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tv   The Coronavirus Newscast  BBC News  July 4, 2020 12:30am-1:00am BST

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but first, adam fleming, laura kuenssberg and fergus walsh discuss the latest on the coronavirus crisis. well there we all were on wednesday afternoon watching the bbc news channel which is in informative as ever and out popped a friend of the podcast, clare weham, the global health policy expert from nse. ——lse and then well, you won't know what happened. so how can we make sure that they are getting the right data so we don't have problem again? what your daughter called? she's called scarlet. scarlet, i think it looks better on the lower shelf. and it's a lovely unicorn. do stop me if you need to. his name is christian. christian, i'm just deciding on where money wanted to go. where it mummy wanted to go? i think the first half
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is great, thank you. i'm so sorry. and she is here now. hi. how have the last 20 for i was there for you? a little bit weird just that clip makes me a little bit sick just thinking about it. i don't know, it's always weird hearing your own voice. i'm sure you guys know that more than anyone else. seeing what's happening what's blown up over the last 20 for hours it's a little bit weird. talking of that, normally have lots of questions about global health policy and the pandemic and we only want to talk to scarlett. where is she? well she really wanted to come on and i told her how excited mums can be if you talk to her. where currently having fish finger gate. i told her she could come on after she finished them i thought that might make it work but were all well. i wonder though ijust noticed that you are on the tate day show on nbc show on nbc ——today show in america this morning. only the biggest
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programme in the world. exactly. i just thought maybe she's too big for us now. it was really weird one of my best friend lives in kansas and she was suddenly rang him and what are you doing on my tv? and i was like i don't know. where is a unicorn tonight because you me and adam can't see you both up it's on the top shelf where she left it. clare lovely to catch up with you next time a promise will talk about the latest in the lockdown in panama or the executive committee of the world health organisation is on my back. and if you can let scarlett know that if she does want to tune into this minor television podcast we are going to be talking about schools, air bridges and actually we do have some other celebrities on. didn't they say never work with children and animals? we got scarlet having fish finger she wanted to come to the tv. and then what good have labradors
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later in the program. work and have animals on this addition of the coronavirus newscast what could possibly go wrong? the coronavirus newscast from the bbc. hello, it's adam in the studio. and in the studio to meet apart. i'm chris and others studio about 20 metres away. none of your children could jump into the cupboard at any point, chris? i have padlocked the door. are they somewhere else in the newsroom where they suddenly might wander into our studio? i'll send them in your direction and moment. anyway, children across england got the news, actually maybe they hadn't been waiting for it i don't know how they feel about it that in september everyone will be going back to school in england. that is 8.82 million children. and the news was announced by gavin williamson the educations secratary and our old friend the downing street daily briefing. from september attendance will once again be mandatory.
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and no child should be out of school unless it has been agreed. this will be crucial if we are to minimise the effect of this pandemic on every child's long term education or development. now, there was a bit of a false start though wasn't there wasn't there, laura? about school going back because initially the governments dream scenario is that all primary schoolchildren would be back now. of course and it's been very very messy because different schools, different kinds of schools, different parts of the country a different local authorities, different parents, different head teachers have taken very, very different views of what's possible and what's not possible and of course there've been thousands of different senses because no school is identical. the government has been heavily critics size of not taking more of a national role saying look, this is how it's meant to happen, we are going to do everything we can. therefore either return in september, while there is a lotta pressure on that because i think
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the government can't have a sort of political mess up twice in a row by not providing clear enough guidance. but today the guidance that came out well that is another whole load of rules or regulations in itself. it's not can be straightforward. you could probably do your gc se and bad. that's an idea. i volunteer as first teacher of that. let's work through the guidelines because we are joined now by francessca craik, who is from county durham. hello mrs craik. hello, thank you for having me. wow, massive headphones. it looks like you're about to do a dj set. let's get our heads down and turn over the exam papers. we thought maybe because there's a lot of stuff to get through, we mightjust go through what's going to be a typical school day from septemberfor you. let's start off with getting to school, what's the school bus going to be like? i think principally this is got to be one of the most challenging things for leaders schools to get to grips with. we've been given the guidance that they are allowed to travel
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together on school buses. so a school like mine which is got ten different school buses coming to our site, that's going to be really quite difficult to ensure that social distancing happens on the buses. certainly no capacity to have additional buses put on we have to stagger and start lessons at different post for a different year groups. but in a school like mine with over 500 children coming in on buses, am i going to have to start looking at a curriculum which is dictated by which book arrives on site rather than by the year groups which i would normally teach children? i think part of this hasn't really been thought through. with the full picture of how schools truly operate. likewise, the parents as well, there will be a lot of parents who will want to drop their children off because of anxiety around transport. off because of anxiety but if you've got children in different year groups
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and they are staggered starts perhaps in a half hour or 45 minutes between different year groups starting in the school, how are parents going to go about their day as well? certainly things to be thought through. the whole principle is in it that the classes are basically meant to stick with each other in their bubbles all day and all the time. but after the morning is going to be tricky enough, what about when they actually get there? once they actually physically get onto site we will have to have a variety of entrances to welcome people into. we are fortunate enough because i'm part of a relatively large trust to invest in individual handwashing basins. so we have additional capacity within our school but i do wonder what that will be like for other school leaders with around the country. once peoples are in our pupils are in we've also got a make very difficult decisions around specialists as well. for example, my year sevens are going to be housed in the bubble
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in humanities who is going to get these specialist science labs? which year group am i going to have to attribute them to? there are going to be some real challenges for school leaders around this because schools generally operate at a maximum capacity. so there aren't spare classrooms to put additionaljudgement into. —— children were going to have to make some hard decisions. it might be that the science labs for gcse classes have come a year 11 have to go. that's their area and we will have to teach them other subjects in the science. oh, so you could bejust stuck in a science lab? the rest of the school year of for the first half of the school year, yeah? potentially, because another one of the issues is that the government is advising us that they want to minimise contact so that means infrequent crossing in corridors, some school corridors are so incredibly narrow. some schools are really, really old in terms of their build. so how you physically get the kids from one place to another without coming into contact with another year group is again another logistical problem.
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because once you've moved children from one area of the school you have to naturally have to filter into another part of the school. there is no holding pens in the school, there is no spare space. so where do these children go to? ultimately, on a bubble, you might have to look genuinely at your in this area of the school and you're going to have to bring staff to you in order for that to work. the rivalry like you get the music suite or you get the science lab or you get the gym, you can have to play bass clover two years could do it sam's. imagine how you handle that? the school day first day back in september is quite complicated already. we haven't even got to morning break or lunch time. that's gonna throw up a lot of logistical challenges as well no doubt. undoubtedly because again, we want the best for our students, parents wa nt the best for our students, parents want the best for their children, the area i work in we have a large numberof the area i work in we have a large number of children who are on free
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school meals and that will be eight reflective picture up and down the country as well. won't be able to we wa nt country as well. won't be able to we want to be able to give our children to chorus hot meal. which staggered lunch breaks and limited dining, some schools might realistically have to start looking at feeding children from ten o'clock in the morning. if you're going to be able to get them all the way through. or if you're really down to dining space it might be that you'll have to invest, we are currently looking at investing in hot lockers. so our children's wherever they are in the building can still have a hot delivered to them. you mean like an airline meal? like chicken or beef, really? yes, that kind of a principal because we think that it's wrong tojust principal because we think that it's wrong to just offer children a cold lunch choice. that would be an easy thing for us to do. but is at the right thing for children? we know that food is such a critical component of children being successful in school. when you add
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up successful in school. when you add up all of these challenges that you face, i suppose a question some i come to is, is it going to be worth a?| come to is, is it going to be worth a? i guess trying to offer education however limiting is worth it. but my goodness, the list of challenges you are setting out here is colossal. goodness, the list of challenges you are setting out here is colossalm is colossal. and again i'm fortunate i work within a very successful trust in we've got lots of school leaders. we have shared planning days to try to tackle this together. ido days to try to tackle this together. i do really feel for isolated school leaders who might genuinely be looking at the guidance and thinking i don't know how i'm going to do this. and i've got to do this and it's going to prove very very difficult. in principle what the government is setting out is entirely rational. we all want children back in school, of course we do. i'm a mother myself. i have a soi'i we do. i'm a mother myself. i have a son who's about to transition into secondary school. everybody wants kids back in school. but there are a lot of challenges and i think by as
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not being afforded any further financial support from the government as well, hot locker food may come at a premium. additional cleaning which has to take place in school, that comes at premium. additional resources so that you're not handling the same equipment as each that comes at a premium as well. loads of pressure on you and loads of pressure on the government to get it right. many parents are looking at this it very anxiously over the next few months. could you clarify one thing for us, as far as you understand, what happens if a teacher or a people actually contracts coronavirus? we've seen in leicester for example where cases are popped up again. schools immediately closed was up what do you think will happen in that circumstance? hopefully, the track and trace system will be so robust that we would be able to immediately ta ke that we would be able to immediately take action around that. my understanding is that if i have a staff member or a pupil in a particular year group and is an enclosed in a contact that i would have to disband the whole bubble.
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including the members of staff who've worked within that bubble. when you get into use staffing ratios with schools again, if i was to lose a significant amount of staff. then that might have a knock oi'i staff. then that might have a knock on effect with howl staff. then that might have a knock on effect with how i would be able to staff the rest of the school safely. so if one bubble pops in a school particularly if you have a very large school, that could pop your whole school effectively. very large school, that could pop your whole school effectively! very large school, that could pop your whole school effectively. a lot to think about in the gcs e on covert secures schools in england. thank you very much and good luck with the first day of school. which is still quite a long way off but a lot to sort out by then. only two weeks. i suppose yes, you've got to get all the place now so you have the summer holidays already to go in september. thank you. thank you. before school goes back you have the school holidays. but will we be able to go abroad for the school
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holidays? chris, what is the latest on what we used to call air bridges then we call travel corridors. now you no one really knows what they actually are. so for three and half months we've had this unprecedented advice haven't we ? months we've had this unprecedented advice haven't we? being told not to travel abroad. and unless it's absolutely necessary for that what we're going to get is imminent, a list of countries that we can travel to but also that we can travel back from without having to quarantine for a couple of weeks. we should get that list on friday about 70 countries, whole thing being delayed because countries have been on the list and then taken off the list. also there's been a bit of a row with the devolved administrations who wanted to have a say as well. the curiosity being that borders are a matter for the uk government but health advice is a matter for a number cardiff health advice is a matter for a numbercardiffand health advice is a matter for a number cardiff and belfast. and there's been a bit others blown up publicly involving nicola sturgeon the first minister of scotland and
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transport secretary about how that was all happening. but we are finally going to get a list pretty sooi'i. finally going to get a list pretty soon. so, the list of red country shouldn't go to, ever countries would usually think about before you go and green countries which are totally okay. let's check to somebody whose business is holidays. the boss of last—minute .com. somebody whose business is holidays. the boss of last-minute .com. hello. think about it, this government policy, is it actually a bit last—minute .com and some people say? yeah, i would say it's even more than last—minute .com. we weren't expecting the list on monday, monday they said later that week and now it's supposed to be tomorrow. let's hope they get their act together and finalise the list. has that delay cost you money and caused chaos in the travel industry? no, ithink caused chaos in the travel industry? no, i think it's really causing a lot of uncertainty to the people. as sooi'i as lot of uncertainty to the people. as soon as possible johnson last week
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and announced the idea of the air corridor or a travel corridor as you call them, we saw a surge on website doubling all the people really trying to find the best solution to get away and get some sun on the beach. but now we are still here waiting to understand which country are on waiting to understand which country are on the list in which men are not. and it's a bit frustrating to be fair. what proportion of people going onto your website up until now have been actually booking anything? if they have been booking anything they've been guessing as to which country is going to be on this ok list and which ones aren't. we are seeing more and more people moving from lookers into bookers. already over the weekend with the double the reservation with them than the weekend before. i have to say that a lot of people are just making a bet and counting the fact that there are and counting the fact that there are a numberof and counting the fact that there are a number of countries in europe
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where the situation is i would say, actually better than in the uk. so they are expected to be able to travel to this country. lookers too because i love that. i know you said the government has a got their act together, what do you think has been the problem. because they have been talking about it for weeks. you were expecting it on monday but we have things been going wrong?|j expecting it on monday but we have things been going wrong? i really don't know. to me it doesn't look like such a difficultjob. i would have expected a first list on monday. and then it a week or two weeks later more countries coming on the list. i think probably the problem is they are trying to get the final list before announcing an think it's an approach that is not really for the consumer in the uk.
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is there a particular country, if it's not on the list, whenever it comes out that will pause a because a big problem for you? know. i don't expect so. a course for us us and asia was an important market i have i'io asia was an important market i have no expectation about them to be back. but most of the destination we said in the summer are back. but most of the destination we said in the summerare in back. but most of the destination we said in the summer are in europe. back. but most of the destination we said in the summerare in europe. so spain, greece, france, italy. typical destination for the british consumers. and i would be really surprised they not be on the list to be frank. you mention greece, the prime ministers dad went to greece and he said that it was an essential visit could because he was going to fix up his property that he rents out. so it was part of his business was up and he went via bulgaria. it's just that flights from the uk to greece our band. when you think about stanley johnson the
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to greece our band. when you think about stanleyjohnson the prime ministers trip to greece? well, i don't like to comment on personal decision. but i have to say that this year is one of the best years to visit greece or spain or italy. there will be a lot less people, overcrowding will not be an issue. is it in venice or rome this time is beautiful. so it might be lovely for tourist to be able to wander around st. peter's and rose rome without having to queue or get in a gondola without having to queue. those crowds mean problems for the travel industry. there have been a lot of really serious warnings about how tough it might be for that part of the economy. how do you see it from your position? how worried are you about your business?” your position? how worried are you about your business? i am not very worried for my business because last—minute .com is an online company. we are totally digital and we don't own inventory. so we don't
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owi'i we don't own inventory. so we don't own hotels, we don't own charters. so for us it's a bit easier. to sail in the stormy days. but i'm a bit concerned for the industry as a whole. the number of jobs concerned for the industry as a whole. the number ofjobs lost in the airline industries is staggering. we saw this week easy jet announcing they are restructuring. british airways starting at her no, i think 20,000 people. the impact on the industry is very big. and that is why the uk government and all the governments around europe they can get their act together and realised that the thing that at least for the summer all the data, the medical data are positive. they shouldn't be much concerned about travelling around. you talked about travelling around. you talked about how inevitably stormy this spirit has been for your industry because of a pandemic. in the british context how more stormy has
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been because of what you described as the uncertain messages you've heard coming out of the british government? the approach of the british government, the pen dam yet management has been a bit unconventional. just to mention one element they introduce a quarantine oi'i element they introduce a quarantine on arrival onjune element they introduce a quarantine on arrival on june eight and so the sickness and the decision taken had beena sickness and the decision taken had been a bit strange to me. and for sure this is not really in the industry in the uk and the travel industry in the uk and the travel industry to recover. thank you very much. some controversial comments they are the ministers who been looking after both the travel industry and a quarantine policy would be a bit about he said that when they? yeah, it's true though that when the government is finally ready to talk about what went wrong, they keep saying when i ask, oh it's
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not yet time, will look back at lessons learned. but i think the decision around not quarantining at an early stage, which a lot of other countries did come it will be one of the things that people really want to push them on. the point privately and privately actually people coming into the country were mainly at that point where it's coming back from half term holidays. when other countries are putting quarantine measures and for that there's no question that has been one of the controversial decisions that will be a lot of picking around on the months to come. on this part of the podcast we've worked nearly with children shout we added in some animals now? i think so. because lara, i know you have been particularly keen that we speak to oui’ particularly keen that we speak to our bbc sport colleague but is not really him it's actually his dogs you want to speak to. i'm afraid it is. because they became very famous during the pandemic for doing this. one to control and the switch mabel sensing this might be a chance still waiting, still believing and you
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wonder what oliver is doing here. only has to hold on going to the upright though high tariff with no opposable thumbs high risk at this stage was up and it's gone and mabel ta ke stage was up and it's gone and mabel take said! no mercy from the younger dog who takes this victoryjust as time runs out. a famous wind built oi'i time runs out. a famous wind built on patients. and share belief. you know they've even got a book deal now? mabel and buck. yeah. but luckily, we've got andrew carter here. hello andrew. hello, how are you? wears all of that just mabel. i'm glad you got that right. all of his hair! i'm glad you got that right. all of his hair i can try and turn the camera around. she's a bit crass at the moment because she's had hasn't had her 17th walk of the day. going to tell us that all of his on cnn. she's doing a tui with her and the ca nticle of she's doing a tui with her and the canticle of usa. which i did actually do. that is a thing. in the
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dim and distant past of all that is. yeah, so i'll quickly turn around hang ona yeah, so i'll quickly turn around hang on a 2nd. see all of his well? 0h hang on a 2nd. see all of his well? oh yes. oh yes, there she is. they are so oh yes. oh yes, there she is. they are so lovely. they are, yes but i'm afraid now she's got the squeaky rabbit which i would have to take away because that's can be no fun. there she is! that's what's happened to me then. i used to be, well i was a semi—respectable broadcaster but i'iow a semi—respectable broadcaster but now it'sjust a semi—respectable broadcaster but now it's just animals. there we a semi—respectable broadcaster but now it'sjust animals. there we are. that's what i do. what was it that sparked the first video? what was it that made you think you know what i'lljust give this a go?”
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that made you think you know what i'lljust give this a go? i actually recorded the day that a huge amount of sport went. because i was getting ready to go down to cardiff to do wells in scotland six nation in the final weekend. i was in a message that that was off for that at the same time an e—mail came in saying that was all. they all went so the joke was what's a sports broadcaster supposed to do? i commentator the dog. let us in on a secret, do you always record the commentary as you doing the video or do you sometimes doing the video or do you sometimes do the commentary having already recorded the video? that secret will go to the grave with me. all of and mabel. on the first one i was commentating as i did it but then i wasn't quite, i was sort of muttering way to and then you put it oi'i muttering way to and then you put it on more cleanly afterwards. thinking of what you going to say and then it graduates through the commentary that i've done, once you get to the online zoom meeting it becomes a bit more complicated. that was quite a production number. that was a production number. that was a production number. that was a production number. i was making up
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my production number. i was making up 5 production number. i was making up my dogs and as i was biking out on think of what mike doing? making on my think of what mike doing? making on 5. think of what mike doing? making on my dogs. there we are. you're about to do an interview now you're putting a microphone on mabel‘s collar. have any like dodgy billionaires made big money offers to buy all of it mabel? because they just love them so much? know billionaires have offered to buy my dogs. i'm looking at them now and all of his giving a hard stare. i would sell them for the right amount of money. i wouldn't part with them for the world. throughout all of this i am frequently reminded when i look at them, when i'm talking to them, they are my dogs and i love them, they are my dogs and i love them but they become sort of something else slightly which is a bit weird but throughout it all they are just dogs. and i got the same relationship with them is so many people will have had with their dog throughout all of this. they are the
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sort of morale officers of families and households. been leaning on them and households. been leaning on them a lot. completely agree with you. you said there's been some ridiculous offers what is been the most ridiculous? first of all, i was given lots of offer to commentate on various things on yoghurt and pizza and car rentals and things of the like. lots of things. lots of well—meaning, first of all i would also say that social media which obviously can be a pretty unpleasant place, throughout all of this has been incredibly, just lovely. 35,000 messages, 40,000 messages over the studio and videos come again. everything a one of them maybe one or two, they weren't even that unpleasant they just sort or two, they weren't even that unpleasant theyjust sort of questioning on that dogs, are you deliberately starving your dogs just for video content? this is how labradors eat. she's crossed. you
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need to take her for a walk. let's see how crossed he is and then will say goodbye. i can't see the shot so you'lljust say goodbye. i can't see the shot so you'll just have to say goodbye. i can't see the shot so you'lljust have to tell me if there and shot. i think he could see mabel there. ina and shot. i think he could see mabel there. in a bit of oliver. can you see all of his well there? yeah, we can see them both. go out for a walk, guys. you didn't want to see me in the first place. let'sjust leave them there. thank you very much and to all of and mabel for cheering us up throughout this and tonight as well. all of this has certainly made up for the lack of support for the top thank you eve ryo ne support for the top thank you everyone for tuning into the coronavirus newscast. will be back with another episode very soon. if la ra with another episode very soon. if lara stops watching the live stream of the dog. i would watch a drug channel, i wanted. by of the dog. i would watch a drug channel, iwanted. by everyone. the coronavirus newscast from the bbc.
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this is bbc news, i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: president trump faces criticism over his plans to celebrate american independence day at mount rushmore — with no face masks or social distancing in sight. as pubs in england reopen on saturday, the prime minister boris johnson issues a warning to the public not to be complacent. police brutality in the spotlight in mexico — with a teenage soccer player shot by a policeman from a parked patrol car. plus, the show must go on: britain's theatres are trying hard not be forgotten, as they remain shut for the forseeable future.

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