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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 17, 2020 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the nhs in england is to get £3 billion of extra funding to help it cope if there's a second wave
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of coronavirus this winter. they are dealing with a lot of ongoing pressures. so whilst £3 billion sounds like a lot of money, we need to be absolutely clear how and where that money is going to be spent. later today the prime minister is expected to set out the next steps on the road out of lockdown restrictions and it's known he's keen to encourage commuters to return to the workplace to help the economy recover. the uk tourism industry says that since lockdown there's been a "near total shutdown" in international tourism to and from the uk. russia dismisses allegations that it tried to steal uk research for a coronavirus vaccine. captain tom moore will be knighted by the queen today in his own personal ceremony at windsor castle. please do get in touch with us regarding any of today's stories, on twitter @annita—mcveigh, or #bbcyourquestions
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and coming up this hour — the big butterfly count. the public is urged tojoin an annual butterfly count, as part of efforts to protect wildlife. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the nhs in england will get an extra £3 billion of funding to prepare for a possible second wave of coronavirus this winter. some of the money will be used to keep nightingale hospitals open to the end of the financial year, and for private hospitals to carry out non—urgent operations. the prime minister is expected to give more details in a downing street briefing later today. he's also expected to announce new powers for local authorities
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in england to impose lockdowns, as the government seeks to reassure the public that coronavirus is under control. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. today, borisjohnson will set out plans aimed at preparing the nhs in england for the winter ahead. this will include funding to keep the nightingale hospitals open through till the end of the financial year in march. their workload with covid—19 patients was much less than expected, and they were put on standby. some are now being used for scans for cancer patients, but spare capacity will be maintained in case there is a second wave of coronavirus infections. a deal will also be done with private sector hospitals which provided beds for nhs use during the crisis. funding will be allocated to cover routine operations for nhs patients. on top of the £3 billion for england, there will be money allocated proportionally to the devolved administrations. the prime minister will also confirm plans to boost testing by the autumn and a new marketing campaign
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to raise awareness of the test and trace scheme. the british medical association, representing doctors, said it was vital to understand whether the money would be enough to boost capacity for a potential second wave and also meet the needs of millions of patients who have had care delayed during the pandemic. hugh pym, bbc news. saffron cordery is deputy chief executive of nhs providers, which represents hospitals and other nhs trusts in england. she says clarity is needed over where the money will be spent. if you think about the nhs as a whole, its annual budget is around £120 billion a year. so that might give you some idea. it is a little under 3% of its annual budget. perhaps that helps in terms of putting it in some kind of context. but i think what we need to say is that any additional funding for the nhs is obviously welcome, but i don't think we are clear yet
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what this money will be used for and what it will cover. i think that is what nhs trusts on the front line really want to hear. because they are facing a triple whammy of pressures coming up. they have got the pressure obviously of winter itself, plus the possibility of a flu epidemic alongside coronavirus. they are dealing with this ongoing pandemic and need to be ready for a surge. and also, finally, they have got to start getting usual services up and running. so they are dealing with a lot of ongoing pressures. so whilst £3 billion sounds like a lot of money, we need to be absolutely clear how and where that money is going to be spent. our political correspondent, iain watson joins us from westminster. good morning. you heard it, a call
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for clarity, so what can we expect by way of detail from the prime minister when he speaks about this later? there will be detailed across the board, not just later? there will be detailed across the board, notjust on the nhs, because we will get the next chapter of his road map out of the coronavirus crisis. it will stretch nine months into the future and it will cover up money for the nhs of course and a whole range of other things. we heard about the ramping up things. we heard about the ramping up of testing in october, by the end of october, but also there will be encouragement for people to go back to work, to try to get the economy moving, and some kind of idea of when we might be able to return to normality. at the pace at which we move along the road map will be cautious, we are told, but he will wa nt to cautious, we are told, but he will want to give some sense that, in due course, the virus is being kept under control. in terms of specifics, apart from what you heard from hugh pym on the health service, there will also be an announcement ona there will also be an announcement on a local lockdown is put at one of
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the criticisms by local authorities has been that it has been very difficult to get the data in sufficient detailfor difficult to get the data in sufficient detail for them to pinpoint outbreaks early on under the health secretary is saying that actually, some of these criticisms out of date and the data is getting there more quickly now. also there has been a split between central and local government functions and responsibilities, so there will be more powers for local authorities to impose local lockdowns in the hope that you could have very local lockdowns when outbreaks occur and you don't get it as a whole citywide lockdown they are experiencing at the moment in leicester. in addition, i think what the government will try to do is boost people's confidence to get back to work so they are saying, we can control the virus and if there is a second wave, there is enough funding, they would suggest, for the nhs, but as we heard, there is scepticism as to whether that will reach doing routine operations but that they will suggest people can
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get back onto public transport safely put out there will be a range of confidence building measures, pa rt of confidence building measures, part of it the government easing restrictions but also pushing people to start doing some of the things they may have done before lockdown in their normal lives. let me pick up in their normal lives. let me pick up on that because let's talk about people getting back to workplaces under the suggestions are that the prime minister is keen in order to help the economy for that to stop happening. but we all heard the chief scientific adviser saying there is absolutely no reason a change in the guidance for people working from home so what sort of messaging, given that tension, do you think we can expect from boris johnson? you think we can expect from boris johnson? certainly different music and discordant notes in the music coming from the chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, and from downing street at the moment to ponder whether they can reconcile that, we will find out this morning to ponder what patrick vallance was saying is that where companies have
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found it productive that people working from there was no need to change the official advice. that could suggest that boris johnson might emphasise there are a whole range ofjobs which are perhaps best done not from home, in the office, on building sites and elsewhere, and there might need to be further encouragement for people to go and do those kinds ofjobs but he will also emphasise that the government has done a great deal working with companies to make sure that workplaces are safer now than they would have been before, they are covid secure, to use the jargon, with mitigations in place, plastic screens, with mitigations in place, plastic screens, the likes we have seen in shops and hairdressers, which have already opened. where it is safe to go back to work, it is likely people will be encouraged to do so could that we also had the policy on face masks to be used on public transport where you cannot maintain a social distance. at the moment it is easy to maintain social distance even in rush hour on large sections of public transport because people are simply too wary to use it on the
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government advice had been to avoid it where you could end to travel outside rush hour if you could. i think there will be some encouragement and perhaps a campaign over the summer to try to encourage people back onto it in greater numbers as well predict the reason is not simply where people work but what they do when they go to work. if they are travelling on public transport, they are subsidising that and if they having lunch, they might be keeping sandwich shops open and the rest a bit there is a worry that if too many people continue to work from home, the economic recovery will be slower. thank you very much. later today, the prime minister is expected to set out plans for the next steps on the road out of lockdown restrictions, and it's known he's keen to encourage people to return to work to help the economy recover. we can speak now to andrew sentance, senior adviser at cambridge econometrics and also former member of bank of england monetary policy committee. thank you forjoining us. what you
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think the finest might say on this today? obviously he wants this economic recovery but as we discussed a moment ago, the chief scientific adviser is saying there is absolutely no reason to change the guidance on people working from home. there is that tension between politics and health advice. home. there is that tension between politics and health advicelj home. there is that tension between politics and health advice. i think the prime minister needs to be very careful for a number of reasons. the prime minister needs to be very carefulfor a number of reasons. one is that there are a lot of health and environmental benefits and flexibility benefits from people working from home. obviously, in terms of what sir patrick vallance said yesterday, it keeps people distant from other people, so the spread of coronavirus can be much more easily checked if people are working from home. firstly there are a lot of benefits from home working. but the other point is i don't think it is the government's job to intervene in the contract between an
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employee and an employer. yes, they need to set a broad regulatory framework but they cannot tell or should not be telling employers or employees, you have to go to work in this sort of way. i think there was a danger that what the prime minister says will be interpreted in that way. i think he needs to be quite careful in terms of his pronouncements today. that is interesting, and on that point, do you think a lot of businesses are actually thinking on different lines to the pm? many are discovering and have discovered that they can operate very successfully with significant numbers of staff at home, working from home, and they might look at this being a more permanent arrangement? that is another tension between apparently what the prime minister is saying and what some businesses might be
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thinking? i would agree with that andi thinking? i would agree with that and i think it is part of a longer term trend towards more employment flexibility. i think we should be encouraging employment flexibility for a whole host of reasons. but last year, about one in eight people said they worked from home in the last week, and that rose to close to one in two, nearly 50%, at the height of the lockdown. and i think where we will settle in terms of the economy is somewhere between those two numbers conduct clearly, the lockdown imposed working from home for people for whom it was not a natural thing and some of those might want to get back into the office but i think what we should be aiming to do is to create the maximum possible flexibility and also encourage firms to put in place good policies that allow employees
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to make sensible choices. what we have learned here in the uk with our labour market policies is that actually offering more flexible it helps employment and employment is going to be the key issue in the next 12—18 months —— more flexibility. but what about those businesses, the sandwich shops, gyms that offer a lunchtime exercise classes to office workers, we heard the boss of cards galore saying, please come back in in order to help my business survive? what about those sorts of businesses that depend on a pretty full return to what one might call the normal economy, people going back into city centres and town centres, to other businesses and offices in order to help those smaller ones survive? there is a real problem there, isn't there? this is another big issue.
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you might say it is a problem, but are we going to try to get the economy back to an old normal, which is underpinning your question there, orare is underpinning your question there, or are we going to try to find a new normal? and some of those businesses will need to find different ways of offering their services, as we have already seen in the lockdown, with more online businesses, more delivery businesses. and the economy is going to have to adapt to a new situation. trying to get back to where we were exactly before the crisis is not the right approach. we need to try to find the new normal as opposed to going back to the old one. andrew sentance, senior adviser at cambridge econometrics, thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... the nhs in england is to get three billion pounds of extra funding to help it cope if there's a second wave of
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coronavirus this winter. later today the prime minister is expected to set out the next steps on the road out of lockdown restrictions and it's known he's keen to encourage commuters to return to the workplace to help the economy recover. the uk tourism industry says that since lockdown there's been a ‘near total shutdown' in international tourism to and from the uk. russia has dismissed allegations it tried to steal research into a coronavirus vaccine and meddle in british politics. the uk, the united states and canada say hackers in russia have targeted organisations trying to find a vaccine. separately, the british government says it's "almost certain" there were russian attempts to interfere in the uk's last parliamentary election. we heard a little earlier from security ministerjames brokenshire, who explained the government's response. this is incredibly serious. it is
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appalling that any government should act in this way. why we have called this out, we have obviously given advice to different companies as well in terms of the steps they can ta ke to well in terms of the steps they can take to protect their systems, and also to mitigate action. but i think it is right we have worked collaboratively easily and collectively at the national cyber security centre i determined it is right to call this output their attribution is around 95% plus in terms of who is responsible and therefore the actions that have been taken by them and the information has been given. let's speak to the bbc‘s sarah rainsford in moscow. hello, two accusations levelled at rush it yesterday but what has the response been from the kremlin? the kremlin was very quick to respond and dismiss both the allegations as unfounded and to say they would not tolerate such accusations point we
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have heard from the foreign ministry here, quite scornful of some of the language that was used as the uk, as it said, called russia out on these things. the foreign ministry was saying, where is the evidence, it is saying, where is the evidence, it is saying almost certain is like highly likely, pretty vague. that was a public reaction at least here in russia and the response that has been mirrored in state television coverage, for example this morning. basically dismissing it and shrugging it off, not making a huge deal about, it has not made the headlines so far here in russia at least. what are the russian authorities are saying about the country's own efforts to find a vaccine for covid—i9? country's own efforts to find a vaccine for covid-19? i think that is interesting because shrugging off yet more allegations of yet more election interference, that is almost parfor the election interference, that is almost par for the course here election interference, that is almost parfor the course here in russia these days, it is not the first time they have been accused of that, but focusing on accusations
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that, but focusing on accusations that they may have been trying to steal scientific research related to covid—i9 vaccination programmes, thatis covid—i9 vaccination programmes, that is potentially quite a snub for russia in quite a dent in what is a very positive official picture here of their own race to find a vaccine. we have heard only this week quite a lot on television and from officials here about russian efforts, praising their own scientists and their effo rts their own scientists and their efforts because of this week the first volunteers were discharged from hospital having gone through the first of a russian vaccine put it phase three trials are expected to begin later this summer. and one of the key figures involved in the trials has said russia expects to be producing some 30 million doses of its vaccine by the end of the year and hopes to be first to market point of this is a race, a race which has a huge amount of national prestige rising on it but also a lot of money. whoever produces the vaccine that is most efficient and effective will of course reap the
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rewards of that. suggesting that russia may have been trying to cheat in the process, i don't think people here will like that too much at all. thank you very much, sarah. leaders of the 27 member states of the eu are gathering in brussels for the first time since march. they'll be attempting to settle a trillion euro budget and are being asked to agree an additional pandemic recovery fund. there are sharp divides with some countries unwilling to dole out cash without strict conditions. our europe correspondent, kevin connolly reports. let's start the meeting if we are ready. for months, europe's leaders have been stuck with the stilted diplomacy of the video conference. now, at last, they are to meet face—to—face, but that doesn't mean they will see eye to eye. at the very moment the eu 27 are struggling to agree a trillion euro budget for the next seven years, they are now being asked to create a 750 billion euro covid
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recovery fund as well. one point of agreement — agreement won't be easy. no, not easy. this is politics. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, is a sort of a spokesman for a small group of northern countries, the frugal four, who want to limit the bill and offer help in loans, not grants. translation: i could not explain to myself or to others that we would be willing to offer loans, let alone subsidies, without the condition of far—reaching reforms, to make sure countries come out stronger and to make sure we are able to check if these reforms actually took place. leaders of southern countries like italy and greece remember how life drained from their streets and their economies and want generous help now, not big bills to repay later. and they don't want supervision from their wealthier
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neighbours either. translation: we insist on the full amount of funds that the european commission has proposed. we believe that the majority of them should be in the form of grants and not loans and of course, we insist that, to receive these funds, there is no need to add special conditions. brussels insiders will tell you there is always a deal in the end but this time it will not be easy. hungary's viktor orban is threatening to veto the whole thing if it includes criticism of his authoritarian style at home. one sign that things aren't back to normal — the building that normally houses hundreds of journalists at summits will be empty. they have been told to stay away. and one thing that never changes — the rumour that it may yet take another summit to get all this sorted. kevin connolly, bbc news, brussels.
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tourist attractions that rely on foreign visitors have found themselves particularly badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic. visit britain — which represents the uk tourism industry — says that since lockdown there has been a ‘near total shutdown' in international tourism to and from the uk. ben thompson is at the tower of london to see how that's been affected. a beautiful view of the tower, but looking at this, it never fails to strike me when i see locations like this that should normally be packed with people, looking almost com pletely with people, looking almost completely deserted. yes, good morning, you are right and you might be able to make me out at the bottom of your shot, with this glorious view across one of the oldest buildings in london up to some of the newest in the city. this place normally would have about 15,000 people on an average summer day at the moment they are getting around 500 because we know, well documented
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issues with airports, tourists deciding to stay away, or are not able to travel at all in some cases. for places like this, it means they have to work out where that money is coming from. they would traditionally make most of it in the summer months when the weather is so good, people coming to see this, the white tower and the ravens on the lawn and legend has it that when the ravens leave the tower, it collapses and the kingdom falls. put a lot of work going on here during lockdown to make sure it is safe for visitors to make sure it is safe for visitors to return and that is the job of andrew who is the governor here. quite a big job on your hands, talk me through that fall in visitors firstly because you need people here to pay the bills? absolutely, we are an independent charity, completely funded by our visitor income and other events we put on here and in other events we put on here and in other palaces across historic royal palaces put that we normally make over £100 million a year and most of it comes from visitors but this year we are set to make 98, a massive
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drop off and that is a result of the drop off and that is a result of the drop in visitors. and primarily you get a lot of visitors from the united states and they are not able to come, other european countries might be choosing to holiday closer to home so what does it mean for your finances and how do you get people back here to make the numbers balance? 70% of our visitors are from overseas and a good chunk comes from overseas and a good chunk comes from the us. we need that market to come back but it looks like it will not for some time but that we are looking to europe to come back sooner looking to europe to come back sooner than that but primarily at the moment, we are looking to the domestic audience pulled up normally about 30% of our audience, 30% of our visitors, and we are encouraging people who can travel into london to do it now. there is no better time, the tower is quieter than they will ever see the tower is quieter than they will ever see it and it will be a really special experience. i have been struck by how quiet it is, to be able to see something like this while the crowds are not here. but people will inevitably worry about
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security and safety so what have you done to make it safe? i know a lot of narrow corridors and small towers... safety has been at the top of our list of priorities before we reopen to put it we have had to keep some of the narrowest places closed, but towers with only one route in or out but we have opened parts we feel we can do safely and the safety of staff and visitors as being at the heart of that. there is loads of hand sanitiser station in place, we have a one—way route and people are of course following social distancing guidelines and we are encouraged to book online for time to slot in a way we have not done before. and priestley, you spent lockdown here, you live here so how is it macro —— briefly. macro -- briefly. it was a novelty to stop but it wore off quickly! this place lives and treat on its visitors and we need them back. thank you for having us this morning. as andrew said, he had been living here with all the staff you see, they are pretty privileged at being here but like the ravens, they
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are getting used to having visitors back and remembering what they do but on a morning like this with a view like that, you really can see why people from all around the world travel here and the challenge for andrew and the team is to get those visitors back but make sure they do so safely. looking absolutely wonderful at the tower, and hopefully a lot more people will be able to get back safely soon. for the many who won't be travelling abroad this year for a holiday there are, of course, many beautiful parts of the uk opening up for business. our correspondentjohn maguire reports from cornwall, on how residents and visitors there are finding a new—found fondness for the staycation. there's sand, sun and surf, as you would expect from a st ives summer, but social distancing means it's far from business as usual. challenging times for all who are trying to work within the restrictions. in terms of the tourists who are coming, it's reminding them
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to be respectful of how we are here, come and enjoy it, we will help you enjoy it, but if we have anti—social behaviour, then we will issue dispersal notices but that's a last resort — that's not our style here because we want you to have a good time and relax, and go home safely. a welcome return, but serving so many visitors all at once isn't easy. we have gone from having the place to ourselves to it being completely packed, as usual, however, of course, all the restaurants and shops can take half capacity, some people haven't gone back to work, so there's still quite a big issue for the future of st ives, and the future of some of our local shops and businesses who are going to still struggle, although people — thank goodness — are now here. cornwall is famous for its sardines — the fish of course, not the game — but you wouldn't know it today. when lockdown was in full effect, people here warned visitors to stay away, promising that when the situation improved,
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they would be welcomed back with open arms, and that's happening in spades. the doom bar was created by a mermaid and she was swimming around until a fisherman came in from sea one day and saw herswimming. he hadn't caught any fish so he tried to catch her with a harpoon and she was so upset she created the doom bar. the pandemic has broad challenges but also opportunities for change. andy's cameron's boat and surf school company in north cornwall has reinvented its business model. probably one of the real positives of the whole covid issues down in cornwall is a lot of the businesses have started working together that would have traditionally been competitors. so for the boat businesses in padstow, we now have an email group working out how we can not be on the pontoons at the same time to allow separation between the passengers. and again the same on the beaches, we work with one of the big surf schools which is close to our surf school, the two big operators and how best to work in the water together. padstow is synonymous with rick stein. his businesses employ 600 people in the area. the cookery school has been
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converted into a pop—up restaurant. his son, jack, tells me how hard closing the doors has been. if you had offered us to open first week ofjuly, when we went into lockdown, we would have said that would be great because we are a seasonal business. this summer season will save us, there is no doubt if we had missed out on this revenue, i think we as a company, 45 years old restaurant company, we would likely be not trading next year, simple as. change to survive is the mantra here. emma's cafe is around the cornerfrom one her grandfather used to run. she was brought up in new zealand but is now back in padstow and adapting her business to cope with coronavirus. we normally cram people in like sardines, really, so it was a tough decision but we decided forjuly and august, we'd go takeaway onlyjust to deal with the social distancing. we can't cram people in like we normally did and with only six tables, it really isn't worth it so we've done takeaway. we've created a whole new frontage,
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and it is going really well. living on a peninsula jutting out into the atlantic ocean requires a good deal of resilience, and never has that been more severely tested than now. john maguire, bbc news, cornwall. some beautiful images in the last few minutes from the tower of london and there, of from cornwall. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. a very warm day out there for some of us but for others there is a bit of rain in the forecast. there is a weather front that is creeping further south across scotland and into northern ireland so it will bring a bit of rain here, although northern scotland is brightening up. northern areas of northern england are seeing some rain arriving too whereas for the rest of england and for wales, there will be some warm, sunny spells. very warm and humid and temperatures reaching the upper 20s in parts of south—east england.
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this weather front with the cloud and the rain isn't moving very far very fast. still some rain overnight in parts of northern england, especially west of the pennines, north wales, parts of the midlands later in the night. northern ireland and scotland have a cooler night, some spots in single figures, but warm and quite muggy south of our weather system. and into tomorrow, we find that weather front still giving some rain to parts of northern england, wales, the midlands, still warm and muggy across south—east england. for scotland and northern ireland, sunny spells and you may catch a blustery shower. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mike bushell. we were talking yesterday about jofra archer, breaking that secure bubble. more on that today. yes, he will be in his hotel, isolating, as he has to do. still able to watch the cricket but not able to take part. day two of england's second test
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gets underway in around 90 minutes against the west indies. they'll resume batting on 207 for 3, with dom sibley and ben stokes at the crease — both chasing centuries in what will no doubt be a key day in this match. for more — we can go live now inside the bio bubble at emirates old trafford and join our cricket reporter henry moran. good morning, thank you for this. how crucial would you say the session this morning is in deciding the whole outcome of this series, not indeed this test? it's hugely important, the weight dom sibley and ben stokes played last night, you could see the energy sapping away from the west indies bowling attack, they named an unchanged team for this test, the west indies, looking to secure the first series win against england since 1988. if england bat through the morning session three wickets down they will be very much on top and potentially putting themselves in a position, setting the platform to score big
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ru ns setting the platform to score big runs in the first innings, you would expect them to go on, if not win the game, then put themselves in a position where they cannot lose it. this time yesterday the jofra archer story was breaking, as he sits in isolation in his hotel, i wonder does he watch with the window open, behind the curtains, how much of his team—mates been rallying around him? it's interesting, we have been keeping our eyes trained on the far side of the ground from the media centre to see if we can see him watching the game from the balcony. no sign yesterday, but it's been an interesting one, more developments on the story are more conversations about the potential implications of that breach of bio—security, the buyout secure environment, we learned about that 2a hours ago. ashley giles, the england cricket director says this is an incident that could have cost the ecb tens of millions of pounds and could have put the summer in jeopardy and they ta ke put the summer in jeopardy and they take these things incredibly seriously but the england head coach
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has said that the team is rallying round and supporting jofra archer. he made the point, players make mistakes, young people make mistakes. jofra archer has got to spend five days on his own in his room thinking about what he has done and have two covid 19 tests that have to come back negative before he can get back and play for england. no doubtjofra archer will be watching on and not really enjoying much of this week. absolutely, henry, we will leave it there, we will let you get ready for the start of play in just under 90 minutes. thank you so much for your time. there's a huge game at the bottom of the premier league tonight as 16th place west ham take on 17th place watford. they're both three points clear of the relegation zone and bournemouth plus aston villa. their boss dean smith admits villa might need to win their last two games to avoid the drop. ezri konsa had put them ahead at everton but his acrobatics on the line couldn't keep out theo walcott‘s late equaliser. elsewhere, brighton drew at southampton.
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at the other end — leicester city boss brendan rodgers, has urged his team to "make history" by qualifying for the champions league — forjust the second time ever. it's after they beat sheffied united 2—0 to stay in the fourth and final qualification spot. and they're ahead of manchester united, on goal difference — just three goals as united kept the pressure on with a 2—0 win at crystal palace. marcus rashford with the opener. and guess what? united play leicester on the final day of the season. "we are a weak team" and "things have to change". they're the stinging words from lionel messi as his barcelona team lost the spanish league. it's real madrid who won the la liga title — their first since 2017 under manager zinedine zidane. translation: this title has got a special feeling, especially after being locked up at home for two months. we came back and we prepared ourselves in a different way. and we managed to win the spanish league which, in my opinion, is the most difficult to win.
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and tiger woods says he plays golfjust as well, without fans watching. that's in contrast to rory mcilroy, who has said it has affected his game. having said that, mcilroy‘s made a promising start at the memorial tournament. the world number one goes into this afternoon's second round on two under par — four shots off the lead. he's playing alongside woods — who's a shot further back in his first competitive event since february and chasing a record 83rd pga tour win. that's all your sport for now. mike, thank you very much. yes, we had a little bit of a pause there, as we sorted out the cameras. but mike, thank you! as we've been hearing this morning, the nhs in england will be given an extra £3—billion of funding to prepare for a possible second wave of coronavirus. downing street said the funding would be available immediately and would allow the nhs to continue
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using private hospitals and maintain the temporary nightingale hospitals until the end of march. experts have warned that a second wave of cases this winter could see around 120,000 covid—19 deaths in uk hospitals. so how significant is this announcements of funding? siva anandaciva is chief analyst at the king's fund, a think tank specialising in health care policy. thank you very much forjoining us today. put this amount in the context of the overall nhs budget for us, first of all. £3 billion is a substantial amount of public funding but in context, we already spent about £145 billion each year on the health service in england. we are talking about 2% when we talk about £3 billion. the second piece of context i think is relevant is the government is already allocating five and billion pounds for things that help the health service during covid 19 like the nightingale
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hospitals, like the increased use of the private sector so i think overall 3 billion is nothing to sniff out, of course, but at the same time is it going to be enough when we heard about the triple whammy that the nhs faces, a possible second wave of this virus, ordinary winter pressures and then, of course, trying to catch up on services that have been missed because of the pandemic? so i think it's fair to say two things, first of all, there are multiple calls on this funding, i don't think anybody would realistically expect £3 billion to do everything from help the health service prepare effectively for a second wave to tackling the massive backlog that has already built up so certainly, i think the second thing is if we have learned anything over the last few months, it's more money can be made available as need increases so i would see this more as a down payment to help the service prepare for the known risks we are already aware of but if a second wave emerges i would expect the cash ——
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managers would start negotiating for extra cash that is needed. we heard a call for clarity this morning, details on how unfair where money will be spent. would you explain for us will be spent. would you explain for us why it's crucial health care providers know at this point exactly where that money might be going? sure. there's a long history of the nhs being given winterjust as winter approaches to help you prepare and i think this 3 billion is analogous to that and if we have learnt anything, it's the more notice you have, the better that money is used because you can start doing things like bringing on additional staff, doing things like bringing on additionalstaff, preparing doing things like bringing on additional staff, preparing to open words, working closely with social ca re words, working closely with social care providers to release the capacity they have, if they have it and all of that takes time so the more clarity, the more forewarning there is, the more effective this money can be for improving services for patients. more planning and better planning can be done, of course. do you think and we often
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ordinary years, this is not an ordinary years, this is not an ordinary ear by any stretch of the imagination, winter pressures, do you think there's a possibility that some of those winter pressures might be in terms of usual seasonal viruses because people have been social distancing and so forth. could that take a bit of pressure off the nhs this winter?|j could that take a bit of pressure off the nhs this winter? i think there is a positive and negative side, the positive is exactly as you say, some of the social distancing, the extra rigour around hand washing, might help reduce transmission of a number of viruses including flu, not just transmission of a number of viruses including flu, notjust coronavirus, which would help services for winter and also changes in behaviour, people aren't out and about as much, this will reduce risk so all of that on the positive side can reduce winter pressures but negatively, it may not feel like it, but the nhs has actually been lucky in the last four years because we haven't had a really bad flu outbreak, normal flu. we just really bad flu outbreak, normal flu. wejust don't really bad flu outbreak, normal flu. we just don't know. at this point, what type of flu season we will have
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soi what type of flu season we will have so i think there's quite a lot of uncertainty in the air. thank you for your thoughts on this. captain sir tom moore, who raised more than 30 million pounds for nhs charities during the lockdown will travel to windsor castle today to be knighted by the queen. it will her first face to face engagement with a member of the public since march — and the only honour to be awarded since the beginning of the lockdown. here's our royal correspondent sarah campbell. # happy birthday to you. it started as a family challenge — walk 100 lengths of the garden to mark a 100th birthday, and in the process raise £1,000 for nhs charities. the uk and much of the world was on lockdown at the time and as the former army captain's story spread, it became clear that his understated manner and wise words were what people needed to hear. the donations kept coming and coming. by the time he celebrated his birthday, the total had topped £30 million.
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he received an estimated 140,000 cards from around the world, an raf fly—past, and, it was subsequently announced, a knighthood. his response was typically modest. i'm still tom moore. i think "sir thomas" sounds very nice, but inside i haven't changed! nothing's changed inside. today, he and his family will travel here, to the quadrangle inside windsor castle, where the queen's birthday parade was held last month. all investitures have been on hold during the pandemic, but for captain sir tom, the queen has made an exception. "i could never have imagined this would happen to me," he tweeted earlier this week. an inspiration to many thousands of people around the world, his will be an exceptional ceremony for an extraordinary man. sarah campbell, bbc news.
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and of course, all of us here hope he has an extraordinary and wonderful day. captain tom, who will be knighted later by the queen. the headlines on bbc news... the nhs in england is to get £3 billion of extra funding to help it cope if there's a second wave of coronavirus this winter later today the prime minister is expected to set out the next steps on the road out of lockdown restrictions — and it's known he's keen to encourage commuters to return to the workplace to help the economy recover. the uk tourism industry says that since lockdown there's been a ‘near total shutdown' in international tourism to and from the uk. we are all being asked to join an annual butterfly count as part of efforts to protect wildlife. butterfly conservation, which runs the count, said the fine weather in spring this year saw butterflies emerge at the earliest average time for 20 years — which it says should prompt some
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interesting results. if you're interested in taking part, the survey involves spending 15 minutes in an outdoor space, counting the amount and type of butterflies spotted in that time. dr zoe randle is senior surveys officer at butterfly conservation. really good to have you with us and i think we can certainly say most of us i think we can certainly say most of us have been spending quite a lot more time outside this year. i've seen more time outside this year. i've seen lots of, i called them cabbage white butterflies, i don't know what the proper name is, i have seen lots of those but what difference do you think, first of all, lockdown this year, the absence of as much, not the total absence but obviously much less traffic on the roads, planes in the sky, etc, what difference is that making to wildlife in general and butterflies in particular? well, it's too early really for us to say what benefit the lockdown has had with lack of transport and travel and cars on the road and everything
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but one thing is for sure. that is people have had the chance and the opportunity to pause, get off their hamster wheel and take notice of butterflies and moths in their gardens, window boxes, out on their daily exercise. and this has been, many people have sought solace in nature, it's been really beneficial, we know there are studies that have been done to engaging with nature is really beneficial to us and so we are asking people to give something back by taking part in the big butterfly count this summer. as you said tell us how to do that exactly. said tell us how to do that exa ctly. h ow said tell us how to do that exactly. how do you take part. go to the big butterfly count website, download the id chart from there, all the instructions are there. there is also a big butterfly count app you can download to your smartphone and choose a sunny spot, spent 15 minutes counting the
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butterflies you see and logging them on the app or the website. you can do this anymore, like i said, the garden, window box, on a countryside walk, churchyard, park, where ever you like, just 15 minutes, give something back to nature, relax, unwind as well. sounds good. but why is it important as many people as possible get involved in this and talk to us about how previous surveys have helped to manage butterfly conservation? basically, butterflies are what's known as indicator species. if the butterfly numbers are going up, then the health of our environment is looking pretty good. if numbers are going down, then things aren't so good so taking part in the big butterfly count helps us take the pulse of nature, if you like, to see how healthy our environment is. butterflies have been suffering from long—term decline, three quarters of art butterflies are sadly declining, one of which is the small
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tortoiseshell which is declined by 7996 tortoiseshell which is declined by 79% since the late 70s but what we are seeing is that butterfly has had really good sprint numbers this year and we are hoping the second group which is starting to emerge now, will be absolutely bumper for the big butterfly count participants to count and record, and submit to us and if the small tortoiseshell has a good year, then that will be really fantastic for it and show it has a little bounce back. doctor zoe randall, thank you so much for your time and! randall, thank you so much for your time and i hope lots of people take pa rt time and i hope lots of people take part in the survey. thank you. it's the first night of the bbc proms on friday and things are going to be rather different to usual. the coronavirus restrictions mean audiences at home are being offered a ‘fantasy season'— with archive performances and some live concerts. a grand virtual orchestra made up of all the bbc orchestras will perform a new mash—up of beethoven's nine symphonies recorded in lockdown.
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here's our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. the 125th anniversary of the proms, and they never looked or sounded quite like this. no live concerts for the first six weeks, instead, the opening performance tonight on radio 3 is a special commission recorded during lockdown. 323 bbc musicians in their own homes combined to mark beethoven's 250th birthday. they are playing a mash up of his symphonies. accompanied by two dancers who are in a beethoven bubble. ian man was chosen to create the piece. there is an entire season, an entire proms season that has had to be replaced. so, yeah, it's a wonderful honour but not one that i was expecting to do. and, um, i have made the most of it and it's something i have enjoyed hugely and something that it hope captures a lot of the celebratory
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spirit of the proms. and the whole piece, including a nod to saturday night fever will be shown on sunday night on bbc four. from then until the august bank holiday weekend, the proms will feature reruns of archived performances. but for the final two weeks, a return to the royal albert hall and live performances from the likes of sheku kanneh—mason and nicola benedetti. for the orchestral pieces, it is not clear how many musicians will be allowed on stage. so four different programmes have to be planned for each concert. and as for the last night of the proms, it's unclear if the public will even be allowed in, singing along to land of hope and glory. at the moment, the
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audience can just hope. colin paterson, bbc news. with me is david pickard, director of the proms and the soloist soprano from the last night of this year's prom, golda scultz. very good morning to both of you. david, firstly, what you do is all about creativity, you had to be so creative about this year so tell us about what we can expect from the proms this year. as you say, we've had to think on our feet this year andi had to think on our feet this year and i lost count of the number of scenarios we've been planning since the middle of march but i think what we we re the middle of march but i think what we were all really determined to do was make sure we still had this incredible eight week celebration of music, you know, over 120 years it's been going now and we had to do it ina been going now and we had to do it in a special way so one of the wonderful things about the bbc owning and running the proms is the fa ct we owning and running the proms is the
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fact we have an amazing archive of performances we can show and for the first six weeks that is exactly what you will hear. you are starting with the archive, graduating to live performances but how difficult has it been to plan when you don't know how many musicians you might be able to get together at any one time? it's been really challenging stop we are still working on the logistics now but i'm pleased to say things are becoming a bit clearer, we've recently are becoming a bit clearer, we've rece ntly ha d are becoming a bit clearer, we've recently had guidelines from the dcms which are quite clear about the sort of social distancing we need to observe on stage, we are working to all health and safety implications andi all health and safety implications and i think now we are really pretty confident about a fantastic two weeks of concerts. you are not going to be hearing a lot of mahler and shostakovich, but we've got an amazing array of concerts and artists and great stars like golda. and nicola benedetti, like you said, will be part of the programme. and it will be such a platform for live
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music. let's talk to golda now, i know you were one of the last artists to perform live before lockdown started at the royal festival hall. now you're getting ready to perform at the last night of the proms at the royal albert hall so how are you feeling? of the proms at the royal albert hall so how are you feeling ?|j of the proms at the royal albert hall so how are you feeling? i think i probably feel a lot like sir tom ex commission mark i am excited about the opportunity and very aware that there is a gravity to this moment. and i want to be cognisant of it and also acknowledge how brave everyone in the uk has been and i wa nt everyone in the uk has been and i want to honour that. that is at the front of my mind right now, trying to be honourable and also bring joy back to the world, the way that it should be. yes, because music is about transporting people somewhere else, isn't it? how important is that at this time, i would love to
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get a thought from both of you on that. golda. i think get a thought from both of you on that. golda. ithink right get a thought from both of you on that. golda. i think right now, when we are all socially distancing, it's really difficult, even now, having to have this conversation with my laptop, basically. it's difficult to get that sense of togetherness at this moment sol get that sense of togetherness at this moment so i think what music really does is, it is so universal, regardless of language, country, continent you come from. it seeps straight to the heart of you and breaks you open and allows you to process your grief and move your way tojoy and process your grief and move your way to joy and happiness, process your grief and move your way tojoy and happiness, which i think is absolutely essential right now. but if you don't have an audience when you are performing, how difficult will that be for you?” think i'm definitely going to have to start working on my camera angles. so i might be asking you for some tips! there's a lot that has to go into it, luckily munich opera, the bavarian state opera, they did a
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series of ghost recitals and so i have a little bit of experience because i was one of the performers who got to do that. i'm just going to try and translate that into what i'm doing for the camera, but be able to work with the conductor and with an orchestra again, it's really something so special. i think even in that moment, we, as the performers, are going to be feeding off each other '5 energy and the joy we have making music together.“ off each other '5 energy and the joy we have making music together. ifi can offer you any advice, you know where to find me! david, coming back to you on the importance of music right now. we've all been looking for ways to distract ourselves, to ta ke for ways to distract ourselves, to take ourselves out of this situation that we are in. even though the proms will be different this year, it could be, i think, proms will be different this year, it could be, ithink, one proms will be different this year, it could be, i think, one of the most special? absolutely, the archive recordings that we have are absolutely phenomenal, my colleagues on radio and television have pulled out some of the most amazing moments
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and backing what golda said, music is so important to all of us and i think the other thing to remember, for many performers, they will not have played together for six months. so there may not be the audience, the frisson of the audience but i know from august is starting to get together, the emotion of simply being with your colleagues, making music live again will be very overwhelming and i'm sure that will come across very clearly when we broadcast from the royal albert hall. david and golda, thank you both are very much. good luck with the weeks ahead! thank you. thank you. time now for a look at the weather. we can get all the details from nick miller. welcome to nearly the weekend, a date started with warm sunshine for some of us, rain for others. this weather front moving south over the uk to read the next few days, reaching kent on saturday night into sunday morning.
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today it's sitting over scotland and northern ireland, cloud and outbreaks of rain, only very slowly moving its way further south. it will brighten up today across northern scotland, you may see the odd later, that weatherfront staying with outbreaks of rain, northern ireland, southern scotland, parts of northern england, especially the further north you are. south of that there will be sunny spells, humid, will become very warm for some, particularly through central and eastern parts of england, especially in south—east england. for the cricket we expect a lot of cloud around this afternoon, looks like the bulk of the rain that weather front will stay to the north. that is until we get to tomorrow we expect some rain. there will be rain heading in later this evening across north—west england overnight, feeding into north wales, parts of the midlands. some showers into northern scotland, northern ireland has clear spells, cool at night, to the south of the weather front, quite warm, quite muggy. very
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slowly moving south, splitting the weather into three zones for tomorrow the start of the weekend. breezy in scotland and northern ireland, sunny spells, you may catch a shower, northern and western scotland, to the north of northern ireland. northern england, the midlands, wales, cloud, you may see rain during the day, much of southern england into east anglia, staying dry, not as warm as today, still humid, still some warmth, temperatures heading towards the mid 20s. under part two of the weekend into sunday, heavier rain along this weather front, it into sunday, heavier rain along this weatherfront, it continues into sunday, heavier rain along this weather front, it continues very slowly southwards, by sunday bit of a change in the forecast, it may well be rain lingering into the morning across parts of south—east england. we will keep updating on that, apart from a few showers in northern scotland, elsewhere sunny spells around on sunday. all parts turning cooler. maybe the odd spot close to 20 degrees, most of us
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falling short of that later in the weekend. john maguire, bbc news, cornwall.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the nhs in england is to get £3 billion of extra funding to help it cope if there's a second wave of coronavirus this winter. they are dealing with a lot of ongoing pressures. so whilst £3 billion sounds like a lot of money, we need to be absolutely clear how and where that money is going to be spent. later, the prime minister is expected to set out the next steps on the road out of lockdown restrictions and it's known he's keen to encourage commuters to return to the workplace to help the economy recover. elsewhere, as brazil passes 2 million cases, some on the front line blame the president for playing down

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