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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 5, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and martin giessler. our headlines today: thousands of drinkers have flocked to pubs across england for the first time in three months after lockdown restrictions were eased. we have really stepped up a social distancing guidelines. hand sanitiser, it has been safe. you have lived on your own and you haven't seen people, if you are going to a pub, it is important. but it was a mixed picture when it came to social distancing, with scenes of tightly packed crowds in parts of london.
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clapping for our carers one more time. the nation honours the nhs on its 72nd birthday. to have given so much during this present, ijust to have given so much during this present, i just want to say that it is you who have been our shields. it's race day. formula 1 is back — mercedes block out the front row of the grid as the season restarts in austria. it has been a very windy night and it will be an unseasonably windy day but on the plus side some more sunshine around today than what we had yesterday but if you heavy showers around, too. when you later for all the details. —— joined showers around, too. when you later forall the details. ——joined me later. it's sunday, the fifth ofjuly. our top story: thousands of people across england have enjoyed their first night out in pubs for more than three months, after a major easing of lockdown.
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restaurants, hairdressers, theme parks and libraries also opened their doors, with strict social—distancing measures in place, but police have voiced concerns the rules weren't always being observed. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been out in northampton, to get a taste of the "new normal" night out. it was a daylight began to look familiaragain in it was a daylight began to look familiar again in england. pubs and restau ra nts familiar again in england. pubs and restaurants had already reopened in northern ireland on friday. yesterday, it was england's turn, but nothing was going to be quite the same again. the government is desperate for people to get spending but it also wants to stay safe. and as day turned into night, it became apparentjust how difficult that would be. don't push me. it has gone midnight here in soho and although most of london is quieter than usual, the crowds are still out in force here. as you can see, many of the bars and cafes are still open which is great news for the entertainment industry but it is not much evidence of social distancing going on. police officers were out in force across england. the
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national chair of the police federation in england and wales took to twitter at the end of his shift in south hampton, saying... earlier in the day there was relief ofa earlier in the day there was relief of a non—alcoholic kind. instead of wrestling with clippers and scissors on cells, the experts are now back in charge of our locks from behind a visor. for those wanting something a bit more hair raising... theme parks have also opened the gates but with more than the usual precautions. good place to come along, 30% capacity, toilets are all clean so fine, all good. and it's now possible to head back to the big screen not to theatres where industry bodies have want of massive closures. meanwhile, eight—year—old
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oliver veins did the honours at the yorkshire air museum. eight out of ten of the most popular uk attractions are museums but they survive on a mixture of public money and ticket sales. this one reflects on past battles with opponents that we re on past battles with opponents that were visible. the challenge now is to win the war against an unseen enemy. john mcmanus, bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak is expected to announce a doubling of the number of frontline job centre staff when he delivers his economic plan on wednesday. it comes after the prime minister said the pandemic would, in his words, cause "many, many job losses" and that high unemployment was "inevitable". our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now. jonathan, what more do we know? in the last couple of weeks there had been majorjob losses announced
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in various sectors, whether it was aviation, retail and the arts and entertainment sector as well which has been particularly badly hit by the coronavirus crisis and as you say the prime minister himself has predicted any, many job say the prime minister himself has predicted any, manyjob losses as a result of the coronavirus crisis, despite thejob retention scheme that the government has put in place to avoid mass unemployment. but in the coming months, as that comes to an end, we are hearing from the government today that they are going to recruit 13.5 thousand extra mentors to work in job sectors, work coaches, whose job it mentors to work in job sectors, work coaches, whosejob it will mentors to work in job sectors, work coaches, whose job it will be to help people who are unemployed find work. and get them into newjobs. so thatis work. and get them into newjobs. so that is coming at a cost of £800 million. these 13,500 people will be in theirjobs by march with around half of them in place by october. business groups have welcomed it, the institute of directors is a good first step but more is needed. the
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chancellor needs to reduce the pressure on businesses through taxes and we will hear more about his plans for the economy when he makes a statement in parliament on wednesday. thank you very much. nhs england is launching a new service for people said to be experiencing on—going health problems after having coronavirus. it's called your covid recovery and it's available to people who had to be treated in hospital, as well as to those who managed their illness at home. it will allow people to access mental health services, contact health workers and track their progress either online or over the phone. a local lockdown has been imposed in spain's catalonia region after a sharp rise in infections, affecting more than 210,000 people. the president of sergia said no—one would be allowed to enter or leave the area and provisions to allow non—residents to leave have been put in place. our reporter guy hedgecoe is in madrid now. guy, is this being seen
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as a major problem in spain? is to be taken very seriously indeed. spain lifted their restrictions two weeks ago, the strict lockdown that had been in place since much march. they decided to lift travel restrictions into and out of the country and since then, we have seen a number of small outbreaks of coronavirus. however, in catalonia, there has been particular concern. the local government said there are nine outbreaks there, relatively small outbreaks there, relatively small outbreaks of the virus. several of them in companies that sell and gather fruit. that is what we know in terms of where the outbreaks are, but it has said it will implement this lockdown, this new quarantine, for people of the area, for two weeks in principle. so if you try and leave or try and get in without
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documents, you can be fined by police and the authorities are hoping that this will bring these new outbreaks under control. donald trump has lashed out at china over the coronavirus pandemic as part of his speech to mark the united states' independence day. the president declared the united states to be the "greatest and most virtuous nation in the history of the world" at the event in washington, dc, where large crowds gathered to hear him address the nation. today marks the 72nd birthday of the nhs, and at 5:00 this evening, millions of people are being encouraged to take part in a nationwide clap to commemorate the occasion. it will be a moment to show gratitude to nhs staff and key workers, who have helped during the pandemic, as our home editor, mark easton, reports. at five o'clock on the 72nd birthday of the national health service, the country is being encouraged to stop what it is doing and take a moment to give thanks with a huge round of applause for all those whose actions
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have helped save lives during the pandemic. applause .ina applause . in a video message released today, the prince of wales recognises the selfless nurses, doctors, paramedics and selfless nurses, doctors, paramedics a nd cou ntless selfless nurses, doctors, paramedics and countless other staff whose ge ntle ness and countless other staff whose gentleness has made us great. despite all that has been endured, there is deep because for gratitude and a true reason for pride in the way we ca re and a true reason for pride in the way we care for all members of our society, our greatness truly is in gentleness. so, ladies and gentlemen, thank you all for what you have done, more than i can possibly say. a spitfire will tip its wings above eight hospitals as well as the homes of fundraisers and volunteers. the words thank you, nhs, painted on its underside. the flight nhs, painted on its underside. the flight part is a tribute to people across the uk who supported the health service and each other in the last few months. at five o'clock
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today when clapping for carers one final time, it is a chance for the nhs itself to say thank you to everybody who has played their part, including the public who, by going through this difficult lockdown period, have reduced the infections and helped save tens of thousands, probably hundreds of thousands of lives. last night, candles were lit and dozens of public landmarks work eliminated in the blue of the nhs. a tribute to those whose lives have been lost in the pandemic was a 70, the prime minister will bejoining the prime minister will bejoining the club outside number ten, after which, people will be invited to raise a cup of tea or a glass with neighbours to reflect on the connections that have been made during the lockdown. millions came together for the regular thursday evening clap for carers during the height of the pandemic and the hope is that this final thank you will encourage communities to build on that togetherness for the next stage
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of the crisis. mark easton, bbc news. the american rapper kanye west has announced he is running for the president of the united states in 2020. it shows —— he chose american independence day to make an announcement on twitter, triggering announcement on twitter, triggering a social media storm. with months to go before day, it is unclear whether any official paperwork has been filed for him to be appearing on state election ballots. it is not the first time west has suggested he could run for the white house and has been a vocal supporter of president trump in the past. it is a curious one, that, that he is running against the present he supports. do you know four years ago, people were saying if donald trump was getting in, what are we going to have next? president can you west? don't vote against anything in politics. good morning to you. "we're not out of the woods yet,"
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that was the warning from the prime minister ahead of yesterday's major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. pubs were among the businesses allowed to reopen, but the campaign for real ale says around half remained closed because of safety concerns. breakfast‘s tim muffett spent the evening in northampton, to get a taste of the "new normal" night out. this is the best thing since sliced bread! the old house in northampton closed for 15 weeks, packed once again. what do you miss question but the social side! if you have been living on my own and without seeing people are going to the pub, it is important. has been heartbreaking. horrible. what is the point of work? shutin horrible. what is the point of work? shut ina horrible. what is the point of work? shut in a box. now is the time to release the box! but the pub going
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experience he has changed. hand sanitisers at the bar. where drinks are no longer ordered. when every body comes in, they are designated their seats and then we are sending a waiter over and there is just table service. it was hard at first but easy to get used to. sunday nights have been filling in quieter since march but familiar sights and sounds are returning to stop tentative steps back to how things were. it is kind of nice to see people again. it is scary as well because obviously we still have the pandemic going on. they have really stepped up social distancing guidelines, hand sanitiser, it has been quite safe. has it affected your night at the pub? oh no, it hasn't affected it, ifeel safer. is not just pub and hasn't affected it, ifeel safer. is notjust pub and restaurant owners that are getting reacquainted with a saturday night out. across england, so, too, are paramedics and police.
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from cornwell. .. to so, too, are paramedics and police. from cornwell... to london... please could be seen checking up on pub —goers. in north nottinghamshire, four people were arrested and several pubs decided to close after alcohol—related antisocial behaviour. in northampton, police patrolled the city centre no major incidents were reported. patrolled the city centre no major incidents were reportedlj patrolled the city centre no major incidents were reported. i think the fear might have been that it would explode. i am glad to see this town that we all got a lot of affection for, starting to be enjoyed again. i'm glad to think that the economy may start to get that lived. health comes first, however, so my ultimate think is that people remain safe was that it think is that people remain safe was thatitis think is that people remain safe was that it is really important not to let that guard down. at the brooklyn social, for lewis, it was a very special 30th birthday. social, for lewis, it was a very special 30th birthdaylj social, for lewis, it was a very special30th birthday. i have social, for lewis, it was a very special 30th birthday. i have waited for this moment for a long time and absolutely glorious. for many, a
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saturday night to remember. lovely, absolutely lovely. tim muffett, bbc news, northampton. to be fair, i know how he feels. i hadn't meant to go to the pub yesterday, i hadn't. we went for a walk and the pub was there! it is funny, isn't it? how accidentally find yourself in the pub? said we wouldn't go in if it was not quiet but it was and social distancing was observed and that first pint was quite nice. we have almost a fortnight to wait in scotland. i am anticipating that moment eagerly. enjoy the anticipation if you can. better be worth it! it is not the weather to be outdoors at the moment. particularly with the wind around this weekend? yes, that's right. it was very windy for the time of year. low pressure spreading through the north of the
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uk, and it is going to bring is a very windy second half of the week. however, it is going to be brighter thanit however, it is going to be brighter than it was yesterday, a lot of bowed around, that humoured hour. today we should see some sunshine. there is the culprit, low pressure sitting to the south of the uk, we see the strongest of the winds here. this is a very week—old front, it is going to continue to spread eastwards a cross going to continue to spread eastwards across southern and eastern england over the next few hours. you could bring a few spots of rain but when here clears through it will push that humid, moist air into the near continent and a much fresher airflow. we will have something to compensate so it will bea something to compensate so it will be a few degrees cooler, we will have that sunshine. a windy day for all areas, especially for scotland, southern goblin, northern ireland, northern england, 50—60 miles an hour —— southern scotland, some of those showers could be heavy and thundery. those gusts could lead to some disruption as temperatures range from mid to high teens in the
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north, could make the low 20s in the south—east given sunny spells. overnight, it stays very windy, the wind pending north—westerly, so it will be a fresher feel at night than it was last night, 9— 10 degrees and showers, blustery across the west of the uk. there is our area of low pressure, it is going to bring wet and windy weather for the working week. high pressure coming in from the west, that gradually settle things down for many of us on monday. we are still in this run of pretty fresh, cool, north—westerly winds, but we should have quite a bit of sunshine around. the chance of showers continues in the east. still a busy day, but winds will fall lighter across the south—west as high pressure moves in. there are your temperatures. high teens in the north, you could scrape 20s in the south—east. as we head into tuesday, high pressure holds on and we see this next feature running in off the atla ntic this next feature running in off the atlantic that will bring another
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speu atlantic that will bring another spell of cloudy and wet weather on tuesday. it's coming in quite quickly, some uncertainty in the north and south, it could be a bit further northwards than these graphicsjust. eitherway, further northwards than these graphics just. either way, it further northwards than these graphicsjust. eitherway, it is going to bring some wet weather for a time on tuesday, but with the best of the right weather across the extreme south we will see 21 degrees. otherwise, pretty disappointing again for this time of year further north. wednesday and thursday, it remains largely u nsettled thursday, it remains largely unsettled with the pressure in the north and the west having a greater chance of showers that winds will continue to ease down as we move through the week. rachel and martin. not much to cheer in that, stav, but we will forgive you. disappointing for this time of year, you should never be disappointed by the weather injuly, it's always disappointing. we did have spectacular weather through may and june. may, june, july, and this coming august. now time for a look at this week's
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click. theme music welcome to click. i hope you're doing ok. and, i don't want anyone to panic, right, but lara has left the building. she's gone rogue... is that the outside? it's the outside world! i've been allowed out. and you may be next week! oh, no. no, too scary. too scary! what're you up to? well, i was actually inspired by last week's food special to grow some of my own veg. but seeing as i can't even keep a cactus alive, i've gone for a spot of technology to help, of course. 0k. so what's that all about then? ok, so welcome to my smart garden.
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this is actually called click & grow. good name! seriously? brilliant. yep, absolutely. now, this is actually a spot of verticalfarming. although i've been setting it up outside it will live indoors, and the device provides exactly the right amount of light and water that the plants need. plus, the plants all come like this in little sachets where you have the seeds for whatever plants you want, but also what the company calls smart soil, which means thatjust the right amount of nutrients should be within each pod so there should be no problem in creating perfect crops. now, this device has been around a little while, but what is new is that it now syncs your smart phone, plus, this should bejust the right amount of these products that one person needs to not have to go to the supermarket. what are you planting then, at the moment? well, i've got some lettuce, i've got some basil, and i've got some tomato growing. so when all this is over, i can make you a salad. laughter well, there's an offer. all right, well, you carry on sowing
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and i'll see you in a few minutes. the influence of facebook in elections has become a huge topic. the world is still debating to what extent it was responsible for president trump's victory back in 2016. as the 2020 us elections approach, the discussion over the influence of social networks is once again on the agenda. joe biden, the nominee for the democrats, has been warning that not enough has been done to protect the integrity of elections. but while the world has been talking about facebook and twitter, another social network has been on the rise — tiktok. just a few years old, it's already been downloaded more than 2 billion times. its alluring mix of funny videos and the latest dance moves have been a particular hit with younger users. but with great power comes
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great responsibility. tiktok‘s huge user base could mean that it has a huge influence. and as james clayton has been finding out, it is now being used as a political platform. and just like facebook and twitter before it, a dark side is emerging. tiktok is a platform where you have fun and be creative. its whole philosophy is based around music, lip syncing and, of course, dancing. it's not supposed to be a political platform. it was not supposed to be any platform other than music. i mean, that's how it started. tiktok banned political ads last year, but its content is increasingly political, blurring the lines between comedy, entertainment, and politics. tiktok uses laid claim to sabotaging donald trump's tulsa rally, reserving seats in droves they would never use. now people have started sitting up and taking notice
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of the platform's political power. the big question now isjust how influential can these videos be? and are they the future of political advertising? tiktok is easy to use and fun, giving users creative tools to make imaginative content. and exactly the same tools have been applied to political videos. there's a green screen option so you can be your own presenter, pointing different facts and figures on the screen. the other thing you can do on tiktok is sing along with your mates, by duetting with them by splitting the screen. but that's big on political tiktok too. you can use it to react to other people's political comments — not always in a good way. sabrina haake ran to be north—west indiana's democratic candidate. she didn't have much a social media following anywhere until she posted this video on tiktok. pop music
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# you know i'm your type, right...# the video has had more than 300,000 likes. that's the kind of engagement you might expect of a presidential candidate. what worked for you in terms of getting likes? well, it was the music. # you know i'm your type...# tiktok‘s a perfect venue for people who want to get across their message in very simple terms. because there's not a — you know, it's sort of the two—second soundbite platform, right, which is kind of everything that i'm running against, but it also works because it gets people to look into your platform, and read it more closely. despite this tiktok popularity, sabrina haake didn't win, not even close. evidence perhaps that popularity on tiktok doesn't necessarily translate into votes at the ballot box.
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but tiktok wasn't designed to be political. its blend of short videos and young users makes it particularly vulnerable to fake news and extremist material. during the george floyd protests, a man linking himself to an extremist libertarian militia, call the boogaloo boys, allegedly shot and killed a federal security officer, injuring his colleague. he's been charged with first—degree murder. the movement that he belonged to aims to prepare for an armed struggle against the state. boogaloo boys often wear colourful hawaiian shirts, and are almost always heavily armed. tiktok has tried to purge boogaloo videos by getting rid of the boogaloo hashtag. but were able to find many gun videos using a different boogaloo hashtag to get round the ban. the thing that's interesting about
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them is that it is like the wild west. the president of media matters first spotted a rise in this extremist material a few months ago. they were getting around it in two meaningful ways. one was that their identifier wasn't picking up the gun somehow. and none of tiktok‘s countermeasures were searching for the right terms for the boogaloos, so even though it was against their rules it was just filled with boogaloo stuff. and so it was pointed out to them and they took it down. so a perfect example of the wild west, right. no rules. ok, they put in place a rule, they updated it. after we showed these videos to tiktok, they took them down. in a statement to the bbc, tiktok said: these problems are by no means unique to tiktok. facebook in particular has been criticised for its response to extremist material.
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how these companies engage with this issue is hugely important in a us election year. we have no idea at the moment what kind of impact tiktok could have on elections or any other kind of political event in the coming years. it's such a huge app in terms of user base, but there's no transparency over how it provides information to people at the moment. so we really need some more clarity, both from the app and from people who are using it, on what it might do in terms of political campaigning this year. with all of the press coverage that tiktok has received, it's easy to forget just how young tiktok actually is — just three years old. and we're still, perhaps even tiktok is still, getting to grips with the huge amount of power the platform now wields. many more of us have been working from home during the pandemic and if, like me, you're starting to feel a spot of zoom fatigue, then how about some new ways of doing meetings?
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well, chris fox has been taking a look at what can be done in virtual reality. at the start of this week, i really did think who's going to put on a virtual reality headset to do work or video calling? why wouldn't you just do it on your computer like everybody else? but, i have to say, some of the apps in development have really surprised me. this is spatial, a meeting space designed to bring together people with vr headsets and those without. those without a headset can drop in using their computer and webcam. so i can see zoe up on a huge video wall. and those of us with a headset are represented by these 3d avatars. all i had to do was upload a photo or take a picture using my webcam and it turned that into a 3d avatar. it applied my skin colour to the arms, and look how accurately
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it modelled my fringe from a 2d webcam image. and, just forfun, i tried making an avatar using a picture of a dog and i had to see this so you have to see it too. laughter now we're all in the meeting room together we can share files and photos, even 3d objects like this rendering of mars. this is in many waysjust like a video just like a video call, but i can't stress to you enough how different it feels. and spacial, unlike a video call, really feels like the people are there in the room with you. and if you go up to them too close it feels uncomfortable and weird, especially if you go really close because you can, at the moment, look through their head and see their teeth and eyeballs, which is a little bit spooky. and here's how the setup looks for zoe, who isjoining usjust like a video call on her laptop. she gets an overview of the room and she can see our 3d avatars moving around in front of that video wall. it was certainly a more personal and sometimes too intimate experience. and that feeling of really being in the same room as someone when you're in vr makes
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it very compelling. brilliant. that was chris fox. and that's it for the short cut of click, from me on the sofa, and lara with her tomatoes. i'm just syncing my plants to the app! laughter very 2020. listen, the full version available right now for you on iplayer. please, do check it out. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with martin geissler and rachel burden. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news:
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thousands of pub—goers in england have enjoyed their first drink in more then three months after the most significant relaxation of lockdown rules so far came into force. restaurants, hairdressers, theme parks and libraries also opened their doors, with strict social—distancing measures in place, but police have voiced concerns the rules weren't always being observed. the government is expected to announce a big increase in the number ofjob centre staff, after the prime minister said the pandemic would cause "many, many job losses". the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to give details later this week of a recruitment drive to double the number of expert mentors who help people to find newjobs. thousands ofjob losses have already been announced. the spanish government has imposed a local lockdown in a region os catalonia after a sharp rise in infections, affecting more than 210,000 people. police checkpoints have been established to make sure no—one is able to enter or leave segria. catalonia is one of the spanish regions worst affected by the coronavirus.
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donald trump has lashed out at china over the coronavirus pandemic as part of his speech to mark the united states' independence day. the president declared the united states to be the "greatest and most virtuous nation in the history of the world" at the event in washington dc, where large crowds gathered to hear him address the nation. today marks the seventy—second birthday of the nhs, and at 5:00 this evening, millions of people are being encouraged to take part in a nationwide clap to commemorate the occasion. last night landmarks in the uk were lit up blue in celebration and to express thanks to all nhs staff and key workers who have been working on the frontline during the pandemic. we know that some families have been struggling since lockdown with food poverty, and we've reported here on breakfast on the successful campaign by footballer marcus rashford, to make sure school—age children still receive food vouchers throughout the upcoming summer holidays. but there are worries that parents
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of pre—school age children are not getting enough help — and it means entire families are going hungry. fiona lamdin reports from bristol. is that enough? it is a big one, isn't it? sarah and her five—year—old daughter making lunch together. i am trying to sort of give them what they need first and then i willjust have whatever‘s left over. let's set the table. but sarah won't get to eat this. nearly all her food goes to sarah won't get to eat this. nearly all herfood goes to her children. . sort of getting by on a snack, a coffee in the morning and may be a piece of fruit for lunch and try and finish off what they have and then make sure we all eat together in the evenings which is a sort of around five o'clock and i have just got used to that, that has just become a pa rt used to that, that has just become a part of our lockdown life now. so are you permanently hungry?” part of our lockdown life now. so are you permanently hungry? i think i have just got used to it now. i don't feel like i am starving it is just that that is what i am used to
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now. i have lost weight during lockdown which i wasn't really intending to do and some people have commented on it but when you know it has come from the fact that you can't eat properly, it is not really a compliment. sarah relies heavily on the food vouchers her children get from the school. but if like single mum jade your four—year—old son is in nursery, while there is some help, it is not as much as if her son was in school. i have been at home 211—7. the electric is more, the gas is more, you are using more water and obviously everything builds up. this food club in bristol was set up to feed the under fives as they have seen demands nearly triple during lockdown.” as they have seen demands nearly triple during lockdown. i think the under fives have been left out of the thinking was not children at school do get support through the voucher schemes where the children underfive don't voucher schemes where the children under five don't get that support and their families really need it. and you are seeing them being
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hungry? yes, we're seeing them hungry, daily, yeah. i love those. anotherfamily hungry, daily, yeah. i love those. another family relying on this club. jade's partner has been furloughed. we had to reduce our rent costs, our bills and our shopping and where we have both the girls at home full—time, there is they would normally be in school and nursery receiving free meals, we are now have to feed morning, lunch, evening, snacks throughout the day, so this has been an absolute godsend. beating 520 families across bristol who might otherwise be going hungry. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the department for education says the needs of the most disadvantaged children are "at the heart" of everything it does and it has put in place a range of measures to support them, including grants and extra tuition. let us catch up with what is happening in the world of sport.
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another spot makes its return. it is race day in formula 1 after four months away. there will be an all—mercedes front line later today when formula 1 finally returns in austria. valterri bottas will be on pole despite crashing out of his final lap of qualifying. lewis hamilton will be just behind him in second. both mercedes cars have been painted black this year to reflect the teams support for anti—racism. meanwhile, red bull's max verstappen will start in third. va ltteri bottas valtteri bottas did a greatjob today and have to do a betterjob naturally and it is a long race tomorrow so we will see what we can do. we are very, very close here. this is a very strong track for. —— va ltteri this is a very strong track for. —— valtteri was up to be that close, i am pretty happy. the battle for a top five finish and a spot in next season's champions league is hotting up in the premier league. there were wins for manchester united, chelsea,
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arsenal and leicester — as alex gulrajani reports. it has been a season that mason greenwood won't forget in a hurry. the 18—year—old has broken into the manchester united team and doesn't look to be going anywhere, anytime soon. look to be going anywhere, anytime soon. with its team surprisingly behind early on against bournemouth, greenwood what his first of the game. and with united back on track in the second half, he went alone to add theirfourth in a in the second half, he went alone to add their fourth in a 5—to win. commentator: 0h, add their fourth in a 5—to win. commentator: oh, this special talent has done it again! if that is on the playground or out on the training ground or back home, he knows where to finish, how to score a goal, and it doesn't matter if there is a 75,000 pence here at all travelled on no—one, that is what he does was not —— old trafford. on no—one, that is what he does was not -- old trafford. in the week he committed his future to north london club, he showed why they raised him so highly as he scored in their 2—0
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win over top five rivals wolves. a top five target for both of those youngsters would be to emulate jamie vardy. a little fortune helped him reach 100 premier league goals for leicester against crystal palace. another 100 wasn't too far away as they ran out three nil winners. —— another one. i take each game as they come, what will be will be. i get frustrated every time i don't score but what you have to remember is, it is a team game and as long as we're picking up points, it don't really matter who scores. they will have to keep on winning as chelsea are hot on their heels in the race to finish in the top three. olivier another season's premier league all scorer another season's premier league all scorer helping them over —— to a 3—0 win over watford. as the old guard show they are not ready to be replaced just yet. at the bottom of the table, time is running out for norwich city. they were beaten by brighton thanks to leandro trossard's first half goal, leaving norwich now six
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points adrift from safety. in the championship, leeds won at blackburn to take another step closer to the premier league. they're six points clear of third placed brentford with five games to go. fulham, nottingham forest and cardiff occupy the other three play—off places. cardiff won 1—0 at bristol city, who sacked their manager leejohnson after the game — their seventh defeat in nine matches. the government has given the green light for further international sporting events to take place in england over the course of the summer. competitors and teams will be exempt from quarantine upon arrival in the country. it had already been confirmed that england's test matches against the west indies and pakistan would go ahead whilst two f1 races will take place at silverstone on the 2nd and 9th of august. it means that english teams still involved in european football could play the second legs of their current ties at home venues. manchester city still have to face real madrid at the etihad in the champions league while manchester united and wolves also have home matches still to play
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in the europa league. there was big shock in the epsom derby as the 25—1 shot serpentyne, stormed to glory. it was the first time in history that the derby was staged without spectators. it didn't seem to affectjockey jockey emmet mcnamara, as serpentyne moved clear to win by five and a half lengths. it's a record breaking eighth win in the race for trainer aiden o'brien. he seems to see things in horses that everyone else doesn't seem to see. an unbelievable achievement was not ridiculous. and for a man so young as well, he could have twice to that at the time he finishes off. it was a double celebration for o'brien as his horse ‘love' also won the oaks to seal a classics double for the irish trainer. it was the first time in racing history that the oaks and derby had been run on the same day. remember those names. serpentyne and
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lover. i imagine it will be a quiz winning question in the future. will need more material for winning question in the future. will need more materialfor our winning question in the future. will need more material for our quizzes! the same questions are beginning to appear. -- love. people can start going out on seeing each other in real life there is no need for a quiz. too many arguments in our family. impossible. it is 6:41. when britain went into lockdown in march, thousands of university students made their way back to their family homes — but with flights grounded, our next guest was stuck with no way back to his home country of greece. but that didn't stop kleon papadimitriou — he decided to get on his bike and cycle the 2,500 miles from aberdeen to athens. hejoins us now. i bet you are glad to be home was to
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but what you had to get there. tell me firstly the obvious question. why on earth get on your bike? well, i guess, obviously i do want to get home and the reason i had to do it was because my rent was finishing andi was because my rent was finishing and i had nowhere to stay. but for me, something like that is a tremendous personal challenge and i do like to best myself every year. will you a cyclist anyway? have you ever done any distance cycling before? just a very small race, it was 90 kilometres, but that was about it. i was never a cyclist, just mountain biking as a hobby, thatis just mountain biking as a hobby, that is the only biking i ever did. presumably you had a half decent bite, didn't you? i had to get a bit ofa bite, didn't you? i had to get a bit of a better life for the trip otherwise i was not going to make it. where did the journey take you? i studied from aberdeen, i went down to edinburgh, leeds, across into the nedlands from whole, and —— from
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hull. then into germany and then down into austria, down into the eastern side of italy where from there i crossed into greece. so through the alps? through a portion of the alps. i did have two skip a little bit, cheat a little bit, there was 120 climate as i did by train but they did help me a lot. two or three days at least. we were just looking at pictures of your trip. it looks absolutely amazing, what an experience, but it can't all have been easy. what problems did you have? i had a lot of problems both physical and mental. i was very alone during that time and i had a lot of support from my parents and friends who were calling me and pushing me on. physically, it was very challenging at first although
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eventually i managed to pace myself and get used to the race every day. a lot of technical issues with the bike. i had a small kit on me that i was able to fix on the road whenever something occurred. phenomenal achievement. and i know that you, because of the restrictions in different countries, you try to avoid the big towns and cities, and it was an essential trip, i get that, but how did you try and limit the risk you posed to other small towns and visit —— other small towns and villages in the towns you are passing through and the shops and so on? absolutely forced one thing i did find out was i was coming into contact, obviously, with a mask and all that with about one or two people every four days which is a very much smaller amount than when i was in student accommodation so that definitely decreased the risk. also, you know, i never did expose myself
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to anything, any people that i didn't have to because for me the biggest fear is that i get stuck in a foreign country with my parents unable to help me and coronavirus, that was a very big fear for me.” imagine you will be flying back to aberdeen in the autumn and also, i understand you basically fed yourself on peanut butter sandwiches and sardines? so presumably, if you ever see another peanut butter sandwich in your life again, you will be fine with that. —— if you never see. i will be happy to never see one. lovely to talk to you. phenomenal achievement, well done to stop you are looking well after all of that. they give talking to us. —— thank you for talking to us. he had to endure snow, hail and extreme heat. all of the elements. extraordinary. what will we get, weather—wise,
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today? a bit of everything! it has been windy, we had gale force winds overjuly and we have the strongest of the windsor dash winds across central and —— strongest of the winds across the centre and north of the uk. this southern flank where you can see a lot of the isobars squeezing over there, bringing strong winds. we also have a cold front moving southwards and eastwards a cross front moving southwards and eastwards across england and wales. they should clear over the next few hours and we should see the sunshine emerge to some cooler and fresher air, cooler and better than it was yesterday after that humidity. lots of showers, blustery showers, allowing into northern ireland, northern england, southern scotland. they could be heavy own factor and a lot of rain. winds could be 50—60 miles an hour, 40—30 in the south, it is going to feel pretty autumnal
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out there but mid to high teens across the north of the country, we could scrape 20— 21 degrees in the south—east given the sunshine. so it stays windy through this evening and overnight and as you can see we are backing to a north—westerly, so it will be a fresher note for most, showers wrapping up in north and western areas, temperatures falling to 9— western areas, temperatures falling to 9- 12 western areas, temperatures falling to 9— 12 degrees, last night it was about 17 degrees, so very warm and humid. low pressure pushing on into scandinavia, then, we have a ridge of high pressure trying to build on for a short while. this high is going to try to fight back towards end of the week and this weekend could bring some drier, settled in sunny weather to us. it's a bit of a way out of the moment. the run—up to is quite changeable. on monday, a calmer day as high pressure pushes in. fairly cold, fresh winds and most of the showers will be across eastern parts of the country. about 20 in the south—east, a bit
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disappointing for this time of year. and then these viewing is another speu and then these viewing is another spell of wet weather to the western pa rt spell of wet weather to the western part of the country on tuesday —— and then this brings us another speu and then this brings us another spell of another. it could be quite heavy, persistent rain across some central areas through tuesday. again, temperatures a little bit disappointing. it stays quite changeable with signs of it settling down as we had on into the following weekend. rachel and martin. thank you! not great. not brilliant. time now to look at some of the week's most interesting stories from around the world with reporters.
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in russian polling stations right now, rule number one — put on facemasks and gloves. rule number two, if you're vladimir putin ignore rule number one. the president called this a vote to change russia's constitution. to make the country stronger, he says. to protect russia's history and its heroes. to guard its natural resources, to keep it the animals happy. but critics say the smiles are a smokescreen for the kremlin's main objective. putin himself and his people, they pretend that the major changes are about this, about strengthening russia, but the main idea is to have putin stay in the position of president forever.
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two terms — effectively forever. for this family, that's a worrying prospect. in a polling stations that looks more like a clinic, they voted no to the new constitution. but with little hope of winning. after all, campaigning against the amendments had been banned. and the vote itself lacked independent observers. russia is going in the wrong direction. the direction is to dictatorship. i think this is a sad day. there will be less political freedom. that's very bad for us. i think putin is not acting in our best interests and he needs to step down. critics of the vote say that what's happening here is nothing more than a show. and here's one example. even before polling began, copies of the new constitution were printed and published and available in the shops stop it says here on the cover — "valid when the official
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results are announced". in other words, what that result was going to be was never in doubt. some russians believe that putin forever is a good thing. when an experienced politician staying in power, especially in a country as difficult as russia, i think it doesn't hurt if he is supported by the people and that's exactly the case. the president said he would never change the constitution to stay in power. well... never say never! so you could see more of this. only next time, it'll be the new constitution. abandoned by their men
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more than a year ago, the women of the islamic state group have mostly been forgotten by the world. in these camps, women from britain, france, and across the world have been left to fester — a problem ignored. shouting since their capture, the camps have grown thick with extremism. is' ideology is still in command. so kurdish—led forces are trying to regain control here to take back their camp. women have been murdered, scores of children have died from disease. some here claim a change of heart and now fear for their children. for those who speak out against the extremism in the camps, their identities need to be protected. this is tortuous.
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i can't wait for my children to leave. even though i dream of living with them and purging my pain, i have no problem staying behind. if not, ideologically speaking, there will be nothing that can be done to save them. it will be too late. and the camps aren't holding. here a raid on a house, the kurdish led sdf are looking for escapees. inside two russian women and one from uzbekistan with their children. they were bound for turkey, say officials. they are now back in detention. there is a newfound to their predicament. the islamic state group is again on the rise and promises to free the women.
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in the dead of night in syria, a convoy of kurdish—led special forces are on the move earlier this month. inside this house, is suspects, thought to be armed. 150 were arrested in this operation alone. many more are at large. the coronavirus and troop withdrawals mean local forces are left to do most of the fighting. is is back. "the caliphate remains," says this graffiti. terrorising and extorting the people here. this man's son was murdered by thejihadists. translation: eyewitnesses said a car started following them. it caught up with them and then they were kidnapped.
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the next morning, theirfriends organise a search party. they found their decapitated heads resting on the asphalt. where once it commanded cities and armies, is is diminished, but it is again emerging from the shadows. the world is distracted, but the men and women of the islamic state group are determined not to be forgotten. in tokyo, they marched. in hong kong, they gathered. in bangkok, they zoomed. the numbers were smaller, but the message of solidarity was still clear.
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for these people, black lives matter in asia too. in mainland china, state media condemned the killing of george floyd. so too did government officials. translation: racism against ethnic minorities is a chronic disease of american society. but in this society, muslim minorities are detained in so—called re—education camps. foreign critics told to mind their own business. and when it comes to attitudes on race few would argue that china is progressive. blackface on prime—time television, just one example. in april, signs went up around the city of guangzhou, forbidding black people from entering shops and restaurants, apparently to stop the spread of covid—19. see what the chinese police are doing to us. these videos also emerged showing african residents appearing to be evicted from their homes.
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reddick has lived in china for seven years. he says he feels safe working as an african—american artist in shanghai. but even in the city's modern and progressive art scene, he's face problems when potential clients find out he's black. and then, "oh, i'm sorry," when i send photos over. we were only looking for a chinese person or a white artist, or something like that. so this issue of colour and race is definitely something that is global and that is something that is systemic. here in multi—ethnic singapore, a debate on chinese privilege has re—emerged. # yeah, i speak chinese. she is better known by her alter ego and she has made a name for herself calling up the racism she sees against indian and malay minorities who make up almost a quarter of the city's population. i think he black lives matter movement has shown a spotlight at the double standard in singapore,
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and how we are very quick to talk about racism when it's anywhere else but here. but they're not ready to look inward and just look at how they have lived their lives for many years and whether they have done anything to potentially offend anyone around them. keith has spent almost two decades reporting from asia. to him, the region's real test of tolerating ethnic minorities in top positions. you know, a lot of countries and companies like to say we don't discriminate, we're inclusive, et cetera, et cetera, but when you get down to brass tacks, to ask yourself how many people are not from the dominant ethnic group and could rise to a certain level? i think that when that conversation may start, they think it would be a long way off yet. around the world, the black lives matter movement asks new dialogues
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about race and white privilege. but here in this part of the world the biggest challenge may be similar end the assumption that racism is something that happens somewhere else. in the brilliant blue waters of the mediterranean, another example of the potential damage man can do to nature. a local conservation group alerts the coastguard. help is needed — and the clock is ticking. this is what they find. one of the ocean's largest animals, trapped and desperate. a sperm whale has become tangled up in nets, thought to be used by vessels involved in the illegal fishing of swordfish and tuna. this is only a young whale. they can grow to around 12 metres in length, and weigh more than 50,000 kilos. for more than two hours, divers struggle to free the creature as it became more and more exhausted.
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finally, they were able to release it, and monitor the whale as it headed back out to sea. eventually, the conservation team lost contact, but they say they will try to get sight of it once more, to make sure the animal has recovered from its ordeal. good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and martin giessler. our headlines today: thousands of drinkers have returned to pubs across england after three months, after lockdown restrictions were eased. we've really stepped up social distancing guidelines. we've used hand sanitiser, it's been quite safe. if you're living on your own and you've been without seeing people and you're going to the pub, it's important. but it was a mixed picture when it came to social distancing, with scenes of tightly packed crowds in parts of london. clapping for our
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carers one more time. the nation honours the nhs on its 72nd birthday. to all who have given so much during this present danger, i just want to say that it is you who have been our shield. more sunshine than what we had yesterday and a few heavy showers around. joined me —— joined me it's sunday, the 5th ofjuly. our top story: thousands of people across england have enjoyed their first night out in pubs for more than three months, after a major easing of lockdown. restaurants, hairdressers, theme parks and libraries also opened their doors, with strict social—distancing measures in place, but police have voiced concerns the rules weren't always being observed. john mcmanus reports. it was the day life began to look familiar again in england.
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pubs and restaurants had already reopened in northern ireland on friday. yesterday, it was england's turn, but nothing was going to be quite the same again. the government is desperate for people to get spending but it also wants them to stay safe. and as day turned into night, it became apparentjust how difficult that would be. don't push me. it's gone midnight here in soho and though much of central london is quieter than usual, the crowds are still out in force here. as you can see, many of the bars and cafes are still open which is great news for the entertainment industry but there's not much evidence of social distancing going on. police officers were out in force across england. one, john apter, the national chair of the police federation in england and wales, took to twitter at the end of his shift in south hampton, saying...
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earlier in the day there was relief of a non—alcoholic kind. instead of wrestling with clippers and scissors ourselves, the experts are now back in charge of our locks from behind a visor. for those wanting something a bit more hair raising... theme parks have also opened the gates but with more than the usual precautions. good place to come along, 30% capacity, loads of space, lines, toilets are all clean, so it's fine, it's all good. and it's now possible to head back to the big screen, but not to theatres where industry bodies have warned of massive closures unless they receive state help. meanwhile, in elvington, eight—year—old oliver vaines did the honours at the yorkshire air museum. eight out of ten of the most popular uk attractions are museums but they survive on a mixture of public money and ticket sales. this one reflects on past battles with opponents that were visible. the challenge now is to win the war against an unseen enemy. john mcmanus, bbc news.
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the chancellor rishi sunak is expected to announce a doubling of the number of frontline job centre staff when he delivers his economic plan on wednesday. it comes after the prime minister said the pandemic would, in his words, cause "many, manyjob losses" and that high unemployment was "inevitable". our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now. it isa it is a harsh reality check for everybody. what is the government going to do then? this is the first step that we know about ahead of rishi sunak‘s economic statement on wednesday. and as you say, the government is going to recruit an extra 13 one half thousand mentors "13,500 extra 13 one half thousand mentors ——13,500 mentors to help people back into employment. that is obviously creating jobs in itself
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and it is something that business groups have broadly welcomed although they have said the impacts for the coronavirus crisis which is clear for us for the coronavirus crisis which is clearfor us all to for the coronavirus crisis which is clear for us all to see stop in the last couple of weeks, it seems like there has been announcement ofjob losses. the retail sector da, creative industries which have been so creative industries which have been so badly hit. and the government says despite the support it has put in place with thejob retention scheme, that is coming to an end in the coming months. high unemployment is inevitable. there will be pressure on the chancellor to go further on wednesday when he outlines his plans. also, the big question of how all of these measures are going to be paid for. labour say the government has taken a one size fits all approach and need to extend that the pretension scheme and other support in local areas which may have to go back into lockdown after the restrictions have eased. rishi sunak‘s promised a bold plan and it will have to be want to
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meet this challenge. thank you very much, jonathan. the spanish government has imposed a local lockdown in a region of catalonia after a sharp rise in infections, affecting more than 210,000 people. police checkpoints have been established to make sure no—one is able to enter or leave segria. catalonia is one of the spanish regions worst affected by the coronavirus. donald trump has declared the united states to be the "greatest and most virtuous nation in the history of the world", in a speech marking the country's independence day. the president also lashed out at china over the coronavirus pandemic, at the event in washington dc, where large crowds gathered to hear him address the nation. our correspondent david willis has this report. after a fiery speech on the eve of independence day in which he accused angry mobs of seeking to tear down america's history, president trump struck a more
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conciliatory tone in an online address to the nation. the country, he said, was on its way to what he called a "tremendous victory". we were doing better than any country had ever done in history — and not just us, any country — and then we got hit with this terrible plague from china and now we're getting close to fighting our way out of it. on an independence day unlike any other, americans were urged to celebrate freedom by staying indoors. some ignored the call, despite the recent surge in coronavirus cases here. but across the nation, thousands of events fell victim to the pandemic and on a day that celebrated america's founding, the country's divisions were once again sharply in evidence. all: shut it down! black lives matter protesters gathered just a short distance from the white house as the president played host to a lavish fourth ofjuly fireworks party and, once again, took up the theme of american nationalism.
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those that are lying about our history, those who want us to be ashamed of who we are not interested injustice or in healing. their goal is demolition. our goal is not to destroy the greatest structure on earth, what we have built — the united states of america. the event drew thousands to the national mall, despite repeated calls from health officials here for people to avoid gathering in large groups. cheering. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. well, mr trump could have a bit of competition in the upcoming election. the american rapper kanye west has
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announced he is running for president of the united states in 2020. the unlikely challenger to donald trump and joe biden chose american independence day to make the surprise announcement on twitter, triggering a social media storm. but with just four months to go before polling day in november, it's not clear whether any official paperwork has been filed for him to appear on state election ballots. this is not the first time that west has suggested he would run for the white house and he has been a vocal supporter of president trump in the past. thanks to simon who has been tweeting me this morning, explaining that you need to file your application by a certain deadline in application by a certain deadline in a certain state and we don't know if he has done that. also, in a number of states, you need to collect a number of signatures. exactly. it may be a big pr stunt! we will see... thank you for being with us this morning. we are looking back at what
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was a fairly monumental day in england in terms of lifting the lockdown. for the first time in three months, has been professionally trimmed, paints have been pulled and friends have been gathering again. but there was a warning from the prime minister, people must stay safe and sensible to avoid any upsurge in the virus. did people take notice? let's speak now to rob moore, a paramedic for west midlands ambulance service, and virologist, dr chris smith. it has been an average shift in the ambulance service. we were prepared foran ambulance service. we were prepared for an upsurge ambulance service. we were prepared foran upsurge in ambulance service. we were prepared for an upsurge in calls relating to people being out drinking and it hasn't happened thankfully. there hasn't happened thankfully. there has been obviously extra people in the pubs. people that hadn't been there for some months, but really we're not seeing a big impact from that. certainly not where where i have been in birmingham. that is promising for the people it is a
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sign that people have heeded the advice and had a really sensible night which is good. that is great news. tell us about the preparations you are putting in place to deal with people if you are having to go out and navigate your way through crowds. extra crews have been called in to deal with any extra 999 because we had got. we had extra meetings in the lead up to last night to make sure all the plans we re night to make sure all the plans were well rehearsed and they knew at —— knew the layout of the city was up —— knew the layout of the city was up birmingham is going through a lot of change at the moment so making sure they knew all of the access and egress routes. on a smaller scale, it is making sure ambulances were ready to deal with patients who were intoxicated and it is just little things like making sure we had enough sick bags for people if they might need them. oh, nice. all the essentials. rob, you are presumably looking from a distance was not what did you make of it? my hair still
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needs the attention of a professional, as you can probably tell. we were concerned because this does mark a point in which we could go from people having few freedoms to having more and there was of course the concern that people would go overboard. one police officer did note, or in his words, it was crystal clear that drunk people can't socially distance, but i think by and large, those people, certainly the public, near me, were responsible and believed to be out and about, getting some fresh air and about, getting some fresh air and socialising again. nobody really presumably is surprised that when people are sufficiently inebriated, they forget about social distancing. assumedly that was factored in, that some of that would happen. yeah. the way you come up with these guidelines is you say look, if most of the people most of the time to most of the right things, because we have a little bit of headroom, because the r—value is less than
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one, we do have a bit, not a huge amount, but a one, we do have a bit, not a huge amount, buta bit one, we do have a bit, not a huge amount, but a bit of room to manoeuvre, and that means that by and large, as long as most people going the right direction, we are going the right direction, we are going to continue as a country to go in the right direction, so there is that room to manoeuvre. we saw some pictures from soho, people enjoying themselves, having an old—fashioned night out. what do you think when you see these pictures? the vast majority in the people in this country are responsible. people have dealt with a lot of very astringent losses of their freedoms and that has borne fruit was up we have low levels of the viruses circulating in society now but i would remind people, have a look at what is going around the world was up have a look at big cities like melbourne, have a look at leicester and remind ourselves where we have come from, where we have got to and where we could easily lurch to if we don't
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remain vigilant because this thing hasn't gone away. we still have a lot of circulation in the virus in the country, it is just a lot lower than where we started. icu nodding along, chris. people will be worried. what we saw this weekend was a testing of the water. about half of the pubs were opened and that will increase with you and your collea g u es that will increase with you and your colleagues i am sure are not being complacent, are you? oh definitely, the planning continues. the ambulance service is really aware of what is going on and the health service as a whole. what we do every yearin service as a whole. what we do every year in terms of christmas and new year, making shock robust plans are in place. also with sporting events. one thing that has been clear to me asi one thing that has been clear to me as i have been in and out of people's houses during the pandemic, the coronavirus is the talking point for everyone and everyone is so aware of their need to take response ability and that is really promising
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because of it means we are on the front line trying to deal with the pandemic and it is nice to see the whole country is in it together and i think last night for me has helped to prove that. we talk about the new normal and people being used to seeing ppe being used widely in the use of masks and visors even. that was evident at the pub i was out yesterday. personally, when you are dealing with people that are intoxicated, it is about communication and being able to speak clearly to them, to be heard, to be understood, so how much is ppe and inhibited to that? it does provide a challenge. one of the biggest parts of my role as a pandemic is to communicate, it is the most important thing i do and when i lose half of my face to a mask, that can make it really challenging, both with people who might be hard of hearing who might rely on lip reading and certainly people who might be intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, when you lose out of your face and lose their facial expression, it is hard to get across the messages that we need to. it has certainly added some
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new challenges to my work over last few months but it is something that those of us, good communicators are usually able to overcome quite well. chris, we're going to be talking later in the programme about the economic side of this, which is equally important. what would you say? as in surveys over the last couple of weeks saying anything between 50%— 80% of people are relu cta nt to between 50%— 80% of people are reluctant to go back out to work. at some point we are going to want to encourage people to go out, spend money and get the economy back up on track. would you say to people with those concerns? the concerns are that poverty breeds ill—health, it breeds long—term morbidity and it causes death as well, just causes them ina causes death as well, just causes them in a different way. and so we have to remember that the reason we have to remember that the reason we have a healthy population, to the most part in this country, is because we have a relatively well funded health service, certainly compared to some countries. but if we continue to spend money and we don't continue to generate money, then we won't have it in the future,
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and that will lead to more ill—health. and that will lead to more ill— health. that is and that will lead to more ill—health. that is something to be aware of. it's very easy to focus on the here and now, but we must also look down the track. there will be victims of coronavirus, people who are poor because of coronavirus, and they will cause ill— health are poor because of coronavirus, and they will cause ill—health as well. so as notjust they will cause ill—health as well. so as not just the here they will cause ill—health as well. so as notjust the here and now problem, this is a long—term problem. we will be living with this for the rest of our lives. in barren mind there is a huge sort of enormous case burden building up in the nhs of things that haven't been done —— air in mind, people who haven't had operations because they haven't had operations because they have not been able to go to hospital and have those things, because we have had to deal with the coronavirus. those things will need to be dealt with as well and that will cost money. it's important we establish the economy, otherwise those services are not going to be there for people in the long—term. yes, some problems backing up. chris, thank you, and rob, back of a 12 hour shift. get some good sleep.
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now, a lot of people were talking about the fact this was going to be quite a big saturday, particularly in england without lockdown —— with that lockdown lift so we have been asking people to send in photos of their socially distant saturdays. sally westly in southampton had a haircut and then enjoyed a walk and a pint! mark catchlove sent in this picture of him having a trim — mask included! and it's not just about pubs and haircuts, alison eyre and the huth harriers have been enjoying their first socially—distanced run. they say it will be the first of many. so you're beginning to see, you know, groups of people emerging once again. and actually, fundamentally, that i think is what people were really looking forward to, just making those connections and being able to see family. you know it strikes me about those pictures?
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smiles. it's lovely to see people with genuine, sincere smiles. what he was a man who's going to take the off everybody‘s phase. good morning, stav. i was just off everybody‘s phase. good morning, stav. i wasjust listening about how people are happier to be out and about, although it is important to be safe and keep social distance going. it's great to be out and about, yesterday was dry for many of us, warm and muggy and cloudy. today we have gales and these gales are pretty intense for the time of year. we don't really see areas of this deepin we don't really see areas of this deep injuly, we don't really see areas of this deep in july, but we don't really see areas of this deep injuly, but you can see on the southern flank, tightly packed isobars. we are seeing gusts of 50-60 isobars. we are seeing gusts of 50—60 miles an hour, this front is continuing to sweep through at the moment. it will clear through the south—east corner of the next few hours, then it is a brighter day today. at least we have sunshine to compensate but there will be a lot of heavy, blustery showers pushing into northern scotland, northern
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ireland, north—west england and those gusty showers arrived, some of them could be heavy and fund reemerged together to produce longest because of rain. the wind is a feature today, 50—60 miles an hour again, this could bring down some big branches, trees and at the moment of course. 30—a0 miles an hourin moment of course. 30—a0 miles an hour in the south. areas will stay com pletely hour in the south. areas will stay completely dry with sunny spells but it will be blustery. and a cooler, slightly fresh air to the field, we have lost that community. mid to high teens in the north, we could hit 20 in the south—east. tonight it stays blustery, winds back to a north—westerly, driving into north—western areas again. southern areas could stay dry with lengthy clear skies. temperature is cooler than they were last night, some uncomfortable sleeping. 9— 11 degrees. enter monday we are starting the new week off with air pressure building from the south—west, there is the pushing up into sand and a beer. ——
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scandinavia. so showers running down eastern counties, the further west, the wind is turning lighter, close to that high pressure area. you see sunshine in southern ireland and much of south—western england and wales. on the first side, though, that when coming in from the north—west, temperatures about 16—20 in the south—east. and then off the atla ntic we in the south—east. and then off the atlantic we will have another spell of wet weather to parts of the country for tuesday. a bit of uncertainty from this western front but it could bring some rain at times to central portions of the uk. we could see temperatures a little bit disappointing, i have to say for the time of year, mid to high teens celsius for most of us. it remains very changeable throughout this week, high pressure always trying to build in from the low pressure comes in to bring further spells of rain but there are signs as we enter the end of the week, high pressure
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building back which should settle things down with some sunshine. turning a little bit warmer as well for some of us in the south. there is some good news, rachel and martin. all right, you'vejust is some good news, rachel and martin. all right, you've just about got a smile out of me. thanks very much, stav. it's the 72nd birthday of the nhs today, and people are being encouraged to turn out at five o'clock this evening, for a special one—off clap for our carers. there's never been a year quite like this in the history of the health service, and many people will want to say thanks to nhs workers for all they've done to help during the pandemic, as our home editor mark easton reports. at 5:00 on the 72nd birthday of the national health service, the country is being encouraged to stop what it's doing and take a moment to give thanks with a huge round of applause for all those whose actions have helped save lives during the pandemic. applause in a video message released today, the prince of wales recognises the selfless nurses, doctors, paramedics and countless other staff whose gentleness has made us great.
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despite all that has been endured, there is deep cause for gratitude and a true reason for pride in the way we care for all members of our society, our greatness truly is in gentleness. so, ladies and gentlemen, thank you all for what you have done, more than i can possibly say. a spitfire will tip its wings above eight hospitals as well as the homes of fundraisers and volunteers. the words "thank u, nhs" painted on its underside. the flight path is a tribute to people across the uk who've supported the health service and each other in the last few months. at 5:00 today, when we're clapping for carers one final time, it's a chance for the nhs itself to say thank you to everybody who has played their part, including the public who, by going through this
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difficult lockdown period, have reduced the infections and helped save countless, tens of thousands, probably hundreds of thousands of lives. last night, candles were lit and dozens of public landmarks were illuminated in the blue of the nhs. a tribute to those whose lives have been lost during the pandemic. this evening, the prime minister will be joining the clap outside number 10, after which, people are invited to raise a cuppa or a glass with neighbours to reflect on the connections that have been made during the lockdown. banging on pots and clapping millions came together for the regular thursday evening clap for our carers during the height of the pandemic and the hope is that this final thank you will encourage communities to build on that togetherness for the next stage of the crisis. mark easton, bbc news. we're nowjoined by the founder of the original clap for our carers campaign, annemarie plas, and nurse
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catherine keeton, who has also celebrated her 72nd birthday this year — and is working as hard as ever. annemarie plas, you have really started something special. you think it's right we come out and applaud again today? i think so. we had this in the first part of the crisis, we don't know what lies ahead, so it's good to recharge our batteries for weight might be a heavier time that lies ahead. and catherine keeton, i said we don't normally celebrate the 72nd birthday is, what i meant was we don't often give them such a big fa nfa re we don't often give them such a big fanfare —— birthdays. and you've gone back into the profession, away working now, at 72, if that isn't an odd question? i don't see it as a job, i see it as a passion. and
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that's why i'm still working. and how is it going? it can't have been easyin how is it going? it can't have been easy in the past few months? no, it hasn't. i think with the whole world focused on healthcare workers, and their fight against covid—19, it's just amazing to see there is a light of courage out there amongst all this tragedy. and what are you thinking of the way that the country has recognised the work the nhs has been doing? it's been absolutely superand! been doing? it's been absolutely super and i would like to thank the beautiful staff who made a tea room for us ina beautiful staff who made a tea room for us in a garden where we could go relax in our breaks and unwind before undoing another six—hour shift. that was really important to our patients, so we could give them the best care possible. so i thank them and also the wonderful community out there and their spirit of making a skeletal scribes and witty hearts — —
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of making a skeletal scribes and witty hearts —— colourful scrubs and pretty hats. and annemarie plas, you couldn't have expected this campaign to take up the way did. i know this campaign wasn't initiated by you, but you will be at the heart of it? tell us about that. i'll be joining number10, tell us about that. i'll be joining number 10, the big institute there for the clap there with the barbecue. it's their acknowledgement of how important the nhs is to everybody and how they have helped eve ryo ne everybody and how they have helped everyone through the crisis. no-one would have thought that nothing outside your front would have thought that nothing outside yourfront door would have thought that nothing outside your front door has turned into you clapping up outside ten downing street with the prime minister? i wasjust talking to my husband. four months ago i would never have thought this was going to happen in july,
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never have thought this was going to happen injuly, no. never have thought this was going to happen in july, no. and i'm curious to hear both of your own experiences of the nhs. i know for you, annemarie plas, it was first when you came to this country with a two week old baby and how you account for them. tell us about that? week old baby and how you account for them. tell us about that7m week old baby and how you account for them. tell us about that? it was really touching. i came here is a new mum in a new country and they really went beyond to track me down and show me around and see what it was all about. they really helped me and it was really touching. we don't have anything like that in the netherlands. they feel, yeah, very happy to be here and be in touch with the nhs in this way. and catherine keeton, you have worked in zimbabwe and in south africa, you have worked at a time of polio outbreaks, it's about gillow cisak breaks, a jv on the front line in south africa —— polio outbreaks, the regular doses and hiv ——
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tuberculosis. but what's different working at the nhs? what i think the national health service is a great place to work and there is a great range of diversity. people come together, sharing knowledge and direct each other, and it's amazing. all right. thank you both, good luck, and enjoy the moment at 5pm today with the rest of the country. thank you. thank you. stay with us, we have the headlines coming up.
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"we're not out of the woods yet" — that was the warning from the prime minister ahead of yesterday's major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. pubs were among the businesses allowed to reopen, but the campaign for real ale says around half remained closed
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because of safety concerns. breakfast‘s tim muffett spent the evening in northampton, to get a taste of the "new normal" night out. at last, a pint in a pub. i've missed this so much! this is the best thing since sliced bread. the old house in northampton closed for 15 weeks, packed once again. what do you miss? the social side! if you're living on your own and you've been without seeing people and you're going to the pub, it's important. how hard has it been for you not going to a pub? it's been heartbreaking. it's been horrible. i feel like i've lost myself. what's the point of work? it's been a long time which is we was shut in a box. now is the time to release the box! but the pub—going experience here has changed. hand sanitisers at the bar where drinks are no longer ordered. when every body comes in,
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they‘ re designated their seats and then we send a waiter over and there's just table service. it was a bit weird at first but it's easy to get used to. saturday nights have felt eerily quiet in towns and city centres since march, but familiar sights and sounds are returning. tentative steps back to how things were. it's kind of nice to see people again. but it's scary as well because obviously we still have the pandemic going on. we've like really stepped up social distancing guidelines, we've used hand sanitiser, it's been quite safe. and has that affected your night at the pub, if you're using hand sanitiser or keeping a distance? no, it hasn't affected it, i feel safer. it's not just pub—goers and restaurant owners that are getting reacquainted with a saturday night out. across england, so too are paramedics and police. from newquay in cornwall... to borough markets in london... police could be seen checking up on pub—goers. in north nottinghamshire, four people were arrested and several pubs decided to close after alcohol—related antisocial behaviour. in northampton, police patrolled the city centre but no major incidents
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were reported. i think the fear might have been that it would explode. i am glad to see this town that we've all got a lot of affection for, starting to be enjoyed again. i'm glad to think that the economy may start to get that lift. health comes first, however, so my ultimate thing is that people remain safe. it's really important not to let that guard down. at the brooklyn social, for lewis, it was a very special 30th birthday. i have waited for this moment for a long time and... absolutely glorious, i tell ya. for many, a saturday night to remember. lovely, absolutely lovely. tim muffett, bbc news, northampton. yesterday was the day that
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campsites and caravan parks in england reopened, and so this weekend people have been enjoying a break for the first time in months. alison freeman has gone back to the waterside house campsite in cumbria for us, to see how people found the first day of their holiday in the age of the ‘new normal‘. good morning. windy, by the look of it, there. what a difference a day makes. you can see the lake looking choppy behind me. i don't think the night was too bad for people here in the campervan ‘s but i think maybe you can see over here are a few of the tent sleepers. it is a bit of a shame because this is a big change for these who have lost a lot of seasonal encompass. what a difference a day makes. we have speaking to people to see how their first day was going. the lakeside
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had been quiet for months but early yesterday morning, that all started to change. just after 6pm, campervan is pulled onto this campsite at olds water stop lee from south shields one of the first to arrive with his partner. been stuck in the house for too long, to be honest and this is what we love. do you have any apprehensions about being here? are you worried about safety? nothing at all. you keep your distance and say hello and that is it. oh as long as you are nice to people and respect them and stay where you would want them and stay where you would want them to be, then there is no reason why you can't. feel at home. the local wildlife kept a watchful eye isa camping local wildlife kept a watchful eye is a camping field is filled up throughout the morning. there were reports of campervan ‘s containing keen holidaymakers lining the roads of the lake district. people travelling for hundreds of miles for their first taste of a new sort of freedom. allan london was empty when
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we left, never ever seen that in my life but when we got here it was like oh, a few people have beaten us to it. stay in the house, stay in the house, and then after you can be released after a long time so he is like you are excited to go out and enjoy the river and everything.“ the tents went up, the beers were opened. families and friends socialising in a way that hadn't been allowed for months. first opportunity as soon as they opened up. how does it feel to be opportunity as soon as they opened up. how does it feelto be back? cracking good, the weather is not too good but we can live with that. it is the company and the view that counts, so... despite only letting about half of the number of campers onto the site to help with social distancing, it was still a relief for the owners to get back in business. the mood is, you know, everyone's elated, they are skipping into reception to check—in. this, they are so pleased to be out and about. it is a really lovely day in
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the forecast was rubbish so it is nice watching them all pitch up. nearby, puli bridge was bustling with visitors, many from the camp sites. we just want more confidence in the visitor market and we need some good weather to to drive us forward and i think people —— things will start to come back from the —— for the industry. the first day of trading mentor staff and customers could get used to the new normal. so far so good. no—one's been moving ta bles far so good. no—one's been moving tables and chairs and no—one has had to be reprimanded so well done our customers. it has been heartbreaking having the best spring ever. seeing the passers—by and knowing what would have been. the main thing is we have all come through on the other side so let's make the most of thisjuly other side so let's make the most of this july and august. you wouldn't believe it was july the way the weather is at the moment by i'm joined now by a few hardy campers
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who spent the night here last night. how was it for you last night?l who spent the night here last night. how was it for you last night? a bit windy, to be honest. just put my earphones in and carried on as much as you can. talked about it being the first day out after lockdown was eased. not looking at the same four walls, a different scenery. it has been nice. ruby, how was your sleep? very, very, very windy that i couldn't quite get to sleep because i kept getting woken up every half—an—hour. i kept getting woken up every half-an-hour. but still glad to be here? yes, nice to get out. obviously we went to the pub and everything, it isjust nice. well done, ruby. rob. we saw you pay —— banging in the tent pegs. how was it? again, just glad to be out, being stuck in four walls. i've been working through it all butjust to get away from the norm, it has been absolutely brilliant to get away.
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reduces summer weather not putting you off? its fine, used to this. -- british weather. debbie, the owner of the campsite. how was it overnight? wild! it has been windy. everybody seems in really good spirits, though. it is to be expected. it isjuly. it is the lake district. as long as everyone's still smiling. how do you feel to have finally been open again?” still smiling. how do you feel to have finally been open again? i am relieved. the mood, even in this weather, it is fantastic. everyone's still smiling, everyone's still happy. that is why we're here. everybody following the rules? they to be. they are, i suppose the social distancing in place and things like that. fantastic, not a problem. thanks very much. people are sticking at it and that
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typically british way. congratulations to all your hardy campers. i think there are two types of people in this world, people who enjoy camping and people who will tell you they enjoy camping. which one do you fall into? i do not enjoy camping buti one do you fall into? i do not enjoy camping but i admire people who do. full respect to those families! places of worship in england are now allowed to reopen after changes to lockdown guidance came into effect yesterday, but people of all faiths are likely to notice changes to how they usually practice. we'll be hearing from our religion editor martin bashir injust a moment, but first let's take a look at how one mosque in woking is adjusting. we are here in the first purpose—built mosque in woking to do a risk assessment. the government has indicated that very clearly, before a place of worship can open for private prayer, the organisation
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and the leadership of that institution has to do a risk assessment and we are here today to conduct that risk assessment. what we're trying help mosques with his to balance private worship with social distancing rules so we are measuring the distance between where people can pray, looking at whether they can use the wash facilities, how they enter the building, how they exit the building, the whole issue around ppe for the workers in the mosque and also the people that are going to use the facility to pray, using masks, using sanitiser, taking off their shoes, all of these type of things. we are looking at a 50 point check for each mosque in every location. we have seen fundamental changes in the wave islamic worship has taken place in the mosque since the covid pandemic. you can see congregation,
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people standing shoulder to shoulder, that hasn't stopped. people used to come to the mosque to wash themselves, that hasn't stopped. people used to embrace, hug, shake hands, that has stopped. it has changed in the uk, and around the world. let's go now to our religion editor, martin bashir, who is at saint paul's cathedral in london. we can see how they are facing out the chairs there, martin was in mark yes, you can. thank you forjoining us. yes, you can. thank you forjoining us. it is a resplendent cathedral. many moments of national importance have taken place here. the first wedding of the prince of wales, the funeral service of winston churchill. but there is also a worshipping community and there hasn't been much worship in the past 3.5 months. as can see, the whole nave has been stripped bare. this cathedral normally accommodates about 2000 people. there will be no
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more than 250 here today. i want to introduce you now to the bishop of london. this of course is the mother church of the diocese of london, james the mullaly. —— dame sarah mullaly. presumably you are excited this morning? the buildings have been closed for over 3.5 months but our churches in our communities have been stepping up and stepping out, whether providing food, ppe packing, providing online service and this sunday, our church buildings are open. some remain online but it is a very significant moment and we can contribute to the spiritual and the physical and emotional healing of this nation at this time. there has been an enthusiasm for church buildings to be opened. has that surprised you given that over the last ten years, monday church attendance has actually declined something like 50%. there are more people that go to a premiership foot or match at the weekend than
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attending a church. —— football. what we know is they have a significant place in our communities and of course some of our churches have continued to grow here in london. what we have seen over the la st london. what we have seen over the last few months is people have gone online. one in five of us in the la st online. one in five of us in the last month has gone online in a service which is why from today, some of our church buildings are open. some ways —— won't some until they can safely do it but they can go today to some places. you have responsibilities for the practical and organisation of today's first service. how will things be different? it will be different because some of the things we would typically do like shaking the hands of our neighbour, singing together, receiving holy communion in the form of bread and wine, won't be possible, there is still plenty of things we be able to do this and we will be able to greet our neighbours at the peace with a wave or a smile. our director of music who is the
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first singer to hold that post since the 13th century, he will be singing and our organist will be playing and of course we will still receive holy communion but in the form of bread alone. i thought singing and congregational singing was actually not allowed. congregational singing is not allowed but you are allowed to have a solo singer provided they are distant quite a long way from the rest of the congregation. so we will have that solo voice singing right up by the high altar. as i came in, i saw a great door, hand sanitisers. i also noticed that you don't have any signs indicating to me to distances. how will you be doing that? what we have discovered is that two metres is four floor tiles so we have signs that say two metres are four floor tiles. it is an easy way wherever people are walking in the cathedral, they can just look at the tiles and ensure they are two metres distance.
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fantastic, very convenient. bishop, final question for a final question for you. you were a director of nursing - you have director of nursing and you have been very cautious about the physical condition of people. does today represent an opportunity for you to, as it were, address their spiritual needs? today is an opportunity not just to spiritual needs? today is an opportunity notjust to address their spiritual needs but also their physical needs. church is about both. and so enabling people to worship here today, we also say to them and they still have to be cautious. covid—19's are still here which is why we have put in place protection of them. and asking them to fulfil that. because it is about spiritual needs but people can still go online. not every church will be open today. it will be a mixed economy for a little while yet. bishop dame sarah mullaly and james milner, back to you. here's stav with a look
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at this morning's weather. and ice weather watcher picture behind me. trees blowing. blues in the strong wind. —— blowing in the strong winds up a photograph from leicester. this will be typical of conditions we are expecting across the country today. very strong winds for the time of year, gale force winds, and on the plus side, we should seek more sunshine around and pretty heavy showers, too. also this deep area of low pressure. this southern flank where we can see most of the isobars quite tightly packed together, across the northern half of the uk, which is where we will continue to see the scales of a cold front also sweeping southward and eastwards and that will clear away in the next couple of hours and take the cloud and patchy rain with it. then the sky should brighten up call —— plenty of sunshine around. scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, northern wales, some storms and many of them thundery, factor in the wind, 50—60
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mph, a0 heaven 30 further south, it will feel more like autumn injuly. reflect back to the mid to high teens in the north and we could see highs of 20 or 21 degrees in the south. as we move through tonight, it stays very blustery. the winds are not as strong as they are today but it will be a cool direction blowing in from the north—west piling in showers across scotland and north—west england and northern ireland and north—west wales. further south, lengthy dryer interludes here and temperature is much lower than they were last night. last night was very warm and humid, high—teens celsius. we're looking at a 9— 11 degrees across the country built up as you move through monday, a fresh date of another breezy day sunshine and showers was up most of the showers across the east, dryer the further south and east that you see you later. 60 mph winds. i hope those campers in the lake district are backing up. good luck, that is proper commitment, getting out there
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on the first weekend. we're on the bbc news channel until 9:00 this morning. do stay with us there. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. sun, sea, surf, and social distancing. as spain and other european countries open their borders to tourists, we ask is wise to go on holiday when our health could still be at risk? well, for a change let's start with some good news.
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and it looks like holidays to many parts of europe are now back on the cards this summer thanks to countries like spain, italy, and france and greece reopening their borders to tourists from a list of designated countries. but assuming you do get to soak up that mediterranean sun, just what kind of holiday can you expect? recently, the balearic islands run a pilot project to test spain's new coronavirus protection measures for tourists and we went along to see how it went. it was one of the hardest hit countries of the pandemic and, in turn, it had one of the strictest lockdowns. children stayed at home and the army patrolled the streets. in march, spain its entire tourist industry. a move greeted with sadness on the spanish balearic of mallorca.
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getting travellers back again was vital to spain's way to recovery. but that meant that the way it welcomed tourists back was vital too. they wanted the world to know that they were taking this seriously. to test their covid—19 countermeasures, spain invited 11,000 germans over two weeks to fly to the balearic islands. the first flights arriving in mid—june. the aim — to show how spain could keep tourists safe. hello. we feel very safe at the moment.
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so it was very good, organised, and we are happy to be here. none of these arrivals were subject to the two week quarantine that was imposed on all visitors since the beginning of spain's state of emergency. instead, they had their temperatures checked and were asked to hand over the contact details for their accommodation. for tourism companies here, it's all been very welcome. it's very good news that after 92 days we're getting our first arrivals back to palma de mallorca. obviously it's been a very complicated period of time both here on the island and in general obviously the world. but the tourism is a very important part of the spanish economy and it needs to start again.
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applause the tourists were sent to a select few half full hotels where hand sanitising, social distancing, and a self check—in system were in place. i think all of the people wanted to have a chance to take a little sun and reach maybe a little bit of normality. we want to go to beaches. and we feel safe, here. but for some people there are still some hurdles to overcome. if you have too many things to check at the airport, it will be a disaster. and then it takes two or three hours to leave the airport. i don't know if people will like this. if tourists develop any symptoms, they'll be tested for free within 2a hours and then get results within a8 hours.
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the trial was cut short when spain opened its borders to travellers onjune 21. in the end, just a fraction of the german tourists expected to take part came, but officials declared it a success. there's no guarantee the safety measures in mallorca will be placed throughout spain and every traveller will have to research their destination thoroughly and weigh health risks for themselves. you miss this so much and the thing we most miss, like staying in the scene with everybody and with the public, it was amazing today. so, we are happy that we had
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people cheering for us. hey! all looks great, but i know there are lots of people out there with reservations about flying. so joining me at stjames's park in the heart of london, at an appropriate distance, of course, our global guru simon calder and philip allport from norwegian. guys, how are you? very good, thank you. i've been doing flying! yes, you have! it's not too bad. if you're one of those people who are really concerned about social distancing, don't go near an aircraft this summer, because you're not going to get any. but if you think, well, probably my fellow passengers, the other people i'm going to encounter are going to, of course, not travel if they are symptomatic or have been told they are infected,
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then it's all right. it's pretty austere, kind of back to the '70s, but, yeah, i think those of us determined to travel this summer will be able to get where we need to be. you're going to have problems, of course, in terms of social distancing in the big resorts, but that's going to become much easier because half the people at least are not going to be showing up. there's an enormous reluctance out there are people who have perhaps got used to lockdown, are feeling kind of safe, kind of comfortable, and the idea of suddenly going out and meeting 1000 strangers simply doesn't appeal. and you've got this tension of course between, well, obviously i want to preserve my health, i don't want to risk anyone else's, but i'm also desperate to see the wonders of the world and enjoy travel. now, philip, norwegian is one of the key low—cost airlines. your business model relies on cramming people in, so how do you keep people safe?
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like all airlines, we've adopted a number of measures, so cleanliness and our cleaning routines are the top ones. so going forward, we will be sanitising all the touch points, which are armrests, tray tables, toilets, and ensuring that distancing can take onboard as much as possible. so the middle seat will be assigned last on an aircraft. but families, groups, they will still be able to travel together but individuals, if they want to sit apart, they can. and it is a matter, as simon was saying, of people taking responsibility. so if you're showing symptoms or you're due to isolate, you really should not be travelling. the airline industry as a whole is doing everything possible to make sure travel‘s as safe as it can be, but there will be reduced capacity. i mean, there are less flights actually taking place in summer and that in turn means less people travelling as well. and i guess it's all about giving customers that peace of mind that they're being looked
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after if they do choose to fly? well, can i put in a couple of points here? yeah, of course. it's absolutely correct. for example, easyjet, the biggest budget airline in britain, cutting 70% of its place injuly, august, september. ryanair, the biggest european budget airline, they're cutting maybe 60% of flights in july. as a result of that, of course, they're trying to fill every single seat on every single flight. and aviation will not be for you if you want to absolutely minimise the risk of contact, you are going to be taking a risk. and all the airlines are doing great things to try to provide reassurance, but i think that's what it is, it cannot be any kind of guarantee. i used to clean out plans in gatwick airport here in london. and, frankly, it's a tough old business when you've had 180 people on a plane. it's not great, particularly in the time available, for you to be able to get absolutely everything perfect. so some people might say international air travel is the reason why coronavirus spread so quickly in the first place. let's say someone was travelling from oslo to london,
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for example, and they ended up bringing and spreading the virus. does norwegian take responsibility for that? the social distancing measures at airports are completely different to how they were in march. most airports more or less stopped flying for the last three months and it has taken us this long to also liaise with the european safety agency to really find what methods are the best to ensure that the best safety protocols. i mean, no guarantee but people have a personal responsibility to be careful. does the airline have responsibility to let passengers know if they have just flown with someone who has tested positive with covid? so that doesn't fall with the airlines, no. that would be track and trace and a local policy depending on the country you're in. many countries are requiring everybody who comes in to fill a passenger locator form out and that says here's where i have been, here are my contact details, here's where i'm going to be,
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whether it's at home or your destination when you're on vacation and here is the flight came in on and here's my seat, 23f, so that, if somebody in 22d becomes symptomatic, than the local health organisation can get in touch and say you have to self isolate for ia days. it's not perfect, but it's the best we've got. good morning welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and martin giessler. our headlines today... thousands of drinkers have returned to pubs across england after three months, after lockdown restrictions were eased. we've, like, really stuck to, like, the social—distancing guidelines. we've used hand sanitiser. it has been quite safe. if you are living on your own and you have been without seeing people and you go into a pub, it is important. but it was a mixed picture when it came to social distancing, with scenes of tightly packed crowds
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in parts of london clapping for our carers one more time. the nation honours the nhs on its 72nd birthday. all who have given so much during this present—day, ijust want to say that it is you who have been over shield. want to say that it is you who have been our shield. it's race day. formula one is back. mercedes block out the front row of the grid as the season restarts in austria. good morning to you. and it is going to be a very windy day today, certainly for the time of year. but we should see more sunshine today than what we had yesterday, although there will be a few heavy showers around. join me laterfor all the details. it's sunday the 5th ofjuly. our top story... thousands of people across england have enjoyed their first night out in pubs for more than three months, after a major easing of lockdown. restaurants, hairdressers, theme parks and libraries also opened their doors, with strict social—distancing
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measures in place, but police have voiced concerns the rules weren't always being observed. john mcmanus reports. it was the day life began to look familiar again in england. pubs and restaurants had already reopened in northern ireland on friday. yesterday it was england's turn, but nothing was going to be quite the same again. the government is desperate for people to get spending, but it also wants them to stay safe. and as day turned into night, it became apparentjust how difficult that will be. well, it has gone midnight here in soho and though much of central london is quieter than usual, the crowds are still out in force here, you as you can see. many of the bars and cafes are still open, which is great news for the entertainment industry, but there is not much evidence of social—distancing going on. police officers were out in force across england. one, john apter, the national chair of the police federation in england and wales took to twitter at the end of his shift in
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southampton, saying... earlier in the day there was relief of a nonalcoholic kind. instead of wrestling with clippers and scissors ourselves, the experts are now back in charge of our locks, from behind a visor. for those wanting something a bit more hair raising, theme parks have also opened their gates, but with more than the usual precautions. it's a good place to come along. 30% capacity, loads of space, lines, toilets are all clean. so it's fine, it is all good. and it is now possible to head back to the big screen. but not to theatres, where industry bodies warned of massive closures unless they receive state help. meanwhile in elvington,
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eight—year—old oliver did the honours at the yorkshire air museum. well done. eight out of ten of the most popular uk attractions are museums, but they survive on a mixture of public money and ticket sales. this one reflects on past battles with opponents that were visible. the challenge now is to win the war against an unseen enemy. the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to announce a doubling of the number of front line job centre staff when he delivers his economic plan on wednesday. it comes after the prime minister said the pandemic would, in his words, cause "many, manyjob losses" and that high unemployment was "inevitable". our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now. jonathan what more do we know? it gives an idea where the political battle ground will move to next. it gives an idea where the political battle ground will move to nextm does and it's about the economic response. labour have criticised the government for what they call a one
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size fits all approach and say they support people have received throughout coronavirus crisis in the form of thejob retention throughout coronavirus crisis in the form of the job retention scheme or furlough scheme as it has become known needs to continue in certain sectors and areas, places like leicester and elsewhere perhaps have to go back into lockdown. but the government says thejob to go back into lockdown. but the government says the job retention scheme is coming to an end, that will not be extended. we are starting to hear about some of the things they are going to put in place and this announcement about job centres as part of that. 13,500 job centres as part of that. 13,500 job centres as part of that. 13,500 job centre staff roles created to help people looking for work, many of whom will have lost theirjobs as a result of the coronavirus crisis. that's costing the government about £800 million. rishi sunak will outline more about his approach in the coming days on wednesday he will make an important statement at parliament and there is pressure on him to do whatever the government
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can to stave off the impact of the coronavirus crisis. he has already said there is only so much the current can do and the prime minister has also admitted there will be significant unemployment as a result of covid—19. will be significant unemployment as a result of covid-19. thank you very much, jonathan. nhs england is launching a new service for people said to be experiencing on—going health problems after having coronavirus. it's called your covid recovery and it's available to people who had to be treated in hospital, as well as to those who managed their illness at home. it will allow people to access mental health services, contact health workers and track their progress either online or over the phone. a local lockdown has been imposed in spain's catalonia region after a sharp rise in infections, affecting more than 210,000 people. the president of segria said no—one would be allowed to enter or leave the area and provisions to allow non—residents to leave have been put in place. let's speak now to journalist sara canals who's in barcelona. sara, what rules have
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been put in place? what exactly are regulations? mellor people are not forced to stay home, this is not a strict lockdown, businesses, restaurants and bars are still open and generally people can live a normal life however authorities are asking people to stay home and slow down their activity, meeting of more than ten people are not allowed. locals won't be able to leave the confines of an area except for work or reason of force majeure. they are not allowing visitors and this has caught many people off—guard who were away for the weekend, so the police starting yesterday having installed checkpoints on the border of the area to inform people and starting on monday, people will have to carry
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on monday, people will have to carry ona on monday, people will have to carry on a document that will justify why they are leaving or entering the area. and given the impact the pandemic had on spain earlier on in this pandemic, presumably there is a sense of unease when clusters like this come out? a real sense of worry, is there? exactly. people here are worried because this is significant, two that we have seen several outbreaks since brian lifted the outbreak but —— spain. there is a need to find this balance between being cautious but also moving on. the spanish president have sent a message to the citizens saying they need to be careful but also not to be scared. kind of carry on with normal life. generally, the figures you have been low but still authorities are vigilant. and focus
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on finding this balance, reopening the economy and guarantee safety to citizens. this is not particularly a region in catalonia tourists would go to but lots of brits thinking about heading over to spain, thinking about holidays. will these kind of spikes have any implication for british travellers this summer? it will have an impact obviously that area but as for now, visitors can come to barcelona and this is why the catalan authorities have acted quickly to lockdown the specific area and avoid a virus spread, so for now to can visit barcelona, the effort is functioning and if nothing changes or if we do not see outbreaks un catalan capital, this will still be our usual summer and new normality for
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two this to want to come to barcelona. i'm sure many well. thank you very much indeed for that. donald trump has lashed out at china over the coronavirus pandemic as part of his speech to mark the united states' independence day. the president declared the united states to be the "greatest and most virtuous nation in the history of the world" at the event in washington dc, where large crowds gathered to hear him address the nation. today marks the 72nd birthday of the nhs, and at 5pm this evening, millions of people are being encouraged to take part in a nationwide clap to commemorate the occasion. last night, landmarks in the uk were lit up blue in celebration and to express thanks to all nhs staff and key workers who have been working on the front line during the pandemic. one big story we should mention because it is top trend on social media is the fact can us has
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declared his intention to stand to be the us president. it's fairly straight there where he has put this out on twitter. but we don't know if it is... you suggested that this may bea it is... you suggested that this may be a publicity stunt. he has said it before. only because there are practical obstacles to him achieving candidacy status. just because you need to register in certain states and geta need to register in certain states and get a certain amount of support. it should not be a huge obstacle to him you would think. key seems to be serious. it was a fairly plant announcement. so we will watch that with great interest as i'm sure well that man right there who was a friend of his in the past. we will see how he handles it. huge reaction on social media as you would expect. yesterday saw the reopening of the hospitality industry in england, but around half of pubs stayed shut because of uncertainty over how many customers would return according
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to industry experts. they say this weekend is worth around £210 million in takings for english pubs alone, but the long—term economic future across the wider sector is unknown. sam miley, from the centre for economics and business research joins us now. good morning, thanks for being with us. we were told to expect scenes of chaos perhaps last night. it seems to have been sensible saturday in fa ct. to have been sensible saturday in fact. what do you make of what we saw from a business perspective? from a business perspective as you mentioned, the research has suggested that the spike in spending to be seen in pubs this weekend could top over 200 million. looking at the way pubs have operated this weekend, we have seen a considerable shift in terms of practices. we have
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seen shift in terms of practices. we have seen table service, taking details, and for the large part that seems to have gone relatively smoothly. there we re have gone relatively smoothly. there were certain headlines certain local newspapers this morning alluding to certain issues involving law enforcement but for the most part across the country, things seem to have gone smoothly in terms of the first day of reopening.” have gone smoothly in terms of the first day of reopening. i guess what they wanted was this, steady business rather than huge crowds coming out all at once? that was certainly one concern and given that so certainly one concern and given that so many prominent members of the industry had lobbied for perhaps even a later opening date in order to provide that sort of buffer zone for being able to prepare to reopen, having more of a gradual return may well soon those who have seen three months without any business. almost half of pubs have stayed shut, not
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everybody has decided to stay open just yet? that's certainly a concern for pubs in terms of profitability. given that social—distancing rules, any form of social—distancing rules, will essentially leave them with a restricted capacity and while that restricted capacity and while that restricted capacity and while that restricted capacity remains in place we u nfortu nately restricted capacity remains in place we unfortunately won't see every pub reopen its doors, it's simply not profitable for them to do so. and in terms of longer term outlook for the industry as a whole, it may be crucial to the sort of long—term health that they are able to open their doors sooner rather than later. the government is desperate to get this message out to get out and start spending, get the oil back in the economic engine, get the economy back up and running but people might be concerned, reluctant to pa rt people might be concerned, reluctant to part with the money they might have saved over the lockdown because of fears of a second wave of this virus coming in. how much of a concern is that for business? of course that is a massive concern. so
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long as there are lingering fears over coronavirus there is going to be prevailing economic uncertainty. as you mentioned, consumers have been able to save a considerable amount in lockdown in the absence of spending opportunities and the tendency for consumers to part with that cash they have saved will be crucial for that cash they have saved will be crucialfor any sort that cash they have saved will be crucial for any sort of recovery and consumer activity, particularly in the hospitality industry. and pubs alone. and there is only a finite amount of revenue these businesses can make up, you won't go out and eat all the dinners you would have over the last four months or have all the haircuts over the last four months. you have to start afresh now. which businesses are going to do well out of this? you alluded to the hairdressing industry, in terms of the sort of mid — long—term outlook we would suggest they will
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show much more resilience than the pub and wider hospitality industry and that is essentially because hairdressing represents much more of an essential service. consumers are less a ble an essential service. consumers are less able to substitute the services hairdressers provide whereas with pubs and entertainment spending, during the lockdown period we have seen during the lockdown period we have seen people shifted behaviours when they have not been able to visit such establishments and we would suggest the hairdressing industry show much more resilience and be much more prominent than pubs and hospitality is. are busy time for the hairdressing industry, thanks very much indeed. this weekend had different names, one critical feature of scotland is that young children under the age of 12 are being told they do not have to socially distance any more. so
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they can legitimately hug their grannies and grandads which we will talk about later on. you called it sensible saturday which i like. and it did turn out to be. sally westly in southampton had a haircut and then enjoyed a walk and a pint! mark catchlove sent in this picture of him having a trim — mask included! in scotland they are waiting until the 15th until barber is open again. alison eyre and the huth harriers have been enjoying their first socially distanced run. they say it will be the first of many. claudia phelvin sent in this gorgeous picture of her seeing her five grandchildren for the first time since christmas! they enjoyed a day on hove beach with fish and chips.
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here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. pretty windy around most of the country? it has ended. the pressure for the time of year sweeping north bringing unusual strong winds, gales especially for central and northern parts. blustery, this picture depicts how it will be across much of the country. some blue spots, we will see quite a bit of sunshine today computer yesterday but there will also be some heavy showers piling into the north and our country. here is the culprit. the sdp area of low pressure, lots of isobars which is why we're seeing a here and the strong squeeze. clearing that over the next hour and that will mean brighter skies with sunny spells but lots of shower was
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pushing into scotland, northern england, northern ireland also northern and western wales. a couple further south but some areas in the south—east could stay dry altogether with plenty of sunny spells but the wind will be a feature today. up to a0 miles an error in the south, up to 60 in scotland, northern ireland. particularly high root of the pennines. mid—teens across, it will feel more like autumn. it will stay blustery tonight, more showers into the north and our the country, dry weather further south but lengthy clear skies and with the cooler air in the north—west it will be fresher tonight than it was last night. the area of low pressure pushes to scandinavia taking a heavy rain and strong wind with it. high—pressure building from the but this feature will arrive across our shores on tuesday. monday not bad —looking
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day, quite blustery across eastern areas because of that area whereas further south tending to stay dry with plenty of sunshine. fresh feeling, here comes that area of low pressure, uncertainty whether it is north or south, could be further north or south, could be further north on tuesday but either way will bring a spell of wet weather into central parts of the country. north and south bit of dry weather, but temperatures not that great for the time of year. mid—teens in the north, hire teens south. the rest of the week is changeable, further bouts of cloud inch showers across southern areas, some sunshine further north. back to you. lots of tense canopies going up in pub
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gardens around. you will have the same in scotland when it starts opening up. inside pubs on the 15th. but outside? 60 mile an hour wind? good luck with that. thousands of weddings have been postponed due to lockdown, but yesterday some very happy couples made it down the aisle after restrictions were eased in england. we spoke to fiona sharples and chris fisher yesterday morning, just ahead of their nuptials, which went ahead with some covid—secure restrictions in place. they'lljoin us again in a moment but first, let's take a look at their special day. hello! morning! morning, how are you feeling? it's not kind of, the wedding morning you quite imagined. you're the best man and you look very well, you look very smart. what have you got to look after? rings and actually i can't... do... actually i can't actually do
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the register because you have to be eight to do the register. and i'm only four. great gotcha first dance. was a guest because back it was lovely. out really nice. relaxed about the
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day. i noticed you wearing their jeans for example? inaudible. trying to be more comfortable and we nt trying to be more comfortable and went back everything, i am not very comfortable in suits anyway myself so... comfortable in suits anyway myself so..., comfortable in suits anyway myself so... ,who comfortable in suits anyway myself so... , who are much happier engines. just said we are what you're comfortable. just come along, we wa nt you're comfortable. just come along, we want you there. those could not come with us socially distance from the side which was lovely. remained asked of some of the differences that special day. have up to 30 people and the guest list was shutdown quite massively. albert, just a
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second. is that the best man? he performed? it's a big responsible, the best man duties? , george of the rings, you? i ,he , he stood in front of the church and that, didn't you? pictures of the date itself. would have imagined? it was still perfect less. lucky the date we had originally happened. apart from reception not having everyone there it was
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amazing. very lucky of family that could prepare. what part of it as well. i have a blessing parents will be able to. i string it out as long as. congratulations. and well albert. what thejob. congratulations. and well albert. what the job. did well. as excited this morning. albert probably had more energy than they have to riding and best man?
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it's time for our daily appointment with the gp. this morning we're joined by dr nighat arif, who's in chesham in buckinghamshire. i really did. how did you like people standing outside for hairdressers and this was 8am, hairdressing important rightly so. people are getting out and were good, social—distancing, standing packages apart, having a conversation, bizarre lines for
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hairdressing working went for a walk, there is a pub socially standing with each other, social—distancing, overcrowding, it was not... the chaos that i thought it was. the british public, and just expect. talked about this before, can't get back world. this and get big groups of young insect parts but generally across the board, sounds and adjustments. the public aware of the tragic loss of life had. whatever darkest days were locked in
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and everyone is fully aware of the second absolutely right. people are invisibly sensible promoting second work as it is about what is right for everyone. i am looking at the world that i am what to shutdown the country and to protect lives, that isa country and to protect lives, that is a huge ask. for children work, stay looking after them, the sacrifices as a gp, worked nhs it is a massive thank you. opportunity for eve ryo ne a massive thank you. opportunity for everyone to say thank you. college.
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this appreciation highlighted over the last month but what are the big challenges for the nhs now? its massive piece of organisation. i have worked for well over a decade asa have worked for well over a decade as a doctor. i have delivered three babies saved my son was like life and continues to save my son, life and continues to save my son, life andi and continues to save my son, life and i can't get my head around how huge it is. the longevity of it actually i realise public. gatekeepers how nhs works because it isa gatekeepers how nhs works because it is a finite resource. this i know are capable of. captain tom raise millions for the nhs.
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marcus rashford and his organisation we re marcus rashford and his organisation were able to turn over a government and ensure children didn't go hungry this summer. we've started a movement and we've done it for all the right reasons and communities are bundled together and been able to pick each other up. that's what we need to leave the nhs and we need to be tackling the different issues within the nhs, institutionalised racism, sexism, the gender pay gap, we have to look at our resources, we have to look at our waiting times. yes, it's a thing that needs to be managed and we will get there. but what we need to do as individuals at home say, right, what is it out with? let me look after how much i eat, how much i drink, how much exercise i'm getting, let me pass that onto my children because all going to be how we look after those resources . going to be how we look after those resources. there are challenges, rachel, i agree. resources. there are challenges, rachel, iagree. but resources. there are challenges, rachel, i agree. but i think that in order to do that, if we can come together as british people to look after the nhs, this can survive and survive because this is the jewel in the ground. this is the most amazing
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organisation may have and i would be happy to serve it for the rest of my life. i'm going to be applauding you just for that last and sam. it so is great to hear from you, have a lovely sunday. it's wonderful to hear health professionals been so positive, especially about last night, it went so well, they're so proud of the british people they're behaving so sensibly given some of the fears people had. the andrew marr show is on bbc one this morning straight after us and we can talk to andrew right now. who's on the show today? i have handcrafted an entire programme to follow on from that interview because we are talking about what the nhs got right during the covert crisis, what went wrong and above all what is the future of the nhs. i have said simon stephens, the nhs. i have said simon stephens, the chief executive of nhs england. you very rarely see him on
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television, he is doing a major interview with me. matt hancock, the health secretary and for the labour perspective of that, anneliese dodds. i've also been talking to the author, maryjordan, about the other trump, milani trump will stop as her husband goes into election season, a very busy hour. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with martin geissler and rachel burden. here's a summary of this morning's main news. thousands of pub—goers in england have enjoyed their first drink in more then three months after the most significant relaxation of lockdown rules so far came into force. restaurants, hairdressers, theme parks and libraries also opened their doors, with strict social—distancing measures in place, but police have voiced concerns the rules weren't always being observed. the government is expected to announce a big increase
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in the number ofjob centre staff, after the prime minister said the pandemic would cause "many, many job losses". the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to give details later this week of a recruitment drive to double the number of expert mentors who help people to find newjobs. thousands ofjob losses have already been announced. the spanish government has imposed a local lockdown in part of catalonia after a sharp rise in infections, affecting more than 210,000 people. police checkpoints have been established to make sure no—one is able to enter or leave segria. catalonia is one of the spanish regions worst affected by the coronavirus. donald trump has lashed out at china over the coronavirus pandemic as part of his speech to mark the united states' independence day. the president declared the us to be the "greatest and most virtuous nation in the history of the world" at the event in washington dc, where large crowds gathered to hear him address the nation. today marks the seventy—second
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birthday of the nhs, and at five o'clock this evening, millions of people are being encouraged to take part in a nationwide clap to commemorate the occasion. last night landmarks in the uk were lit up blue in celebration and to express thanks to all nhs staff and key workers who have been working on the front line during the pandemic. the prince of wales also recorded a tribute to health workers. despite all that has been endured there is deep cause for gratitude and true reason for pride in the way we ca re and true reason for pride in the way we care for all numbers of our society. our greatness truly is... so, ladies and gentlemen, thank you all for what you have done. more than i can possibly say.
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by by the way, kanye west has announced he wants to run for president of america. that is huge social this morning. it's time for the sport. what's happening today? well, we have football back, tennis back, horse racing back, it feels like it would have been four months for fans of formula 1 waiting for their to return. but it is back. formula 1 finally returns in austria today, and lewis hamilton, known for his seventh world title, just behind in second. both mercedes cars are been painted black this year. support for anti—racism meanwhile red bull's max verstappen will start in third. valtteri did a greatjob today and gotta do a betterjob naturally and it's a long race tomorrow so we'll see what we can do. we're very, very close here. this is a very strong track for valtteri. you can look at all the tracks
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across the year and there are tracks that sometimes i'm stronger and sometimes he's stronger and this is one of his, so to be that close, i'm pretty happy. the battle for a top five finish and a spot in next season's champions league is hotting up in the premier league. there were wins for manchester united, chelsea, arsenal and leicester — as alex gulrajani reports. it's been a season that mason greenwood won't forget in a hurry. the 18—year—old has broken into the manchester united team and doesn't look to be going anywhere anytime soon. with his team surprisingly behind early on against bournemouth, greenwood got his first of the game. and with united back on track in the second half, he went alone to add their fourth in a 5—2 win. commentator: oh, this special talent has done it again! if that's on the playground or out on the training ground or back home, he knows where to finish, how to score a goal, and it doesn't matter if there's
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a 75,000 fans here at old trafford or no—one, that's just what he does. arsenal, too, have a young prospect in bukayo saka. in the week he committed his future to north london club, he showed why they raised him so highly as he scored in their 2—0 win over top five rivals wolves. a target for both of those youngsters would be to emulate jamie vardy. a little fortune helped him reach 100 premier league goals for leicester against crystal palace. 101 wasn't too far away as they ran out 3—0 winners. jamie vardy is back in business! i take each game as they come, what will be will be. i get frustrated every time i don't score but what you have to remember is, it is a team game and as long as we're picking up points, it don't really matter who scores. they will have to keep on winning as chelsea are hot on their heels in the race to finish
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in the top three. olivier giroud another season's premier league all scorer helping them over to a 3—0 win over watford. as the old guard show they are not ready to be replaced just yet. at the bottom of the table, time is running out for norwich city. they were beaten by brighton thanks to leandro trossard's first half goal, leaving norwich now six points adrift from safety. in the championship, leeds won at blackburn to take another step closer to the premier league. they're six points clear of third placed brentford with five games to go. fulham, nottingham forest and cardiff occupy the other three play—off places. cardiff won 1—0 at bristol city, who sacked their manager leejohnson after the game — their seventh defeat in nine matches. the government has given the green light for further international sporting events to take place in england over the course of the summer. competitors and teams will be exempt from quarantine upon arrival in the country. it had already been confirmed that england's test matches against the west indies and pakistan would go ahead whilst two f1 races
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will take place at silverstone on the 2nd and 9th of august. it means that english teams still involved in european football could play the second legs of their current ties at home venues. manchester city still have to face real madrid at the etihad in the champions league while manchester united and wolves also have home matches still to play in the europa league. there was big shock in the epsom derby as the 25—1 shot serpentyne, stormed to glory. it was the first time in history that the derby was staged without spectators. it didn't seem to affectjockey jockey emmet mcnamara, as serpentyne moved clear to win by five and a half lengths. it's a record breaking eighth win in the race for trainer aiden o'brien. he seems to see things in horses that other people don't seem to see. an unbelievable treatment to train eight epsom derby winners and for a man so young, eight epsom derby winners and for a man so young, he could have twice that by the time he finishes his career. it was a double celebration
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for o'brien as his horse 'love' also won the oaks to seal a classics double for the irish trainer. it was the first time in racing history that the oaks and derby had been run on the same day. another big win there. wasn't that incredible, the lead from the front, stretched out the lead, slightly caught in those final couple of furlongs but what the derby. absolutely. as you know, my knowledge of horse racing is limited. we'll leave it there. just think about love, that's all you need. we know that some families have been struggling since lockdown with food poverty, and we've reported here on breakfast on the successful campaign by footballer marcus rashford, to make sure school—age children still receive food vouchers throughout the upcoming summer holidays. but there are worries that parents of pre—school age children are not getting enough help and it means entire families are going hungry. fiona lamdin reports from bristol. is that enough? oh, it's a big one, isn't it?
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sarah and herfive—year—old daughter making lunch together. i'm trying to sort of give them what they need first and then i'll just have whatever's left over. do you want to set the table? but sarah won't get to eat this. nearly all her food goes to her children. sort of getting by on one meal a day and maybe a snack. i'll have coffee in the morning, maybe a piece of fruit for lunch and try and finish off what they've had, and then i'll make sure we're all eating together in the evenings, which is a sort of around 5:00, and i've just got used to that, that'sjust become a part of our lockdown life now. so are you permanently hungry? i think i've just got used to it now. i don't feel like i'm starving, it's just that's what i am used to now. i have lost weight during lockdown which i wasn't really intending to do and some people have commented on it, but when you know it's come from the fact that you can't eat properly, it's not really a compliment. sarah relies heavily on the food vouchers her children get
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from their school. but if like single mum jade your four—year—old son is in nursery, while there is some help, it's not as much as if her son was in school. having him at home 2a—7, obviously they eat more, the electric‘s more, gas is more, you're using more water and obviously everything builds up. this food club in bristol was set up to feed the under fives and they've seen demands nearly triple during lockdown. i think the under fives have been left out of the thinking. children at school do get support through the voucher schemes whereas the children under five don't get that support and their families really need it. and you're seeing them be hungry? yeah, we're seeing them hungry, daily, yeah. i love those. another family relying on this club. jade's partner has been furloughed. we had to reduce our rent costs,
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our bills and our shopping, where we've got both the girls at home full—time, whereas they'd normally be in school and nursery receiving free meals, we're now have to feed morning, lunch, evening, grazing throughout the day, so this has been an absolute godsend. feeding 520 families across bristol who might otherwise be going hungry. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the department for education says the needs of the most disadvantaged children are "at the heart" of everything it does and it has put in place a range of measures to support them, including grants and extra tuition. yesterday was the day that campsites and caravan parks in england reopened, and so this weekend people have been enjoying a break for the first time in months. alison freeman has been to the waterside house campsite in cumbria for us, to see how people found the first day of their holiday in the age of the 'new normal‘. the lakeside has been quiet for months.
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but early yesterday morning, that all started to change. just after 6am, camper vans pulled onto this campsite at ullswater. lee, from south shields, among the first to arrive with his partner. glad to be back? don't think you could wait could you ? no, we've been stuck in the house for too long to be honest. and this is what we love. do you have any apprehensions about being here, are you worried about safety? not at all. keep your distance, you say hello and that's it. as long as you are nice to people and you respect them and you stay where you would want them to be, then there is no reason why you can't feel at home. the local wildlife kept a watchful eye as the camping field is filled up throughout the morning. there were reports of camper vans containing keen holiday—makers lining the roads of the lake district. people travelling hundreds of miles for their first taste of a new sort of freedom. london was empty when we left.
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i've never seen that in my life but when we got here i was like, oh, a few people have beaten us to it. stay in the house, stay in the house and after, you can be released after a long time, so you're excited to go out and enjoy the weather. as the tents went up, the beers were opened. families and friends socialising in a way that haven't been allowed for months. first opportunity, soon as they opened up, we booked straight on. how is it to be back? absolutely brilliant, isn't it? it's a cracking view, the weather is not too good but you can live with that. it's the company and the view that counts, so. despite only letting about half the number of campers on the site to help with social distancing, it was still a relief for the owners to get back in business. the mood is, you know, everyone is elated. they are skipping into reception, you know, to check in and i think they are just so pleased to be out and about, it's a really lovely day and the forecast was rubbish, so it's nice watching them or pitch up.
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nearby pooley bridge was bustling with visitors. many from the campsite. i'm optimistic about the future, we just want more confidence in the visitor market and we need some good weather to do to drive us forward and i think things will start to come right for the industry after a long time. at the tea room in the village, the first day of trading meant staff and customers could get used to the new normal. so far so good. no one has been moving tables and chairs and no one has had to be reprimanded so, well done our customers. it's been heartbreaking just having the best spring ever and seeing that pass us by and knowing what would have been but the main thing is we have all come through on the other side, so let's make the most ofjuly and august. and we can join alison now who's at the waterside house campsite in cumbria to see how everyone's getting on after their first night.
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bit if when there alison? it has been a bit of a wild and windy night, bit difficult for the people in tents but we have some clever campers who came in the camper vans last night. you guys could have come from manchester, let's have a chat with jack. how did you sleep last night? i slept well but it was very windy. it was knocking the camper van and it was a bit hard to sleep but i did say well. good. just tell about the precautions that you have been taking to try and keep you and yourfamily been taking to try and keep you and your family safe? well, we wanted to be one of the first to get out camping because we really mist it, so we camping because we really mist it, so we thought we would be a self contained as possible, so we came with our own toilet, which was at the most risk of blowing away the night. we have been doing the washing up at our tent and generally trying to leave no trace and support the campsite in their first opening weekend. thanks very much guys. i
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hope you have a nice nights sleep tonight. see you in a bit. let's speak to darren, darren manages one of the shops in pooley bridge. darren, you have benefited from the campsite being opened again haven't you? how it been? has been a big upturn in the customers yesterday. a lot of returning, people with second homes, it's really nice to see them because a lot of them are friends as well. a new people as well. it was fantastic how people... i would say 99% of people observed social distancing measures. there was a few that didn't and that was disappointing from a personal point of view but everyone was really happy to be there, really observant andl happy to be there, really observant and i think it's fantastic because we've had a little bit of it with the deliveries we've been doing but these campsites and sites i've had nothing. they need some money coming into survive. so it's been a positive experience for you all? yeah, it has. there was the odd one,
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you can see them with the beer gardens is the drink starts to flow, but everybody who came into our shop on the other businesses around were absolutely fantastic and really adhering to the measures. 0r thanks ever so adhering to the measures. 0r thanks ever so much adhering to the measures. 0r thanks ever so much darren. adhering to the measures. 0r thanks ever so much darren. so, as you can see, it's been a positive experience despite the gusty wind and that little bit of rain we had over the past few days. thank you so much, alison. i just past few days. thank you so much, alison. ijust wonder if past few days. thank you so much, alison. i just wonder if those little lads were holding onto each other to stop themselves blowing away. they were fabulous. well done to all of them were there. we have the weather coming up. first of all, goodbye to martin who is off to read the news for the andrew marr show. let's have a look at what the weather is going to do in hands of professional now. it is a very blustery weekend certainly for today, we're looking at widespread gales, gusts of 60 miles an hour in central and northern areas. on the plus side, there are spells of sunshine. more sunshine than what we
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had yesterday. as i mentioned, there will be gales and also heavy showers, backing into northern and western parts of the uk. all courtesy of this deep area of low pressure at the time of year, lots of isobars indicating the strong winds in southern scotland, northern ireland and northern england, they will see the gusts of 60 mph. a cold front spreading south—east will clear away and we should see the brightening up, lots of showers, scotla nd brightening up, lots of showers, scotland and northern ireland, northern england, northern and western wales, thundery, few of them merging together to produce longer spells of rain. it's the windows that are the real feature, 30, spells of rain. it's the windows that are the realfeature, 30, a0 mph in the south, 50 or 60 in the north, particularly over the pennines, just take extra care, they could be some trees down and the trees have full leaves this time of year. it will feel quite autumnal, particularly when those showers come along, temperatures in the mid
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teens, bit higher further south. blustery overnight, the winds back toa blustery overnight, the winds back to a north—westerly, cool air mass moving down, plenty of showers per northern nest areas, dry interlude in the south but are much cooler and fresher night tonight. very muggy across southern and eastern areas last night. an area of low pressure pushing off into scandinavia taking gales and rain with it. higher pressures trying to build in from the south—west but this feature will develop little area of low pressure which will bring some wet weather to some parts for tuesday. monday is not a bad day, a lot of sunshine around, most of the showers will be across eastern areas, close to that area of low pressure and it will be windier as well. dry and bright for many, not a bad day. windier as well. dry and bright for many, nota bad day. high windier as well. dry and bright for many, not a bad day. high teens in the north, we could see 20 or 21 degrees in the south—east but then this feature moves in to bring some wet weather to some parts of the uk for tuesday. a bit of uncertainty to northern and southern extents. at
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the moment, models are picking up that it's going to be moving to a central suede. to the north of it, if you showers, sunny spells, maybe some dry weather through the south of it. temperatures again in the mid to high teens celsius, we could see 21 degrees in london. for the rest of the week, it stays pretty changeable, low pressure systems moving in bringing further cloud and rain at times. there are signs as we end the week to the weekend, following weak, high pressure might try to build into bring us a more settled and sunny weather. so it's not all doom and gloom. now before we go, we have one last, heart—warming story for you. throughout lockdown, we've become used to keeping up with our family and friends at a safe distance via video calls — but you just can't beat a good hug. well, as of yesterday in scotland, young children no longer have to follow distancing rules when meeting other children or adults outdoors, meaning our next guests could finally give their grandchildren a hug. they'lljoin us in
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a moment but first — tissues at the ready — let's have a look. 0h! oh! cuddles! how's my big boy? how's my big boy? am i getting a cuddle? 0h! am i my big boy? am i getting a cuddle? oh! am i getting one as well? can you give me a hug? you're a big boy? our too big to a hug. i think next week she'll get a hug. it'sjust like christmas day. it's brilliant. christmas day. that was gorgeous. in lanarkshire are bobby and ellen bell, with grandsons
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noah and isaac. just tell us, how did that feel?m was absolutely wonderful. it's been such a long time during lockdown so we really enjoyed it. the children we really enjoyed it. the children were excited, won't you? these children are in and out of your lives a lot in normal circumstances are they? yes. most days they used to be in the house, we will collect them from school so we really miss them. it was great to see them. had using seen at all during lockdown? just twice we waste to them outside their —— we waved to them. and on my birthday they brought me some cakes. but other than that, just twice waving to them. so it's really nice to see them and take it back to normal. well yeah, nothing makes up for a wonderful hug. anna, as their
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mum, it must be gorgeous for you to see them being reunited once again and i'm sure just see them being reunited once again and i'm surejust to have see them being reunited once again and i'm sure just to have your see them being reunited once again and i'm surejust to have your mum and i'm surejust to have your mum and dad around be able to have them support you. yeah, they are my parents—in—law so it's just been amazing because they've been amazing with those over the years with childcare and everything and the grandparents are such a massive part of their lives and their grand daughter ava is well, you could just tell how much they've mist him over this whole time and the boys as well, as i'm sure all kids everywhere, been saying when can we go and visit? so to be able to see them when i said that they could come and give them a hug, the two boys were just like, can we? come and give them a hug, the two boys werejust like, can we? it come and give them a hug, the two boys were just like, can we? it was a wonderful moment. just hopefully we can get back to a bit more of that soon. i have a four-year-old and part of the difficulty is that to him, you know, yes you can see a grandparents but you can't hug or touch them. what is it been like to you trying to talk to them and explain the virus to them? it's
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difficult. especially isaac, isaac will be three at the end of the month and he will say things like, is the virus still here? and you have to say, yes, it still here. so gets it from that point of view but when we're out walking on the streets, it so difficult because you're trying to encourage them to still wave at people while you nip across the road to avoid contact, so it must be very confusing for them but they've coped well so they have been able to distance themselves a bit so i'm just glad that they can get back to normal now.” bit so i'm just glad that they can get back to normal now. i would if you can ask bobby for is, because i just love his expression ofjoy when he saw the children, ask him what it's meant to him to be able to hook the boys? bobby, how was it for you see the grandchildren? all great! great! a big bear hug. my mr benn
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standing in front of me. now that you've been able to get together outdoors, what are your plans? how much more will be able to see them and be involved in their lives? the time. back to normal hopefully and also, my grand daughter ava is 16, she's a teenager now but we'll all get together in the next few weeks hopefully and i can't wait for the hairdressers to open, so if barry, my hairdresser is listening, tell him i'm definitely booking an appointment. i think you are looking well on it to be fair. yeah, but it's too wild and well done to nicola sturgeon because she's been absolutely wonderful. i thought i'd get that warning. welcome to. tell me, have you got any treats lined up for the boys? well, they are going in for scrambled egg, outside probably, we will bring it out to the table for them and have some scrambled egg and bacon. i'm sure will enjoy that. scrambled egg and
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bacon, that sounds like a great brea kfast. bacon, that sounds like a great breakfast. well, enjoy the summer holidays and then back to school in august. how do you feel about all about? initially i was quite apprehensive about it as a lot of people were, but given that the numbers to be coming down, i mean it's great, obviously with me and my husband working, and just how much the kids are mr friends and everything, i think it'll be great to get back to normality, just fingers crossed like everyone else that numbers keep continuing to drop in that they are able to do that safely in august, so i think it'll be great for them to just see their friends and be able to just have that sort of bective fun and normality back. another grandchild on the way as well. you're going to have your work cut out, no doubt about it. it's been gorgeous to see you all, a totaljoy to see being
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reunited. thank you so much for your time and enjoy the rest of your weekend. that's anna, bobby, ellen, isaac and noah. that's all from us. join dan and louise from six o'clock tomorrow morning. goodbye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. despite surging coronavirus, donald trump uses his independence day speech to attack on those he accuses of seeking to erase america's history. we will not throw away our heroes. we will honour them and we will prove worthy of their sacrifice. will there be a hangover? england wakes up after a major easing of the lockdown, and pubs and restaurants re—open. in spain's catalonia region, tens of thousands of people
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are getting used to re—imposed coronavirus controls,

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