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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 27, 2020 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the return of the foreign holiday. from the 6th ofjuly, british tourists are set to be allowed to travel to european countries including spain, france and greece without having to self—isolate when they get back to the uk. as texas and florida reimpose virus restrictions, the us infectious disease chief says the nation has a "serious problem" in its handling of covid—19. india records its highest daily number of new coronavirus cases so far, surging to over half a million. ireland is set to get a new government today as the country's two largest parties, fianna fail and fine gael, form a coalition for the first time. praise for the actions of a glasgow police officer who was one of six
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people injured during a stabbing at a hotel in which the suspect was shot dead. president trump signs an executive order calling for protesters who target statues and monuments to be jailed. and as the majority of the uk's pride events move online today, some are still planning to march — including veterans of london's gay liberation front. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. i'm shaun ley. we begin in the uk. the british
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government is expected to announce on monday a major change to its quarantine rules, which will make it far easier for tourists to go on holiday to much of europe this summer. from july the 6th, anyone arriving in the uk from a country considered to be at low risk from coronavirus will no longer have to isolate for m days. the changes will pave the way for thousands of people to go on holiday to countries including france, spain, italy, greece and turkey. america's top infectious disease expert, dr anthony fauci, has warned the country faces a ‘serious problem' after a record 40,000 new cases of coronavirus were confirmed in 2a hours. the number of coronavirus cases in india has passed half a million, and the rate of infection is still accelerating. meanwhile president trump has signed an executive order to protect statues and monuments from attack, after dozens were toppled during anti—racism protests. more on all those stories to come, but first, tom burridge reports on the opening
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of tourism between uk and europe. after a long lockdown, some people are desperate for a holiday abroad. we just want to get away from the familiarity of home, you know, being locked up together, as much as i love my family dearly! like others, john is relieved that he and his family won't have to quarantine once they travel back from their holiday in spain. the self—isolation would be a real barrier to going away because of the timing of our holiday. when we get back, we haven't got 14 days before our little ones need to go back to school. you know, they've missed out so much, we can't have them missing out on any more. a series of travel corridors are planned from july 6th. it will mean that people from low risk countries like france, spain, italy, germany,
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the netherlands, greece, turkey, norway and finland will not have to self—isolate after they travel. a final list will be confirmed next week. portugal and sweden are expected to be given a red rating because of concerns about the prevalence of the virus. anyone travelling in from there and much of the rest of the world will still be subject to the quarantine rules. the republic of ireland has always been exempt. we believe it can be safe to operate without the need for quarantine. for airlines, which have been battered by the pandemic, it's a move in the right direction. we really need to move quickly to establish some safe corridors, and we're not talking about throwing it open to the entire world, but where it's safe to operate, we fundamentally believe that we are also safe to operate and we need to do that quickly. we will now begin boarding by seat rows... row—by—row boarding this summer should be a more orderly affair. there will be new rules on board.
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it is required of all passengers to wear your facemask or face covering. there is an exception for children under the age of six. and no trolley service, although you hopefully will get water. welcome, anybody else ? but with quarantine removed for many destinations, travel companies hope they can land more bookings. tom burridge, bbc news. let's speak now to the travel expert simon calder, who's at gatwick airport. cutting a rather lonely figure there! what are we expecting to be announced on monday? it might not be announced on monday? it might not be announced until wednesday, but they have definitely announced that they are going to make an announcement, and that is that the double lock, effectively preventing you going on holiday abroad, will be lifted from
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the 6th ofjuly, and that is the foreign office advice which for the last three months has warned against all but essential travel anywhere abroad. and if you were to go against that advice, your travel insurance would be void. and on top of that, the quarantine rules which came into effect on the 8th ofjune, which meant that anybody coming in to gatwick or any other airport or indeed international rail station or port, needs to go home and self—isolate for two weeks. so the plan is with this new traffic light system that a select group of countries will be regarded as safe, and you won't need to quarantine, and you won't need to quarantine, and your travel insurance will be valid because you will be going with foreign office approval. this will allow of course the travel industry to start off. the last saturday in june atan to start off. the last saturday in june at an airport like gatwick, there should be around 150,000 people passing through. i have seen about four so far. the travel industry is desperate to get back
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flying, and many people are desperate to get a broad. there are a lot of people who want to travel abroad for all kinds of reasons. they might still be worried about safety, because i think on board planes is going to be different, for example. and they might say, actually, i will stay in the uk this year. but lots of people come to the uk from some of those countries too, so uk from some of those countries too, so it will work both ways, but some countries like portugal excluded. why? there is so much controversy, particularly about portugal. there has been a spike in cases. a couple of parties were staged led to very significant increases in cases in some areas of lisbon, the capital, which most people wouldn't have a go too. they have gone into lockdown again. and the concern is that islands like madeira and the azores, which have a very low or even nil incidence of coronavirus, are being tarred with the same brush, as well
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as the algarve, which of course is the target for many british holiday—makers, and there is already talk on social media of a so—called spanish swerve, which is people coming home from a spanish airport rather than from lisbon, faro or porto, so as not to have to go into quarantine. add to that the paris pause, where you root your plane so it touches down in france, and that enables you to avoid quarantine from pretty much anywhere else, and there isa pretty much anywhere else, and there is a lot of unanswered questions. also, shaun, concerns that people will think, i can go to france this weekend and come back after the 6th ofjuly, i don't need to quarantine, they will be going abroad against foreign office advice on avoiding their travel insurance. that is a very salutary warning. simon calder from gatwick, thank you very much. just as well, it looks like he has
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gone already! the us has recorded an all—time daily high of 40,000 coronavirus infections, according to figures from johns hopkins university. the white house coronavirus task force warned young people that their behaviour posed a risk to older people who are more vulnerable. 866,000 people aged between 18 and 44 have coronavirus. that's 200,000 more than the next age range. and four times more than those over 75, who are among the most vulnerable. the leading government advisor dr anthony fauci said the overwhelming majority of people being infected were the young, who are more likely to be socialising, and in crowds. two of the country's biggest states, texas and florida, have reimposed some lockdown restrictions, with the governor of texas ordering all bars to close. 0ur north america correspondent david willis reports. florida's decision to relax restrictions brought sun—worshippers flocking back to the beach.
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but just a few weeks later, the coronavirus has come surging back with a vengeance. nearly 9000 new cases were reported in the sunshine state in the space ofjust 2a hours, a record. hospitals in some parts of the country now fear they could be overwhelmed, and it's no longer mainly elderly patients that they are dealing with. we are seeing more younger patients than older patients. the older patients tend to be sicker, so we are seeing more younger patients who are getting admitted to the hospital, and that's a trend that is new. call it quarantine fatigue. young people in some parts of the country, bored after weeks indoors, are starting to socialise. understandably, no blame there. understandably. but the thing that you really need to realise is that when you do that, you are part of a process. so if you get infected,
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you will infect someone else who clearly will infect someone else. we know that happens. closed again. in texas, another hotspot, bars that had onlyjust reopened are shutting their doors once more, and sending back their beer. the staggering spike in daily infections has put the white house on the defensive. the trump administration claims to have flattened the curve, but the vice president conceded that infections are on the rise in 16 states, and he seemed uneasy. as we see new cases are rising, and we're tracking them very carefully, there may be a tendency among the american people to think that we are back to that place that we were two months ago. that we're in a time of great losses and great hardship on the american people. the reality is we're in a much better place. medical experts are more cautious, however.
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they warn that if the current outbreak isn't contained quickly, it could spread to states that are doing better, rendering the sacrifices of the last few months invalid. david willis, bbc news. india now has half a million cases of the outbreak and the rate of infection appears to be rising. yesterday more than 18,000 new cases were declared, the highest number so far. the western state of maharashtra is the worst—affected area. delhi has been hit hard too — with more than 77,000 cases in the city. india imposed a strict lockdown across the country in march, but many of the restrictions were eased this month. more than 15,000 people are known to have died as a result of contracting covid—19. india's prime minister narendra modi praised the results of what he called the ‘people—driven fight‘ against coronavirus — and called for people to continue wearing masks and to maintain social distancing. 0ur delhi correspondent zubair ahmed says state governments are very
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concerned about the rising number of infections. so some of the state governments have now extended the lockdown until the 31st ofjuly, and preparations are afoot to increase the number of covid—19 patient beds in hospitals. and of course one of the reasons the government, the central government is telling us that we need not worry so much, because these numbers are rising because the number of deaths is also increasing. you know, they are testing 100,000 people a day, which was not the case a few months earlier. so that is why, they say, the number is rising. but there is no need to worry, as the economy is reopening, obviously the cases are going to go high, but the number of deaths is still not as high as some western countries. this is the argument of the government.
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a police officer that was seriously injured in a multiple stabbing in glasgow has been praised for his bravery. constable david whyte's condition has been described as critical but stable. he was one of six men injured in yesterday's knife attack, in a hotel housing asylum seekers. the suspect was shot dead by armed police. police in the uk have been called to break up a number of public gatherings as people continue to disobey coronavirus restrictions. a fire broke out at the liver building in liverpool during a second night of celebrations for the club's premier league title win. in london, police clashed with crowds of people attending an illegal street party. it was the third consecutive night that officers in the capital have had to break up large gatherings. speaking earlier, commander bas javid from the metropolitan police,
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explained how much of an impact mass gatherings can have on local communities. its the communities that are very, very upset about this. this is much more about the impact on those communities that people live in themselves, and they need to show their own social responsibility and ta ke their own social responsibility and take some personal accountability here as well. lockdown isn't over. we've seen some easing here of the restrictions, and my advice to people, particularly those who have started to disregard the current health regulations, is to comply with them. they are there for your own safety and for that of your family and your communities. lockdown isn't over, but restrictions have been eased, and when we have big gathering such as the ones we have discussed, it is absolutely on individual to take accountability for their own actions and for their own health and safety. let's ta ke and for their own health and safety. let's take a look at the headline so
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far this hour. from 6th ofjuly, it's thought british tourists are to be allowed to travel to european countries including spain, france and greece without having to self—isolate when they get back to the uk as texas and florida reimpose virus restrictions, the us infectious disease chief says the nation has a "serious problem" in its handling of covid—19 ireland is set to get a new government today — as the country's two largest parties, fianna fail and fine gael, form a coalition for the first time president trump has signed an executive order protecting us statues and monuments, after some were targeted by anti—racism protestors. demonstrators tried to pull down a statue of one of his predecessors, andrewjackson, outside the white house earlier this week. in a tweet, president trump called for "long prison terms" for what he described as "lawless acts against our great country!" scott lucas is a professor of american studies and international politics at the university of birmingham.
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scott, thank you very much for being with us on bbc news this saturday. let me ask you first of all about this particular incident that appears to have prompted this. why is andrew jackson a controversial historical figure, is andrew jackson a controversial historicalfigure, and is andrew jackson a controversial historical figure, and why is is andrew jackson a controversial historicalfigure, and why is it prompted this response from the president? andrew jackson, who was president of the united states in the 18305, was a strong supporter of slavery. he also was notorious because of the mass killing of native americans. he was the general who expectedly led to native americans being expelled from areas like florida and the south—east of the united states. and so he has a target for people of colour because of that very chequered record, even as he has been a hero to some american southerners for almost 200 years now. it is interesting because there have been some other situations. i think protester5 succeeded in taking down the statue
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of general albert pike, a confederate general in judiciary square, and there had obviously been criticism of the black lives matter protest5, some were ta rget5 of monuments have been involved, and the president spoke out 5trongly, but an executive order add5 weight to this. let's be honest here, this i5a to this. let's be honest here, this is a triple distraction. fir5t to this. let's be honest here, this is a triple distraction. first it is a distraction from the issues raised by the antiracism marches, which have largely been peaceful and were supported by more than 80% of americans. secondly it is a distraction to take headlines away from coronavirus, which as you heard from coronavirus, which as you heard from your correspondent has now set a daily record three days in a row with more than 115,000 cases per day and with cases 5urging in 33 states. and thirdly it is a distraction from trump's own declining poll numbers. his approval is at the lowest point it has been since last october and he has fallen behind the democratic
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nomineejoe biden, he has fallen behind the democratic nominee joe biden, so he has fallen behind the democratic nomineejoe biden, so this is an attempt to steal the headlines, because here is the key thing. it already is a crime to deface or pull down federal statutes. trump's executive order is just a token that reinforces that. that is an interesting point, so the law already adequately protects these monuments and statues, you say. just in terms of the coronavirus, the potential impact. we had the first press c0 nfe re nce potential impact. we had the first press conference by the task force yesterday in quite a long time as these figures search. vice president mike pence having to dance around a bit, this question about why you are saying it is important that people respect social distancing, think about behaviour in crowds, and then simultaneously he has started holding campaign rallies again, the one last weekend in tulsa at which the president spoke. he not only danced, he waltzed all the way into fictional territory when he said, we are making tremendous progress against coronavirus. as he defied wearing a mask, as he defied his own
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white has medical advisers by praising that trunk rally which broke social distancing, and it was interesting that even as mike pence declared tremendous progress, dr anthony fauci, top infectious disease expert, came up next and said we are in a crisis situation, the virus is spreading and that as my the virus is spreading and that as myp the virus is spreading and that as my p spoke, european union was putting out the report that it may $0011 putting out the report that it may soon ban travellers from the united states because of the spike in the virus. professor scott lucas, thank you for being with us. the republic of ireland will have a new government today. the leader of fianna foil, micheal martin, will become prime minister. it's the result of an unprecedented coalition deal between his party and that of the outgoing taoiseach, leo varadkar. the green party will also get some cabinet posts. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page has more. the republic of ireland is getting a new prime minister, or taoiseach.
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it is micheal martin, who has led his party, fianna fail, for nine years. leo varadkar, the leader of fine gael, is standing down from the top job in government. but he'll still be in the cabinet, in the post known as tanaiste, the deputy prime minister. in december 2022, leo varadkar will swap places with micheal martin, meaning he will take over leadership of the coalition. the third party in power are the greens. their leader, eamon ryan, is also in line for a senior ministerial role. fianna fail and fine gael have dominated governments in dublin for almost a century, but never before have they gone into coalition with each other. they grew out of the two sides in the irish civil war in the 19205, and the historical rivalry between them has been fierce. broadly speaking, they're both parties of the political centre, though fine gael has tended to be slightly to the right of fianna fail. their combined electoral strength is
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dropped in the last decade. there have been weeks of negotiation since the general election in early february. back then, the most first preference votes went to the left—wing republican party sinn fein, led by mary mcdonald, and it will now lead the opposition for the first time. the green party's influence can be seen in the coalition‘s goals. this commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 7%a to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 7% a year, are cut by more than 50% by 2030. the government says it will spend twice as much on public transport as new roads. they will be a national economic plan to try to help businesses recover from the coronavirus pandemic, and because the uk is ireland's nearest neighbour, the brexit trade negotiations will be incredibly important. to say the least, it's going to be a challenging few years. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page there.
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to celebrate his fiftieth birthday, the british broadcaster, dj spoony, is dedicating an entire day to celebrate half a century of black british excellence. the eight hour live stream, taking place tomorrow, has been inspired by the black lives matter movement. trevor nelson, baroness doreen lawrence and idris elba are among some of the people who will be taking part. dj spoonyjoins me now from central london. a very good morning to you, thank you very much, and a belated happy birthday. i hope you have recovered from the celebrations. yes, thank you very much. my beloved liverpool football clu b you very much. my beloved liverpool football club managed to pick up their first football club managed to pick up theirfirst premier football club managed to pick up their first premier league title in 30 years on the day, so it was a double celebration, a massive one for me. i imagine that is something people watching around the world have been celebrating with you as well, even if not your birthday specifically! but this has inspired you to want to do something else on sunday this weekend. tell us about that. it was largely because with covid and the restrictions in my mind, i had planned to have a massive party or two for my
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birthday, and then i thought, because i can't do it in the way that i wanted to, and it coincided timing —wise with george floyd's quite tragic passing, that maybe it is time to celebrate everything that has been going on in british culture, that black british people have contributed to especially, so i got onto my phone and hustled a couple of numbers, ran round some people i classed as friends, some people i classed as friends, some people i classed as friends, some people i have come across professionally and we are putting on an eight hour live stream tomorrow, so we are an eight hour live stream tomorrow, so we are really excited by that. and where will people find this if they want to celebrate in the uk and internationally? we have a page at 50bbe.co.uk, which stands for 50 and
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british black excellence, you will be able to get it there. it will also be on youtube and places like that. we are trying to get a monthly by black british event started, and making it a regular event. how important is that in terms of awareness of people's involvement and cultural awareness. it isn't just in the black community, it is generally in the community that we live. my parents came from the caribbean when they were quite young, but we are fully interwoven into british culture, especially here in london, not exclusively of course, but i think it is important that we are aware, because if we are going to try and address that balance, then we do need black businesses to feel that they can, not compete in a sense that i want your business instead of your business, but for itjust your business instead of your business, but for it just to your business instead of your business, but for itjust to be something that people can look towards having and go beyond barber
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shops and food shops, can we expand that and have property companies, elements that might manufacture cars evenif elements that might manufacture cars even if we can't have the whole car plant, and it isjust at even if we can't have the whole car plant, and it is just at some even if we can't have the whole car plant, and it isjust at some point trying to like i said address that balance. we are going to have to leave it there, viewers from around the world are leaving us. good luck with that. 50bbe.co.uk if you want tojoin dj spoony with that. 50bbe.co.uk if you want to join dj spoony for with that. 50bbe.co.uk if you want tojoin dj spoony for his birthday celebrations. you are watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. after the heat and humidity of the past week, it is all change this weekend. it is cooler and wetter at times, bands of rain or showers spreading across the uk and some prolonged downpours for northern ireland and for scotland. but there is a risk of flooding from that rain today, and while some of us creep that rain today, and while some of us creep into the low 205, most of
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us us creep into the low 205, most of us will fall short of that this afternoon. in brisk winds, gusting to 30 or a0 mph, afternoon. in brisk winds, gusting to 30 or40 mph, and afternoon. in brisk winds, gusting to 30 or a0 mph, and further rain or showers around. 0vernight temperatures dropping lower as well, so temperatures dropping lower as well, so it is easierfor sleeping. and then into tomorrow, it looks like it will be quite wet into northern ireland, parts of scotland, northern england and north wales, showers elsewhere too, but probably fewer showers for the southern half of wales in the southern half of england compared to today. it will be windier tomorrow, some gusts in excess of a0 mph, and it will be a cooler day across england tomorrow as well.
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hello this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines: the return of the foreign holiday — from 6thjuly, it's thought british tourists are to be allowed to travel to european countries including spain, france and greece without having to self—isolate when they get back to the uk as texas and florida
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reimpose virus restrictions, the us infectious disease chief says the nation has a "serious problem" in its handling of covid—19. india records its highest daily number of new coronavirus cases so far, surging to over half a million. ireland is set to get a new government today, as the country's two largest parties, fianna fail and fine gael, form a coalition for the first time. president trump signs an executive order calling for protesters who target statues and monuments to be jailed. as the majority of the uk's pride events move online today, some are still planning to march — including veterans of london's gay liberation front. the northern italian region of lombardy saw the first coronavirus outbreak in europe. mark lowen, who has reported on the story from the start, returns to ask what went wrong.

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