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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2020 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire — here are the latest headlines. more job losses because of coronavirus — 5,000 jobs are under threat at sandwich chain upper crust and 1,700 jobs are to go at airbus uk. pressure on the government to give councils data more quickly to deal with virus spikes — after criticism it took too long in leicester. information is being made available to local authorities. there is a dashboard and information on test and trace is made available to local authorities right now. police in hong kong use tear gas and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, under china's new
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national security law. the us buys up nearly all stocks for the next three months of the drug remdesivir — one of the only ones shown to work against covid. the victims comissioner for london calls forjuries on rape trials to be given clearer directions about rape myths and consent — to try to increase the 3% conviction rate for rape. and now because of the lies about me he's just out and he is free, even with all the evidence. that's frightening. and if you've given evidence in the trial of an alleged rapist, what was your epxrience like? do let me know — you can email, anonymously if you prefer victoria@bbc.co.uk. and remembering the man who should've been england's
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first black footballer — jack leslie was subject to racism — now fans want to see him honoured with a statue outside his club. a growing list of companies are now slashing jobs as the uk economy suffers its worst contraction in 41 years. the world's largest aircraft manufacturer, airbus says it plans to cut 1,700 jobs from its uk workforce, as it deals with the effects of the crisis on the travel industry. thousands more jobs will also go, in germany, spain and elsewhere. this morning, ssp group — which owns the sandwich chain upper crust — says up to 5,000 jobs could be cut across its uk outlets and head office. it's because of reduced numbers of passengers at railway stations and airports.
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and about 600 workers will lose theirjobs, after the shirtmaker tm lewin announced it will close all of its uk shops. it says it's taking all of its sales online, to help cut costs. this report is from andy moore. it's a global aerospace giant manufacturing a fleet of aircraft, but airbus is being hit by coronavirus like every part of the aviation sector. thousands ofjobs will be lost at plants across europe. in the uk, it's expected about 1,700 jobs will go in broughton in flintshire and filton in bristol. that represents about 15% of the british workforce. in a video press release, the airbus chief executive warned the path to recovery would be slow and agile. we need to act now by adapting our workforce to reflect the new situation in the international aircraft sector and protect the longer term future of the company.
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jobs in the aviation sector are highly paid and highly skilled. it's estimated two or three jobs will be lost in supply chain for every singlejob that goes at airbus. we've been working very hard with airbus and many other companies in the aerospace sector to try and avoid this happening but unfortunately, because of indecision by government to intervene, it's resulted in today's announcement. the government says it will do its best to minimise the impact. we accept that we cannot save every job, even though nine million people have been furloughed through a scheme which is cost £20 we accept that we cannot save every job, even though nine million people have been furloughed through a scheme which is cost £20 million and counting. everyone realises you can't count on that forever, but we can't save every job. and there is even more grim news in the aviation sector from the airline easyjet. they've warned they may have to close bases at stansted, southend and newcastle airports.
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the union unite says at least 1,300 people could lose theirjobs. andy moore, bbc news. let's get more from ben thompson, our business correspondent. we have this wave ofjob losses and the latest this morning, news ofjob cuts at upper crust. yes, what a dire day in terms ofjobs in the uk and that ssp story, as you said, the firm we probably all use, may be on a daily basis, probably never heard of it because it operates all the brands we may know at airports and train stations, you mentioned upper crust, it also runs caffe ritazza, camden food company found at some airports and also runs a franchise in those locations for some of the starbucks and burger king outlets as well. it is a huge business, one operating right around the world. what is interesting about the announcement this morning is that the job losses will come for ssp only in the uk. it says the recovery
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in the uk is taking longer than elsewhere in those markets overseas and so it has been forced into a position to cut these 5000 jobs. that is primarily because ssp is a job done like business that operates in railway stations and they have said passenger numbers on the railways are still down by 85% as we'll continue to work from home if we'll continue to work from home if we can. we are not commuting, we are not travelling, not picking up that cup of coffee or a croissant on the way into work in the morning and that means for them business is really struggling. what they have said this morning as this is the start of a consultation. 45 days of consultations with the unions and its staff and if the pick—up in the uk economy and in that market is better than they are expecting then they won't have to make as manyjob cuts. but nonetheless it does underline the difficulties that many firms are facing right now. they say that the market in 2020 will remain subdued and therefore they are
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taking action to address that. for upper crust, caffe ritazza and starbucks, some of those workers employed by ssp, it's worrying times this morning. it does underline particularly for the travel and tourism industry, remember once again this is a travel firm for all intents and purposes, struggling as we stay at home as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. thank you very much, ben. ben thompson reporting. the government is under pressure ben to act more quickly to provide local councils with data about potential spikes in coronavirus cases in their areas. yesterday, leicester became the first city in the uk to be put under a local lockdown. some directors of public health say they are not getting detailed and up—to—date information about local outbreaks — such as individual addresses and workplaces. the doctors' union, the british medical association, says it's vital that councils are given more information so they can act swiftly. dr manish pareek is a professor of infectious diseases at the university of leicester. he says other cities will also see
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more cases in the coming weeks. those of us who work in the health system always expected that there would be, even after this first wave, that there would be ongoing spikes in activity. the virus hasn't changed. it remains with us, as we know. and as people start to move and mix, what the virus will do is transmit. so in those areas of the city in leicester at the moment which are inner—city city and have a lot of dense housing there is likely to be transmission. but i think it's unlikely to be the only city. i think looking forward there is likely to be spikes and activity in other inner—city areas in the coming weeks and months. and here's a gp, dr rosemary leonard, explaining why it is so important for local health experts to have access to detailed data. there seems to be a problem getting very detailed information out. and it hasn't been explained why. but we do need that information if these local outbreaks are to be contained. i think what we really need to know is really
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detailed information, so where actually are people testing positive. is it because there has been screening done in a care home, for instance, and there are a lot of positive instances? for instance, and there are a lot of positive cases? really down to that much detail where exactly are the outbreaks happening. and in what age groups. this morning the business secretary alok sharma responded to the claim that local authorities aren't receiving enough data. data is obviously being monitored constantly by the joint bio—security centre together with public health england and the test and trace system and information is being made available to local authorities. there is a dashboard and information on test and trace is made available to local authorities right now. so information is being shared. of course, where we are able to improve we will do that. linda bauld, is professor of public health at edinburgh university. alok sharma says information is being shared. but the first signs of
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a problem in leicester emerged early injune and a problem in leicester emerged early in june and local officials a problem in leicester emerged early injune and local officials there we re injune and local officials there were only able to look at positive tests from hospitals as opposed to positive tests from the drive in the centres and people having tests at home. yes, number of us have been very concerned about this from the beginning, in england specifically. because what has happened is local directors of public health have not had the control and information they need. it has now become apparent that we now call the pillow to microdata, not the positive tests in hospital but those in the community as you say, that data has not been provided quickly enough —— pillar two data. and those instances in ca re two data. and those instances in care homes. they are not getting the data about community transmission and if we are to prevent future lockdowns that data is absolutely key. the significance of leicester not getting the results of the test from people having them in their homes and in the driving places is that they had an incomplete picture.
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they didn't think there was a problem in leicester. they thought there was something like 80 positive cases and when you put all the cases together there were 944 positive cases, a really different picture. it is, and it is so heartbreaking in a way. yesterday i was on a programme with local people from leicester talking about the fact they were all ready to open, local hairdresser, for example, a small business, already is and set up to go after weeks of not being able to do that and are now taken away from them for several weeks because we haven't had, not only of the data, but the communication. effectively the system has not been working in the system has not been working in the way it needs to. other countries have done this much better. i hope we will learn lessons from this. directors of public health in particular need to have high quality, rapid data to be able to respond locally when problems occur. is that a message to public health england or a message to the department of health? whose responsibility is it to give information to local directors of
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public health? i understand things are now improving. data—sharing agreements arejust are now improving. data—sharing agreements are just being signed at the moment between public health england and local councils. it is a shared responsibility across the sector. clearly phd has an important role to play and i think the key thing is we mustn't forget that even a part of the contact tracing system has been, as you know, contracted out to private firms. let's not forget good old—fashioned public health because they are on the ground and if they can have that data more rapidly we will be much better off. thank you very much, professor linda bauld. thank you. 36 suburbs in australia's second biggest city, melbourne, are to go back into lockdown following a surge in cases. authorities have said those areas have had an "unacceptably high" number of new infections detected in the past few day. up to 300,000 residents from those virus hotspots are banned from crossing the state border. they face fines of $7,000 or up to six months in prison. for the first time
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since beijing imposed a new security law on hong kong, police have carried out dozens of arrests and used water cannon and tear gas against protestors. in a tweet, police shared details of their first arrest — a man detained for holding a flag of independence. he was also wearing a t—shirt branded with "free hong kong". under the new measures, people convicted of threatening security could face life in prison. hong kong's chief executive, carrie lam, has described the new security law as the "most important development" since britain handed back the territory. at a ceremony marking the 23rd anniversary of its handover, she called the law a "turning point". western governments have condemned the move as an unprecedented assault on hong kong's liberties and autonomy. translation: the national security law only
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targets an extremely small minority of people who commit four types of crimes that seriously threaten national security as provided in the law, namely secession, subversion of state power, organisation and carrying out of terrorist activities, and collusion with foreign or external forces to endanger national security. it serves to protect the life and property, basic rights and freedoms of the overwhelming majority of our citizens. claudia mo is a pro—democracy hong kong legislator. she gave her reaction to carrie lam's defense of the new security law. they say black is white, you just can't argue and you shouldn't argue because it's the emperor speaking, because they are the law. it's so obvious by now, so clear that beijing just wants to stun hong kong into nothingness, into a black hole. that you people will be so petrified, so frightened and intimidated that you wouldn't dare to say anything or do
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anything in opposition. now, i personally never agreed with this hong kong independence call, because we don't even have our own water supply, not enough, anyway. but the fact is, they are now arresting people for owning a banner on that sort of issue and it's a crime. can you believe it?! i mean, people can't even talk about it, let alone advocate it. and there will be notjust speech crimes but thought crimes in hong kong. 0ur correspondent martin yip is in hong kong. martin, tell us what is going on behind you. yes, victoria, i'm standing in the shopping district, it is more than just a standing in the shopping district, it is more thanjust a high standing in the shopping district, it is more than just a high street, it is more than just a high street, it is more than just a high street, it isa it is more than just a high street, it is a busy shopping district with locals and tourists. but now they
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have cordoned off this whole street asking people to leave the area going back to where they marched at the start. there have been dozens of arrests already, this lunchtime, which is a few hours ago, and as you may have already heard, under this new piece of national security law, has been made. there is a weird stand—off at the moment. people are walking away here and some of the police are leaving as well. water cannon trucks have been doing the rounds. 0therwise, cannon trucks have been doing the rounds. otherwise, they could have been thousands of people filling the street because of the annualjuly the 1st march organised by the pro—democracy group. this year it has been banned, before this piece
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of national security law it was banned under the covid—19 social distancing measures. tell us what it feels like there? does it feel tense? people that really calm behind you. there is a mixed feelings. just a few moments ago the other crowd, in fact, feelings. just a few moments ago the other crowd, infact, if feelings. just a few moments ago the other crowd, in fact, if i can try and turn the camera around a bit and show you what it is like, there are still some people gathering on the other side of the road. that's the entrance to victoria park where most of the major pro—democracy rallies would have started. so people are still staying, hanging around, watching what the police are doing and some of them have been yelling at police a few moments ago. we have witnessed at least two people probably in their 50s or above, one man and one woman, being pepper sprayed by the police, and then they had to be dragged away by volunteer
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first aiders to wash those irritating substances from the pepper spray. irritating substances from the pepper spray. there is a rather su btle pepper spray. there is a rather subtle atmosphere. there are angry people here who still want to express their anger towards the police and the government but obviously it is a different day now in hong kong. thank you very much, martin. thank you. the us has bought up virtually all stocks for the next three months of a drug shown to work against covid—19. more than 500,000 treatment courses of remdesivir for american hospitals have been secured. the vice—president explained the steps the us are taking to treat those with the illness. we are in a much better place because of the availability of what's known as therapeutics, or medicines, to treat people that have contracted the coronavirus and are experiencing severe symptoms. dr steve hahn of the fda is here and he will speak about the progress that we are making, whether it be
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the availability of remdesivir which we are distributing in another tranche this week, the use of blood plasma and steroid treatments, and also we continue to hear very hopeful signs about the continuing progress for developing a vaccine for the american people. we have been talking about the british government coming under pressure to act more quickly to give detailed data to local councils to help them deal with any spikes in coronavirus cases. 0bviously what has happened in leicester. some directors of public health say they are not getting detailed and up—to—date information about local outbreaks. let's talk to various people about this. to elisabetta groppelli, virologist and lecturer in global health at st george's university in london. zoe thompson on the isle of wight and lisa clark in plymouth.
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and lisa clark. there is no suggestion that in plymouth or the isle of wight those areas are next for a local lockdown. so we, how has lockdown been on the island and what would an extended lockdown mean for you and other islanders? the lockdown has been incredibly difficult, as well swear in the uk, stressful for businesses, incredibly worrying, but we have seen the island community really come together and island businesses really step up. i think everyone is kind of getting back into the swing of things. people are wanting to reopen. this period, actually, i think, isjust as reopen. this period, actually, i think, is just as difficult. reopen. this period, actually, i think, isjust as difficult. it's about now trying to create a balance between opening but keeping people
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safe. i think the messages coming out from leicester, particularly, as you say, with regards to the transparency in the figures and the pillar two testing is quite worrying. so hopefully there will be more transparency. but it is still a very worrying time. lizzo what would your biggest fearfor very worrying time. lizzo what would your biggest fear for lockdown being extended the in plymouth? we are a player cafe for the under fives, so although cafe is can reopen, we cannot open on the 4th ofjuly because we are a play area and we have soft plate so we are not finished riding the wave of the first lockdown, so to slam straight into a second lockdown would ultimately sink us, i think. i think i would really struggle to come back from that. likewise, as zoe says, the community of plymouth have really pulled together here over the la st really pulled together here over the last few months and there is a feeling here at the minute that as
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soon as we open the doors our customers will come. a further lockdown may affect their confidence as we come out of the other side of that. the government help is coming to an end now, the furlough scheme is beginning to be phased out. i am managing to generate a small income at the minute through taking our character, we have a big mascot and we take her for visits to visit children on their doorsteps and in their gardens. the income i'm generating from that i'm setting aside to make up the shortfall when the furlough payments come over the coming months. and ultimately to pay some rent, what i can pay. but if we go intoa some rent, what i can pay. but if we go into a second lockdown that stops. that's more revenue i'm managing to generate stops, the government funding stops, and i really don't know what the future holds. i'm worried for myself, my livelihood, i'm worried for my staff's jobs and worried for my
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customers. there has been a lot of talk about pubs and clubs and restaurants. new parents are not going to those places any more. they are coming places like here to socialise and with other parents and share parenting hacks uncomfortably breast—feed and not worry about their toddlers. i'm worried about them because if we go under that lifeline goes for them as well. there is so much going on there, lisa. let me go back to zoe for a second before we bring in our virologist. the isle of wight has had a small number of cases, but obviously it relies on people getting on ferries to come to you to visit, to holiday there. does that worry the people who live and work on the island ? worry the people who live and work on the island? yeah, there is a lot of frustration with regards to the opening up. understandably the community are really protective of the island. we had a new case yesterday which was the first new case in over a week. so actually, as
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you say, the number of cases has been very low and i think the community really want to protect that. but equally, our local businesses, we have lost all the revenue that we normally get from the season from easter onwards. so july and august is potentially a lifeline for a lot of the businesses on the island. and to go into any kind of future lockdown would be devastating for a lot of them. so it is really about getting this balance between wanting people to come to the island to appreciate our beautiful beaches and coastal walks and the things we have to offer, but equally protecting ourselves and visitors and our communities to ensure that we don't go back into lockdown. i think the individual businesses have taken it very seriously. and i'm proud of the businesses. they have understood the guidance and implemented it to the
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best of their ability. but it is a real balancing act. 0k, best of their ability. but it is a real balancing act. ok, let's bring in elisabetta groppelli, who is a virologist. good morning. would you expect there to be other leicesters? it isa expect there to be other leicesters? it is a difficult question and i seriously hope there will not be. but what we know is it is going to be likely there is going to be a few bumps going as we transition along this pandemic. what is going to be crucial is that although we know that the virus is difficult to detect, it is very crucial to identify it early, so before we actually have outbreaks. at the time we have localised clusters, so we can prevent going into a city large outbreak like leicester. they are not inevitable but there is certainly work that needs to be done to avoid letting to those large bumps in the curve like leicester.
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how do you quash those kind of postcode outbreaks, if you like? first of all you need the postcode data, don't you? absolutely. postcode i think is geographical. this is where it is important to remember that the virus infects people, human beings, and the whole idea behind test, trace and isolate is that you know who is infected and you can go and ask where they likely caught the virus on who they have beenin caught the virus on who they have been in contact with. they are very much individual, person based contact tracing and that is what is really needed to keep the clusters down. when the clusters get out of control, then of course, it's all about there are too many people, we don't know where the virus is, so we are approaching it geographically and then it becomes easier to administer because you canjust draw
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administer because you canjust draw a line around a postcode and it is easier to implement. it is really a situation that we should try to avoid. yes. and also, it is worth pointing out that when overall the numbers of cases are low, very small increases can have a disproportionate effect on the data, which could mask the overall trend, which could mask the overall trend, which might still be largely downwards. absolutely. ithink because now the numbers have gone down so quickly, it is actually a good situation to be, in being able to pick up bumps in the curves, these localised outbreaks. but still, you know, this is still something we shouldn't consider inevitable and this is also a reminder that the virus, yes, it is not out of control in our nation, in our country, however, it is still prevalent in this country and there is still a lot of work that needs to be done and therefore detecting it. the positive case is not per se the end of the world but it is certainly
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an indication that we need to go on to tackle it, especially at local individual level. thank you very much, elisabetta groppelli. lisa, good luck and i wish you all the best, the owner of mu music. the general trend across the uk is falling cases. in lancashire weekly cases fell from 42—16 in the week up to during the 26 and in essex it fell from 68—14, so there is some good news. we have been talking aboutjob losses this morning. morejob losses we re losses this morning. morejob losses were announced this morning, particularly in the aviation sector. airbus, for example, is cutting 1,700 jobs at its commercial aircraft plants at filton near bristol, and broughton in north wales. the business secretary, alok sharma, said the industry is getting support from the government.
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there are unfortunate impacts on the industry, one is on the travel sector and one is on airlines and we will continue to provide support across the economy to make sure that people are supported in theirjobs and where unfortunately they face losing theirjob we provide support to help them find a newjob. losing theirjob we provide support to help them find a new job. let's talk to labour's shadow transport secretary, jim mcmahon. good morning, to you. if you were in government, would labour step in and save these thousands ofjobs? government, would labour step in and save these thousands of jobs? the truth is the government have given a number of interventions, whether it is the furlough scheme or a lone support for business but what they haven't got is a coherent plan, a package of support that really reflects the struggling sector and how long that will take to recover. what we say is they should be a deal but it should be a deal with conditions in the national interest. so it is not right, to be honest, that we are seeing huge amounts of public money being given over to operators without any conditions about how they are treating their
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staff, about making sure that money is being given to uk based suppliers, about making sure that they maintain their commitment to they maintain their commitment to the climate emergency, making sure, by the way, if they had the benefit of the uk safety net and they are not already uk taxpayers, now it is time they started paying into the safety net. the number of companies paying dividends out. on one hand they are receiving government from they are receiving government from the uk taxpayer, on the other straight out the door in dividend payments to their shareholders. that's before we get onto the number of operators who are not giving refunds to the consumer. package is really important. if you were in government, regarding furlough and all the rest of it, you would say there are conditions attached. explain to me how that would save these thousands and thousands and thousands of jobs in these thousands and thousands and thousands ofjobs in upper crust, tm lewin, in the aviation sector? what we would do first of all is to allow a more flexible approach to furlough. 0bviously a more flexible approach to furlough. obviously it will not be the case that you go from being out
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of work on monday and on furlough and straightaway you're back on a full—time contract because aviation will take much longer to recover, particularly because it is a very seasonal business. so what we are saying is far more flexibly, allow shift working to take place, allow the gradual working from the three days up to four days, five days, over a much longer period. we also so have flexibility on the loan repayment scheme. at the moment the requirement is repaying them in two yea rs requirement is repaying them in two years but that doesn't take into account how long it may take to recover. when we look across the continent to spain they allow five yea rs, continent to spain they allow five years, which i think is far better reflecting how long it will take us to recover. in terms of the furlough scheme, sorry to interrupt, even with your idea of flexibility with the furlough scheme, perhaps three days a week and four days a week building it up, are you suggesting the british taxpayer, if you were in government, the british taxpayer would continue subsidising the wages of thousands of people in the aviation sector who face losing theirjob for two years, three
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yea rs, theirjob for two years, three years, four years? it won't take that long to recover. how do you know? there summer season, which is the most profitable season for airline operators and airports and for the supply chain, will not be what it was last year. it will take time for that to recover. what we have been calling for with the trade unions is an extended scheme beyond 0ctober unions is an extended scheme beyond october to take us into the new year. so, sorry, just so i'm absolutely clear, i want to be really specific with what labour would do. you would extend the furlough scheme as it is in october to january? into next year. for insta nce to january? into next year. for instance where somebody might currently be at home... that will not stop hundreds of thousands of jobs being cut either? if you can get operations back to normal it won't be the case that everybody will be required to return back to work on a five—day or a six—day contract. but it could be that they can work realistically two or three days and gradually that will take up as the business picks up. i should say that the government have done quite a lot on furlough, credit
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where it is due in terms of the chancel are stepping up. but that's got to be maintained because it would be ridiculous, wouldn't it, to spend billions of pounds on a furlough scheme that is meant to be ajob retention furlough scheme that is meant to be a job retention scheme for staff who the government know will be made redundant very shortly. it is far more sensible that those jobs are protected and far more flexibility offered by government and a more realistic view about how long the sector will take to recover. bear in mind 1.5 millionjobs for the uk economy, aviation is critical to our economy, aviation is critical to our economy and also critical to the recovery. thank you very much. jim mcmahon, labour's shadow transport secretary. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again, the weather for the rest of the week fairly unsettled. today, a lot of cloud around. there are some sunny breaks, though and in the sunshine and temperatures rise. sharp showers across parts of southern england and wales. they could be thundery but we have weather from pushing south across scotland, introducing showery
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outbreaks of rain. in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. sunshine in northern scotla nd ireland. sunshine in northern scotland that it will feel cooler in the northerly wind. tonight the showers were merged to give persistent and heavy rain. 0n either side of it, variable amounts of cloud and some clear skies but again, witha cloud and some clear skies but again, with a northerly component, it will feel colder in the north compared to the south, where there are overnight lows of 13. tomorrow, you eventually say goodbye to this band of rain, it pulls off into the north sea. a drier day for most. still some cloud around but there will also be some sunshine and like today, as temperatures rise, it could spark off some sharp showers with highs of 22. thank you very much, carol. juries sitting on rape trials should be given clearer direction on the meaning of consent, rape myths and the impact of trauma on victims — that's according to the victims commissioner for london. claire waxman has told us that in light of low conviction rates in rape cases, more needs to be done to improve juries' understanding
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of sexual violence. currently only around 3% of reported rapes in england and wales result in a conviction. she's also calling for more support for alleged victims going through the justice system, saying many victims have told her they emerged more traumatised than before. in a moment, we'll hearfrom her, but first one woman told us her experience of going through a trial. this is "joanne's" story — the nature of what she talks about is upsetting — you might not want children to watch, for example. and her words are spoken for her. i was facing the jury with the judge and my left. i was so nervous. it was kind of adrenaline, like, right, i'm going to do this, i'm having him for what he's done. on that night, four of us went out and i got quite drunk. i was sick and stuff, so the barmaid got me a cab.
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my friend said she'd come with me but by the time she came outside, i was gone. i don't remember getting in the taxi. i remember driving along. i was in the passenger seat. they was greenery coming past and i knew something was wrong because there's no greenery round by where i live. i started saying to the driver, look, i'lljust get out here, it's fine, i'lljust get out here. just let me out here, i'll walk but he wouldn't. i remember trying to open the door and i couldn't. i remember asking him to let me go and... i remember him pulling out his... and then i don't remember
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anything, really. until i'm sat in a car with a woman and i was just crying and crying and crying and saying to her, am i going to die, am i going to die? i was pleading with this woman, saying i'll do what you want, just let me go. she cries. yeah, and ajumbled thing came on the radio and she said "we've got him. "you don't need to worry. "you're safe." i'm glad i don't remember much. i hope i never do, to be honest. the police told me things that happened, the things i couldn't remember. he'd driven me to my house. at that point, i was sick. i got out of the car
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and i was on the floor. he grabbed my arm and put me back in the taxi. my neighbours saw it all from the window. then he took me to a cashpoint. 0n the cctv, he was literally holding me up. eventually, i must have given him my pin and he took out £100. and... that's when he took me to where it happened. they found me because a man heard the screaming and phoned the police. they were looking for a while, i think. there's body—cam footage of when they found me. i was in the back of a van. apparently, it's quite desperate. i was hysterical and undressed. i don't know if i want to see that footage. they showed it in court. all these strangers have watched it but i thought,
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that's ok, that's ok, it will be worth it. all through the trial, i was just sick with worry. when i looked at the jury when i was talking, some of them were quite sort of stonefaced. one of the defence barrister‘s questions was, oh, so you've had mental health problems in the past, is that right? i said yes, because i had depression and anxiety when i was much younger. but they tried to say that i wanted to get attention or something. then he questioned me about what i was wearing, saying i wasn't wearing any underwear. i was wearing a bodycon dress and tights, it's quite a normal thing to do. it wasn't an invitation. then he said, £100, that's a lot
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of money to you, isn't it? he was making out like i couldn't afford rent without it, making this image of someone desperate, you know? then he went on to say about how... ..how i'd got offered to do things if i could have my money back from the thief from being sick in the car, which i wasn't expecting. i wasn't expecting that. that's not who i am. to say that in some way i would let a stranger do that to me for any amount of money, it's disgusting. but because it cast some doubt, you know, how can you ever prove that that is not what happened? thejury acquitted him.
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after the trial, there's nothing. i've been struggling a lot with ptsd. bad anxiety, can't sleep. i get flashbacks. i don't get in taxis ever and i don't go to that part of town. but it's actually the trial i think about more than what he did to me. at every stage of everything i said, there was evidence. and more — there's the cctv showing me not being able to stand. the barmaid, my friends, my neighbours, the man who heard the screams, all witnesses. my torn dress. the fact that his story kept changing. all the forensics and the injuries, i had cuts, bruises, like a boot mark on my back. when they caught him, he had my phone.
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the gps proved where he'd taken me. i don't know how you can see all of that and think, yeah, yeah, she was up for it. that kind of worries me because that's the general public. and now, because of the lies about me, he's just out and he's free. even with all the evidence. that's frightening. if i could go back today and prove to them that i didn't consent, that i didn't say yes to any of that then i would, but i can't. and... ..now i never will be able to.
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that film was produced by emma ailes, and directed by owen kean, and you can watch it again on the bbc news website and on bbc social media accounts. thank you for getting in touch with me about this. i will read these, anonymously of course. hello, i was raped last year, tinder gone wrong. i begged him to get off me. he took advantage, he raped me, i reported it immediately. while i had forensic evidence taken, i was going through more trauma. months later, they said there wasn't enough evidence to even charge him. as victims, we are co nsta ntly charge him. as victims, we are constantly being let down, destroyed by the system. my life is over but he lives on, able to rape others. and another one, my experience of a rape trial was horrific and i've been left traumatised from the experience. it's like i was being violated all over again is my decisions and actions were scrutinised. juries have little or no knowledge of the impact of ptsd
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ona no knowledge of the impact of ptsd on a victim's recall, especially as the criminal justice on a victim's recall, especially as the criminaljustice process took over 18 months. it was a very lonely experience. now we can speak to the victim's commissioner for london, claire waxman. and "lara", whose name we've changed. she was sexually abused as a child by former music—tour manager michael murphy. the case came to trial more than 30 years later, after a number of victims were identified by the police. "lara" testified in court. he was acquitted of three counts, and there was a hung jury on the remaining 12 counts. in a retrial six months later, he was convicted of all remaining 12 counts, including rape. thank you, both of you for talking to us. "lara", i wonder if you could describe your experience of appearing in court to give evidence? i was terrified, i was completely, com pletely i was terrified, i was completely,
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completely terrified. i was sick both times before i gave evidence. i couldn't work beforehand, i couldn't work afterwards. i had to take lots of time off of work. i couldn't concentrate, just couldn't think of anything other than the trial. and then, on the day of the trial, the first trial, where the prosecution barrister was lovely, but the defence barrister, shejust com pletely defence barrister, shejust completely broke me. she accused me of all sorts of things. she accused me of attention seeking. she accused me of attention seeking. she accused me of attention seeking. she accused me of making it up for compensation and the compensation system, the way it works is you have to apply within two years of reporting and the trial took three years, three and a half yea rs took three years, three and a half years to get to court. so the system is setup to kind of persecute you. so she accused me of that. she accused me of being mad. she said, i'm sure you believe it happened but
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it didn't really, which is what he used to do. so... read traumatising. i was going to say it with the first case ending with the defendant being convicted of three counts on 12 cou nts convicted of three counts on 12 counts with a hung jury. you had to testify again, what was it like the second time at geller the second time, one of the things they threw at me the first time which knocked me sideways because they had my phone and had gone through my messages, i had disclosed to friends i had also been abused by other people. because of what he did, i didn't realise i could say no so i was abused by other people and they threw at —— that at me and it threw me sideways. afterwards i thought i wish i said this and that. with the retrial, gave me the opportunity... i was terrified again, sick again but it gave me the opportunity to say all the things i would have said and should have said the first time
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round if i hadn't been completely side blinded by that accusation. so it gave me a chance to say what i needed to say. but, yeah, it was horrific. the fact i had to go through it twice to get some sort of justice... i'm very aware that i'm very lucky because not everybody gets that opportunity and there were five of us at the first trial and not everybody got that opportunity the second time round. so although we got somejustice, the second time round. so although we got some justice, it's only partial justice and we got some justice, it's only partialjustice and i know that it's still incredibly difficult for the people that didn't getjustice. it's so hard. it's hard on all of us. but it's so hard. ifelt like i wasn't believed. i felt like i it's so hard. ifelt like i wasn't believed. ifelt like i hadn't done enough. 0ne believed. ifelt like i hadn't done enough. one of the accounts he was acquitted of was a count against me. the fact he got away with that... i still think, oh, ishould have said this and i wish i said that. i still
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think about it. it's devastating, devastating. let me bring in claire waxman, the victims commission of london. good morning to you. what percentage of rape cases actually reach trial stage? so, last year i published the london rape review to understand what was going on for rape victims and survivors, how long it was taking from report to court. we look to a particular month and after that month there were 84 allegations of rape. only 6% got to court and only 3% were convicted. so it's, unfortunately, very few are getting to court. we are seeing a lot of what is being picked up in the video and what "lara" hasjust said is there are a lot of rape myths and the stereotypes deeply entrenched in our society and that is played out in the criminal justice system as well. it's very much reflected in police decisions, i think it plays a part in cps
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charging decisions as well which is why it is at an all—time low when is coming into court because jurors are memberof the coming into court because jurors are member of the public and those views are very much entrenched in society. so what sort of training are you calling forjuries to have? at the moment there is guidance forjudges that they can direct juries in certain cases around consent and submission, for example, but we need to go further. i want to see a standardised approach, a proper approach to really tackle and dispel these myths and stereotypes i think are influencing the decisions of jurors and what we're seeing in these poor conviction rates, as well. and the defence use it, because as we have seen over the la st because as we have seen over the last few years, there has been a real focus on mobile phones and the amount of material that is being looked at on a victim's mobile phone. notjust that, their medical records, their school records, all of this is helping to fuel defence to really endorse these rape myths in that courtroom. we had it in the
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videojust round in that courtroom. we had it in the video just round around in that courtroom. we had it in the videojust round around mental health and twisting there and using that for an health and twisting there and using that foran unfair health and twisting there and using that for an unfair narrative about the victim. and they don't have a right to respond, either. so it is really important that if we are going to scrutinise rape victims in this way, there has to be a balance in the process and in the courtroom. we have to ensure that jurors are understanding myths and be it through leaflets or videos before the trial, understanding a consent and submission and the impact of trauma. many people believe that there is an physical resistance then it isn't rape and that is misunderstanding the impact of trauma for many rape victims, who frees and there won't be resistance because they have gone into shock and they are not able to fight back. that is the impact of trauma and it is not being recognised throughout the justice process and certainly not in the courtroom. what are some of the other rape myths that your dill juries of the other rape myths that your dilljuries need to be educated on?
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so, there was a commission last year that did a fantastic survey of the public. one in ten men think if a woman is drunk or asleep and you had sex with them, that is not rape. these are the sorts of myths we need to challenge. there is obviously again around if they don't appear distressed or tearful in the court room process, then that somehow means they have been raped. they have to understand that people respond differently. a lot of victims will shut down. they will sort of become detached from the trauma in order to survive, especially such a long and complex process of trying to get caught, which is close to three years and post covid, i think even longer. so we have a lot of work to do. the government need to move very, very quickly on their end to end review they started last march that they have made very little progress in. the judiciary tell us judges have to
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be authorised to sit on cases involving sexual offences and they receive special training which is updated every three years. they say judges routinely give directions to juries on the meaning of consent, on rape myths and the impact of trauma on victims. research was done i think at the end of la st research was done i think at the end of last year that looked at what was happening in the courtroom. actually, as we know, that is very varied, it is not happening as standard. whilst it might be in the guidance, it's not happening in all rape cases and we needed to be mandatory and to make sure that is happening, that they are properly tackling these myths and stereotypes. i know for certain that they aren't understanding the impact of trauma. judges aren't understanding and so therefore jurors won't understand it. this is something the government need to be pushing when they finally publish the recommendations from their end—to—end review. the recommendations from their end-to-end review. i would like to go back to "lara" if i may, finally. in the film, talked about being traumatised again by the trial and
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said the trial was worse than being raped. i wonder if that something you can relate to? i really relate to the things joanne you can relate to? i really relate to the thingsjoanne was saying. it's just devastating. i felt like to the thingsjoanne was saying. it'sjust devastating. ifelt like i wasn't believed. i've been having counselling with rape crisis centre for a year and pretty much the whole year has been focusing on the trauma of going through two trials are now it's come to an end and i can't get help from the nhs because they think i should have dealt with it in specialist counselling and they don't understand actually going through a trial is really traumatic. you need support for that before you can look at the trauma of what actually happened to you. thank you very much for talking to us, "lara" is not her real name. and claire waxman, we appreciate your time, the victims commission for london, calling forjuries to be educated, effectively, on the subject of consent and rape myths. i have quite
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a lot of e—mails from you about similar experiences. some of them are similar experiences. some of them a re really similar experiences. some of them are really long. i have read them all, i will read them all and perhaps get back to you. and if you have been affected by any of the conversations we have just heard, there are loads of organisations and websites get can help you and offer support and you can find them all on the bbc‘s action line website. we will bring you the latest news headlines on the hour. before that... plymouth argyle fans are starting a campaign to have a statue erected of a footballer called jack leslie in the city. leslie was selected for england back in 1925. but he was then taken out of the squad — because he was black. clive coleman has the story. jack leslie, a phenomenal footballer, but was he denied his place in sporting history because of the colour of his skin? jack leslie played for plymouth argyle,
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then in the 3rd division, in the 1920s. he's believed to be the first black player to captain a league side. here at plymouth, jack leslie scored 137 goals, at times, suffering racial abuse from both crowds and opponents but, in 1925, the club manager called him into his office and gave him some thrilling news —jack leslie had been picked to play for england. it was the talk of the town. but when the papers came out some days later, billy walker, of aston villa, was in the team. jack was named as a travelling reserve. he never travelled. england struggled a 0—0 draw in belfast, while jack scored twice in plymouth‘s 7—2 victory at home to bournemouth. what happened to jack has passed into family history. you have the wedding picture there, which isjust lovely, isn't it? they looked so happy, didn't they? certainly did. lovely picture. yes.
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well, in those days, you didn't have the television. if someone came down to watch him, they were not watching his football, they were looking at the colour of his skin and, because of that, he was denied the chance of playing for his country. plymouth argyle has already honoured one of its greatest players in this mural and has renamed its boardroom after him, but fans want a statue ofjack and a campaign is under way. we think that at a time when some statues are coming down, we want to campaign to put a statue up — to celebrate jack leslie, his incredible achievements, but also to remember that historic injustice where he was denied his england cap. the last thing on my mind was me being the first black player to play for england. commentator: intercepted by viv anderson, he's on his way. one to his right, one to his left... 53 years afterjack leslie's selection for the national side, viv anderson became the first black player to win a full england cap. it's incredible that, to get the euphoria of getting
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the call up from the manager to say that you've been picked for england and then, within a few days, the let down of being dismissed from the squad because of the colour of his skin, it is appalling, really. i'd never heard ofjack leslie until two weeks ago and that's a crying shame, because what he achieved and what he did should be paramount in every black person's mind, you know? but, hopefully, this statue we're trying to get erected will carry on his legacy. after his playing days, jack returned to his trade as a boilermaker, before ending his working life in the boot room at west ham, where he cleaned mud from the boots from england stars bobby moore and geoff hurst — hardly fitting for a man who should have been remembered alongside them and now, perhaps, will be. clive coleman, bbc news. if you want to get in touch this morning, you are very welcome. you can e—mail me or get in touch with me on twitter. after 10am, we will be live in hong kong where beijing
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has imposed a new security law. the police are on the streets and so are pro—democracy protesters. more reaction tojob cuts pro—democracy protesters. more reaction to job cuts here pro—democracy protesters. more reaction tojob cuts here in pro—democracy protesters. more reaction to job cuts here in the pro—democracy protesters. more reaction tojob cuts here in the uk also. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again, the weather for the rest of the week remains fairly u nsettled. rest of the week remains fairly unsettled. today, a lot of cloud around, but there are some sunny breaks. in the sunshine, the temperatures rise and we see some sharp showers across parts of southern england and also wales. they could be thundery but we have a weather from pushing south across scotla nd weather from pushing south across scotland introducing some showery outbreaks of rain. in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. sunshine in northern scotla nd ireland. sunshine in northern scotland that for you it will feel cooler with a northerly wind. tonight, the showers will merge to give us a more persistent and heavy rain. on either side of it, variable amounts of cloud and some clear skies but again, with the northerly component it will feel colder in the north compared to in the south, where we are looking at overnight lows of 13 degrees. tomorrow, you eventually say goodbye to this band of rain. it pulls off into the north
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sea. a drier day for most. still some crowd around but also some sunshine and like today, as temperatures rise, it could spout off some sharp showers with highs of 22.
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hello, welcome to bbc news — i'm victoria derbyshire, bringing you the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. police in hong kong use tear gas and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, as china's new national security law comes into force. it's a bit of a weird stand—off at this moment with the riot police here and people walking away, and some of the police are leaving as well. the water cannon truck has just been doing rounds. more uk job losses because of coronavirus — 5,000 jobs are under threat at upper crust and 1,700 jobs are to go at airbus uk. the us buys up nearly all stocks for the next three months of the drug remdesivir — one of the only drugs shown

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