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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 15, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: back in business. thousands of shops in england re—open after nearly three months of lockdown. a different way of shopping and queueing today for shops reopening, but, will customers be up for it? i am at but, will customers be up for it? i amata but, will customers be up for it? i am at a retail park in cheshire to find out. face coverings are now compulsory for passengers on public transport in england. praise for the black lives matter supporter who saved another man from violent protests.
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i wasn't thinking, i was just thinking of, you know, a human being on the floor, it wasn't going to end well if we hadn't intervened. footballer marcus rashford writes to mps asking them not to stop free school meal vouchers. the england and manchester united star, who's raised more than 20 million to feed british children, is concerned the scheme ends next month. i want her to go through the same system and it is very difficult to find a way out. low cloud, mist and fog rolling in across eastern parts of the uk but for most, dry day with sunshine and showers but some of those could be heavy and thundery. i will have all the details in 27 minutes. it's monday 15th june. our top story: it's a day of major change in england as lockdown restrictions
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continue to ease. after almost three months, all non—essential shops in england including clothing retailers and department stores can reopen today, if they adhere to strict safety measures. meanwhile, if you're travelling on public transport in england, you'll have to wear a face covering from today, or risk a potential fine. brea kfast‘s graham satchell takes a look at the changes. for almost three months, high streets have been deserted, town centres empty. but from today in england, things change. all nonessential shops, clothes, books, charities, everything, can reopen. it'll be far from normal. there'll be one way systems, hand sanitisers, perspex screens, social distancing, and of course, cues. —— queues. i don't mind cueing. i don't mind, as i long as i can get into the shops and see what is available. it will be just nice to feel more normal.
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even with the safety measures, i'm still cautious to go out in public. and i definitely think, as soon as the normal shops open, there will be a huge rush. and i'm too careful about my own well—being so i probably just won't go out. announcer: please remember to use a face covering while travelling on tfl services. travel will also look different from today. face coverings are now compulsory on buses, trains, trams, ferries, planes, with some exemptions for smaller children and people with some medical conditions. and there will be more flights, easyjet for example, will resume a small number of passenger journeys from this morning. there are changes in education, some secondary schools in england will open today butjust for years 10 and i2. again, there'll be one—way systems, social distancing, and smaller class sizes. and some outdoor attractions like zoos will also open from today. lockdown is being eased and england will look
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and feel considerably different. it will need more time and patience to work. graham satchell, bbc news. these new regulations apply to england only. let's run through the rules for the rest of the uk. in northern ireland, non—essential retailers were allowed to reopen on friday. in scotland, shops are still closed. whilst the welsh government says they would like to see non—essential shops reopen from the 22nd ofjune, if coronavirus cases continue to fall. in scotland, outdoor tourist attractions like zoos and safari parks, have been told to prepare to welcome visitors from 15th july, if it's safe to do so. no date has been set for outdoor attractions to reopen in northern ireland or wales.
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when it comes to face coverings, england is the only nation where it is mandatory to wear them on public transport. in scotland, northern ireland and wales, the advice is to wear coverings in places where social distancing is more difficult. if you don't wear a face covering while using public transport in england, you could be refused travel and could also be fined, but this will be a last resort. elsewhere, the isle of man is the first place in the british isles to drop social distancing rules. there have been no new cases there for 22 days. lots to think about at the start of this new week. the boss of easyjet has insisted he would feel 100% safe travelling on a packed plane. it comes as the budget airline restarts flights for the first time in 11 weeks. a limited number of planes will take off, while passengers will be required to wear face coverings. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at gatwick airport, tim — how busy is it this morning? a welcome sight for easyjet. this
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flight a welcome sight for easyjet. this flight departing in just under an hour's time to glasgow. this is the first easyj et hour's time to glasgow. this is the first easyjet passenger flight since the end of march when the entire fleet was grounded. it has been a horrid time for airlines and airports. easyjet just horrid time for airlines and airports. easyjetjust one of several airlines that have said job cuts are inevitable. it is a welcome sight for them. face coverings, as you say, mandatory today in england on public transport and that includes inside of aircraft as well, so includes inside of aircraft as well, so passengers on this slide and others will be required to wear face coverings. they won't be forced to sit and distance from other people, it is thought the face coverings themselves will be enough and they will have to put their own hand luggage into the hole above the seats as well. so plenty of changes and plenty of questions to ask the chief executive of easyjet. we will be talking to him at about 6:50 because of easyjet, lion air have all launched action into the
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restrictions that were launched last week and say they will have a devastating impact on the travel industry and they want to see those overturned as well. so yes, a step back towards normality but it is a long way from normality. easyjet will be flying to about eight uk destinations, 22 across europe as well. they are easing their way back into what they hope will be a normal service. but certainly, flying will feel very different for the time being. tim, thanks very much. the boss of easyjet coming up a little later in the programme. any passengers catching flights, and those who decide to visit the shops, will need to maintain a two metre distance in line with government guidance. it's been announced that the rule is under review. countries including france and denmark only require people to keep one metre apart. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. good morning to you, mr mason, lovely to have you on the programme. hopefully you can explain why, there isa hopefully you can explain why, there is a huge difference between various
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countries will stop some one metre, somei.5 and if countries will stop some one metre, some 1.5 and if few are two metres. iam not some 1.5 and if few are two metres. i am not sure if you have had to deploy your new fashionable garment yet but i had this on the way to work this morning. it takes some getting used to when you have the spectacles on. despite the face coverings, there is the two metre social distancing rule, despite the fa ct social distancing rule, despite the fact that around europe, around the world, there are other measures, a smaller number. up until now, it has been cautious. scientists point out that the likelihood of catching coronavirus when you are to metres apart is very, very small and it is greater if you are closer together. but the argument now made by some is it might be a greater but it is not much greater and you have got to weigh up the economic consequences as well. plenty of businesses and conservative mps say, look, but usually for the hospitality very industry, pubs, cafes, restaurants, potentially opening up in england from the fourth ofjuly, many would be unviable unless the two metres distance is reduced to one metre. so
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a review is under way, the government is looking at theirs and not, crucially, just speaking to scientists, but speaking to economists as well stop so balancing the relative risks of a slightly increased risk of the virus. hope is as you drive down incidents of the virus, the likelihood of catching is much reduced, however close you are to anyone else. the prime minister has been talking about inequality? he has written a big piece in the daily telegraph, talking about all of the rows about racism and statues in the demonstrations and the violence that we saw over the weekend. he talks about far right thugs and bother boys converging in london at the weekend and described some of them as being latently racist and said it was miserable to see winston churchill's statue entombed in its protective sheath,
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as he put it. lots of talk about statues and cultural symbols but the meat, the detail in this article is this idea of across departmental government commission looking at all aspects of inequality as far as race is concerned. employment, health outcomes, academic and all other walks of life. now, we don't have any detail about this, about who is going to manage it, run it, when it will conclude, what difference it will conclude, what difference it will make, but the prime minister seemed rush keen to be seen to grapple with this huge if she —— the prime minister keen to be seen grappling with this huge issue that have been circling over the last couple of weeks. several eu countries, including germany and france, are reopening borders and lifting travel restrictions from today. it follows advice from the eu commission which claims that the rules are no longer an effective measure to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. travellers from the uk will be able to visit nine european countries, without having to quarantine on arrival but will still need to self isolate for 1h days
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when they come home. a man accused of urinating on a memorial to the murdered police officer keith palmer, during demonstrations at the weekend, will appear in court today. this photo was widely shared on social media after protests in london on saturday. andrew banks, who's 28 and from stansted, has been charged with outraging public decency. police have condemned two large illegal raves in greater manchester at the weekend which attracted around 6,000 people. a man died from a suspected drug overdose at one event, while a woman was raped and three men were stabbed the other. greater manchester police said the gatherings defied the work done to slow the spread of covid—19. it is really inappropriate for people to attend those when there has been so much work by people in the nhs, the police and the communities trying to protect us all from the terrible virus.
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more than 900 blue plaques on buildings across london are to be reviewed by english heritage, in response to concerns that some honour figures linked to racism or slavery. the charity says it hopes to recognise those who have been traditionally under—represented in history, including members of the black community. an image of one man carrying another to safety during violent protests in london over the weekend, has been hailed as a symbol of unity, after it was widely shared online. patrick hutchinson was photographed carrying an injured man, following clashes between far—right protesters and anti—racism activists. 0ur news correspondent sean dilley explains what happened. yelling. a snapshot in time gone viral. this was the moment a badly injured white protester was rescued by a black lives matter supporter. i wasn't thinking. i wasjust thinking of, you know, a human being on the floor. it wasn't going to end well had we not intervened.
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patrick hutchinson stepped in when the man became separated from his group. i scooped him up into a fireman's carry and sort of marched him out with the guys around me protecting me and shielding me and protecting this guy from getting further punishment. and that's the job patrick says he was there to do. had we allowed something like that to happen with all of us there present, you know, the narrative would have been very different today. and, you know, black lives matters, the media, whoever, would've painted a different picture. thousands turned out in support of separate protests in the capital organised by anti—racism and far right groups. it wasn't long before pockets of violence flared up. protesters clashed with each other and six police officers were injured. patrick, a personal fitness trainer by day stepped in when he saw this man in distress.
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it was a bit of a melee on the stairs. the guy ended up on the floor. and these guys rushed in to stop him from getting trampled. the government later said that the largely peaceful protests were hijacked by a violent minority. patrick hutchinson says he was pleased to protect the reputation of the peaceful majority. no other thoughts in my mind apart from get him to safety. sean dilley, bbc news. that was one of the extraordinary images over the weekend, wasn't it? let's take a look at today's papers: borisjohnson has written in the daily telegraph about the row over some of britain's historic statues. he says he is "extremely dubious about the growing campaign to edit or photoshop the entire cultural landscape". the guardian reports that the world health organization has warned against any further lifting of the coronavirus lockdown in england, until the government's contact tracing system has been shown to have worked.
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several newspapers, including the metro, feature a photo that went viral over the weekend, taken at saturday's protests in central london. patrick hutchinson was photographed carrying an injured man away from further harm, following clashes between far—right protesters and anti—racism activists. and one of the main stories on the website for scottish newspaper, the herald, reports that traders have called on the scottish government to set a date for when they can reopen for business. non—essential shops in england are allowed to open from today. marcus rashford says we need to help kids like me. looking at a list of things he has done since lockdown, his charity has raised £20 million and help to feed 4000 children stop he lodged a campaign to help the homeless. he has supplied 3 million
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meals to vulnerable children in the uk. we had a tv exclusive... and can i say he is 22. we have an interview with him, went to his house last night and spoke to him about some of the courses he believes them. making sure children do not go hungry, particularly over the holidays when children who have been getting free school meals will not get them. clu bs would school meals will not get them. clubs would have closed down as well. he has written a powerful letter to the government about his childhood and how important meal vouchers were to him and we will run that this morning. a bit after 630 will see some and then the full thing at 830. cipolla mccartney and his wife —— sir paul mccartney are near their home outside new york.
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that is paul mccartney fully masked up, glove up and going out and getting themselves a juice first thing in the morning. paul mccartney 78 years old. he is in great shape. if you have a mask on you can go incognito. i have hatch of the date for you. a couple found an egg in the park, i love how they have taken a picture of every stage of the story. alice kendall, quick as a flash put the other night and that they could help the oven, just to warm it and out popped a little duckling. can you see that one? a
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duckling. can you see that one? a duckling coming out the details. how did they know that was going to happen? some people arejust did they know that was going to happen? some people are just clever. two hours later, the shell cracked open and the duckling emerged. a wonderful addition to the couple's family who live in hampshire. winchester was the best place to live in the uk last year and with ducklings as well. even random eggs have a magical surprises. very quickly, you know all the strawberries we were going to eat at wimbledon? they are going to be made into lovely wimbledon jam. because of course there will be a strawbridge got so they will be made intojam. strawbridge got so they will be made into jam. bubble bless, grandparents feel the love. from this weekend,
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lots of people able to go and see or bubble up with one other person from another household and, if you like sending your pictures, do let us know. we will have to show some later on. i think you can find us on social media but send them in. a lot of through the window. that one that broke my heart, the grandad saw the newly born grandchild through a window. you are watching bbc brea kfast. as non—essential shops across england are preparing to re—open their doors this morning, our experience on the high street will still feel very different from life before lockdown. in a moment, we'll speak to our consumer affairs correspondent, sarah corker, who is in bishop auckland.
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but first let's go to cheshire 0aks where sean can give us more details on what we can expect. 0rdinarily, in the middle of a working day, this place would be ram, people looking for a bargain, going into their favourite designer store but if you like queueing, that is what is going to happen from now on. a large number of people expected. right around the retail outlet, this is where you have to be queueing. you follow this line around. a new way for retailers to be working and for customers arriving, only half the car parking spaces. they generally expect 20,000 people on an average busy day, so
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maximum half if the car park are full. all the hand sanitiser and cleaning in place. we have a retail a nalyst cleaning in place. we have a retail analyst with us. what a different world. it really is. today is a significant day but what we have to be aware of is that there is a battle ahead, maybe the biggest retail has faced because consumer appetite would have deemed, there is cautiousness about safety measures and the fact that they cannot work with as many people. a lot of the personality that you get from a store experience will be taken away, the smiles, the food and beverage
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outlets, this would be a task for retailers to overcome. what chance of this being a success? it is all about experience, that is our physical stores will survive so what do you think will happen?m physical stores will survive so what do you think will happen? it really depends on experience. it is just a different kind of experience. inaudible paramount for it to be saved. they have to improve queueing technology, making it safe and efficient. i also think, we might see more flourishes in little smaller villages so we have a battle but i think if it is set up to be consumerfacing it but i think if it is set up to be consumer facing it will win. are there types of stores that will do better than others? the blender
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brand will struggle because it is going to be a question of, why should i bother so it has to be a standout service. one of the workers here this morning making sure everything is up to spec. plenty of hand sanitiser, stores full of it but it would be a big test as to whether it will make us feel co mforta ble whether it will make us feel comfortable for the ten o'clock opening. very different stories with the high street. let's go to see sarah. after 12 long, long legs with the shutters down, retailers are hoping
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that today our high street will come back to life. small independent stores have been working really, really ha rd to stores have been working really, really hard to make sure safety measures are in place so they can open safely and today is a big day for them. inaudible... open safely and today is a big day forthem. inaudible...” open safely and today is a big day for them. inaudible... ithink open safely and today is a big day for them. inaudible... i think we have been let down by the technology. we will try... shall be try again? let's try once more. hello, good morning. we are back, having some technical difficulties but i was showing you inaudible...” think the key is, don't move. abandon ship. shall be try carol? do not move any part of your body! can
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you imagine doing the weather like this. it would be a nightmare. mixed fortu nes this. it would be a nightmare. mixed fortunes with the weather today. this is county durham. look at this fog, damp and drizzly but if we move towards the northern ireland, look at the blue sky. as we go through this week, the weather is similar to yesterday with sunshine and heavy thundery showers. yesterday, this area was the waiters. 80 millimetres in the first hour and in the second ten millimetres so there was some flash flooding and we could see similar through the course of this week. a lot of mist and fog in parts of the uk. most of it will lift across the north—east, it will hang onto it. further south, through the
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afternoon, a lot of dry weather triggering showers. most of them across part of the midland, in and across part of the midland, in and across wales, in the west and a few in the east as well. a real difference in the temperatures. 14 in aberdeen. through this evening, many of the show was fading. a repeat performance. mist and fog across parts of scotland and northern england. temperatures similarto northern england. temperatures similar to the nightjust gone. dominating our weather. you can see here just about, a weather front out west. with the low pressure, we're looking at show is developing and if anything tomorrow, as the low pressure dress further east, more widespread showers than today. we
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start off on a relatively dry note. some coastal fog hanging about. heavy showers, and thundery with real downpours. 15 degrees in the north, 22—23 in the south but somewhere in the sunshine you could see 24 or in the 25. into wednesday, all the low cloud mist and fog coming in from the north sea. show was around, a lot of them heavy and also thundery with temperatures 15— 23 degrees so feeling quite humid as it has been in the last few days and it has been in the last few days and it will be in the next few days. looking ahead from there, we continue with some of those showers, particularly so across england and wales. further north, we start to see something a little bit drier coming our way. by the weekend, something more promising, drierand
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warmer and sorrier as a ridge of high pressure settles things down. —— warmerand high pressure settles things down. —— warmer and sunnier. thank you very much for that. we have been talking about grass today. it has been that with all the rain that i have been trying to get sally to rescue our lawn. an so do your plants, i do not know if you find this, some of the plans are enormous. that is true and i am inspired by you and dad and i'm going home to fix my lawn... of course, iam not. iam only pretending that is true! how are you at tomatoes? my tomatoes are going
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well but my letters is huge! rampant lettuce well but my letters is huge! rampant lettu ce a nd well but my letters is huge! rampant lettuce and scarifying laws. thank you very much. everything is all right in the world when you have rampant right in the world when you have ra m pa nt lettuce. right in the world when you have rampant lettuce. when carol says you can you can. you're watching brea kfast. can you can. you're watching breakfast. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment but also on the programme, as safari but also on the programme, as safari but is is reopened, we are at lovely to find out what visitors can expect and the challenges of looking after more than 500 animals during the town. —— lockdown. we'll hear from manchester united and england striker marcus rashford about his own experience of free school meals and why he wants the government to continue the voucher scheme during the summer holidays.
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as budget airline, easyjet, resumes its first uk commercial flights from today. we'll speak to the chief executive about how they're making air travel safe for passengers. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: all non—essential shops in england can open from today after almost three months. businesses including charity shops, book stores and clothing retailers are allowed to reopen, if they introduce strict safety measures. the prime minister has urged people to "shop with confidence". it comes as face coverings are also made compulsory on public transport in england. easyjet is restarting flights today, for the first time
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in 11 weeks. a limited number of planes will take off, while passengers and crew will be required to wear face coverings. the first flight, to glasgow, is due to take off from london gatwick at 7am. the boss of the budget airline has insisted he would feel 100% safe on a packed plane. several countries in europe a lifting travel restrictions from today. they say the rules are no longer an effective measure to bruce —— prevent the spread of the coronavirus. british nationals have been warned against all but essential travel. those that do go abroad will have to self isolate for 14 days when they come home. a man accused of urinating on a memorial to the murdered police officer keith palmer, during demonstrations at the weekend, will appear in court today. this photo was widely shared on social media after protests in london on saturday. andrew banks, who's 28 and from stansted, has been charged with outraging public decency. more than 900 blue plaques
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on buildings across london are to be reviewed by english heritage, in response to concerns that some honour figures linked to racism or slavery. the charity says it hopes to recognise those who have been traditionally under—represented in history, including members of the black community. it is time for our usual appointment with a gp at this time of the morning. this morning we're joined from bridlington by doctor zoe norris. good morning. thank you for being with us. our main story today is about the reopening of quite a few shops, particularly in england, of course, there are other rules and regulations in scotland and ireland, northern ireland and wales, we have been speaking about that as well this morning. what are yours thoughts about the reopening of essential shops and how that might affect you and those doing theirjob in the medical fraternity this morning? i think it is going to
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really just split the population morning? i think it is going to reallyjust split the population in half. if we expect anything to loosen in terms of lockdown, there are either patients that are very anxious, very concerned and really remaining pretty much isolated, all patients that are thrilled and very happy to get out and do something different and usually that is based on age, it tends to be the younger patients who are quite happy to get out and about and older patients who are much more cautious, but then there are people who have other complex or underlying medical health problems that mean they are being extra cautious as well. it is quite a mixed picture and itjust makes it a mixed picture and itjust makes it a little bit difficult to advise people when we're being told one thing is safe another is not in that contrast can be a bit tricky. if you speak to people, there are some who would say, oh, yeah, shops are reopening in england, i am looking forward to getting out there and
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others are saying, what do you mean? there is no chance of me going to a shop for at least a few more weeks! i think for me, personally, it strikes me a little bit strange that i can't go shopping but i can't go and have a cup of tea with my pa rents and have a cup of tea with my parents unless we stand in the garden. and i don't go inside to use the loo. i find that a little bit weird and! the loo. i find that a little bit weird and i think patients are finding it confusing, too. we will be speaking to a member of the government a bit later this morning about that issue of social distancing, the fact it is two metres in the uk and it varies in different countries across europe, and also about the issue of face coverings because that, i am sure, is something that many of your patients are asking you about on a daily basis. it isn't people are anxious. there are lots of people who are making their own masks, purchasing cloth masks or have scarves and things, but quite a lot
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of people would quite like the medical ones and i think that is a real worry in the nhs. we have already seen those dreadful shortages of ppe. we are still struggling to have an adequate supply and we are also a bit confused because now that hospitals are being advised that any patient coming infor are being advised that any patient coming in for outpatients, for investigations, should also have a face covering on and are being told that if they don't have one they may need to supply one to the patients but in general pratt is, if you get called to go to your gp waiting room —— general practice, if you go to the waiting room, you don't have to wear one and that is confusing for patients as well. do they have to be made out of a particular arterial? we're not calling them face masks, just face coverings, because as long as you have something covering you, you are ok, is that right? yes, any type of face covering, it could cloth, anything lightweight and breathable so cotton is good, if you can have something that is double
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woven so two layers rather than one, thatis woven so two layers rather than one, that is really helpful, and quite a lot of the cloth masks people are making at home or buying from others do have several layers in front of the face, but it really is just having something over the nose in the mouth, something that comes under the chin and making sure that it is just under the chin and making sure that it isjust nice under the chin and making sure that it is just nice and snug under the chin and making sure that it isjust nice and snug up under the chin and making sure that it is just nice and snug up around the top of the face, is the main thing. those who are regular bbc brea kfast viewers thing. those who are regular bbc breakfast viewers might remember a few weeks ago, seems like monk to go now, we were talking about the fact that you two girls were making ppe equipment for you and other doctors. -- it equipment for you and other doctors. —— it seems like months ago now. how are they coping with things now and are they coping with things now and are any of them going back to school? neither of them are in the year groups that go back to school so we had a contact from school the other day saying if we are able to reopen a little bit further before the summer holidays, would you want to send your children back in? and,
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we're to send your children back in? and, we' re really to send your children back in? and, we're really happy with what they are doing at home, they are getting live lessons every day, they are getting the chance to chat with their friends getting the chance to chat with theirfriends and getting the chance to chat with their friends and i think we're just concerned about to the burden to school is already under of having to fit in those other year groups and the essential workers, so we will just be keeping them off until the summer. always interested to talk to gps on this programme every day about some of the main issues that patients are talking to you about. has it been about going out and face masks and things related to coronavirus? 0r masks and things related to coronavirus? or have you seen a much greater conversation rate, things not related to what we have all been talking about for the last few months? yes, i think we are seeing activity levels in general practice pretty much back to normal now in terms of the volume of queries we are dealing with. 0bviously we're doing most of that over the phone or video if possible, but lots of patients who have held onto things, sat on things, you haven't come to see else because they are worried
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about coming out of the house, about coronavirus, are now presenting later on than they normally would with conditions so that is a challenge for us and for them and also if we do feel we're going to send somebody to hospital, patients are quite reluctant to go and feeling it is unsafe to do so and thatis feeling it is unsafe to do so and that is a difficult doctor zoe norris, always good to talk to you. always a pleasure to be your first appointment of the day. i know we have had a few technical issues, doctor zoe was out of sync there but i hope you could understand. people are in two camps, some people are happy to go to their gp, some people staying away, some people have to go to the shops, some people have to go to the shops, some people would not go into a shop today at all. talking about getting hold of face coverings as well. last week i was having a look on ebay and people are obviously making their own ones now and selling them. i
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think five for £35, that double layered one, i know you can get them cheaper than that, but if people are desperate to get hold of something, you can find yourself paying an awful lot of money for something you could make for a relatively small amount of money. and also, we did it on the programme yesterday, a piece about how easy it is to make your own face coverings. also, you could wear a scarf own face coverings. also, you could weara scarf and own face coverings. also, you could wear a scarf and tie it, it is that simple, isn't it? pants on your head. you do that. right. england and manchester united striker, marcus rashford, has written a passionate and highly personal letter, asking the government to re—think its decision to end free school meal vouchers in england, during the summer. citing his own experience as a child, marcus says "the system wasn't built for families like mine." i've been to meet him to hear more about why this issue is so important to him. my my mum was a single parent, she had
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five kids all living in the same house. the programme i started at 11 yea rs house. the programme i started at 11 years old, you are supposed to started at 12 years old, which basically gives you accommodation closer to the training facilities and a new school and she worked that ha rd to and a new school and she worked that hard to push it forward because she knew that for me that was the step i needed to take, i needed to be eating the right foods while i was growing up, being close to my new teammates, schoolfriends things like that, so she made the decision when i was 11 years old and united allowed it. that was the reason i went at a younger age and it was to help my mum with her situation and also get myself out of the situation i was also get myself out of the situation iwas in. also get myself out of the situation i was in. there is always an element of sacrifice to try and get to the top level and you know, that is the one we had to make initially. my mum, she did the best she could. i
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remember we used to go to a shop called pound world, and everything was under a pound. we would get seven yoghurts and you would have won yoghurts today. and so on. she did the best she could within the circumstances but some families out there like me that have four or five kids, it is literally impossible to ta ke kids, it is literally impossible to take control of the situation. this is all going on at a time when kids should be concentrating on schoolwork and stuff like that, and it is just crazy to think that this is still going on. we are in 2020 now and it is just something i is still going on. we are in 2020 now and it isjust something i don't believe should be happening. he really cares about it, doesn't he? he cares about issues that mattered to him as a young black man in this country. he speaks very passionately and from a place where he is totally informed because this was his childhood. he talks about being hungry as a kid. we will show you a longer version of that interview coming up where he talks about
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growing up, going home and knowing there was only so much food in the cupboard and they had to make it last week and you know, he and his siblings would be hungry. united took him at 11 because they normally ta ke took him at 11 because they normally take a young man like that at 12, because his mother couldn't afford to give him the food. that was to help the family. he was obviously hugely talented but also —— to help the family and make sure he got fed properly and had the best chance of getting into their academy, they could see the talent and they were very generous and decided to help the family in that way. lots of times when foot bowlers speak out, there is a lot of people that they stick to football. i think people should be happy that he has not stopped to foot football —— footballer. the department for education says ‘the national voucher scheme will not run during the summer holidays but thousands of children will receive additional support through their holiday activities and food programme, which offers free meals throughout
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the summer holidays.‘ marcus rashford says that lots of clu bs marcus rashford says that lots of clubs he would have gone to in the summer can't reopen at the moment because of covid. we will see the full thing with marcus rashford after 830 this morning. jane is with us with a look at the rest of the day's sport. we start with an extraordinary story. atjust 11 years of age, gb's number one female skateboarder sky brown has the world at her feet. but last month, she suffered a serious injury in training which left her in hospital. the olympic hopeful, who lives in los angeles, took a 15 foot fall through a gap she was attempting a trick on. had the olympics been this summer, she would have been ruled out. doctors said that if she hadn't been wearing a helmet, she could have died. sky and her father have been speaking to our sports correspondent natalie pirks. i had seen her do it so many times.
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i don't remember me going down. i was going in the air. what was going through your mind? just seeing it makes me feel sick, physically, it is terrifying. i did everything i shouldn't have done, running up to herand grabbing her, wake up shouldn't have done, running up to her and grabbing her, wake up sky, wa ke her and grabbing her, wake up sky, wake up. she wasjust not responding. and sky, i am guessing you don't remember any of this.|j just you don't remember any of this.” just remember that the hospital, like, what? iwas just remember that the hospital, like, what? i was like, just remember that the hospital, like, what? iwas like, i just remember that the hospital, like, what? i was like, i saw my mum crying and i was like, no, i didn't wa nt crying and i was like, no, i didn't want her to feel bad. two she had nine lacerations, stomach lacerations. all her bones around her eye socket and top of her head. i cracked my tooth. and these two
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fingers are actually fractured.” skywest the —— sky the fullface helmet and she wouldn't be here today if she wasn't. she is usually very smelly and happy was not when you saw that video, why did you think i am going to show people this? on social media, everything is perfect, people might think i am supergirl buti perfect, people might think i am supergirl but ijust perfect, people might think i am super girl but ijust want to show sometimes you are going to fall. it is ok to fall sometimes, you are going to fall, get back up and keep on going because, you know, that can't stop us from doing what we love. is that your plan now for the next year, heading into 0lympics, just to push even harder and
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stronger? i am going to go higher, do whatever i can dojust... stronger? i am going to go higher, do whatever i can do just. .. safely. laughs. so good to see that beautiful smile back. we wish her well on the road to recovery. rory mcilroy had been in contention to take golf‘s first tournament back after the coronavirus, but the northern irishman had a dreadfulfinal round in texas with five bogey‘s and a double bogey. this was mcilroy at the 4th, he dropped right down the leaderboard. the tourament eventually went to a play off where american collin morikawa missed this three foot putt. gifting the charles schwab challenge to fellow countryman daniel berger. england'sjustin rose finished one shot behind the leaders. as we countdown to the return of the premier league on wednesday, there was a moment of history in spain as their top flight completed its first round of matches since lockdown. real madrid defender marcelo became the first player in la liga to take the knee
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in a show of support to the black lives matter movement. he did it after scoring their third goal against eibar. that moved real to within two points of league leaders barcelona. premier league clubs will replace players names with the words ‘black lives matters' on the back of shirts and they'll wear a badge alongside one for nhs staff. tennis and queens was due to start today, but instead all eyes are on america as officials decide later if the us open will go ahead at the end of august. world number one novak djokovic is among those saying he might not take part in the grand slam, but he was on the court yesterday, and left it in tears. djokovic won his final match over world number seven, alexander zverev, in front of more than 4,000 fans, in the adria tour. it's a tournament djokovic set up to help players get back to match fitness. but the emotion was all too much for the serbian, reduced to tears in his post match interview in belgrade, saying the event reminded
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him of his childhood. nothing to be ashamed of, we have all been emotional during lockdown. and it is not something you see very often from novak djokovic. no, he's straightfaced. things have been getting to him. not a lot of sport around. now that he's a possible return, he is getting a little teary. we all have, dan has anyway. in the next half an hour, the first easyjet flight to depart in more than two months, will take off from gatwick airport. the budget airline is restarting a handful of flights, as lockdown restrictions are eased. things will look very different for anyonewho decides to travel though, with all passengers required to wear face coverings and social distancing measures in place. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at gatwick, and he's joined by the chief executive
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of easyjet, johan lundgren. not long to go now before the first easyj et not long to go now before the first easyjet flight since the end of march will be making its way to glasgow. i am joined march will be making its way to glasgow. iam joined by march will be making its way to glasgow. i am joined by the chief executive of easyjet. first of all, what is it going to be like flying on and easyjet flight? it will be slightly different to what people have been used to before. he will be required to wear a face mask on board the aircraft. you will not get any service in terms of food. those are the two main things. but there are the two main things. but there are also things that passengers will not see. a deep disinfection every 24 hours, protection from the virus on surfaces. it has been such a difficult time for many, many airlines. 30% of your workforce,
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4500 jobs have been furloughed. but you have been helped by the government. in what way would that seem reasonable for easyjet staff that lose theirjob? it is important to understand that the crisis we are seeing is the worst that aviation has ever seen and we have been one of the most affected industry. the follow schemes have been useful but we have a different level of demand going forward and we recognise it will be used before we get to the levels we had before. —— furloughed. was it right to pay that money in dividends to shareholders? that was decided in an agm on the sixth of
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february, before anybody could anticipate what was going to happen in terms of this crisis so i think thatis in terms of this crisis so i think that is something that has been with them from a timing point of view but it is also important to recognise that, as we are starting to fly today, which we are very excited to be doing, it is a small step towards recovery. let's talk about the quarantine regulations. people arriving have to itself isolate for 14 days and you are going to challenge that in the court. we hope that the government is looking actively on how they can replace this quarantine. a lot of people do not understand why it was put in place in the first place. there is no medical or scientific evidence from a public health point of view why you should not be able to connect into territories where there
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are hardly any new cases of the virus in the first place so we are looking to replace that either with international air bridges or remove the quarantine as a blanket approach and only makes it applicable in territories whether cases of coronavirus coming through. all those quarantine rules means you have to cut more jobs? it clearly has an impact on demand, we can see that. the rest of europe is now opening up and removing restrictions, removing florentines and lifting those limitations for conductivity. we see that demand outside the uk is quite strong so if we see there are some promising start taking place across the summer... but you think you may have to cut morejobs summer... but you think you may have to cut more jobs because of those rules ? to cut more jobs because of those rules? we are hoping for it to be
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removed and clearly it has an impact on the demand. as you progress through the summer, british people can go on holidays and make businesses connect to each other which is so important for the economy. the unions are criticised british airways for what they call a fire and rehire scheme. taking people on with less terms than they did earlier. do you rule that out yourselves? we have no plans to do that. we want to engage with representatives and work out the best solution but at the same time we have to make sure the organisation is fit and can adapt to new levels of regulations to safeguard the job so companies can continue to go forward successfully. many people watching will be desperate to get away on a summer holiday. how likely is that going to
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be? iam holiday. how likely is that going to be? i am optimistic. government working actively on solutions on how we can progress through this period quarantine has put in place and we hope they can be replaced soon with a better alternative. when it comes to refunds of floods, if your flight has been cancelled, you should get that within a week but a survey recently said that only 40% of customers got their money back within a week compared to british airways. why such a poor performance? it is important to recognise us as an example. in april we cancelled 47,000 flight and to put that in comparison, last april we cancelled 40 flights. of course, these cancellations meant there was a huge demand for our organisation to cope for the level of refunds asked. round—up processing refunds
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and everyone will get one within 28 days but we have not been able to live up to the normal standards of service but we are progressing refunding and everyone will get their money if they choose to do so. your first flight to glasgow since march two glasgow about to take off. tremendously excited about this. we have been looking forward to this for months. this is a small programme but it is a massive step and we hope to see more flight. thank you very much for talking to us. we will leave you with a shot of the flight about to make its way. the first easyjet passenger flight sent march. it has been a while. we will try and go back there at seven o'clock this morning. quite a moment
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seeing that takeoff. 11 weeks since a flood. it feels like things are changing. in england, yes. nonessential shops opening up lots of talk about face coverings and social distancing. it is still two metres and we will be speaking to someone from the government at 7:30 a.m.. we've been asking you to get in touch this morning with your pictures of loved ones being reunited, after lockdown restrictions were eased in some parts of the uk. here's granny claire finally holding her 10 week old grandaughter. coralie was born after a 60 hour labour, to claire's daughter lizzie. well done, lizzie! she had been really poorly. coralie has been really poorly with possible sepsis and after numerous visits to a&e is now on the mend. and finally in her ‘grabby‘s' arms!
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60 hours, isalute 60 hours, i salute you, 60 hours, isalute you, lizzie. this is pauline being reunited with her great niece, two—year—old seren, which pauline descibed as ‘a wonderful day'. and here is granny ranson getting some ‘bubble love' after being reunited with her grandchildren. we note not everybody can go in for the hug, some people are still shielding. we know it is lovely for some people but we know some people are not there yet. it has been emotional time. but we love to get those from you. we'd love to see your pictures if you've been getting together with loved ones, you can e—mail us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or get in touch with us on social media. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. mixed fortunes this morning. some
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with clear blue skies and others with clear blue skies and others with fog. the focus for the week is one where you keep your umbrella and sunglasses to hand. sunshine and some heavy, thundery downpours. low pressure is in charge of our weather. the forecast will not change much but it would be the distribution of the showers that would be the devil in the detail. this morning, quite a bit of low cloud, mist and fog across scotland. western areas, dryer and brighter. some are drizzly and the bank and the same across northern england. elsewhere, patchy mist and fog that lived across across southern england. wales will see some sunshine coming through. sunshine in northern ireland this morning but as temperatures rise, it will spark off some showers, especially in the afternoon, and some could be heavy
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and thundery. real downpours in actual fact. and thundery. real downpours in actualfact. more and thundery. real downpours in actual fact. more likely in western areas but we could see some further east as well. temperatures around 15 in the north, possibly 25 further south. this evening and overnight, we start to see the showers ease. a repeat performance of cloud coming further inland from the north sea across scotland and also northern england and temperatures, a mild night. 9— 13 degrees. tomorrow, we start off with low cloud, mist and fog and later today, most of it will push back towards the coast. tomorrow low pressure drifting eastwards so more showers getting into eastern areas but again, you can catch one almost anywhere. late today, heavy and thundery and local downpours. the shower through the day become more widespread. quite a lot of cloud around as well. temperatures are similar getting up
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into the mid— 20s. the headlines are next. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: back in business. thousands of shops in england re—open after nearly three months of lockdown. face coverings are now compulsory for passengers on public transport in england. praise for the black lives matter supporter who saved another man from violent protests. i wasn't thinking. i wasjust thinking of, you know,
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a human being on the floor. it wasn't going to end well had we not intervened. footballer marcus rashford writes to mps asking them not to stop free school meal vouchers. in an exclusive tv interview with breakfast, the england and manchester united star, who's raised more than 20 million pounds to feed british children, is concerned the scheme ends next month. you know, what families are going through now, i want her to go through that same system and it's very difficult to find a way out. it's monday 15th june. our top story: it's a day of major change in england as lockdown restrictions continue to ease. after almost three months, all non—essential shops including clothing retailers and department stores can reopen today, if they stick to strict safety measures. meanwhile, if you're travelling on public transport in england, you'll have to wear a face covering from today, or risk a potential fine. brea kfast‘s graham satchell takes
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a look at the changes. for almost three months, high streets have been deserted, town centres empty. but from today in england, things change. all nonessential shops, clothes, books, charities, everything, can reopen. it'll be far from normal. there'll be one way systems, hand sanitisers, perspex screens, social distancing, and of course, queues. i don't mind cueing. i don't mind, as i long as i can get into the shops and see what is available. it will be just nice to feel more normal. even with the safety measures, i'm still cautious to go out in public. and i definitely think, as soon as the normal shops open, there will be a huge rush. and i'm too careful about my own well—being so i probably just won't go out. announcer: please remember to use a face covering while travelling on tfl services.
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travel will also look different from today. face coverings are now compulsory on buses, trains, trams, ferries, planes, with some exemptions for smaller children and people with some medical conditions. and there will be more flights, easyjet, for example, will resume a small number of passenger journeys from this morning. there are changes in education, some secondary schools in england will open today butjust for years 10 and 12. again, there'll be one—way systems, social distancing, and smaller class sizes. and some outdoor attractions like zoos will also open from today. lockdown is being eased and england will look and feel considerably different. it will need more time and patience to work. graham satchell, bbc news. these new regulations apply to england only. let's run through the rules for the rest of the uk.
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in northern ireland, non—essential retailers were allowed to reopen on friday. in scotland, shops are still closed. whilst the welsh government says they would like to see non—essential shops reopen from the 22nd ofjune, if coronavirus cases continue to fall. in scotland, outdoor tourist attractions like zoos and safari parks, have been told to prepare to welcome visitors from 15th july, if it's safe to do so. no date has been set for outdoor attractions to reopen in northern ireland or wales. when it comes to face coverings, england is the only nation where it is mandatory to wear them on public transport. in scotland, northern ireland and wales, the advice is to wear coverings in places where social distancing is more difficult. if you don't wear a face covering while using public transport in england, you could be refused travel and could also be fined, but this will be a last resort. elsewhere, the isle of man is the first place in the british isles to drop social distancing rules.
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there have been no new cases there for 22 days. as you've been hearing, the rules around wearing face coverings in england have changed from today. they're now compulsory on public transport, and if you don't wear one you may not be able to travel, or even be given a fine. nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got for nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got for us? nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got for us? always nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got for us? always following nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| good got for us? always following the nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. morning to you, what hav| got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as are got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as are most got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as are most of got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as are most of the got for us? always following the rules, nina is at manchester piccadilly station for us. as are most of the passen rules, as are most of the passengers this morning. just to reiterate, if you are travelling in england today, train, plane, bus, ferry, you will need to wear a face covering for the people might say, what if i'm getting the train over from glasgow to manchester or over from wales, theoretically, yes, you will have to cover your face when you cross the
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border. why is it happening now? we have been talking today about how retail is reopening, the gradual reopening to ease the economy. we expect because we will be sitting on trains for longer, this will be necessary. it is not without controversy. labour are asking why on earth this didn't happen weeks ago and the unions are saying who can ago and the unions are saying who ca n e nfo rce ago and the unions are saying who can enforce it? we don't have the numbers of staff, we can't and won't be able to enforce it. what other repercussions if you refuse to wear one? staff here are saying they really hope it won't to that. though far this morning it hasn't but ultimately, yes, you can be reviewed to travel and you can be fined 50 pounds on the spot or £100 if you don't pay up. this is necessary, we need to open up, this is becoming critical, experts say, and this is a pa rt critical, experts say, and this is a part of that balance between keeping the public safe. nina, thanks. in the last few minutes, the boss of budget airline,
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easyjet outlined to us the safety and hygiene practises in place to enable flights to take off for the first time in 11 weeks. the first easyjet flight has just departed from gatwick airport. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is there for us. what more did we learn about what to expect onboard? a couple of minutes ago, the flight took off, the first one since the end of march. airlines and airports have had a torrid time over the last few months, haven't they, and for many of them, job cuts will be inevitable. easyjet saying that very such thing just a minute ago. when you get on board a flight, base coverings will be compulsory and as they are on all forms of public transport in england and there are precautions as well. it will be a slightly different experience and what people are used to before. you will be required to wear a face mask as you are on board the aircraft and they won't be any service in terms
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of food being served on board. but those other two main things that customers will see. then there are also things that customers won't see. we are doing a deep disinfection and it —— every 24 hours that will include protection from the virus on the surfaces. along with rya nair and from the virus on the surfaces. along with ryanair and british airways, easyjet are launching an action against the quarantine rules which means that anybody will have to self isolate for 14 days and the airlines will say that will have a d eft airlines will say that will have a deft —— devastating impact. that work will be handling 800 day. one positive sign for the air industry today with one plane taking off but normality is still a long way off. tim, thanks very much. any passengers catching flights, and those who decide to visit the shops, will need to maintain a 2 metre distance in line with government guidance. it's been announced that the rule is under review. countries including france and denmark only require people
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to keep1 metre apart. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. why is there such a difference between the various countries? good morning to you, sally was not even with our new fashion garments in england deployed this morning, the two metre rules remains in place. the government says it is all about risk and the scientific advice suggests that it two metres, you are much less likely to catch the virus thanif much less likely to catch the virus than if you are closer. 0thers much less likely to catch the virus than if you are closer. others are making the point that yes it might bea making the point that yes it might be a bit more risky but as the number of cases goes down, you are less likely to meet somebody who has got it and also, there is a massive economic advantage to reducing that number. there are those in the hospitality industry, pubs, cafes and restaurants, that could be opening in england from the fourth ofjuly, who fear that unless there isa ofjuly, who fear that unless there is a relaxation in the two metre rule, their businesses simply won't be viable. well, the prime minister
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has written an article in i believe the daily telegraph this morning about inequality and what the government wants to do about it. yes and this after all of the rows, protest, anger and violence over the last couple of weeks, here is the article in this morning's daily telegraph. the prime minister with plenty to say about the rows, the statues, he says that it is madness that we are trying to edit or photoshopped our entire cultural landscape and thinks that taking dance choose is like trying to doctor a wikipedia entry. but what will the government want to do about what is going on at the moment? they are launching what they call a cross governmental commission looking at all aspects of racial inequality in employment, health outcomes, academia and all other walks of life. they will be a huge number of questions about who will share it, how quickly it will conclude and what difference, bluntly, it will make. iris johnson keen what difference, bluntly, it will make. irisjohnson keen to be seen to be doing something about what is
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happening here at around the world in the last couple of weeks. chris, thanks very much. and we will be putting some of those points that chris raised their two paul scully, a small business owner, a little later in the programme. more than 900 blue plaques on buildings across london are to be reviewed by english heritage, in response to concerns that some honour figures linked to racism or slavery. the charity says it hopes to recognise those who have been traditionally under—represented in history, including members of the black community. from this morning, around 700,000 more teenagers in england will receive some face to face teaching at their secondary school. year 10 and 12 pupils, who are sitting their gcses and a—levels next year, will return to a very different classroom from the one they left in march. we'rejoined now by the president of the association of school and college leaders, rachael warwick, and also by the former head of 0fsted,
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sir michael wilshaw. great to talk to you. it feels like a significant day for a number of reasons. it is a significant day and a welcome day as well. too many youngsters have lost out over this period. and it is good to see secondary school youngsters back in their schools and i am sure they won't be the problem that presented themselves in the primary sector when they opened up a few days ago. there will be plenty of capacity in the secondary school system with just two year groups going on. they will be plenty of classroom space and plenty of teachers to teach them. my only concern is that there will be uniform because —— provision across the country in terms of safety, that the schools that are difficult, are the ones that are in a category may be of special
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measures or require improvement, that they are operating at the same level in terms of safety, equality and provision, making sure that most of the youngsters, if not all of the youngsters, come back, as those schools that are in or outstanding category. rachel warwick, schools that are in or outstanding category. rachelwarwick, how do schools that are in or outstanding category. rachel warwick, how do you feel about years ten and 12 going back today and do you feel the schools are now ready? yes, we are really delighted that we are able to welcome students back to school today across the country in year ten and year 12. today across the country in year ten and year12. i today across the country in year ten and year 12. i am confident that we are ready because we spent the last four weeks planning really carefully, using extensive risk assessments following the department of education and public health guidance, we plan to this, it is fairto guidance, we plan to this, it is fair to say, like a military operation. just to give people peace of mind, to send people back to
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school again. everybody will be waiting for the detail of it but how do the ideas flow with you? we have been trying to find out what this idea is. there are all sorts of possibilities that could involve some provision and school leaders, we would like to know what that looks like as soon as possible. ideally have some voice and consultation in that process was up time is tight now, there are only 12 weeks till the end of summer term and if we're going to be involved in getting something off the ground and ready for the summer, we need to know about it pretty quickly, i would say. michael, how concerned are you when you think about how much education people have missed already up until this point?” much education people have missed already up until this point? i am very concerned. like my colleague
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who you have just spoken to, we won't see what the details are of these proposed summer schools. my worry is that children need to be reassert —— reassured that summer schools will happen and that the people that they know and have a relationship with, teachers and the school, other one is going to be teaching, not somebody else. i think that will present difficulties, but iam that will present difficulties, but i am really worried about the term 93p- i am really worried about the term gap. iam really i am really worried about the term gap. i am really worried about those youngsters from disadvantaged backgrounds. we know from all the evidence that have come to us in the last weeks and months are not doing as well as they should in this lockdown, and it is really up to the education system and schools to make sure that they particularly recover lost ground and we just talked about summer school, but they need to be much more than that. and i said before, schools need to be looking ata before, schools need to be looking at a weekend programmes, twilight programmes, working in half term
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brea ks programmes, working in half term breaks and so on. i speak at it —— as an ex— head teacher, i would be incentivising my staff to do that. rachel, is that something you are thinking about? and also balancing that with the other thing sally was asking about? that concern for what people have been missing out on and how you can catch up? i echo michael's point, especially around disadvantage children and the school they have missed. we are prioritising bringing those students back before the end of term, we would like flexibility, bringing in other students notjust would like flexibility, bringing in other students not just the would like flexibility, bringing in other students notjust the current ones. the government scheme which is in the process of sharing devices with disadvantaged children in year ten, it would be great to see that
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run out to all students, not just year ten. talk of additional funding and again, if that could be used flexibly so that schools can respond to what they see when schools are back. the first role for teachers is to diagnose gaps and to use their skills to breach those gaps and give students confidence and move their learning on and to exhilarate that as quickly as possible once we have them back in classrooms. we had marcus rashford on the programme this morning, the manchester united and england footballer, campaigning forfood and england footballer, campaigning for food vouchers who are of educational age. what is your view on this and what can the government do to support those families who cannot afford to feed their children? get the information from
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schools in terms of what is happening. iam schools in terms of what is happening. i am very concerned that the school voucher provision has been patchy in its delivery and rolling out and head teachers have been complaining about this as they have been complaining about the shortage of laptop computers to children who need them so the first thing the government has got to do is find out what is happening on the ground and feeling those gaps. you mentioned in the last few minutes that the prime minister is making a speech where he is concerned about growing inequality in our society, well, that is manifest in the fact that some of our children are going hungry and go hungry even when schools are up and running. we have to make sure that our education service really is a high quality service really is a high quality service for all of our children are not just for service for all of our children are notjust for sum service for all of our children are not just for sum it service for all of our children are notjust for sum it has been the problem over many, many years. so
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michael, thank you very much for that. rachel, good to talk to you of that. rachel, good to talk to you of that. on the issue of marcus rashford, you will be able to hear the full interview on our programme at 8:30am. zoos and safari parks in england will reopen to visitors from today. after months of being unable to rely on ticket sales, many have struggled with the considerable costs of caring for hundreds of animals during lockdown. breakfast‘s john maguire is at longleat safari park in wiltshire for us this morning. good morning. good morning. there has been a safari park here for more than 50 years. it was the first one outside africa. the idea and model was adopted here. capability brand design parklands and african animals, all sorts here, very famous for their big cats, their lines and tigers and they attract a million
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visitors a year. 4000 per day at the height of the season but for the past four weeks, absolutely zilch. what will it be like now with the visitors back here from today? members only will be allowed here. it isa members only will be allowed here. it is a drive—through and you can imagine it is quite covid—19 secure. good morning. 45 years you have been working here. yes. you rememberfoot and mouth but nothing like the last 12 weeks? this has been a different scenario altogether. foot—and—mouth we we re scenario altogether. foot—and—mouth we were worried about the animals inside but now it is just everything. shopping has been horrendous. the whole scenario has been totally different to normal. horrendous. the whole scenario has been totally different to normatm terms of looking after the animals,
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it is business as usual but it has just been in the income? yes, certain stuff has been furloughed but we are trying to get back to it as normal as we can. john, good to see you. will the animals behave any differently having not seen anybody apart from the staff? certainly. some of our key species, like our cats in the infamous drive—through, they have not had cars to bite bits from so they have been enjoying their natural enclosure but once the cars are back they will be back to the usual behaviour. the big cats are perhaps the star attraction. they behave differently? if they are interested in the cows. the patrol
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staff have an important and good job to maintain safety and if one of the big cats is feeling mischievous, thinking of going for someone's tire, it is theirjob to move them away. you have a staged approach to reopening. the next three days, members only driving through their various aspects of the park will open up. you have all of the social distancing methods in place. we are standing in the only pedestrian area and this is where we have our staff on hand, the social distancing measures and guidelines. just reminders of the social distancing. great stuff. thank you very much. we're talking about england only as is the case with so many of the changes and the easing of lockdowns. zoos and safari parks open from today but with restrictions and
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different to what it would have been like 12 weeks later. we will see some rhinos later. an lovely to see the zebras as well. well done, john maguire. non—essential shops in england will also reopen from today but only those that are able to do so safely. this plastic screens at the tills and floor markings to maintain social distancing form part of guidelines set out by the government. however, labour says the advice for retailers isn't clear enough. we're joined now by the shadow business minister, lucy powell. good morning to you, lucy powell. what do you think about shops reopening today? we welcome shops reopening today? we welcome shops reopening today? we welcome shops reopening today and we hope that people will go and visit their local shops and support their favourite
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shops and support their favourite shops to what has been a difficult time but obviously people need to proceed cautiously and respected the new guidelines. how would you suggest people are made to feel confident about going back to those known essential shops reopening?” think retailers have gone through a great deal of trouble to provide that confidence by laying out floors differently, putting on extra staff, screens, hand sanitisers and so on. that has come at additional cost to those retailers as well. the issue we are most worried about at the moment is the hospitality, hairdressers, beauticians and others are supposed to be reopening in 2.5 — three weeks dives and they do not have any of the guidelines they need to be able to reopen their businesses in the way retailers have today and this is becoming a really urgent issue and the government need
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to get on and produce the guidance which they promise they would produce a day but now we're seeing them will some further review before that time. is it connected to the decision by the government whether they decide to keep the two metre rule or relax that down to one metre? if you were in the job rule or relax that down to one metre? if you were in thejob right now, what would your guidelines before hairdressers, for example? hairdressers, of course, two metres or one metres, it would have to come in much closer contact with their clients so they would need different guidelines and they are still waiting and that is causing them a real issue as well. we would be transparently and openly assessing the issue. what is the distance, the whole suite of guidelines that would minimise risk and keep infection rates low while at the same time maximising the viability of business
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is to reopen because this is the crucial decision. many bars, restau ra nts a nd crucial decision. many bars, restaurants and others, they have the quarterly reds to pay next week and many have not received much support from the government. —— rents. they do not know when they are due to be open, whether it would be viable or not and whether they can be consistent with the guidelines because they have not seen them yet so the government need to do this in a transparent way but critically in a timely way as well. we need to see those guidelines asap. knowing what you know now, would you support a reduction from two metres down to one? if i get to see all of this evidence being laid out in this way, with a real cost benefit analysis that we need to see, and it is notjust about whether i would support it, it is about whether the public would have confidence in that as well, whether
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they would feel confident in going to shops, bars, restaurants, hairdressers and so on. there seems to be one conversation happening with conservative mps in the back rooms of westminster and if anything guidelines. the government have known of this review has been coming up known of this review has been coming up the tracks. they promise this review by today and yet yesterday they lodged another review so it is they lodged another review so it is the worst of all worlds for the hospitality and retail sector is not knowing what the outcome of that review is going to be. just to get some clarity on that, would you support a reduction from two metres to one metre, yes or no? if we see the evidence and it is well argued and it would minimise risk and maximise that effect, we would but we have not seen the evidence law
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have the retailers or the public. the government cannot be having one conversation politically and then another conversation in terms of health needs and health mitigations. let's put this in a table so we can all review it and have confidence in the final decision but that decision has to be taken. let's talk about this ina has to be taken. let's talk about this in a slightly different way. how important is a reduction down to one metre for the hospitality industry? as you would have heard yourself, it is an absolutely business critical issue because, for many businesses, that would not be viable on the basis of two metres and many would not be viable on the basis of one metre. what needs to sit alongside that is the economic help and for example the furloughed
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scheme, which has been a lifeline, businesses... if your business is not going to be viable injuly, how are you supposed to contribute to the scheme? we need to make sure there is flexibility and additional support in these schemes so that businesses who are unable to operate viably continued to get the economic support until such time that they can operate viably. the reason why the hospitality sector is calling so strongly for the reduction from two metres to one metre is because i do not have enough economic support from the government said have to go hand—in—hand. in hand. at the moment, we are seeing the kind of west of all worlds. thank you very much indeed, lucy powell. we will be speaking to paul scully in a few moments but now the weather with
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carol. people have been missing out on and how you can catch up? moments but now the weather with carol. a bit of everything, blue skies, but for others, low cloud, mist and fog that as we go through this week, heavy, thundery downpours and more sunshine. not much in the way of wind to move the thunderstorms along. if you catch one, you will know all about it. low pressure is driving our weather and look, over the uk, pressure is driving our weather and look, overthe uk, really, not much ofa look, overthe uk, really, not much of a breeze. first thing this morning, mist and fog coming in. it is dank in the east of scotland. it is the same across the north—east of england, down towards the likes of north kurt —— norfolk, again, some dank conditions. but for the rest of us, some fog around that will lift. sunshine and some of us already
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starting with some warm sunshine. in that warm sunshine, the showers will get going through the course of the day, particularly in the afternoon. slow—moving, heavy, thundery downpours. some of them in the west, some of them in the east, we could get highs as high as 23,24 and 25 this afternoon. pollen levels are high across england, northern ireland and wales was dubbed through the evening and overnight, a repeat performance of all the locale —— low cloud from the north sea getting back inland. the showers will ease and it will be a mild night, temperature is falling between nine and 13 degrees. we start tomorrow like we started today with all the low cloud, mist and fog with dank conditions, pushing back towards the north sea through the course of the morning and then we will see showers develop. and we are likely to see showers in the east tomorrow. 23 in london.
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thanks for that, carol. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. all non—essential shops in england can open from today after almost three months. businesses including charity shops, book stores and clothing retailers are allowed to reopen, if they introduce strict safety measures. the prime minister has urged people to "shop with confidence". it comes as face coverings are also made compulsory on public transport in england. we're joined now by the small business minister, paul scully. good morning to you, thank you for spending some time with us live on brea kfast spending some time with us live on breakfast this morning. we were hearing about confidence. can you assure our viewers this morning, are you confident it is safe for shops to reopen today in england?” believe it is. i have been working really ha rd believe it is. i have been working really hard with retailers on a day—to—day basis. we have worked with them on the guidance so there area with them on the guidance so there are a few surprises —— so there are
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few surprises were stopped clearly the high street will be very different like it was before with the 1—way systems, the hand sanitisers, these things, that nonetheless, it is safe to shop but i encourage people to be sensible. you work with people in the shops but do go out and shop and start opening up gradually but carefully so that we can start to restore livelihoods and protect businesses and get things going slowly again.” am sure there are some people watching this morning as they have beenin watching this morning as they have been in contact with us saying that they will go to the shops today, but others are very much concerned about going out still and won't be going anywhere near the shops today. how busy do you think it will be. we will wait and see. i am already hearing that numbers are picking up
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around the country. i hope people will be sensible because the two metre rule is still in place. people still need to be socially distancing and that is going to be with us for some time to come. that is why i say people should just stay alert, use their common sense, and people still going about what they are doing, walks and exercise and at the supermarkets, they will still be able to do that with the social distancing in non—essential retail stock we just spoke to the labour party about that, it seems to be an area of concern. party about that, it seems to be an area of concern. were party about that, it seems to be an area of concern. were to come down to one metre, it would make a difference to some smaller facilities and also the hospitality industry as well. can i ask you, in those discussions, would there be an argument to be said, as they have donein argument to be said, as they have done in other countries, where there is some compulsory use of some sort of face covering and then a reduction in that social distancing
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toi.5 reduction in that social distancing to1.5 or one reduction in that social distancing to 1.5 or one metre. in the retail and hospitality sector, they have raised the issue of the economics of the distances, in the guidelines, clearly, there is not a way you can keep the two metre rule guaranteed in some places and that is why you will see a number of perspex screens around the place when you go out shopping and these are things, so there are other measures that can be brought in to mitigate but clearly when you get to the hospitality sector, you will not have perspex between the tables because so much of it is about experience as well so we wa nt of it is about experience as well so we want people to go out shopping, be sensible but also enjoy themselves. go back to the shops second or third time, it will allow the economy to reopen because of the two metre rule is there today, there isa two metre rule is there today, there is a comprehensive review but it will always be based on that best health advice. the chancellor said yesterday, this is a quote, advise
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oars advise ministers who are elected to make decisions. there advises advise ministers. what about the careful balance to get the economy back up and running? the government's first priority through all of these has been to save lives but it also needs to make sure we are restoring livelihoods, protecting businesses and allowing them to open up again so that we can start to recover. but it clearly needs to be based on best advice but ultimately the government will be making the decisions, having had the review, having worked with the scientist, making sure we speak to the retail sector, the hospitality sector, and then we will be able to keep all of these things. can you understand as well has some people might be scratching their heads this morning to stop we spoke to a gp. we a lwa ys morning to stop we spoke to a gp. we always speak to a gp this morning —— every morning at 634. there are patients that have come and spoke to her and she has her own issues about
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being able to go and buy shoes but can't go and see her parents who lived together in the same house. can't go and see her parents who lived together in the same housem is effectively about places where you congregate. this is why the hospitality sector has not yet opened. if you are going on, you are buying something, you are leaving, there is relatively minimal contact but clearly, if you are spending sign —— spending time in somebody‘s house, going to a pub or restaurant, where you are spending a lot of time together, the social distancing becomes harder so the transmission is more likely. that is why this is a step in a way to get into that new normal but it is not a flip switch that we go back to how things were. and in terms of shops as well, talking about the steps to get back to the new normal, might one of those steps be a temporary reduction in vat to help shops?”
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those steps be a temporary reduction in vat to help shops? i think the chancellor will also —— always look at what he needs to do to get the economy working. the chancellor is looking at the support that we are giving at the moment. he has shown a lot of flexibility over the last few months if you see what we have introduced right at the beginning to what we have now, we have flexed as the economy changes. we will make any more announcements in due course. i don't you have seen on our programme this morning, we had an interview with manchester united player marcus rashford who has been talking about the provision of free school meals through the summer for children who are eligible of for them and how the government plans to drop the free school meals during the summer break. he says as a child who was eligible for those free school meals himself, he understands the difficulties, he understands being hungry. he talks very powerfully about his family and how he could have actually been another statistic of a hungry kid may be going the wrong way in life but he was of course saved by football. his
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campaign is gathering strength at the moment, what is your position on whether you think free school meals should be extended for children into the summer holidays?” should be extended for children into the summer holidays? i did read markers's letter. he is an inspirational figure and it is great you have people like that that people can look up to from disadvantaged backgrounds. what we're doing is we're always looking and working out how we can support children, especially as it schools are reopening these last few weeks of term. we have put £9 million into summer activities which clearly, if people, if children are in those activities, they will get fed within that as well. we are also bringing in £63 million worth of support to a hardship fund to make sure that people who do struggle, to choose which mill to eat, can actually get access to a decent meal, that is so, so important. 0ne access to a decent meal, that is so, so important. one for their upbringing and two, for their
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learning. hopefully we get back to school and get back to a sense of normality as this school year starts. just to put that in a little bit of context, marcus rashford who is 22, since lockdown started, has managed to raise £20 million to help support disadvantaged children in this country. when you compare that to the money the government is putting in, that is a significant amount, isn't it? a fantastic initiative, really, he should be very much celebrated for what he has managed to achieve. the £9 million in the £63 million are particular initiatives on top of the various support schemes that we are giving at the moment and so that is why we need to make sure that we are protecting jobs so that people, the pa rents of protecting jobs so that people, the parents of children that you described can actually get into work and can retain theirjobs as well, to feed their children. we do need to feed their children. we do need to make sure that we are getting children back to school as and when it is safe to do so and obviously feeding those people that are run
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free school meals. would you support a u—turn on this policy? free school meals. would you support a u-turn on this policy? clearly, the schools are not open but as i say, that is why we are putting in the initiatives to make sure we can have activities over the summer that we can get children from a disadvantaged background into and obviously they will be fed at that point anyway. paul scully, really good to talk to you this morning. it isa good to talk to you this morning. it is a small business minister speaking to us live on bbc breakfast this morning and also reacting to our exclusive interview this morning with marcus rashford because he went to see him yesterday, sally? we spoke at length about his campaign. the moment, the government is planning to stop the free school meals programme. during the holidays. the difficulty is, during this pandemic, lots of summer clubs and activities that they will be going too, won't be happening, they will be closed.
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marcus has been explaining to me why the issue is so important to him. following more than two weeks of anti—racism protests, marcus also told me how he hopes people will make their voices heard. my mum was a single parent, she's got five kids all living in the same house. the programme i started in at 11 years old, you are supposed to started at 12 years old, which basically gives you new accommodation closer to the training facilities and a new school and she worked that hard to push it forward because she knew that for me that was the step i needed to take. i needed to be eating the right foods while i was growing and needed to be close to my new teammates, schoolfriends, things like that, so she made the decision when i was 11 years old and united allowed it. that was the reason i ended up going at a younger age compared to the others. following more than two weeks of anti—racism protests, marcus also told me how he hopes people will make their voices heard. you have to do something.
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especially, i am a young black person, struggling in the system, but managed to find a way out and help my family. now that i have done that, it is about helping the families that need you most so i think it is important to have a voice. it is one thing thinking about it and writing it down in your house but if you don't get that message out to the people, and to the people higher up, that can possibly change the way things are going. a remarkable young man. you can read the letter that he has posted this morning. we have quite a bit of the interview on social media as well for stocks some of the quotes, he says, "political associations of —— aside, can we all agree that no child should be going hungry". a powerful statement from a young man. as you found out, he is so genuine about trying to make a difference. and it resonates because he talks about how he remembers being hungry, he remembers going
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home and knowing that they had to save bits of food that they had in the fridge and that had to last all week. he talks about going to a friend's house because his parents would be able to buy a bit more food and he would go a couple of times a week to have tea with them because they could afford to feed him a little bit more. it is really very powerful and as dan says, that interview coming up. the department for education says ‘the national voucher scheme will not run during the summer holidays but thousands of children will receive additional support through their holiday activities and food programme, which offers free meals throughout the summer holidays.‘ it was a few months ago that matt hancock was talking about football is taking a hand —— a pay cut and saying they should do more. when footballers talk about sobbing outside the sport, they often get told just picture sport. we should be glad that he has not done that and made a real difference to millions of children across the uk.
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the interview is coming up. jane is here with the rest of the sport. good morning, jane. a really scary looking accident for sky brown. fortu nately, looking accident for sky brown. fortunately, it looks like she is making a full recovery. britain's number one female skateboarder, 11—year—old sky brown, is lucky to be alive after an horrific training accident last month. the olympic hopeful, who lives in los angeles, took a 15—foot fall while attempting a trick. doctors said that if she hadn't been wearing a helmet, she could have died. sky says she put the footage of her accident on social media because she wanted people to know it's ok to get it wrong sometimes. 0n social media, everything's like perfect. you know, people might think i'm super girl or something, but ijust want to show sometimes you're going to fall and i wanted to spread the message, it's ok to fall sometimes, you are going to fall, like, get back up and keep on going because, you know, falling can happen and that can't stop us from doing what we love.
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rory mcilroy had been in contention to take golf‘s first tournament back after the corona virus, but the northern irishman had a dreadful final round in texas with five bogey‘s and a double bogey. this was mcilroy at the 4th, he dropped right down the leaderboard. the tourament eventually went to a play off where american collin morikawa missed this three foot putt. gifting the charles schwab challenge to fellow countryman daniel berger. england'sjustin rose finished one shot behind the leaders. as we countdown to the return of the premier league on wednesday — there was a moment of history in spain as their top flight completed its first round of matches since lockdown. real madrid defender marcelo became the first player in la liga to take the knee in a show of support to the black lives matter movement. he did it after scoring their third goal against eibar. that moved real to within two points
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of league leaders barcelona. premier league clubs will replace players names with the words ‘black lives matters' on the back of shirts and they'll wear a badge alongside one for nhs staff. very much looking forward to that, on wednesday, when is the premier league returns. not long now. thank you very much. the story of dunkirk and the evacuation of tens of thousands of british and french soldiers from the beaches of france, has been celebrated again this summer. but few of us know the story of another group of little ships, which sailed to rescue allied troops in normandy, two weeks later. their mission started on the channel island ofjersey, as robert hall reports. st helier is little sheep forming up
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to celebrate a scintilla of ships. 0ut out from the help which is monko,... by out from the help which is monko,... by then the world had heard of the miracle at dunkirk were tens of thousands of allied soldiers are still being evacuated. 0n thousands of allied soldiers are still being evacuated. on tuesday 16th, an urgent message volunteers into jersey. they sent this telegram to the governor, from the governor to the governor, from the governor to the governor, from the governor to the bailiff and the bailiff turned round to the yacht club. they had a meeting in the afternoon, they decided what they could do and they earmarked 20 boats. they got the cruise together in the afternoon and just before midnight, the first five
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boats out of 20 left st helier. diana, saint clement, teaser, girl joyce, one by one they hold up their sales and set course. the germans we re sales and set course. the germans were probably about 30—40 miles away by the time the little ships got there. they were potentially in the firing line. there was a demolition crew working there, about 50 engineers and royal naval personnel and that is when the little ships really, really came into their own because they were asked to wait until the demolition had taken place to bring the cruise off and to collect a ny to bring the cruise off and to collect any stragglers. by the next morning, the little yachts with the grateful passengers were back in st
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helier. the commander told the cruise, without you, i would not be alive today. after the war, the volu nteers alive today. after the war, the volunteers told their stories and the sailing club was awarded a battle honour. it is one of the reason the story is not told is that for a lot of people it does not have the romanticism of the little ships. it does and here is that romantic story. here are those brave civilian seamen taking their small boats into the line of fire. robert hall, bbc news. what an incredible story.l what an incredible story. a bit of a history lesson as well. beautiful pictures also. thank you for watching bbc breakfast. the need to maintain a social distance of two metres in england is being reviewed by the government.
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we were just speaking to paul scully the business minister a little while ago. it follows pressure from mps and the hospitality industry, who argue that allowing us to be closer together will help businesses once they reopen. however, the government's scientific advisers say that being one metre apart carries up to ten times the risk of contracting coronavirus. we're joined now by kate nicholls, chief executive for uk hospitality, and by dr mike tildesley, an expert in infectious diseases at the university of warwick. thank you to both of you for being with us. let's come to you first of all. i do not know whether you listen to paul scully talking to the importance of maintaining two metres. give us an idea of how to metres. give us an idea of how to metres will affect the hospitality industry? we very much welcome the government decision to conduct a review under this because it is a matter of survival or business failure as far as hospitality is concerned for many of the small
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businesses. if businesses are opening at one metre distances, they are opening at 30% of normal revenue and fora are opening at 30% of normal revenue and for a quarter of small hospitality businesses will not be able to open at all. if they are one metre with additional protection, they can reach 60— 70% and that puts them at break even. it is literally about viability and we know that a third of businesses may not reopen asa third of businesses may not reopen as a result of prolonged closure and that puts a million jobs at risk across the hospitality sector so it really is very sick if you cant. you said one metre for both of those exa m ples said one metre for both of those examples but you are saying to metres is 30% but if it goes down to one metre it comes to 70%? yes. what is your view of moving the two metre rule down to one? inaudible public
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health perspective if we go from two metres to one metre, this will result in an increase in risk and that could be up to ten times. the evidence is still slightly unclear, depending on the study it could be from twice — ten times the risk. there is a risk but it is important to stress this is purely based on public health and any decision made by the government has to take into account other factors, the economic factors upon the businesses in order to make the decision. as we had the chancellor say yesterday, you are one of those committees and it is yourjob to advice but it is the government making the decisions based on all the facts they bring
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into it? if all i was doing was advising the best policy to minimise the impact on public health and there were no other considerations than anyone would say it is for everyone to remain in locked out until there is a vaccine but clearly thatis until there is a vaccine but clearly that is not a sensible policy to suggest when there are so many other things at stake. what i will say and it is very important is that a whole lot of relaxation measures coming into force now and it is extremely important to monitor the effect of that upon the r value. an we need to be flexible so that we maintain it. ido like be flexible so that we maintain it. i do like the fourth reopening is planned. how do you plan for that? are you planning on two metres or building a system or advising people to build the system where it is more likely they will be working with a
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one metre rule or plan for both?” think at the moment we have to plan for both but at the moment we do not have a confirmed opening date so there are many uncertainties our businesses are facing at the moment in hospitality. they employ 3.2 million people so it is a huge industry which does not have certainty about opening date, what guidelines they will be opening under and potentially could be happening within three weeks. it makes it a very anxious environment for ourteam. we makes it a very anxious environment for our team. we would like 70 from government as soon as practically possible. businesses will have to plan for all eventualities of social distancing which meant they are potentially having costs they can hardly do at the time. we need to provide certainty about bringing back off furlough so they can have
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somejob security going back off furlough so they can have some job security going forward. how damaging is uncertainty and how much of this is about confidence, not only for people working there but also people who want to make use of the industry? confidence is critical. none of our businesses can plan, none can apply for loans, none can determine what is happening with their rent which is coming up at the end of this month which is the biggest overhead. there is ultimately going to be some knee—jerk reaction with redundancies coming through this month. also the continued debate does not help consumer confidence. this is a small relative risk and there are other matters the need to be taken into account. we need to make sure that consumers feel confident to return, workers feel confident to come back to work and that the businesses have the confidence to plan successfully for the rest of the year. at the
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moment theyjust do not have that and that means there are jobs at risk. coming back on that issue of two metres or one metre, it seems that, if there is not going to be reduction unless there is a fully functioning track and trace system, u nless functioning track and trace system, unless that is robust and working, that distance will remain at two metres? i think you're right that testing and tracing is extremely crucial. this applies notjust testing and tracing is extremely crucial. this applies not just for the distancing. a lot of talk re ce ntly the distancing. a lot of talk recently about the fear of a second wave and one of the ways to prevent thatis wave and one of the ways to prevent that is for track and trace to be working properly. we can rapidly detect individuals and trace their contacts so that we can isolate these people and prevent larger scale spread and if that works
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effectively, i would scale spread and if that works effectively, iwould hope scale spread and if that works effectively, i would hope that we could relax a whole lot of restrictions which would hopefully include a reduction in the distance. but that should be done with other measures in place, good hygiene practices, taking precautions wherever possible is really crucial because we want to avoid a second wave occurring in the future. thank you to both of you. let's go straight to carol who always brings us the sunshine even when she is talking about extra rain for our gardens. we are starting off with a foggy picture but nonetheless a beautiful picture but nonetheless a beautiful picture in the fog and that fog left through the course of the day. some sunshine around, this is in suffolk. a beautiful day here. the forecast not just for today but this week a beautiful day here. the forecast notjust for today but this week is one four sunshine and heavy thundery
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showers. not much wind in the forecast so if you catch a shower it will last for quite a while. pollard neville very high for northern ireland, northern england and also wales. we start with low cloud and eastern fog from the north sea. further south, we also have some fog through parts of the midlands. that will tend to lift and receive sunshine coming through. warm sunshine coming through. warm sunshine through the course of the afternoon. spiking showers. few in the east, more in the west. a few in scotland. a real difference in the temperature as well. under the cloud, 40 degrees and aberdeen not particularly special. ——14. 21 in glasgow. as we head through the evening and overnight, show was fading and we will see a return to
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these low cloud coming in from the north sea pushing further inland in doing so. it will not be a cold night quite a mild night with temperatures falling between nine and 20 degrees. tomorrow, again hardly an ice about in the charts so once again any showers are going to be slow—moving, heavy and thundery. some of the torrential. we start off with all this low cloud, mist and fog. moser today pushing back towards the north sea coastline and show a developing more widely for the course of tomorrow. more likely to see them in the east than we are tomorrow with temperatures climbing tomorrow with temperatures climbing to the low 20s for some of us. this is an overnight temperature for wednesday where we see a lot of showers, a lot of them spreading from the west towards the east. the headlines are next.
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good morning. back in business. thousands of shops in england re—open after nearly three months of lockdown. store managers are just arriving and last bits of preparation being done. but will the customers turn up? i am ata but will the customers turn up? i am at a real thai park in cheshire this morning to find out. face coverings are now compulsory for passengers on public transport in england. praise for the black lives matter supporter who saved another man from violent protests.
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i wasn't thinking. i wasjust thinking of, you know, a human being on the floor. it wasn't going to end well had we not intervened. footballer, marcus rashford, writes to mps asking them not to stop free school meal vouchers. in an exclusive tv interview with breakfast the england and manchester united star, who's raised more than £20 million to feed british children — is concerned the scheme ends next month. you know, what families are going through now, i once had to go through that same system and it's very difficult to find a way out. it's monday 15th june. our top story. it's a day of major change in england as lockdown restrictions continue to ease. after almost three months, all non—essential shops including clothing retaillers and department stores can reopen today, if they stick to strict safety measures. meanwhile, if you're travelling on public transport in england, you'll have to wear a face covering
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from today, or risk a potential fine. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. all correspondent chris mason. change for england toi all correspondent chris mason. change for england to good all change for england today? yes, good morning. the first thing you will need if you are heading out to work and jumping on the bus, you will need one of these, a face covering. necessary if you are on public transport in england as of this morning. though so—called nonessential shops as described by the government which plenty of us have realised are relatively essential, will have the chance to head back to many of them and they will reopen this morning. but crucially with social distancing measures in place. screens up at the tills and also staying two metres apart. the government is sticking with this idea for now with this idea you stay two metres apart when
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you are out and about. although there are loads of countries in the world where it is much lower. what a prospect of a cut in that? we hear from the government that stuff is under constant review. it gives an impression of dynamism when actually diddly squat is happening. but on this measure of staying two metres apart, it does look like there is some movement. notjust scientists being listened to businesses and as well. this is the business minister on breakfast in the last half an hour. there are difficult decisions to be made but the government's first priority out of this is to save lives, but it needs to make sure we restore livelihoods, protect businesses and allow the economy to open up again so we can start to re cove r. open up again so we can start to recover. but that needs to be based on the best advice, but the government will be making the decisions having had the review, having worked with the scientists
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and making sure we continue to speak to the retail sector and the hospitality sector and we can keep all these things under review.” think we are edging towards this happening perhaps in the next couple of weeks. there is huge pressure on the government to move on this. plenty in the hospitality sector, pubs, plenty in the hospitality sector, pu bs, restau ra nts plenty in the hospitality sector, pubs, restaurants which hope to open in england on the 4th ofjuly, saying their businesses would be viable if people have to stay two metres apart. the government will hope if the number of cases continues to go down, then potentially it will be saved to reduce from say two metres to one metre, maybe encourage the use of these facemasks in more places other than just public transport to ensure that businesses that might struggle without a reduction in that number, can open up and make money again, potentially in just a couple of weeks. chris mason in westminster, thank you very much. we will be live
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ata train thank you very much. we will be live at a train station, piccadilly station, we are at gatwick airport, cheshire 0aks shopping centre in bishop auckland to see the practicalities of how this is going to work if you are venturing out today. it changes in england this morning. slightly different picture in scotland, northern ireland and wales. we were speaking to some of the guys from secondary schools early on in the programme, it is a significant step for many out there. several eu countries, including germany and france, are reopening borders and lifting travel restrictions from today. it follows advice from the eu commission which claims that the rules are no longer an effective measure to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. the foreign office currently advises british nationals against all but essential international travel — those who do go abroad, will need to self—isolate for 14 days when they come home. a man accused of urinating on a memorial to the murdered police officer keith palmer, during demonstrations
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at the weekend, will appear in court today. this photo was widely shared on social media after protests in london on saturday. andrew banks, who's 28 and from stansted, has been charged with outraging public decency. police have condemned two, large illegal raves in greater manchester at the weekend which attracted around 6,000 people. a man died from a suspected drug overdose at one event — while a woman was raped and three men were stabbed the other. men were stabbed at the other. greater manchester police said the gatherings defied the work done to slow the spread of covid—19. it is really inappropriate for people to attend raves when there has been so much work by the nhs, the police and the community is trying to protect us from this terrible virus. as we'e been hearing, nonessential shops, in england, will reopen their doors for the first time today since they were forced to close
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almost three months ago. for shoppers the high street experience will be very different from life before lockdown. so what can we expect? in a moment we'll speak to sean, who is at cheshire 0aks. but first let's go to our consumer affairs correspondent, sarah corker, who's in bishop auckland. good morning, what will it be like there? good morning. after12 long weeks with the shutters down, retailers are hoping our high streets will come back to life. it is full of small, independent shops and they have been working really ha rd to and they have been working really hard to get safety measures in place so they can reopen. we can have a look inside this gift shop, they have hand sanitiser as you come in, a one—way system and you can see the arrows on the floor reminding you to keep two metres apart. customers are asked politely to browse with their eyes and not with their hands. alex, you are the owner. how much of a
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challenge has it been putting this in place? it is definitely a challenge, nothing we thought we'd have to do but this is the new normal. it has been a tough three months for retailers, how do you feel having the doors open? so pleased to be back, we have done a lot of work while we have been close that we have never been able to do before. and arguably the deserted high streets have been the most visible economic casualty of lockdown. you have had a bit of financial help to get through this period? we got the small business grant like a lot of small businesses did and we had a rent holiday from our landlord which was helpful.” streets were struggling before the virus, more people have gone towards online shopping, how do you think you can tempt them back? we have done a lot of work while we have been close. we are a zero waste business and people do prefer to shopin business and people do prefer to shop in the store so that is our
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main premise as to why people should come back. big day today, i will let you get on. the big question is, how quickly will customers come back? will they be confident to start spending again at what is a difficult, economic time. we can chat to wendy, who is next door. we have not had much sleep? no, about two and a half hours. anxiety or excitement? a bit of both. i suppose customers are feeling exactly the same. you run the craft shop and you help support a number of businesses across county durham so it is important to get trade in? yes, all of my crafters, 20 of us in here, it is the only place they have to show their handcrafted goods. you have your visor and that is to reassure
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customers but also to protect yourself? it is, yes. we feel if customers feel safe then hopefully they will come in. and bishop auckland has had a difficult couple of years, almost 25% of shops here are already empty, so how do you think you can compete with the big out—of—town retail parks, how can you get customers shopping again? we feel in bishop auckland, there is so much history in bishop auckland and thatis much history in bishop auckland and that is what is going to bring the visitors in once the restrictions are lifted and eased. so going forward , are lifted and eased. so going forward, hopefully this will be a destination street and we do feel people's shopping habits have changed so much over the last few yea rs, changed so much over the last few yea rs , eve n changed so much over the last few yea rs, even before changed so much over the last few years, even before covid—19, we feel it is the small, local and independent businesses that will bring the high street back to life. lots of optimism, good luck today.
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that is the view from the high street in bishop auckland. sean is ata street in bishop auckland. sean is at a retail park in cheshire. good morning. retail parks have this kind of thing to play with, big car parks, space and they are hoping it will be one thing that will help customers feel confident when they come back. they would normally get 20,000 customers every day at cheshire 0aks amongst all the outlet stores, the food shops that are available. but it will be different and the car park, only half of the spaces will be available and as you go into the stalls, a very different experience. the person in charge of thatis experience. the person in charge of that is kenny murray, the manager. hejoins me from that is kenny murray, the manager. he joins me from across the benches. kenny, what are you expecting? today isa kenny, what are you expecting? today is a new day and we have had a challenging time but we are excited. we are excited about reopening the centre. we have been working hard to make it safe and we want to ensure customers feel safe and feel
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welcomed when they come back today. what will be the major change for people who are used to going to cheshire 0aks on a busy day, this would be rammed, how are you managing to cope with that? 5096 reduction in terms of the overall capacity, that allows us to manage the volume of people. then we have worked hard with our brand partners to manage the kind of numbers coming into the stores. some customers will have to queue. but we have focused around the health and safety and we have got a lot of hand sanitisation, the toilets are open. we are making sure people feel safe when they are here. how sustainable is this, or do you need the social distancing distance to be changed for you to feel like this is sustainable and you will not just feel like this is sustainable and you will notjust have a lot of shop closures ? you will notjust have a lot of shop closures? we are confident, the way we are opening today with the two
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metre social distancing and hand sanitising is fine. some of those measures, we might keep going forward , measures, we might keep going forward, hand sanitation is good and helping guests keep safe. we will see how we trade and see how we go. we will follow the government advice and we have worked very closely with chester west and chester council and also the police to make sure it is a safe environment for everybody. good luck today, the sun is out and that isa luck today, the sun is out and that is a good start. many of the things people are dealing with, queues of customers, starting to see the barriers, the footprints around the stalls which is where you need to stand. many people like jane, can i borrow you for a minute. we have been getting ready for what is coming, but how are you feeling about this being a little bit closer to no more than it has been for a few weeks? it is great to see all of the shops back, seeing the people coming back. it is a really good feeling. i know you cannot see my
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smile, but it is great and lovely to see so many people back at the stores opening. what does it mean foran area like stores opening. what does it mean for an area like this where people will have the high streets and retail parks reopening again? cheshire 0aks retail parks reopening again? cheshire oaks is a main focal point for a lot of people. the shops are great, everybody comes from all over the country, all over the world and after this lockdown, people will be so happy, even though the restrictions are in place, just to see old friends in passing and it will be fantastic. keep that smile up, draw one on by the end of the day. just a quick question at the end for our retail analyst who we have been speaking to, kate hardcastle. if i can bring you in just to ask you, one of the things lots of retailers will have been asking you, how do i get customers enjoying a day at the shops now? you have got to remind them of what you stand for, their safety comes first
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and they can still enjoy some of the vibrancy and your service excellence in how you want to, accommodate them. minimise the queues, maximise their safety and assure them that being in the store will be better than being online. it will be a battle, someone said it will be like decemberfor a battle, someone said it will be like december for a couple of months battle, someone said it will be like decemberfor a couple of months in terms of the feeling and the spending but get in for the long game. it is going to be a big one, lots of people across the country excited to go back to work and open their stores that they have put so much effort in over their lifetimes, ina lot much effort in over their lifetimes, in a lot of cases. waiting to see at cheshire 0aks how many of these yellow markings will be taken up as the day goes on. i expect that will get busier in the next couple of hours. yes, that opens at 10am. if you have been wondering what the shops will be like, the first time in three months. this is this
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morning, people waiting outside primark in birmingham. they have been there since the early hours of this money. i don't know how you feel about that, because it is an interesting mix of people, as they are there in birmingham and similar pictures from liverpool this morning, of people being desperate to get to the shops for the first time ina to get to the shops for the first time in a long time. some people will be watching that ranking, what on earth are they doing? interestingly, lots of people wearing masks, trying to obey social distancing, it does seem very well spaced out and the barriers are in place and it is very organised. people doing a lot to make sure things are in place and they can be open. wider aisles in some places, screens at the till and if you are not able to meet those government provisions, then you are not able to open. that is what is happening in
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england today. i am not sure how you feel about that, let us know. that is the picture from birmingham primark which opens later this morning. as well as changes to how we shop, things also look very different on public transport in england. face coverings are now compulsory, while some flights are resuming for the first time in months. nina warhurst is at manchester piccadilly and breakfast‘s tim muffett is at gatwick airport. let's go to nina first, how are things on the trains this morning? how are the trains this morning, i can see if the people behind you are piccadilly? yes, so far, so good. as of today, mandatory in england to wear face coverings, notjust on a train, butan wear face coverings, notjust on a train, but an aeroplane, ferry and a bus. 0nly train, but an aeroplane, ferry and a bus. only in england. if you are crossing the border from wales or
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scotland, at that moment you would have to put a mask on. most people we have seen in the station have been wearing a face covering. it doesn't have to be a mask like this, i saw somebody with a scarf and also somebody with a sock they had adapted, hopefully clean! staff here are providing face coverings if they haven't got one. those are the changes in the station. if you have ever travelled on one of the shuttle trains between manchester and london you know they are usually packed. not since lockdown and they are limiting the number of tickets sold to about 100 of the 600 capacity maintain social distancing. when you come into the buff a cart, which everybody knows is the best part of the train, there are markings on the floor to make sure passengers keep their distance and also a shield to protect staff. all of the trains are sprayed with a powerful disinfectant
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every four weeks and some trains will have markings saying where you can and cannot set. extra staff to encourage the use of face coverings but it is down to every passenger to play their part. let's have a chat to michael about what sort of challenges that presents to staff. we were hearing it will be up to passengers to make sure they maintain social distance and keep theirface maintain social distance and keep their face coverings and for the duration of travel, how tricky will it be for the staff? we are here to help customers understand how they can continue to travel safely. what we have seen over the last several weeks, customers have worked with us really, really well with these changing guidelines. we are sure they will continue to do so moving forward. we were hearing shown at cheshire 0aks and some retailers and hospitality would say it would make a world of difference if the two metre rule was reduced to one metre, you are running about one in six capacity at the moment, would you
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like to see reduced? are running at reduced capacity on the trains following the two metre guidance. as and when the guidance changes we will react to that as quickly as we can and we will be able to get hopefully more people on the train and more people using public transport. we will try answering this round to james about taking out the camera operator. james, you are one of the station managers and i was chatting to some of your staff and they are concerned if people refuse to wear masks, it will fall on them to enforce it? we are here to encourage people to wear masks and enable that and educate and explain the importance of wearing those masks in order to make sure you are keeping other people around you are keeping other people around you safe when you are wearing the mask. the safety of our staff is paramount so we wouldn't want them to be ina paramount so we wouldn't want them to be in a situation where they are putting themselves at risk. but we are trying to work with passengers to explain the reasons for wearing masks and we have seen a good
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response and a good uptake. so far, passengers have been completely compliant. if they are not they can be refused travel and can be fined £50 on the spot which will go up to £100 if they don't pay after 14 days. lots of changes if you are planning to travel on a train today and similarly if you are heading to the airport. good morning from the north terminal which looks and feels very, very different. anyone who has travelled through this airport, it is so deserted compared to how it normally is. face coverings in england are now mandatory and in the airport, whilst not mandatory, you are being urged to wear them. there are hand sanitiser is here and also vending machines will be installed, which will allow you to buy one of these. many people have come on the train a nyway many people have come on the train anyway so it might already have one. this is an extraordinary time for airports and airlines. they have had
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airports and airlines. they have had a very difficult time just keeping afloat. earlier i had a chat to the chief executive of easyjet. their first flight in months took off at around 7am heading to glasgow. many people watching this will want to know, can i get away on a summer holiday this year and this is what he had to say? i am optimistic about that. i do think the government is working actively on solutions on how they can progress throughout this period. we hope that will be replaced soon with a better alternative. stewart wingate is the chief executive of gatwick airport. what an extraordinary time this is, you have never seen the airport like this? not for such a prolonged period of time, but we are preparing the airport for reopening so the north terminal welcomed its first flight with north terminal welcomed its first flight with easyjet this morning. we are delighted to see that. 0ver flight with easyjet this morning. we are delighted to see that. over the coming weeks we expect to build a
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more scheduled flights, notjust domestic destinations but also across europe hopefully when quarantine comes to an end for the european destinations. the face coverings, on the aircraft you have to wear them, what is the situation at the airport itself? in the airport we are advising everybody to come with their own face coverings so that we can keep each other say. we have done lots of work to keep the hygiene levels to the highest level and we have all the hand sanitisation, deep cleans throughout the airport but one of the things passengers can do to help others and themselves as to wear a face covering when travelling to the airport. going to an airport can be quite an exciting time, an uplifting time, this is very different. can you get through this? this week we will have about 10,000 passengers using the airport. it is very quiet and lots of opportunity to social distance. normally we would have about a million passengers passing through the airport this week. we
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are building up again and it will ta ke are building up again and it will take some time. but we are confident we will recover and we look forward tojune, july we will recover and we look forward to june, july and august we will recover and we look forward tojune, july and august being busier than the last three months. thank you very much for having us this morning and i hope things turn back to normal. it is all about the passengers and james is on his way to nice. never seen it like this, but got to make do. how does it feel to be here without a face covering? very strange and eerie, but it is the way it is. if people do it, then it shouldn't be a problem. are you nervous about getting on the aeroplane? no, if everybody follows the rules, it shouldn't be an issue. looking forward to going to nice? yes, i looking forward to going to nice? yes, lam looking forward to going to nice? yes, i am working over there, so i'm expected to be busy when i get off the plane. have a good trip and thank you for talking to us. this is a very different gatwick airport
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this morning. the look and the feel of it is unlike anything most people have ever seen before. a smattering of passengers checking in at the moment but very few and face masks a common sight, one we never thought we would see. studio: very interesting to see gatwick airport and piccadilly station and on the high street and cheshire 0aks. there has been a lot of chatter about these pictures this morning. yes, this is primark in birmingham. this video shows customers waiting outside and queueing in a very organised and orderly manner. they have been there since the early hours of this morning, birmingham primark. we know there is a queue outside the primark in liverpool. what are you going to say? i am interested to know what people think. in rotherham people have been camping out by the primark. the
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desperation to get into primark is something people are struggling to get their heads around this morning. 0ne e—mail has come in from granny sue. are people so desperate to shop at primark to form queues early in the morning? no way! she said she will ease her way into shopping at her own pace, i'm not so desperate to need anything from any retailer, i don't require any new clothes, i have a wardrobe full of clothes that are not worn. it is like the queues outside ikea. sue is sticking to online shopping. lots of people reacting to these pictures this morning from birmingham. primark is trending along with morning carol. so that is the time to say good morning, carol. now let's get the weather with carol. the forecast for this week is one of
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sunshine and heavy, thundery showers. we have just sunshine and heavy, thundery showers. we havejust had one in welshpool and quite torrential rain. you can see quite nicely on the satellite, low pressure is anchored to the south—west of the uk. everything moves around that in an anticlockwise direction so it is dragging in this low cloud from the north sea. not much in the way of wind so if you catch a shower it will be slow moving and heavy. we have fog in other parts of the country across the midlands, parts of wales as well. that will lift as the sun gets going but we will hang on to the cloud down the east coast. towards the west, you are likely to see a towards the west, you are likely to seeafair towards the west, you are likely to see a fairfew towards the west, you are likely to see a fair few showers, they will be hit and miss but likely to be heavy and thundery. it is the far north of scotla nd and thundery. it is the far north of scotland in the northern isles that hang on to the sunshine but down the north sea coast you can see how we have the see thread either inland or just down the coastline down towards norfolk. as we come in land, there will be some cloud but they will be
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a lot of warm sunshine as well and we will have the showers in south—west england, wales, north—west england, northern ireland and parts of north—west scotland. 15 to 23 but feeling cool if you are under the sea fret. many of the showers will tend to ease this evening. mr malcolm farr coming back in from the north sea pushing back inland and it's not going to be cold, quite mild. temperatures nine to 13 degrees. tomorrow is similar to 13 degrees. tomorrow is similar to today in many ways in that we will watch the cloud pushing back towards the north sea. we will still have showers in the west but tomorrow is the low pressure drifts away further east we are more likely to see some of those in the east as well. like today, they will be slow—moving and not much wind around and not much of a breeze, also heavy and not much of a breeze, also heavy and thundery. temperatures 15 to 23 but we could see 24 or indeed, 25. tuesday into wednesday we have low pressure and we will see a few
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showers but still not much wind. you can see all this low cloud coming in from the north sea and if anything, on wednesday the showers will be more widespread, still heavy and still the potential for them to be thundery and it will feel humid, temperatures 14 to 23 once again. by the time we get to thursday, a weather front across the south producing rain. as we push further north it will be drier and brighter with fewer showers and you can see by the time we get to the weekend, high pressure will take over again. carol, it is great to see you again. no wonder she is trending every monday. have a lovely day. quick things to mention, we lost the bbc breakfast clock. who lost it? i don't know, it disappeared but we have got it back. i know it probably must a few people up i know it probably must a few people up this morning. i want to read this
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letter sent into the dell at —— daily telegraph. "i know that some are warning schools against the computer game fortnight saying it engenders aggression and violence. i ama engenders aggression and violence. i am a 74—year—old who likes to play and keep in touch with his nine—year—old grandson who lives 200 miles away. in playing the game," saysjohn miles away. in playing the game," says john evans, "i've miles away. in playing the game," saysjohn evans, "i've come to interact with many of his friends, who are caring and friendly towards the grandpa among them. they never leave me today, are quick to attend to me when injured and give patient advice. their politeness, comradeship, team spirit, humourand creative thinking would astound their parents," he says. "it is a privilege to be counted among them. leave me, this game has nothing to do with violence and everything to do with violence and everything to do with violence and everything to do with fund. " john evans from 0rmskirk in lancashire. what a lovely letter. what a brilliant way
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to keep in touch with your grandchild as well. it is so easy, particularly when the kids are at home, to be concerned about them spending time on games. but we have to remember, lots of these games are about and strategy. and they never allow grandpa to die. stop it, you will make me cry. frank cottrell boyce put that on social media. thank you very much for some of the good stuff. twitter can be a horrible place at the moment but there are some positive lights and they're making there are some positive lights and they‘ re making a there are some positive lights and they're making a difference. we are now hopefully going to share with you something that is quite positive and powerful. it has it -- had a massive impact on many people watching our exclusive interview with marcus rashford today. england and manchester united striker, marcus rashford, has written a passionate and highly personal letter, asking the government to re—think its decision to end free school meal vouchers in england, during the summer. i went to his house last night. talking about his own childhood, marcus says "the system wasn't built for families like mine". i've been to meet him to hear more
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about why this issue is so important to him. marcus, thank you so much for talking to us today. tell me why you've written the letter that you have written? how important is it to you? it obviously has a huge importance for me, probably on a personal level because you know, what families are going through now, i once had to go through that same system and it's very difficult to find a way out. now that i'm in this position that i mean, it's very important for me to help the people that are struggling. that was the main reason why the letter was written. you know, whether the outcome is that it does change or doesn't change, i know that i have done the right thing in trying to help these people. take me back to that time that you talk about in the letter. how difficult were things for you as a kid when you needed free school meals? yeah. well, you
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know, my mum was a single parent. she's got five kids are living in the same house. the programme i started in at 11 years old, you are supposed to started at 12 years old, which basically gives you new accommodation closer to the training facilities and a new school and she worked that hard to push it forward because she knew that for me that was the step i needed to take. i needed to be eating the right foods while i was growing and needed to be close to my new team—mates, school friends, things like that, so she made the decision when i was 11 years old and united allowed it. that was the reason i ended up going at a younger age compared to the others, it was to help my mum with her situation and also get myself out of the situation i was in. there's always a big element of sacrifice to try and get to the top level and you know, that is the one we had to make initially. my mum, she did the best she could.
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i remember we used to go to a shop called pound world, and everything was under a pound. we'd schedule out the week, so we'd get seven yoghurts and you can have one yoghurt a day and so on. she did the best she could within the circumstances, but with some families out there like me that have four or five kids, it's literally impossible to take control of the situation. this is all going on at a time when kids should be concentrating on schoolwork and stuff like that, and it's just crazy to think that this is still going on. we're in 2020 now and it's just something i don't believe should be happening. we mentioned this at the beginning of covid—19, the problem is that we we re of covid—19, the problem is that we were facing then compared to the problems we are going to face after which we are sort of getting to now. the problems after, there are going to be massive consequences of the
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virus. when you are thinking about your own childhood, growing up in wythenshawe, actually things could have been really different for you, couldn't they? yeah, definitely. 4596 of people like me, black people, people in different ethnic minorities, they are living in poverty. you know, i was very close to being one of that 45%. so i understand it could have gone either way for me. and i'm grateful it went this way for me. but it doesn't make me forget about what happened in the past. i obviously want to help the —— those people as much as i can and raise awareness, really. people want to help. i definitely think that people want to help. but they don't have the understanding or the knowledge behind it and they don't how many people it is actually affecting. when i read the letter, when you
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we re when i read the letter, when you were growing up, do you remember being hungry? yeah, of course. but i also understood, maybe it was just pa rt also understood, maybe it was just part of me growing up, i also knew how hard my mum was working anyway, soi how hard my mum was working anyway, so i never moan, i'd never do anything. if there is food on the table, there is food on the table. if not, i had friends who understood my situation and maybe it was possible for me to go to them house and get some food, whatever.” possible for me to go to them house and get some food, whatever. i know you have written this letter from the heart. tell me what you hope to achieve? well, basically i'm hoping the government make a u—turn on the decision to stop the free meal vouchers and i'm just hoping they do it as soon as possible, really. i know they have mentioned they usually do this this time of the year, summer holidays, but because of covid—19 the situation has been com pletely of covid—19 the situation has been completely different for everyone in the world. circumstances change. i think for at least the summer
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holidays, they have to be willing to make that decision to go back on themselves. and what message would you give to the people in the united states and in this country who have felt the need to protest and at times those protests have become violent, but what would you say to young black men, perhaps the same age as you, who are feeling frustrated and angry today? yeah. i just think, there was i was going to bea just think, there was i was going to be a period of anger and frustration, like you mentioned, but we are not doing this, the things we are doing now is for the next generations that are going to profit from what we are doing now. you know, i think it's right to put your foot down and finally say that we've had enough. you know, we will probably never reap the rewards of eight because it is going to be long after we are gone. but hopefully if things keep going in the right
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direction, wejust things keep going in the right direction, we just want to see change and improvement. that's all people are looking for. especially black people. we want equality, of course. and once you start seeing them things come into play, there will be a lot more peace than what there is. so that's why i think it's a good thing that people are doing what they are doing. but for the future you are speaking about your grandkids and their children. it's going to be massive for them. i think it's important to understand that you do have a voice and it's important to use it. that's exactly what he is doing. that's exactly what he is doing. that is six minutes of the interview, and watching him there, you could see why he is making an impact, not only in his own sphere, but far beyond that as well, raising £20 million over the course of the quarantine. £20 million specifically for children who wouldn't be fed or are not eligible for free school
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meals. it is a really powerful statement from him. it is clearly something, lots of people tell footballers to stick to football, but in this particular case... thanks for doing that! —— you're not doing that! you can hear them talking about being hungry as a kid. being taken on by manchester united a year early because his mum needed the support. i going to the club a year early he would be fed, bed and board by the club. that extra support is something his family desperately needed. he talks about all the other people that helped him and the vouchers that were so important to him as a kid. we do have a response from the department for education. the department for education says the national voucher scheme will not run during the summer holidays, but thousands of children will receive additional support through their holiday activities and food programme, which offers free meals throughout the summer holidays. they go on to say, schools reopen
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more widely, and kitchen open, we expect to make food available for children eligible for free school meals were not yet eligible to return to school. where this is not possible schools will continue to offer vouchers. that is a complicated picture. how are those food parcels going to be distributed? yes, thank you for all the messages and e—mails you have been sending through about marcus rashford. it is having a big impact on social media. lots of mp3 tweeting his open letter. you can read the full letter for yourself. political affiliations aside, he says, can we not all agree that no child should be going hungry? and if you see make the u—turn trending on social media today, that is the hashtag that marcus rashford is trying to use to put some pressure on the government to make that change. we will also see primary trending, but that is for different reasons! as i was leaving yesterday after talking to him, i said, what you think is going to happen? how do
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you think is going to happen? how do you expect this to go? he honestly doesn't know. he says, i don't know, they might not listen to me. but i just want to try. in a really positive way, at the end of all this when we are back to normal, and people say, what did you do during lockdown? marcus rashford could say 3 million meals for vulnerable children, 20 william pounds raised, helping hundreds of thousands of kids. —— helping hundreds of thousands of kids. -- £20 helping hundreds of thousands of kids. —— £20 million. the he learn sign language to judge a competition as well? we are judging a poetry competition together and he learnt sight line was almost immediately. i was terrible. he took to it like a duck to water. he took it very seriously because he wanted to go into the school for children who are deaf and hard of hearing and be able to communicate with them on their terms. it has been great to hear from him. lots of you enjoy that. evenif from him. lots of you enjoy that. even if you don't support manchester united or you hate football, i think you can say, well done to marcus rashford. you can find the full interview on our social media
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channels and it will be across the bbc throughout the day. let's go to jane who has some sports news, including what looked like a really nasty crash for one of our very successful young skateboarders? yes, an olympic hopeful as well. with the limbic is not taken place this summer, it has been beneficial for her. britain's number one female skateboarder, 11—year—old sky brown, is "lucky to be alive" after an horrific training accident last month. the olympic hopeful, who lives in los angeles, fell 15 feet as she was attempting a trick. doctors said if she hadn't been wearing a helmet, she could have died. sky and her dad have been speaking to our sports correspondent natalie pirks. i trusted sky, i've seen her do it 100 times. i don't remember me going down, i was going in the air. what was going through your mind? even just seeing that makes me really sick, like physically, it's terrifying.
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i did everything that you shouldn't do, like i ran up to her and grabbed her, and said, "sky, i love you!" "just wake up, sky, wake up." ‘cause she was just not responding. and sky, i‘m guessing you don‘t remember any of this. well, after the fall i rememberjust like at the hospital, i'm like, what? 'cause i was like... and i saw my mum crying next to me, i was like, no, i didn't want mum to feel bad. she had lung lacerations, liver lacerations, stomach lacerations. she broke a lot of bones around her eye socket and the top of her head. i cracked my tooth. cracked her tooth, yeah. and these two bones, these two fingers are actually... fractured. the helmet was insane. sky wears the full face and had it not been the full face, i don‘t know we‘d be here having this conversation. the doctor that took her in said,
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"i can‘t believe how fast she‘s recovering" and the only reason you could think of is because she‘s very smiley and happy. when you saw that video, why did you think i‘m going to show people this? 0n social media, everything's like perfect. you know, people might think i'm super girl or something, but ijust want to show sometimes you're going to fall and i wanted to spread the message, it's ok to fall sometimes, you are going to fall, like, get back up and keep on going because, you know, falling can happen and that can't stop us from doing what we love. is that your plan now for the next year, heading into 0lympics, just to push even harder, even stronger? yeah, i'm going to go higher, do whatever i can do just have fun too. safely. yeah. laughter.
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yes, safely. hopefully she will be all right for next summer‘s postponed 0lympics. rory mcilroy admits he "messed up" at golf‘s first tournament back during the coronavirus pandemic. the northern irishman was in contention to win it, but had a dreadful final round in texas, with five bogey‘s and a double bogey. this was mcilroy at the fourth. he dropped right down the leaderboard. the tournament eventually went to a play—off, where american collin morikawa missed this three foot putt, gifting the charles schwab challenge to fellow countryman daniel berger. england‘s justin rose finished one shot behind the leaders. as we count down to the return of the premier league on wednesday, there was a moment in history for spain, as their top flight completed its first round of matches since lockdown. real madrid defender marcelo became the first player in la liga to take the knee in a show of support to the black lives matter movement. he did it after scoring their third goal against eibar. that moved real to within two points
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of league leaders barcelona. premier league clubs will replace players names with the words black lives matters on the back of shirts, and they‘ll wear a badge alongside one for nhs staff. and there was a show of support at a new tennis tournament in france last night. players in action there instead of queen‘s, which was due to begin today. no doubt also keeping an eye on events in america, as officials decide later if the us open will go ahead or not at the end of august. the likes of world number 10 david goffin and richard gasquet wore black lives matter t—shirts at the ultimate tennis showdown. it‘s been organised by serena williams and coco gauff‘s coach, patrick moratoglou, who says the tournament will also donate $50 per match to support the movement. great initiative. that is the sport for now. thank you jane. have a nice day. see you later on.
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holidays, finances and life at work and home is the focus of a new consumer programme, your money and your life, which starts this morning at 10 o‘clock here on bbc one. sounds very relevant. it‘s a one—stop shop to answer all your consumer questions, and we‘re joined now by presenters matt allwright and kym marsh. good morning. what do you have in store for today‘s show? good morning. your —— your money and your life coming to you like a lightly buttered toast and a cup of tea to hold your hand and ease all of our ways i would lockdown. are you shopping with confidence, ms kym marsh? well, i'm getting there. you may be worried about what you are going to find other shops. i‘ve been there first, exclusively behind the scenes are one of britain‘s biggest shopping centres. it doesn‘t stop there. your money and your life is your go to for all the consumer questions you have a covering travel, health, work and home. today we‘re talking holiday refunds and answering the all—importa nt question, can i go on holiday this year? i certainly hope so. i need a
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holiday. also, we are looking at earning all the stuff you have been looking at in your home into some cash. we are going to attempt to turn kym marsh, possibly thousands of you at home, into cyclists. yeah come on your bike, matt! that was terrible. if you have got a question for our experts, e—mail us right now. your money and your life at bbc to know whether you are heading to the shops today. look forward to seeing you back here are 10am. don‘t be late. we have been told. ten o‘clock today. you know what else is happening at ten o‘clock today? the shops. shoppers have been queuing for hours waiting for non—essential retailers in england to reopen their doors for the first
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time in almost three months. sean is at cheshire 0aks where people are queueing for the car park. sean, bring us up to date with what‘s happening there. i got igot here. i got here. i didn't think there was any need to rush. but now this is the same. they are about to open the barriers pretty shortly here. the traffic starts to back off. that will be an issue we will see across the country where traffic management is pretty key. front of the queue was maria and her family. good morning. congratulations. what have you got your eye on? spending a lot of money? yeah sure. what's the budget? i'm not sure. good luck with the shopping. no point in first in the shopping. no point in first in the queue and not get anything. good morning. i‘ve got a lease as well. second in the queue. tyler is hiding in the car. he is excited? he is.
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it's in the car. he is excited? he is. it‘s his birthday in two weeks. we did so he could come out and spend some money today and have some fun. were you thinking you‘d be second in the queue? no, we got one this morning that there were queues everywhere. i got him out of bed and said, let‘s go early. we can always sit in the car. didn‘t realise we would be second in the queue. he wa nts to would be second in the queue. he wants to wander around the sports shops. anything for you? not really. today about him. how are you feeling generally about shopping? yeah, obviously we have both come with masks. we are going to be very careful. we are not going to be here all day. just get what he wants my grand go back on. i think it will be too busy. i will let you get back in the car because they are about to open the barriers. good luck. it is starting. we will walk back where we are safe to be this morning. the barriers are starting to open. this is going to be the scene for quite a
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lot of people. a lot of money going to be spent today, you would imagine, compared to the last few weeks. maybe a few people saying —— thinking they are not going to go online as much. at the end of the data something a little bit different, isn‘t it? it is something a little bit different. there the moment. no pressure. you have to find the right key. it's ok. it‘s ok. you‘ve still got plenty of space at the roundabout. the idea for this car park is that half the spaces are going to be available and half would be. that is to try to manage all of the cues that are going to be expected around here. there will be car park management and around all the stores there are barriers directing people far tq. and there‘s a lot of excitement. people are really happy to be opening their businesses again. shoppers are happy to be spending.” have to ask you about a key gate.
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what is happening there? has the fella with the key gone off to find the real queue? yeah, this has been escalated, i think! the real queue? yeah, this has been escalated, ithink! they the real queue? yeah, this has been escalated, i think! they are all pretty calm. this was earlier than a lot of them were expecting to open. if that‘s the case i might start doing a little bit of redirecting myself. i can‘t remember how i got in this morning! you wait for three months to open a gate, you open the gate and you can‘t find the right key. nightmare scenario. thank you very much for that. can't find the right key live on television. when we showed the primary pictures earlier i know people were thinking, what on earth is going on? but i show my saying, if you haven‘t been able to do much for such a long time, that is a big moment to be able to go to a shop and get out. yes, getting out is really good for
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a lot of people, i am sure. let‘s look at what you can do today. zoos and safari parks in england will reopen to visitors from today. after months of being unable to rely on ticket sales, many have struggled with the considerable costs of caring for hundreds of animals during lockdown. breakfast‘s john maguire is at longleat safari park in wiltshire for us this morning. he has put on some weight over lockdown! good morning. yeah, lockdown has been kinder to some than others. not quite me. three magnificent white rhinos. an incredibly endangered species. in fact, these have been involved in a breeding programme to try to support species from around the world because they really are so rare. gates here also, providing the keys can be found, will be opened at ten o‘clock this morning. safari parks and zoos able to open today. what a strange period it has been over the past three months. look at
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her. isn‘t she absolutely magnificent? let‘s say good morning to lord and lady bath. good to see you both. emma, of course, from stra ig htly you both. emma, of course, from straightly come dancing. we say it‘s been a strange time. an existential crisis for some businesses. what has been keeping you awake at night over the past 12 weeks? well, the main source of worry has been trying to understand when and how we would be able to reopen. the government finally gave us the all clear but the situation was somewhat ambiguous and confusing and conflicting prior to that. but i think we have to be philosophical. we had our record year since inception last year. so we come into this from a position of relative strength. and a lot of businesses are not in such a fortu nate businesses are not in such a fortunate position. so i think we have to be a bit pragmatic. good for you. and a staged opening. just members today, safari only, so people within their car? yes, safari
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only for the first three days. everyone must book online. and then from next thursday, again the first two days for annual pass holders only, we open up most of the rest of the park. for example, our indoor food and beverage won‘t be open. animal handling won‘t be open. but most of the other component parts will be open. just with very strict caps on numbers so we can ensure that social distancing guidelines are observed on site. absolutely. the new normal, as we keep saying. emma, we don‘t know when your house will open in the coming months. what had been like not to have visitors? it's grow such a shame. longleat is such a wonderfully family inclusive place. we love sharing it with everybody. it's wonderful to open today the safari and see how it goes and hope for the future, really. and
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the work continues, doesn‘t it? the animals have to be looked after. we talked about the breeding programme with these lovely animals. you are a big fan of these. tell us why? they are so incredible. they are sort of pre—historic when you look at them. so impressive. the breeding programmes we have been involved with to ensure the species, the white rhino, is something i'm passionate about. we have a koala at the centre of research as well. a lot of conservation work goes on here as well. thank you very much. good luck for the rest of the day. getting back to some sense of normality. we have been showing you the parking all its finery. hopefully you have enjoyed those scenes of this morning. the gates open at ten o‘clock this morning. thank you, john. hopefully the gates in a cheshire 0aks as well! quite a few people have been enjoying the desperate search for the key this morning.” enjoying the desperate search for the key this morning. i hope longleat have got the right key as well. it‘s been a long time those gates have been closed. it‘s been a long time for lots of people who
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haven‘t been able to see their loved ones. we‘ve been asking you to get in touch this morning with your pictures of loved ones being reunited, after lockdown restrictions were eased in england. here‘s angela being reunited with her granddaughter amelia lily on herfirst birthday, and enjoying lots of cuddles. this is a picture of nanny kaz and her three—year—old granddaughter harley. when the were reunited they played in the garden, which must have worn harley out because she fell asleep. harley is the fifth generation of girls in the family. her great—great nan is 93 and still going strong. this is a photo of nanna wendy hugging her granddaughter alice, who were reunited after nearly six months apart. this is bobby, who had a very emotional reunition with his grandad. bobby‘s dad died three years ago, and his grandad is a big part of his life. he normally sees him and his nana most days. here is great nana jeano being reunited with four—year—old louis. and here‘s grandma beattie getting a hug from granddaughter aurelia.
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thank you everybody who sent in those special pictures. that‘s all from us for today. breakfast will be back tomorrow from six. until then, enjoy the rest of your day. goodbye.
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hi, good morning welcome to bbc news with victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines: back to the high street — thousands of shops in england re—open after nearly three months of lockdown. i don‘t mind queueing, i don‘t mind as long as i can get into a shop to see what‘s available. even with the safety measures i'm still cautious to go out in public and i definitely think as soon as the normal shops open it will be a huge rush. face coverings are now compulsory for passengers on public transport in england. chanting: black lives matter...
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after two weeks of anti—racism protests, the prime minister

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