic young child, it was horrific what happened to her, disappearing, her poor parents have lived for 13 years, to have her siblings have grown up without a sibling. there are other families siblings have grown up without a sibling. there are otherfamilies in a similar situation and they do not get the same courage. speaking of that, these sunday telegraph has linked these suspect who is imprisoned in germany with other other unsolved child murders, and other unsolved child murders, and otherfamilies other unsolved child murders, and other families who are suffering not knowing what happened to their children, james, they could be a breakthrough in their cases with the suspect who is being held. absolutely, i think it is a good piece of investigation by the
9:54 am
telegraph. they are saying detectives in portugal, spain, france, germany are being invited to reopen cold cases to investigate whether this man, he reopen cold cases to investigate whetherthis man, he is reopen cold cases to investigate whether this man, he is suspected in the madeline mccann disappearance, is also responsible for many other unsolved murders. iabsolutely endorse what rosamund said just that, i can't imagine what it's been like for the mccanns,13 that, i can't imagine what it's been like for the mccanns, 13 years of uncertainty and it is still uncertain. it is only the german police who are saying they think it isa police who are saying they think it is a murder, there is nobody, no evidence that she has died. sadly, the likelihood is that she has, but can you possibly imagine what that has been like for them, added to which, to me, at the unsavoury and un—salacious coverage that the families had to endure for 13 years, i think it is dreadful. if this can bring some closure, a horrible sort of closure, but i can only be good for the family so they can go and live their life in peace, away from
9:55 am
the prying eyes of really salacious journalism. rosamund, it is strange that our last newspaper review is going to be the sunday express, which is about brexit. he used to be the day when brexit. he used to be the day when brexit would be almost the entire newspaper review, and now it is the and finally. boris wants to fix unfair brexit deal, you have a minute. this, the express, saying that the deal is defective, the withdrawal dell, which was done in january, this is an interesting line, the government does not have enough time to fix that deal. there are people saying that we should not extend the period, the transition period, it ends on december 31, they are saying we should not extend it. that is the logical thing to do if we do not have enough time to sort out this deal and borisjohnson is saying we should not, of course you
9:56 am
can if you want to, and now we have got coronavirus in the backdrop. i think one thing to note is these two things are really related to each other in terms of the economic climate, and i saw someone, an economist arguing that actually, it is not an additive effect, it's actually a multiple vocation effect. coronavirus, times the economic hit of the effect of the no—deal brexit, even though they come and no longer likes that term to a transition time now, those two things together will be catastrophic. i said amanda, just a minute. james, with edge of these brexit before. i miss brexit! who ever thought i would say that? great to have you with us as ever, rosamund urwin, james brampton. that's it for the papers this morning. thanks to my reviewers,
9:57 am
rosamund urwin and james rampton. hello. it's a day of mixed fortunes in terms of the weather out there today. still quite a cool and a breezy theme to the weather and there will be some showers around too, but it won't be as wet or as windy as it was yesterday. we've still got low pressure not far away, just drifting off towards the east and starting to fill but higher pressure moving in from the west, so that will gradually quieten the weather down over the next few days. we've still got these northerly winds, particularly cold, strong winds across northern and eastern scotland and down the east coast of england as well. some rain around pushing out of northern england, down towards the midlands, into southern england, eastern wales as well. some of these showers could be potentially heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. and you will notice that breeze today for many of us, gusts of wind about 20 to 30 miles per hour, but certainly stronger than that down the east coast of scotland. so it'll feel quite chilly for the likes of aberdeen, down towards newcastle as well. 10 or 11 degrees here. further south and west, though, in those sunnier spells, 19 or 20 celsius likely. one or two heavy showers
9:58 am
across the south of england, wales, just lingering into this evening, might hear the old rumble of thunder. they should fade away quite quickly and then it's mainly dry with clear spells tonight and a fairly chilly night, especially across the northern half of the uk with those clearer skies, temperatures down into the mid—single figures. many of us in double figures further south. but monday's weather fairly quiet due to this ridge of high pressure in charge, that stays with us into tuesday. by the end of tuesday, the next area of low pressure moves in from the north west, certainly a window of drier, quieter weather for a couple of days on monday and tuesday as well. still one or two rogue showers down the east coast and for wales and the south—west of england on monday, a few sharp showers building through the afternoon. could be some hail mixed in with some of those as well. temperatures still a little below par for this time of year, between about 11 to 18 celsius by monday afternoon. tuesday, a similar day, again mostly, dry light winds, sunny spells as well. so it'll feel that little bit warmer by the time we get to tuesday with temperatures just starting to creep up — between around 13 to 19 celsius on tuesday. more wet weather into the far
9:59 am
north—west by the end of the day. and we could still do with some rain after a very dry spring. we are going to see it through the middle of the week. we've got an area of low pressure developing across the uk pushing its way south. quite a lot of isobars around that developing area of low pressure. so not only quite wet, but quite windy, especially in the south from midweek onwards. and then things do turn a little bit drier and also a bit warmer as we head towards next weekend. bye— bye.
10:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. thousands of people across the uk have demonstrated in soldiary with anti—racism protests in the united states huge protests over the death of george floyd have continued in cities across america — all of them peaceful. in washington, thousands gathered in the biggest demonstrations there in 12 days. the head of the world bank calls the current global economic crisis a "catastrophe" and appeals for debt relief for the poorer nations. brazil says it will no longer publish total numbers of cases and deaths from coronavirus, after their death toll passes 34,000. the british medical association calls for face masks to be worn

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on