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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 22, 2020 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the guidance for more than two million people in england who are shielding because of vulnerability to coronavirus is being eased in two weeks‘ time. there is one group who have been more patient and giving up more than almost any other and that is the 2.2 million people who have been shielding in england. more cases of coronavirus worldwide in 2a hours than ever before — many of them in the americas. the victims of saturday night's attack in reading are named — three friends out on a summer evening. james furlong, joe ritchie—bennett and david wails were sitting together when the attacker struck. he wasn't just every average teacher, he was an incredible person.
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us nascar star, bubba wallace, says he'll continue to fight against racism, after a noose was found in his garage, at a racing track in alabama. and annie lennox rallies fellow musicians in an auction to help raise funds for women and girls across the globe affected by covid—19 — we'll be speaking to her later this hour. hello and welcome to viewers in the uk and around the world. we begin with a significant announcement for more than two million people in england who are "shielding themselves" from coronavirus. from july 6th, they will be able to meet in groups of up to six outside. they'll also be able to form a "support bubble" with another household. on august 1st, government guidance
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will be relaxed, so that, those classed as "extremely vulnerable people" will also no longer be advised to shield. the announcement comes at another significant moment for the global picture on the spread of covid—19. injust one day, 183,000 people around the world were confirmed to have the virus — that's the highest daily total so far, according to the world health organization and it takes the total number of people who have had the disease to nearly nine million. most of the new patients are living in the americas, with brazil recording more than 5a,000 "new infections" on sunday, bringing its total to more than a million confirmed cases. who says that despite a record number of new coronavirus infections, it doesn't mean that some countries have to stop easing their lockdowns. their director general said... meanwhile, new york city,once the north american epicentre
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of the coronavirus outbreak has moved to "phase two" of its reopening plan. back in the uk, the health secretary said the daily number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the country has fallen to below 1,000 for the first time. hugh pym reports. voices of the shielded during lockdown. they have had support, including food parcels. inside, we have a loaf of bread. because i have a serious heart condition, i'm not allowed to go out or go shopping and all that kind of stuff. it's really good. i wasn't expecting it. but the food parcels will stop. shielding in england will formally end, although there will still be some support from volunteers and councils. charlie, who has an immune deficiency, isn't worried about the food parcels. she's been enjoying limited freedom from last month for shielded people to go out. but she's a teacher and due back at work in september, and she says she's worried about leaving home. i won't be going shopping for a while.
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i still don't feel secure out there. so to be honest, i'm not sure how long i will continue to stay indoors. i think i'm still quite anxious about everything. i raised these concerns at the downing street media briefing. what reassurances can you give them that that will be understood and they will get full support? it's so important that employers work with us, and crucially, work with their employees to support them to get back to work in a covid—secure environment. and it's critical that work is provided in a covid—secure way for people who are shielding. but health charities say when shielding ends, statutory sick pay won't be available, so people may be obliged to go back to work even if they feel it is unsafe to do so. we are really calling on the government to step in and for those people who judge their own risk to be so great that they should stay
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at home, that they should still receive financial support and support in getting shopping and medicine so that they can stay at home if that is the right thing for them. shielding will end in england on the 31st ofjuly. in scotland, it will be reviewed, but continue until at least the end ofjuly. northern ireland's scheme, like england's, is due to end at that time. the welsh government says it will continue until the 16th of august and possibly longer. for charlie and others in england, the guidance on going out and meeting people will be relaxed from earlyjuly. she's looking, though, for more reassurances about the risks after shielding comes to a close at the end of the month. hugh pym, bbc news. as britain and the rest of europe look to further ease lockdown restrictions, the world health organization has warned that the pandemic is far from over. last friday saw the highest number of confimed daily cases —
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over 180,000 — and regions like latin america are of particular concern. in brazil there've been more than a million cases of coronavirus. i spoke a short while ago to douglas sterzza dias who is a trainee surgeon in sao paulo where both his mother and uncle and grandmother sadly passd away. i started by asking him just how difficult it has been to lose members of his family. asa we lost both my mother and my grandmother. all my family reunions we re grandmother. all my family reunions were at my grandmother's house around the table, drinking wine, speaking loudly, so we are a family. we did not gather the rest of the family. we have seen an increase in
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the number of people who come to the hospital and the severity of these patients who have arrived. so, we are worried about choosing people to life and to death by a number of respirators. for all brazilian people who cannot isolate themselves because they live in houses with ten people in just because they live in houses with ten people injust one room, for people who believe that is everything all right because the government preach it that it is easing the situation, but people do not understand for lack of information or anything else, iam lack of information or anything else, i am asking myself why we have to reopen shopping centres, shopping malls. what do people need to buy in shopping malls at this time? life, health, i don't know. just a
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snapshot of what is happening in brazil. the world health organization says that record number of new coronavirus infections doesn't mean that some countries can't continue easing their lockdowns. its head says governments need to consider, both people's health and that of the economy. some countries that have successfully suppressed transmission are now seeing an upswing in cases as they reopen their societies and economies. all countries are facing a delicate balance between protecting their people while minimising the social and economic damage. it is not a choice between lives and livelihoods. countries can do both. more on that later. all three victims of saturday's stabbings in reading have now been named. as well as james furlong, a teacher in wokingham who was described as inspirational, his friend joe ritchie—bennett also died. he was a 39—year—old american who had lived in the uk for 15 years. his family in philadelphia say they're heartbroken. and finally another friend who'd
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been enjoying the summer evening in the park, david wails. with more, here's our correspondent rajini vaidyanathan. back at school, for the most painful of reasons. through the morning, they left tributes to a teacher who always told his pupils to fly high. 36—year—old james furlong was the head of history and politics at holt school. with news of his death was still sinking in, students and colleagues held a two—minute silence.
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as a holt community, we all now need to absorb this sad news. our thoughts are with his mum, his dad, his brother and his family and his friends and colleagues. he was a cherished colleague and he will be very sadly missed. applause he wasn'tjust every average teacher, he was an incredible person, and he wasn't just a teacher, he was a human being, and he had family and friends that loved him just as much as we do. 14—year—old lucy last saw mr furlong at a history lesson before lockdown. well, first he told us everything was going to be fine, corona is going to end and we are going to see him again. but you know, we're not, really, are we? we're not going to see him again. former pupils also came to pay their respects to someone they describe as an unforgettable teacher. i came back today because i feel
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like i had a really personal connection with mr furlong. he was one of the teachers who was always there for me. the person who tried to put a smile on everyone's faces. he used to come in and dress up as henry viii. he had really funny catchphrases, he always made us laugh. james furlong was in this park in reading on saturday when he was stabbed to death. today it was confirmed his friend, joe ritchie—bennett, was killed alongside him, an american who lived in the uk for 15 years. he lost his husband to cancer several years ago. bbc radio berkshire presenter sarah walker was a close friend. she delivered this on—air tribute. it matters to me today that you know thatjoe lived a great life. he was loved by so many people and he made us all feel that life was a much better place with him in it.
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tonight, the third victim of the attack has also been named. 49—year—old david wails. he was always happy. everyone had their problems, but he always left that at the door when he walked into the pub, he always made people smile. three friends who had just gone for a catch—up in the sunshine. three lives taken for no reason. police are continuing to question a 25—year—old libyan man following saturday's attack. khairi saadallah was initially arrested on suspicion of murder after the incident on saturday, and later re—arrested under the terrorism act. from reading, our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this is thought to be the moment just minutes after the attack on saturday night, that an armed police officers detained the man suspected officers detained the man suspected of killing the three friends. but
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the careful process of gathering and examining evidence for the investigation being run by counterterrorism policing is still atan counterterrorism policing is still at an early stage. nobody has yet been charged. the home secretary, priti patel, was in reading this morning to lay flowers, to meet the officers, some of them student officers, some of them student officers, that she said ran towards danger and to discuss what is known about the man in custody. we have to look at all aspects of this individual‘s history which dates back over several years. i think we should be clear about the origins, the information, that is part of the intelligence gathering and obviously the picture that is put together. the suspect, khairi saadallah, is 25 and libyan. he came to the uk in 2012 and claimed asylum. he was allowed to stay here permanently when he was given leave to remain in 2018. he came to the attention of mi5 2018. he came to the attention of m15 last year as a someone who might ta ke m15 last year as a someone who might take part in a terrorism overseas,
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but they assessed that he was not a genuine threat or an immediate risk. neighbours said he threw a tv from his top floor flat this year and had a mental health key worker. his family told us that he originally left libya to escape from the violence there and because he was suffering from post—traumatic stress from the civil war, although he had been thinking of trying to return. they said that his long—standing mental health problems had been exacerbated by the coronavirus lockdown. an eye witness has told the bbc that the knifeman walked through the park before attacking the group of gay men sitting on the grass. while the reading town centre remains dominated by forensics teams, faith leaders came together to pay tribute to the dead friends. our prayers are to pay tribute to the dead friends. 0ur prayers are very much to pay tribute to the dead friends. our prayers are very much with the people who have died as a result of this terrible stabbing. our prayers
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to our with the survivors. he said they would say prayers to you for they would say prayers to you for the attacker, that he would see the evil of his ways. the mayor of reading, conservative councillor david stevens, invited the public to join in a minute's silence this morning through reading council's facebook page. thank you for being with us. let me ta ke thank you for being with us. let me take this in stages, because there must be just the most profound shock where you are. absolutely, it is the most dreadful thing. we had it in a small county town like reading. most dreadful thing. we had it in a small county town like readingm isa small county town like readingm is a shock. in terms of today, the coming together, just how would you describe the various things that we have seen and the impact it has had? so, what happened, obviously, by
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sunday various faith groups wanted to do something and on monday morning they decided they should really mark it and what it was was various faith groups, the bishop of reading, they seek community, the hindus, muslims, saying we want to do something and demonstrate that we are all part of the same community. i was invited to be that as well as the leader of the council. what was so the leader of the council. what was so impressive is that they were brought together and the cohesion that came through. it has been a time, there are whole range of different communities and what these different communities and what these different groups were determined to demonstrate. it was not
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it has become incredibly important how we actually react to events like this. yes, the security forces, the police are obviously investigating all this. there are obviously examining the evidence to see if any lessons examining the evidence to see if any lesso ns ca n examining the evidence to see if any lessons can be learned from it. i guess lessons can be learned from it. i gu ess after lessons can be learned from it. i guess after that, there might be able... but we will have to see what they have to say. the line is not particularly good to you, so i will have to leave it there, but thank you forjoining us on bbc news this evening. thank you for your time. good night. across india, calls for a boycott on chinese goods are growing after fighting between the two countries
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on the border led to the deaths of 20 indian soldiers. india depends heavily on its neighbours for manufactured goods and raw materials, so will this rallying cry go beyond rhetoric? nikhil inamdar reports. a publicity stunt perhaps for the cameras. men in india smashing the tv screen into pieces. the video went viral across the country as public anger rises against china. leading to calls to block chinese imports after the deadly border clash. let's come together, to become self—reliant and give china a reply. beyond the rhetoric, the economic reality a slightly different. india is significantly depends on its larger neighbourfor
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crucial imports and investment. 70% of the branded cell phones in india are made by chinese smartphone companies. more than half of india's technology start—ups that are worth more than $1 billion have chinese investments. 70% of the raw material used by india's pharmaceutical makers comes from china. that is particularly important during this pandemic. but with china exporting five or six times more to india than the other way round, there are suggestions to reduce india's reliance on its neighbour. india's wide trade does not give policymakers in delhi much room to move wholly manoeuvre in
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terms of economic retaliation and at a time of heightened military tension, it would only end up hurting both in the long run. let's return briefly to coronavirus and breaking news coming from so to saudi arabia, which has hajj with limited numbers, limiting the numbers for people inside for that becomes in the light of continued risk with coronavirus, the spread and the difficulty of achieving a social distance in the huge number of pilgrims we see every year. so hajj will go ahead but with limited numbers. the singer—songwriter, annie lennox, has invited fellow musicians to contribute to the circle music auction, to help raise funds for women and girls across the globe,
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who've been disproportionately impacted by the covid—19 crisis. the auction, which is live on the platform charity stars from today, invites people to bid on auction items or buy tickets for a sweepsta ke competition. annie lennoxjoins me now — she's the founder of the circle. also with us is raakhi shah, ceo of that organisation which works for equality for women and girls around the world. thank you both for being here. annie, tell me more about what you have decided to launch this particular initiative? of course, covid—19 has struck on a global scale and the most disproportionately affected, as you already said, women and girls and domestic violence has risen in such degrees that it is almost inconceivable and you can imagine in lockdown how that is affecting
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families. the circle works to represent and support global projects around the world, uganda, south africa and pakistan and we have already sent out emergency supplies, but this initiative is a fundraiser that i think people can enjoy, because we have the likes of sting, emeli sande, jessiej, they are all there and they are going to give their time and performance skills so everybody can get involved in this. it is only going to cost something in the region of about £8 01’ so something in the region of about £8 orso and something in the region of about £8 or so and you can have a personalised performance by any one of these 1a artists who are giving their performances to the circle.|j will come back to that in a moment 01’ will come back to that in a moment or two. we had some of those artists on our screen as you are or two. we had some of those artists on oui’ screen as you are just or two. we had some of those artists on our screen as you are just going through that. i will come back to the auction and the sort of things
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ina the auction and the sort of things in a moment or two. raakhi, just tell me the sorts of projects you have in mind that perhaps, once you raise this money, you will try and help? we have already been giving quite a few grants to date and this auction will support a lot more women and girls around the world, so some of the projects we have been and will be funding include a project in uganda supporting women, girls, with food parcels and hygiene packages. we have also been supporting them to build a campaign to raise awareness around domestic violence. we have a project in bangladesh supporting garment workers who have lost their livelihoods. a lot of fast fashion companies have pulled contract in light of covert and may be left destitute. we are supporting an organisation in scotland as well so the more we raise, the more money we can get out to be women and girls he
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needed. tell us more about the auction. you mentioned those personalised performances, had that actually work and what other things have artists actually contributed to sell? taylor swift very generously has donated a signed guitar, which i think will be a really hot item and i think, you think will be a really hot item and ithink, you know, since think will be a really hot item and i think, you know, since this terrible crisis occurred, for artists like myself, who are also in lockdown at home, we have a possibility... i've been doing performances now for the last three months really and as you can see, this is my so—called studio if you like and it is a very simple affair. normally i am on my iphone and i'm just playing my piano and it is an interesting thing for us to do because as musicians, we have a platform and we are about diversity. we are about love and compassion and
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kindness and we need an awful lot of that right now. raakhi, at different stages in at this pandemic, on its liberties have been ridiculed for various things they have done online. —— celebrities have been ridiculed. you have been going now since 2008, give me a brief idea of the sort of things you have actually been able to bring about? we raised nearly £2 million in that time and we have been able to support many women and girls in that time and it is quite its ordinary. we are relatively small but a growing charity and we are really pleased that all these musicians have come together through annie to support this and what we really wanted to do with this auction is to make sure it was accessible to as many fans as possible. it has been a pretty grim time for the last couple of months and we wanted to give a bit of light and we wanted to give a bit of light and relief and we are hoping that withjust $10, which is about £8 and relief and we are hoping that with just $10, which is about £8 to enter, that as many fans as possible
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will be able to. we also hope that people can club together and by this together as a group. good luck with it, because we have run out of time but thank you so much to both of you for your time. back with headlines in a moment. love it or loathe it, we are in for the hot speu loathe it, we are in for the hot spell of weather since last summer and by the middle of the week, widely across england, ten pitches will be approaching or even exceeding 30 celsius. —— temperatures. with that will come in very high uv levels and some strong sunshine. here is the europe—wide heatwave, the currents of hot air coming out of spain and france, spreading across the uk. the thinking is that by the time we get the weekend, low pressure from the atla ntic the weekend, low pressure from the atlantic is actually going to bring fresher conditions, so this low will come in and push the heat to further towards the east and with that we will also get some showers and thunderstorms, but that is not until
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the weekend. this is what is happening in the short term. here in fa ct happening in the short term. here in fact is a weather front and it is a boundary between the fresher atla ntic boundary between the fresher atlantic air and that hotter continental air. when we have that boundary, we have a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain. it is also quite humid here, because the extreme is coming all the way from the south, say 1a, 15 in glasgow overnight and some clearer skies in england, temperatures will be around 11 degrees first thing. that weather front will continue to be stuck between the hot high across the continent and the low pressure out in the atlantic, so rather than this weather front moving across the uk, it will be sliding along itself, so that means that pulses of rain will move to ireland, belfast, glasgow, right across the aisles, but much of the country, certainly england and wales are in for a bright and sunny day, and a hot one, with 28 on tuesday. here is wednesday's weather map. the hot air is expected to
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spread northwards, reaching northern england, too. temperatures in newcastle around 26 degrees and widely 30 or more across central and southern england. on thursday, the temperatures will rise a little further, probably peaking at around 32 in london and the lowlands of scotla nd 32 in london and the lowlands of scotland around 26 celsius. then towards the end of the week, we'll start to see low pressure approaching, cloud will start to gather in the north of the country and then by the time we get to the weekend, there's temperatures will be quite a bit slower, but we could be quite a bit slower, but we could be 33 on friday in the south—east.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the guidance for more than 2—million people in england, who are shielding because of vulnerability to coronavirus, is being eased in two weeks time. there is one group who have been more patient and getting up more than almost any other and that is b 2.2 million people who have been shielding him england. more cases of coronavirus worldwide in 2a hours — than ever before — many of them, in the americas. the victims of saturday night's attack in reading are named — three friends out on a summer evening. james furlong, joe ritchie bennet and david wailes were sitting together when the attacker struck. he was not just
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he was notjust an average teacher, he was an incredible person. us nascar star — bubba wallace — says, he'll continue to fight against racism — after a noose was found in his garage, at a racing track in alabama and annie lennox rallies fellow musicians in an auction to help raise funds for women and girls across the globe affected by covid—19 hello and welcome to bbc news — for those watching in the uk or around the world.in just one day — 100 and 83 thousand people around the world were confirmed to have coronavirus: that's the highest daily total so far, according to the world health organization. it takes the total number of people who have had the disease to nearly nine million. most of the new patients are living in the americas — with brazil recording more than 5a thousand new infections on sunday, bringing its total to more
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than a million confirmed cases. james robbins takes a look at the pandemic across the world. each new grave is a tragedy of the pandemic. brazil has now registered more than 50,000 deaths and more than one million infections. president bolsonaro's determination to dismiss the threat, oppose lockdowns and reject distancing has been hugely divisive. many still support his far right views, but others say he is to blame. we didn't prepare, we didn't take this seriously. and now we see exponential curves exploding. when politicians face biology, or challenge biology, biology wins by a huge margin. peru and chile have been particularly hard hit too. poorer countries often have limited health care. in peru they are struggling. but many governments feel they have to take risks to get
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their economies working again. translation: the trend is decreasing and that allows us to gradually and progressively begin to restart some of the economy. but it's the world's most powerful country that has recorded the highest number of coronavirus deaths. across the vast territory of the usa, some states are relaxing measures in response to a decline in new cases, just as others face fresh spikes. the whole nation is hurting in this crucial election year. in india, by far the world's largest democracy, the growth in cases is relentless. huge cities suffered first but coronavirus is now spreading through villages which are home to the majority of india's 1.3 billion population. rural areas are underequipped and across the country serious underreporting by the authorities of covid deaths is believed to be concealing the full scale of india's disaster.
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it's too easy to generalise about africa as a vast continent, but here too the extent of health care may be key. in kenya, as in many other countries, considerable experience of past pandemics may help but many health professionals fear africa's biggest test is yet to come. but even in wealthy countries widely praised for their early responses, real risks remain. germany is seeing new localised outbreaks. at a block of flats in berlin and at a big meat processing factory in the state of north rhine—westphalia. locally, the general easing of lockdowns is being reversed to prevent progress so far being lost.
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