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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 19, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: boris johnson's approach to a second lockdown: he says he doesn't want one and it won't be needed, even if there is another rise in coronavirus cases this winter. the royal wedding that took place behind closed doors — pictures are released of princess beatrice‘s ceremony on friday. the shops are open but are the customers returning? the challenge facing high streets as the uk emerges from lockdown. the student becomes the master. a double from aubameyang puts arsenal through to the fa cup final as manager mikel arteta outmanoeuvres his old mentor
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pep guardiola. sunday sunshine on the way for many parts of the uk full up rain really dragging its heels towards the south—east. all the details coming up south—east. all the details coming up here on breakfast. it's sunday the 19th ofjuly. our top story: borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph that he believes any future outbreaks can be dealt with at a local or regional level. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. this nick eardley reports. wasn't so long ago. national lockdown this wasn't so long ago. national lockdown across the uk. streets deserted. things are starting to move again but the economic and social cost of the shutdown will be
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felt for some time. so the government is desperate to avoid a repeat. speaking to the sunday telegraph, the prime minister co m pa res telegraph, the prime minister compares the idea of another national lockdown to the nuclear deterrent. something he can't abandon as an option but one he never wa nts abandon as an option but one he never wants to use. that's because the government thinks local action can work now too. in places like rochdale where locals are being told to ta ke rochdale where locals are being told to take extra precautions. limiting visitors to the house to two full stop wearing a face covering in shops before they become mandatory in england. the government has offered a light at the end of the tunnel, saying things could get back to something like normal before christmas. some of their own advisers big pre— lockdown life, hugging ourfriends, advisers big pre— lockdown life, hugging our friends, shaking advisers big pre— lockdown life, hugging ourfriends, shaking hands with people we meet, everyone going back to work, could take longer, possibly not until a vaccine is found. the government says everything is conditional and the
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virus being under control. and nobody can be certain on what happens next. —— everything is conditional on the virus being under control. buckingham palace has released the first official photographs of the wedding of princess beatrice and the property tycoon edoardo mapelli—mozzi. the private ceremony, attended by the queen and the duke of edinburgh, took place in secret at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. keith doyle has more. like thousands of couples, this was not the wedding they'd planned this summer. coronavirus meant princess beatrice‘s marriage to edoardo mapelli—mozzi was a scaled—down affair held in secret. these, the first official photographs, show it was still an elegant event with flowers completely covering the archway of the royal chapel of all saints in windsor. beatrice‘s grandparents, the queen and duke of edinburgh, were among the guests, which numbered no more than 30 to stay within the government guidelines. prince andrew did walk his daughter down the aisle,
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but he does not appear in the official photographs released. he's taken a lot of flak over the past few months ever since that newsnight interview in november last year. he's come under a lot of fire, a lot of pressure, a lot of criticism, and he probably felt that it was time to be expedient, let the focus of attention be on his daughter. it is, after all, her day. and he'd keep out of the photographs. for the ceremony, princess beatrice wore a modified vintage dress belonging to the queen. she also wore the diamond fringed tiara, which the queen wore on her own wedding day in 1947. this was the first time the royal family were together since lockdown. the queen was seen later in the day, knighting captain sir tom moore. while this was not quite a normal royal wedding, one tradition for royal brides was followed — beatrice‘s wedding bouquet was placed on the tomb of the unknown warrior in westminster abbey. keith doyle, bbc news.
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two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two groups at thorpe park, in surrey, yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency services attended. the met police has released bodycam video footage of its officers being pelted with objects as they tried to disperse crowds at an unlicensed music event. bottles, canisters and a bicycle were thrown at police as they tried to shut down the event in east london on friday night. two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested. two officers suffered minor injuries. up to 3,000 new school places are being created for children in england who have special educational needs and disabilities. the places will be in so—called free schools, which are funded directly by the government as opposed to being run by local authorities. jon donnison reports.
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under the government plans, there will be 35 new schools for children with special educational needs and disabilities. enough for 3000 pupils across england. ministers say they wa nt to across england. ministers say they want to put the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children first but campaigners who have long criticised the lack of provision for children with special educational needs day it is not enough. cautious is the word i would like to see implemented but there are, i think, more than 3000 children requiring special educational needs. the last figure was between 4000 and 5000. no timeline as to when the programme will be completed will be —— was given predicaments as a new schools will begin to open from september 2022. labour says the funding is welcome but says cuts to school budgets has put huge pressure on support for vulnerable children. the number of people with coronavirus across the world
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rose by 260,000 yesterday — that's the largest increase since the start of the pandemic, according to the world health organization. nations which saw the biggest increases include the united states, brazil, india and south africa. globally, more than 600,000 people are now known to have died from the virus. spain's catalonia region has again recorded more than 1,000 covid infections in a single day, as residents endure new restrictions. the surge led to tough new measures being announced on friday for an initial period of 15 days. people in the regional capital, barcelona, are being asked to stay indoors, and gatherings of more than 10 people are discouraged. borisjohnson has been pictured with his new son wilfred for the first time since the baby's birth. downing street released this image of the prime minister and his fiancee carrie symonds with their ii—week—old son. they were speaking via a video conference call to midwives
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who helped to deliver wilfred at london's university college hospital. iam continuing i am continuing my 2020 theme by being obsessed with haircuts and pointing out the john being obsessed with haircuts and pointing out thejohn sony and... it is quite striking. isn't it? there was a picture in the papers when he was a picture in the papers when he was born of him having a reasonable head of hairfor a newborn. it is ha rd to head of hairfor a newborn. it is hard to see when it is a newborn. from the back of the head, it is all definitely there, absolutely. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. as we've been hearing, borisjohnson has told the sunday telegraph "we will not need another national lockdown. " he's done an interview to mark his first year in office. the paper notes that mrjohnson‘s
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comments appear to place him at odds with his chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance. the sunday times front page reflects the worries around unemployment, as it reports that nearly 500 people applied for two vacancies at a pub in wimbledon, london. the newlywed princess beatrice and her husband feature on many front pages but the sunday mirror asks the question, "where's dad?", making reference to the fact the bride's father, prince andrew, is absent from the official royal photos that have been released. and the sun on sunday speaks to the uk's longest—suffering covid patient, fatima bridle, who has recovered after 130 days in hospital. i think she was in a coma on a ventilator for i think she was in a coma on a ventilatorfor more i think she was in a coma on a ventilator for more than 100 days. we arejust ventilator for more than 100 days. we are just starting to hear the sort of long—term health impact on people who had the virus. absolutely.
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we'll get the latest sport from holly shortly and hear how the professionals are getting on. but now, let's see how the world of amateur sport is looking as the lockdown restrictions continue to ease. from covid—secure football and netball to the tricky question of how to socially distance a rugby scrum, mike bushell has been to visit some grassroots teams to see how they're preparing. back to training after months without playing, the team is finally back together again. keep going, that's it, both feet, miles. whether you are nine or 69... you that's it, both feet, miles. whether you are nine or 69. .. you would that's it, both feet, miles. whether you are nine or 69... you would not believe the pleasure that we old boys get from kicking this all around. it is absolutely fantastic four. the camaraderie between us all as well. it helps you with your mental health. two i've missed it loads and it's really fun being back again. i'm happy to play again because i'm playing with my friends. but this is a far cry from what the
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hundreds of players who attend sessions at harbourtown fc used to, and that's even before they kick a ball. parents drop their children, wait there until we temperature the kids. two metres apart, they line up to have their temperature taken, we log it just to have their temperature taken, we log itjust in case we need to track act. on the pitch until now, players have only been able to pass the ball in socially distanced pods of six while keeping their drinks breaks apartand no while keeping their drinks breaks apart and no contact at all has been allowed. it is not easy for the children to recognise the distance but they are getting used to it. it's the new normal. we call it the new approach. but yesterday, the government approved the fa's plans for the next stage. from now on, tackling can take place in groups of up tackling can take place in groups of up to 30 as long as the fa guidelines are followed and competitive matches can be played from august. when the premier league came back on, it makes you want to
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play even more. coming back to training, you just want to let playing matches now. we just want to start to get some contact, some tackling and that is what they want. whatever drills and whatever we do at the moment, we have to finish with some shooting because that's they want to be doing, scoring goals. this club may have come out of hibernation but it now faces a real battle to survive because normally the clubhouse is thriving raising money with weddings, parties, sports, elite therapy class running here but it is all closed. already it is estimated this has cost the club £74,000. add to that £3000 it has cost to make this whole site covid safe. for this club going into hibernation, the bills were not coming but now we're up so now the bills to start coming and so it is that wake—up call, isn't it? it is going to be a big challenge for a lot of grassroot team clubs but
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eve ryo ne lot of grassroot team clubs but everyone is chomping at the bit to go. as they return to rod b, you have to handle the ball so it is sanitised —— rugby. it is sanitised every five minutes. there is tackling but what to do about the scrum? tackling but what to do about the scrum 7 you can't tackling but what to do about the scrum? you can't exactly socially distance in a rugby scrum. at grassroot —— grassroots clubs are keen to retain the elements that make rugby unique but it is clear they will have to be compromised to make it less of a coronavirus risk. it may involve having perhaps only lower body tackles and reducing face—to—face contact. the rf you will submit its latest proposals to the government soon.|j will submit its latest proposals to the government soon. i know they are looking at rule modification that without the contest for the ball, i don't think you are playing rugby union. if we remove everything, we might as well play something else andi might as well play something else and i think that would be dangerous. at the moment, especially with the two metre distance, how are you going to bring in tackling or any of the contact elements? for us as women i think it will be starting
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with a touch game and working our way slowly up to a full contact. there ball is also adapting. groups of six players two metres apart and here it very, greater manchester, it has so far just here it very, greater manchester, it has so farjust been here it very, greater manchester, it has so far just been fitness training without the ball. as the sport prepares to submit its next stage plans to the government for approval, teams are exacting changes. it will be a case of limit that face—to—face marking and probably more outdoor netball, less people on the court physically because we can't, in a normal game, we have a lot of people in a small space. and from the 25th ofjuly when the leisure centre start to reopen, groups of up to six will be able to book this courts as long as they follow guidance and protocols. for all these exports it is a gradual one step at a time return. with each one dependent on government approvals. it might take a while for the touch to come back but at least this is a familiar sight once more. with people back on the pitch together again. mike bushell, bbc news. mike hasn't quite
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got his eye back in, has he? but it is impressive. where there is a well there is a way for the people finding a way to continue with the sport but just finding a way to continue with the sport butjust a social distancing. there is the sense we are heading back to normality when mike is out and about doing his exporting pieces like that but until he is wearing his speedos on the back of a shetland pony... this is it. that is normal to us, isn't it? breakfast weekend normal. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. this is a shot outside our offices in salford. a beautiful morning contrasting with what it was like last night, chris. it was pouring down and there was no test cricket. but there will be today. let us checkin but there will be today. let us check in with ben. good morning, ben. hello nina, hello chris. a much better day on the cards, certainly for the cricket at old trafford today. i wanted to showers you this shot first of all from a weather watch out and about in northern
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scotla nd watch out and about in northern scotland very, very early in the morning at about one a.m.. at this time of year, it doesn't really get darkin time of year, it doesn't really get dark in northern scotland. clear skies overhead. it bodes well for a clear day. sunny spells and showers here and there as well. one exception to that theme, that's towards the south and east of england, because on the satellite picture you can see this stripe of cloud, a weather front that has been plaguing us all weekend, dragging its heels slowly sliding south—east was bringing outbreaks of rain this morning across east anglia through the london area, down towards the south—west. quite misty and murky for some spots in the south—west at the moment as well. e—mail to start across the south—eastern corner. much of wales, northern england, northern ireland office way dry and sunny start, sunny skies a —— sent across scotland. you can see showers is getting going up towards the north—west. not as windy as it was yesterday in the northern parts of scotland. as we go through today, we
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will still see some showers pushing in across scotland, most plentiful across the far north. 0ne in across scotland, most plentiful across the far north. one or two into northern ireland and the far north of england. it is generally a sunny story. across the far south—east this weather front will continue to linger, cloud and spots of rain. a fairly fresh day for many of rain. a fairly fresh day for many of us. towards wales in the south—west. here is confirmation of a much better day. especially for the cricket. good spells of sunshine, temperature 17—18. they should be a whole day's play. as we go through tonight we will finally lose that weather front from the south—east stop looking a dry weather with clear spells, a few showers pushing in across scotland. everyone want to enter north—west england late in the note. if fairly cool night as well. temperatures evenin cool night as well. temperatures even in the towns and cities on the low side of the town at the time of year. 0ut low side of the town at the time of year. out in the countryside well down into single digits. we go on into tomorrow. for many it is a fine —looking day with spells of
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sunshine. the further north you are, northern england, northern ireland, particularly scotland there will be showers at times. quite a fewjobs across northern scotland. again, relatively cool for the time of year, 14—22 —— showers. as we look deeper into the new week, high pressure holding on for most of us as we head on into tuesday. still a lot of dry weather around. a frontal system approaching from the west. mixed prospects really through the week ahead. it turns a little warmer for a time down towards the south. the further north and west you are, the chance of seeing cloud and rain at times. for most of us, sunday sunshine on the times. chris and nina, back to you. that round-up of the cities around the uk has a bit of everything on it. laughter. good news for the second test. see you later on. see you later. time now for some movie recommendations. let's take a look at this week's
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film review with mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode — rounding up the best movies available for viewing in the home. the standout home cinema release this week is clemency — a haunting death row drama from writer/director chinonye chukwu — with an astonishing central performance by alfre woodard. four hours from the execution, all communication with outside parties will cease, that includes miss lumetta, friends, family members, but you can be with the chaplain the entire day — all the way through the procedure. you will have to take your clothes off, wear the shirt, the pants and shoes issued to you.
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when it's time for the procedure, you will be walked to the chamber. woodard plays bernadine williams, warden at a maximum—security prison who prides herself on treating her inmates with dignity as they move through incarceration to whatever awaits — whether that be freedom or death. do you have any family that would like to claim your body? yet despite the professional facade, bernadine has doubts about herjob, accentuated when a botched procedure reveals the true horror of execution. how do you keep doing it? i do myjob. you've given me hope. meanwhile, anthony woods, played by aldis hodge is running out of time after 15 years on death row. his lawyer, played by richard schiff, has uncovered plentiful evidence throwing doubt out on his conviction for murder. but hope of a reprieve is still fading, leaving both jailed and jailer facing a terrible end.
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i can't do this on my own any more. that sense of the toll the death penalty takes on all whom touches runs throughout chukwu's intelligent drama, in which everyone is at the end of their tether — from the warden to the lawyer to the prison chaplain — all of whom seem to be experiencing a form of collective ptsd. i don't see how it's going to work — living with an empty shell of a wife. at the centre of it all is woodard, who conveys so much about her character's history and situation through her stance and stoicism, the modulation of her voice, even the rhythm of her breath. applause too to hodge, who memorises as the inmate facing death, even as new life presents itself — albeit at a distance. i'm here now with you. beautifully lensed by eric branco, and evocatively scored by the greats catherine bostic, this is a powerful thoughtful piece of cinema,
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taken to the next level by the sheer calibre of its performances. you can find it on curzon home cinema or on the bohemian media platform — where viewers can also choose to donate half of the revenue to a participating cinema, charity or film collective of their choosing. in the early 19305, luis bunuel who garnered praise and outrage alike with large door directed one of the strangest pseudo—documentaries ever filmed— los hurdes — or land without bread — a brutal portrait of life in one of the poorest regions of spain. now with bunuel in the labyrinth of the turtles, available on bf iplayer, salvador has made an equally strange animated feature about the creation of las hurdes —
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which similarly defies categorisation. adapted from a graphic novel by furmen sarris, the film centres on the friendship between the artist and friend who agreed to finance the movie if he won the lottery, which he promptly did. unable to control bunuel‘s increasingly outrageous creative urges, he finds himself questioning the entire nature of the project — in which he has invested time, money and most importantly, trust. manuel galiana — who served as animation director on the brilliant chico and rita once again works simple wonders with the visuals, which are starkly intercut with live—action footage from this film. be warned, orchestrated animal
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suffering and death is a recurrent feature of las hurdes, and he does not shy away from this unpalatable truth. act really cool, just act cool. i've got two... ..persons with disabilities. ..persons with disabilities and a blind guy. excuse me, it's visually impaired. visually impaired gentlemen. which one of you is driving? it's sort of a team effort. back in 2007, bbc film, for one night only, told the story of asta philpot who was born with arthrogryposis and who travelled to a legal brothel in spain to lose his virginity. philpot‘s story has since inspired several feature films, the award—winning 2011 belgian pick hasta la vista, the 2016 dutch film, adios amigos, and now a third incarnation, come as you are, an american version of the same story which is available to rent from several premium platforms. seriously, toss it out the window, they can track us.
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boe, you too. did he just throw his phone out? i'm not throwing my phone out. grant rosen meyer, hayden zito and ravi patel are scotty, matt and moe, the trio who arrange a road trip to montreal against the wishes of parents and carers who still treat them as children. my sim card, i threw out my sim card. so stupid. driving the bus is sam, engagingly played by gabourey sidibe who was 0scar nominated in 2010 for a breakthrough role in precious. i'm not your mama, i'm not your girlfriend, and as long as you are 100% honest with me, we are good. let's get in the van. come as you are clearly has a both an impressive pedigree and a sturdy story, which is refreshingly funny, frank and fearless on the subject of the sexual needs and rights of the disabled. it's no surprise that reviews are being filled with phrases like "feel—good" and "heart—warming". but it's also not surprising that the film has attracted criticism for failing to cast actors with disabilities in the lead roles. rosen meyer — who stars and also produces —
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insists that logistics limited their opportunities, while director richard wong asserts that the film's message was so positive, it was worth any backlash. it's true that some of the smaller roles do feature actors with disabilities, including philpot himself, who makes a cameo appearance as indeed he did in the 2011 film. come as you are. it's also true that come as you are, which is both entertaining and touching is a rare example of a mainstream sex comedy that doesn't fit cookie—cutter mould. but in an age where movies as varied as my feral heart, peanut butter falcon, and even the current release, ride like a girl, are proving the positive power of diverse casting. it's a real shame that come as you are wasn't able to follow their lead. kat malone, jane berman, power cords music management, we are on the list. not on the list.
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you're incompetent. you call yourself a pa and you can't even remember to phone and get my name on the list? what? you heard me come you skinny—legged goggle—eyed berger brain reject. you're fired. harsh. don't even bother coming into work tomorrow? miss malone, i found your name. kat malone, plus one. my mistake. one of the surprise treats of 2018 was anna and the apocalypse, a christmas zombie musical, yes, really. boasting a star making central performance by ella hunt. i'm kat malone, a music scout, why don't you and i grab a seat and talk management. hunt takes the title role again in kat and the band a sweet—natured hannah montana—style fantasy in which our heroine as a schoolgirl by day, aspiring rock manager by night. roles which must be kept separate and secret. dollar days are the band with whom kat hopes to make her mark, unhindered by the fact that
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she's in the middle of her mocks and has zero experience of organising a gig, let alone a tour. a warm welcome to dollar days! thank heavens the band members include actual rock star, duggee pointer, the bassist of mcfly, who, regular viewers will remember costarred in the silly horror thriller, the host, which came out on digital back in april. we've gone viral! this is altogether more enjoyable, just don't go expecting a hard—hitting behind the scenes expose. it's essentially a teen fairy tale in doc martens, buoyed up by hunt's likeable presence of, accompanied by the tunes of some velvet morning, and even posting a cameo by badly drawn boy, as an unlikely knight in shining armour. thank you so much for the. no worries, my pleasure. it's available on a range of platforms now. we've died and gone to heaven, boys.
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man, you kidding me, look at this. this place is bigger than roseland. it's bigger than my whole neighbourhood in queens. all of us brings us to ghosts of war, a horror war movie hybrid with one of the most audaciously silly late in the day plot twists of recent memory. don't worry, i'm not going to spoil it for you. suffice to say that while silence may be required of an audience in a cinema, watching this at home, it's perfectly acceptable to go, "what?" we open in the later stages of world war ii, where billy zane makes a suspiciously brief cameo before a group of american soldiers take command of an eerie mansion. so what's wrong with the joint? i mean, if this place like coney island, what is the rush? what evil forces are at work here? apart from the obvious evil forces of the nazis and world war ii, and what was all that stuff with billy zane? ghosts of war is written and directed by eric bress, whose previous credits include the butterfly effect, which should give you some idea of where this is all going. it's a strange mix of the quite
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creepy and the utterly ridiculous, like an extended edition of the twilight zone, longer yet somehow less substantial. if you leave, you die! that's it for this week, thanks for watching the film review, stay safe, and i will be back next week with more home viewing treats. 0k, you've got this. and need you to hit the easy brake, easy brake in a little bit more, little bit more. harder. harder, harder! stop! what are you blind? hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown
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will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph he thinks any future outbreaks can be dealt with at a local or regional level. he compared the idea of another national lockdown to the "nuclear deterrent" — a tool he would not wish to abandon, but one he has no wish to use. two official photographs marking the wedding of princess beatrice and the italian count, edoardo mapelli—mozzi, have been released by buckingham palace. 0ne image shows the couple leaving the private ceremony at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. another shows them standing alongside — but still two metres from — the queen and the duke of edinburgh. the palace chose not to release a picture showing the bride's parents, the duke and duchess of york. two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two
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groups at thorpe park, in surrey, yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency services attended. spain's catalonia region has again recorded more than 1,000 covid infections in a single day, as residents endure new restrictions. the surge led to tough new measures being announced on friday for an initial period of 15 days. people in the regional capital, barcelona, are being asked to stay indoors, and gatherings of more than ten people are discouraged. checking in with holly now with all the latest on the fa cup. is not the fa cup like we normally see it. we are normally used to the huge crowds and the ten —— ten foil cups. i will say one thing about arsenal... arsenal love the fa cup. they've won it more than any other team, but their 2—0 victory over manchester city last night was probably even sweeter for manager mikel arteta —
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beating his old mentor pep guardiola — remember arteta only left hisjob as pep's assistant manager at the end of last year and now he has a chance to mark his first season in charge with some major silverware. jim lumsden reports. it is wembley but not as we know it. 90,000 seats all empty. fans replaced by banners. city didn't mind, a good week so farfor them. the champions league overturned and still two cups to play for. arsenal still two cups to play for. arsenal still reeling from the defeat to liverpool, saw most of the ball for three quarters of an hour before aubameyang found a way through. the gunners were calling the shots, coming close to making it two. all of which gave pep plenty to ponder. his four number two now in the other dugout, was taking a leaf out of his
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—— book. the holders may be finding their feet. city were unbeaten in their feet. city were unbeaten in their last five visits to wembley and it would have been level but for the fingal —— fingers of megabits martinez. sterling had an opportunity, didn't seem to know much about it. city pounded away at arsenal but suddenly on the counter—attack, they were further behind as aubameyang struck again. 2-0 it behind as aubameyang struck again. 2—0 it remained as a superb performance from arsenal took them to 21st performance from arsenal took them to zist fa performance from arsenal took them to 21st fa cup final. so asjim says, they are into the 21st fa cup final. and all in all they're having a pretty good week — after last night's win and then beating liverpool in the league on wednesday. we had an incredible week to beat the best two teams in europe in three days is something that doesn't happen in every day. credit to the players the way they are fighting, believing and the chemistry that they have generating between them to
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go through difficult members —— moments in the game to score the way we scored today. the only regret is we didn't play the first half but we played the second. in that way we lost. it happens, it is football. mistakes in front of the ball when you have chances, it is bad but today it was not that, the reason why we didn't win. we didn't play good in the first half and in these games you don't have time. so arsenal will face either manchester united or chelsea — that semi final takes place this evening. united go into that game having already beaten them three times this season. both united and chelsea also have their sights set on champions league qualification, with 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s side in fifth place, butjust a point behind the third placed blues. this is a great chance to get to the final. just one step away at wembley
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so we are focused on the fa cup and a trophy of course that is massive for any player to win and any team to win so that is our main focus now, to get to the final. then we will look at west ham and leicester after that. of course it feels we are in a slightly different position because the circumstances of the season but we have an opportunity and it is up to the players and ourselves to make the best of it on sunday but we are playing a very good team, we know that, they are in good form. whoever will await us in the final will be a very good team so the work is to be done. well, tonight's semi final between manchester united and chelsea at wembley kicks—off at 6:00. it's live on bbc one and radio 5live with coverage beginning at 5:30. just one game in the premier league yesterday as norwich's miserable end to the season continued. already relegated, the league's bottom club lost their penultimate match of the season 2—0 against burnley — and had two men sent off.
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burnley‘s second a moment to forget for norwich defender ben godfrey — he will not want to see that again. nobody needs an own goal after the season they have had, too. and after all of friday's excitement for leeds united — being promoted to the premier league next season — they were officially handed the championship title after brentford slipped up at stoke yesterday. brentford's defeat meant they wasted the chance to move into the second automatic place. they stay third, a point behind west brom with one game to go. no time for celebrations for leeds yet — they face derby later. some formula 1 to look forward to later as well, with lewis hamilton starting on pole at the hungarian grand prix, as he looks to claim his seventh victory there. it was another masterclass for hamilton during qualifying. mercedes were miles ahead of everyone else — but the six time world champion finished just ahead of teammate valtteri bottas.
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it's the 90th pole of his career — hamilton admitting himself that that requires nothing less than perfection. thankful to everyone back home and the guys here that do such an amazing job and valtteri bottas doesn't make it easy for me at all. it requires absolute perfection when it comes to doing laps and qualifying like that, is one of the things i enjoy most. so modest, isn't he? better weather is forecast for today's fourth day of the 2nd test between england and west indies after yesterday's play was abandoned without a ball being bowled. it's a race against time for england as they try to square the 3 match series at old trafford. west indies will return to the crease 32—1 in reply to the hosts' first innings total of 469. england's danny willett is six shots off the lead going into the final day
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of the memorial tournament. the 2016 masters winner came back from a poor start to finish strongly and put him in contention in ohio. the spaniard jon rahm has a four shot lead on 12 under. that does mean for him, he will become the new world number one if he wins in ohio and if rory mcilroy doesn't place runner—up. based on rory mcilroy‘s performance at the moment, it is unlikely to happen. it is interesting watching some of these sports men and women at the moment struggle without any crowds. it has had an impact on rory mcilroy, tiger woods. i don't have that problem. for me i am better without an audience was top i think you are better with or without the stop for somebody who is married to a note city fan, it doesn't seem releva nt. a note city fan, it doesn't seem relevant. -- norwich city.
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we've been hearing this morning about the prime minister's vow to get all kinds of businesses back to some kind of normality. but what does that mean — in practice — for our high streets? the retail and hospitality sectors have been among the worst affected by the pandemic. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been finding out how some shops and pubs are trying to stay afloat. nostalgia is a key part of this business. it is rhubarb and custard sherbet lemons. they are the top favourites. since reopening their sweet shop in milton keynes. scott and his mum gillian have often found themselves looking back fondly to themselves looking back fondly to the good old days, pre— pandemic. themselves looking back fondly to the good old days, pre- pandemic. we area mile the good old days, pre- pandemic. we are a mile away from where we used to be. it is nowhere near as busy and the footfall in this shopping centre itself is, i think it was down 30%. we would get quite a lot of staff that work in the shopping
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centre coming in on their lunch brea ks to centre coming in on their lunch breaks to get themselves some sweets or to take some home for their family so obviously that has impacted us quite a lot. they have launched a website so suites can be delivered. they noticed changes in customer behaviour. the customers that are coming in are spending more and although our footfall is done within the shop, now spend, their spend is up. why is that happening, do you think? i think people are coming in and thinking, well, i don't want to come in again this week so i will buy it all now and i won't come in later. 0r week so i will buy it all now and i won't come in later. or perhaps they have been part —— deprived of sweets for 12 weeks! the average spend per customer is up about 18%. has that been enough to offset the reduction? nowhere near, no. it has been incredibly worrying. this business was set up in 1989 but has become a shop of two halves. 0n was set up in 1989 but has become a shop of two halves. on this side of the shop, we tend to have all of our occasion wear. people would normally buy it for some of the parties, but
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this year, they have all been cancelled. most weddings are cancelled, people are buying far more casual clothes. more lower price points. and things they can get some everyday wear out of it. dresses like this, £45 price point, has sold really well. these coverings are already compulsory in shops in scotland. from friday, they will become mandatory while visiting shops in england as well. like most shopkeepers, we all have a written off making any money this year. shopping in shops for some people is just too much. i have had one customer asked me to stand outside the shop while she had a look. i think this is going to be the ha rd est think this is going to be the hardest thing we've had to get through. down the road at the six bells pub, it has all changed. that was just one bells pub, it has all changed. that wasjust one big car park. we have remodelled that and added about 70 odd seats to basically make up for the space we had inside, we are now
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totally outside was that we have had totally outside was that we have had to shorten menus, restrict the amount of drinks just to make things quicker and easierfor amount of drinks just to make things quicker and easier for ourselves. for the first, i would say, the first four weeks were really tough from a mental health point of view as well, myself and my whole family, who struggled to see the light at the end of the tunnel. when we get into 0ctober — november, when it sta rts into 0ctober — november, when it starts turning cold, rainy, et cetera, will people be willing to sit outside in the car park and have a drink? i'm not too sure. sean opens —— owned three other pubs nearby. they are very small and never made for a socially distanced world was not our business is based on an 80% capacity as a minimum. when we were suddenly at 20 or 30 or in some cases zero, there is no business. high streets may be filling up once more. trading conditions remain incredibly tough stop tim muffett, bbc news. there is a story on the front page of the times this morning to a pub
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in wimbledon, south—west london, posted an advert for a £9 per hour job and got, guess how many applicants? hundreds? 484. it shows just how many people are out there looking for work at the moment. just how many people are out there looking for work at the momentm are those kinds of stories which really ram home statistics stop we have heard from the offices of statistics, vacancies being at a record low and lots of people looking for work but when you hear the kind of reality of people looking for work like that and how... i mean, iwonder how looking for work like that and how... i mean, i wonder how many applications they normally get stop half a dozen or something? he says usually about 24 top job they can says there has been an increase in the number of searches for supermarket roles compared to this time last year. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. good morning she was well. this was the sunrise
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for a weather watch in north yorkshire. —— good morning to you as well. it bodes well for a fine day in most places with spells of sunshine. there will be showers around but there is an exception to that rule and it comes because of a weather front that has really been with us all weekend long, this stripe of cloud here on the satellite picture. instead of bearing fruit it has been wriggling around across our shores and are still hanging around down towards the south and east of the uk, still bringing outbreaks of rain this morning. a cloudy and damp start in east anglia to the london area. quite mist mchugh christie south—west as well. a warm, muggy start here. for wales, south—west as well. a warm, muggy start here. forwales, binta northern england, northern ireland, a fine start with blue skies and sunshine. sunnis goes into scotland as well but showers is getting going across the north and west of scotland. not quite as windy here as it was yesterday. as we go through the day, we will continue to see showers pushing in across scotland. we could get one or two into northern ireland and the far north of england. all the while we keep
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our benefits are down the south—east, tasers likely south—west and anglia will start to brighten up but this —— far south—east of england likely to stay cloudy and damp all day long. temperatures lower than they have been in the south. 21 for cardiff and plymouth. further north cooler and fresher than that. at least at the cricket at old trafford today it is a much better day after yesterday's wash out. looking at largely dry conditions with spells of sunshine, temperatures up to 17— 18 degrees. as we go through the evening we finally lose that weather front from the south—east. clear starry skies overhead. a few showers blowing in across the north—west of scotland, maybe one or two enter north—west england as well. a fairly cool night, temperatures in towns and cities 8— 10 degrees. in the countryside it could be a few degrees lower than that. medical start to monday morning, but a fine looking day for most with spells of sunshine. through northern england, northern ireland and particularly scotland, we will see showers, quite a few across the far north of
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scotland. the temperatures just a touch below where we expect them to be at this time of year in many areas. 17 in glasgow, a high of 22 in london. as we look further ahead through the coming week, high pressure stays with us, most of us anyway, as we move out of muggy into tuesday, that means more fine weather, showers in the north. behind me there is a frontal system, that will introduce some rain in northern and western parts of the uk, particularly, as we had through the middle part of the week. further south stays predominantly dry and it will turn warmer as well. a mixed bag through the week ahead. most of us will see some sunday sunshine. chris and nina. that will do for us. thank you, ben. a quick cherry briefing. from the mail on sunday, cherry news. cheery news for cherry lovers. i miss read it. he is your cherry briefing. all the things you need to know about cherries.
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basically there are lots of them this year, cold winter followed by the lovely weather during is good forjuicy, flavoursome cherries, so there is a bumper crop of british cherries. i was thinking they were being imported. they normally are, from south africa. this year we are managing to exploit them. hong kong is apparently a big export market. cherries are unlike the vast majority of fruits because they contain melatonin which helps your sleep—wake cycle. contain melatonin which helps your sleep—wa ke cycle. there contain melatonin which helps your sleep—wake cycle. there are a number of types of cherry. i never! we used to have cherry trees up and down the country until the second world war, i was reading. more fascinating previews. mangoes, pineapples, let us take a look at click.
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hey, welcome to click and wear a mask. that's the advice you are given, just do it, it's not a problem. in fact in some part of the world it is just the norm anyway. so do it. hey, lara. hello. i hope you have been bending the metal bit over your nose, now i know about it seems really obvious. absolutely right and i didn't know that, until recently, and it does help it to sit in place so it is very useful information. it does help but it still doesn't fit perfectly although i may have a solution for that later in the programme. it has been a busy week in the world of tech. the uk government has decided to remove all of huawei's 5g kit from the country by 2027. this is a decision with political ramifications and it will also likely delay the rollout of 5g here by two or three years. huawei says the move was bad news for anyone in the uk with a mobile phone. now because the e3 videogames mega trade show was cancelled this year, games companies have been
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doing their launches at online events instead. and last week saw one of the biggest online showcases, the ubisoft forward event but it coincided with three of the company's executives having to resign over an investigation into sexual misconduct. for years the gaming world has been overshadowed by examples of abuse and toxic behaviour. and we report now on how it is not just the pandemic disrupting the videogames industry. games megapublisher ubisoft is currently mired in an abuse scandal centred around its studios. the company put out a tweet before its latest online showcase, acknowledging that it would not be addressing these issues during its event. more on this later. at the event itself, the company did reveal the casting
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of giancarlo esposito, of breaking bad and better call saul fame, as the villain in the latest far cry title. esposito has been cast as a dictator called anton castillo, the ruler of a fictious island in the first—person shooter far cry 6. the player assumes the role of a guerilla fighter attempting to take down the dictator and his government from the island's jungles to the streets of its capital city. i spoke with the actor about donning a performance capture rig to create a villain who is more than a scenery—chewing end of level boss. you have played several characters in recent years who had a quiet menace about them. did you bring that to this game or did you go in a different direction? i always believe that quiet menaces and a reflective menace is the most frightening menace. so you doubt me. he is a dictator, so that whole word, ‘to dictate', the word itself doesn't give us
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the energy of someone who is kind and gentle. are you a monster? good art often makes us think about our world and what is going on in our own lives. do you think this game has the potential to affect the player in that way? oh, my goodness! what a great question. i do. i feel like this storyline is really powerful and without giving anything away it is about relationships. father and son. everything ifeel like i do has some sort of social imprint. my guess is that some of the stuff i thank god that i have been involved with, such as better call saul, the show i do, and breaking bad, godfather of harlem, those statements are in these projects. and there is certainly a statement you can find in this game. what did you think of the virtual version of you created for the game? i was blown away.
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i sat there amazed. i argued, told them they were full of garbage! if that is me, why not just film me?! we all go boom. we are yet to see any gameplay but the title is slated for release in february 2021. the online showcase also got us a glimpse of hyper scape, another addition to the growing ranks of battle royale multiplayer shooters. as well as bringing us actual gameplay from the viking—themed assassin's creed: valhalla and watch dogs: legion, demonstrating its key gameplay feature — the ability to recruit and play as any characters encountered on the streets of this near future dystopian london. but recent real—world events at ubisoft have cast a shadow over the compa ny‘s activities.
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over the past couple of weeks, many women and other people working in the games industry have come forward with stories about workplace bullying or harassment and that runs the gamut from toxic workplace culture right through to sexual harassment and quite early in this wave, ubisoft‘s name started coming up again and again. this has led to dismissals and resignation with two senior executives resigning and a third leaving their postjust before last weekend's showcase. ubisoft gave us this comment. these recent claims describe workplace behaviours that are simply unacceptable. we do not and will not tolerate abuse, harassment or discrimination ofany kind. upon learning of these allegations we immediately launched independent investigations and have already announced a series of measures aimed at driving profound changes within the company as well as several significant personnel changes. the problem with a lot of creative industries,
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not just games, is where you have superstar creative people who are seen as untouchable and indispensable to their companies and sometimes that can create an environment in which those people feel they can get away with anything. ubisoft is not the only publisher with workplace problems. last year riot games came into the spotlight. there was a lawsuit launched against them by ex—employees alleging sexist discrimination at that workplace. the cause ripples throughout the game industry. as we approach the next console generation and videogames achieve ever greater technical and artistic heights, it seems the games industry still has work to do with how it conducts its affairs in the real world. now i don't know about you, but as face coverings are becoming a normal part of life, i have struggled to find one that fits and stays on. this slides off my nose, this one is baggy around the ears.
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so could a personalised 3d printed one like this be the solution? out of the covid we have seen a few companies coming up with 3d printed solutions but one common problem we find is that these masks are not customised so they are a universal size and shape. not these however. this imperial college london research project re—purposes custom—fit 3d printed masks, a concept they were originally working on for people suffering with sleep apnoea. now they hope to create perfect fitting respirators at a time when it seems we could be wearing them a lot. and all you need to get started is a smart phone. first i need to do is scan my face. there are a couple of i0s apps that seem to work to do this. the first is scandy pro. i'm going to have
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to hold very still. although it was a little fiddly to get the image right, i'm told that this app is especially accurate. there is also bellus3d which i thought was simpler to use and virtual me did look pretty realistic. i guess i'll just find out how the mask fits when it actually arrives. currently you do need an iphone 10 or above to carry out this process but alternatives are being looked into, including some for android users. job done. you then upload your scan to the mensura mask website. specially—created code is used to extract the necessary data and that is sent to autodesk‘s fusion 360 platform to tweak and rebuild the model to fit your face. this should provide you with a free file of your mask to print. now assuming you do not have a 3d printer in your living room, there are plenty of companies out
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there that can print it for you at the cost of around a fiver. but while we might all like a better—fitting mask that does not steam up our glasses, the real aim of this project is a much bigger picture. right now, the masks that you can wear are just as good as a face covering if not better. but as we get better, as we get the technology more mature, we will go through the certification process to check that the materials are safe and check the filters work properly. of course, the outcome of each individual mask will notjust depend on an accurate scan but also the quality of the 3d printing. so the mask has arrived. can we have the grand unveiling?
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ta—da! wow! that is quite space age, actually. how does it feel? how does it fit? it definitely fits well. i can feel it is absolutely moulded to my face and i think it would be ok with glasses, no steaming up. but bizarrely, my ears keep popping. i can tell it is really airtight because your voice hardly makes it out of the mask. can you breathe? that is a filter in the end, isn't it? it is and these filters need changing every day but they are standard ones you can buy online and the whole mask can be fully disinfected. is it comfortable? it certainly fitjust right and the edges do feel quite soft so i think if i worked in a job where i had to wear this all day then i could see the benefit. but it does feel a little over the top to just go and buy some groceries. and that is it for the shortcut of click this week. in the full—length version there is also a fascinating look at facebook‘s attempt to clean up its act. that is available right now on iplayer. as ever you can keep up with the team throughout the week on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at bbcclick. thank you for watching.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today: boris johnson's approach to a second lockdown: he says he doesn't want one and it won't be needed, even if there is another rise in coronavirus cases this winter. the royal wedding that took place behind closed doors: pictures are released of princess beatrice's ceremony on friday.
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the student becomes the master: a double from aubameyang puts arsenal through to the fa cup final as manager mikel arteta outmanoeuvres his old mentor pep guardiola. as the summer holidays begin for many, we're live with some of the growing number of people choosing to spend a staycation under canvas this summer. good morning. sunday sunshine on the way for many parts of the uk. as few showers in the north and some cloud and rain really dragging its hills towards the south—east. i will have all the details coming up here on brea kfast. it's sundayjuly 19. good morning. our top story: borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph that he believes any future outbreaks can be dealt
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with at a local or regional level. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in our london newsroom. jessica, borisjohnson is sounding more positive than his chief scientific adviser did on friday. yes, i think people have an eagle eye at the moment for what boris johnson is saying versus what some leading scientists are saying, and you are talking about some of the comments made by the chief scientific advisor on friday. he talked about how we are moving to this phase of local measures to tackle local outbreaks, but he also said as we head into winter and we know respiratory viruses can thrive in the colder months, there is a risk national measures could be needed as well. that is the contrast. i think the fact that borisjohnson doesn't contrast. i think the fact that boris johnson doesn't want another national lockdown is already well known, the huge gust of the economy and the huge gust to the treasury as
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well, not to mention the as yet fully known impacts of mental hills backlog in the nhs. in likening it toa backlog in the nhs. in likening it to a nuclear deterrence, i think the prime minister making it pretty clear how much he doesn't want to go back to any kind of national lockdown, saying as well that he doesn't think we will be in that position. worth mentioning scotland, wales, northern ireland have their own powers and can go their own way. it comes a day after councils in england were handed new powers to target local outbreaks. ministers are being handed even greater powers over the coming weeks and it comes as well as there will be more muggy going into the nhs and expanded test and trace programme, and expanded flu vaccine programme. this is the way the government hopes to move forward as we head into the autumn and winter. as we know, of course with coronavirus, yes, they may hope to avoid another national lockdown, but nothing is certain. shall we do a spot of air analysis? it is my new obsession for 2020. we have a new
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image of the latest addition to the johnson groom. yes, it is there on the front of the sunday telegraph. dorisjohnson the front of the sunday telegraph. doris johnson with the front of the sunday telegraph. dorisjohnson with carrie symons and baby. i think it is oppressed time he has been pictured with this new baby who was born 11 weeks ago. it was you who coined the phrase that boris johnson's new sun was you who coined the phrase that borisjohnson's new sun had a john sunny and head of air, borisjohnson's new sun had a john sunny and head ofair, a borisjohnson's new sun had a john sunny and head of air, a blonde mop ofair. sunny and head of air, a blonde mop of air. you can see the little ba by‘s of air. you can see the little baby's face, we know from the picture borisjohnson baby's face, we know from the picture boris johnson and baby's face, we know from the picture borisjohnson and carrie symons were taking part in a video call with the midwives who looked after them when the baby was born. a nice picture there. top follicle analysis. we will speak to you later on! cherries, babies haircuts... we have it all this morning. buckingham palace has released the first official photographs of the wedding of princess beatrice and italian count edoardo mapelli—mozzi. the private ceremony,
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attended by the queen and the duke of edinburgh, took place in secret at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. keith doyle has more. like thousands of couples, this was not the wedding they'd planned this summer. coronavirus meant princess beatrice's marriage to edoardo mapelli—mozzi was a scaled—down affair held in secret. these, the first official photographs, show it was still an elegant event with flowers completely covering the archway of the royal chapel of all saints in windsor. beatrice's grandparents, the queen and duke of edinburgh, were among the guests, which numbered no more than 30 to stay within the government guidelines. prince andrew did walk his daughter down the aisle, but he does not appear in the official photographs released. he's taken a lot of flak over the past few months ever since that newsnight interview in november last year. he's come under a lot of fire, a lot of pressure, a lot of criticism, and he probably felt that it was time to be expedient, let the focus
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of attention be on his daughter. it is, after all, her day. and he'd keep out of the photographs. for the ceremony, princess beatrice wore a modified vintage dress belonging to the queen. she also wore the diamond fringed tiara, which the queen wore on her own wedding day in 1947. this was the first time the royal family were together since lockdown. the queen was seen later in the day, knighting captain sir tom moore. while this was not quite a normal royal wedding, one tradition for royal brides was followed — beatrice's wedding bouquet was placed on the tomb of the unknown warrior in westminster abbey. keith doyle, bbc news. two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two groups at thorpe park in surrey yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency
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services attended. the metropolitan police has released bodycam video footage of its officers being pelted with objects as they tried to disperse crowds at an unlicensed music event. bottles, canisters and a bicycle were thrown at police as they tried to shut down the event in east london on friday night. two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested. two officers suffered minor injuries. up to 3,000 new school places are being created for children in england who have special educational needs and disabilities. the places will be in so—called "free schools", which are funded directly by the government as opposed to being run by local authorities. jon donnison reports. under the government plans, there will be 35 new schools for children with special educational needs and disabilities — enough for 3,000 pupils across england. ministers say they want to put
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the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children first. but campaigners who've long criticised the lack of provision for children with special educational needs say it's not enough. cautious is the word i'd like to see implemented, but there are, i think, more than 3,000 children requiring special educational needs. the last figure was between 4,000 and 5,000. no timeline as to when the programme will be completed was given, but the government says the new schools will start to open from september 2022. labour says the funding is welcome but says cuts to school budgets have put huge pressure on support for vulnerable children. jon donnison, bbc news. spain's catalonia region has again recorded more than 1,000 covid infections in a single day. the surge led to tough new measures being announced on friday for an initial period of 15 days. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee joins us from brussels. gavin, this is bad news for catalonia and, potentially, for anyone who might be
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planning to visit that area. yes, across spain, in the last weeks they have had 150 separate clusters, localised outbreaks. there are two bad ones where they put areas in lockdown in the basque country, on the coast, and 150 miles, just outside by those places in lockdown. because of the spread in the last few days, to give you a sense of the numbers for the whole of spain back on wednesday, there were just over 300 cases of covid—19 in 24 hours. by 300 cases of covid—19 in 24 hours. by thursday, 580 across spain. yesterday, more than 1000 casesjust for the catalonia region alone, and here in brussels the spanish prime minister is talking of the coronavirus recovery fund, discussing with the french president to shut the spanish french border. that is a possibility. all those
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people in and around barcelona, around 4 million people are being told for the next ten days to stay indoors, do your shopping indoors. they have close to gyms, cinemas, nightclubs. they are not closing bars and nightclubs. they are not closing bars a nd restau ra nts nightclubs. they are not closing bars and restaurants at this stage. but given the speed and scale, this appears to be a second spike, certainly in catalonia, these are the highest figure since may, it is an increasing possibility. tourists have started to go back, the main strips of barcelona we are seeing bigger numbers. it isjust strips of barcelona we are seeing bigger numbers. it is just as the tourist season is getting going again. different motions adopting different measures to contain the virus, borders being used. eu leaders are trying to come to an agreement over the coronavirus recovery fund for member states. how's that looking? this is a longer term prospect of how do you deal with the fact that across europe there will be a massive recession for those countries, many are already in a recession, and behind me they are
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trying to work out the recovery fund, 750 billion euros. the next budget for the eu which is more than a trillion, or countries are to put more money in their coffers. there was a walkout, a snappy breakout according to the prime minister, they walked out, saying get this done quickly. they have talked for 24 hours, more than two series of game of thrones for example. let's see what happens today. a tense day ahead. impressive stuff when you can make a game of thrones reference. it's the start of the summer holidays for most children in england and wales this week, but many families won't be travelling abroad this year for obvious reasons. no, it isjust not an option no, it is just not an option for many. so it's no wonder that many uk campsites have seen a surge in bookings. 0ne company, pitchup.com. says it's dealing with double the number of enquiries compared
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to last year. hardly surprising, is it? 0ur reporter adam mcclean is at a "glamping" site in wirral. good morning to you. good morning. i will keep my voice down as best i can because i don't want to be the person who gets up early and wakes eve ryo ne person who gets up early and wakes everyone else up on the campsite. let me give you a tour. these tens are let me give you a tour. these tens a re nestled let me give you a tour. these tens are nestled in an area that usually be used to grow christmas trees, and until recently, it was just farmland. fields can be rented out to campus for 28 days in the year. the government has doubled to 56 days until the end of this year as more people look to holiday in the uk. we will speak to steve who owns this land in a short while. let me introduce you. you set up this site. tell us, what went into it and what been like? it has been great fun. i have the support of family who have really enjoyed setting the campsite
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up. with the love of camping, ourselves, have put all our efforts into making it a really nice, safe place for the family to come and visit. you are a teacher has well. i ta ke visit. you are a teacher has well. i take it you are a fan of camping in order to set this up. yes, i am a part—time teacher and our family love coming camping and go camping all over the love coming camping and go camping all overthe uk, and i wasjust inspired by the campsite that we have actually been to. this is what i really want to do and i went for it, really. in terms of feeling safe, and people feel reassured that this is a safe place to come and have a holiday? absolutely. this is an ideal area, have a holiday? absolutely. this is an idealarea, and it is have a holiday? absolutely. this is an ideal area, and it is lovely and spaced out, fields around, it is a perfect location for the family. many people have been relying on their local farms for food over the
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past few months. there was a farm shop here, but that went out of business. steve, you have turned to tourism. tell us about that.|j business. steve, you have turned to tourism. tell us about that. i used tourism. tell us about that. i used to be an organic farmer and i have a farm shop and all local supermarkets came locally. we had to diversify, particularly small farmers have to do that. that is exactly what we do today. the campsite you see here is an element of that. what do you make of that change in terms of the number of days that farmers fields can be rented out? you think that will be good for both farmers and tourism? the on the shell of a doubt. it gives all farmers including myself the flexibility to do what we want 56 days without seeking planning consent. it will be beneficial to all of us, and we need today that —— to do that. because of covid—19 and the fact it has had on our income? what effect has it had? my farm has been closed for a few months. we have two many
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alterations, you book online, we have had to change what we do here. what i found very interesting, although we have changed what we do, we haven't done our tractor rise in animal feeding, people have really appreciated the basics that we are doing, the views, the animals. it is really nice to see. thank you very much. we were hoping to speak to some campers. they are still in bed but we hope to speak to them a little bit later. i was going to ask them to they have a good night's sleep, but the question has sort of a nswer sleep, but the question has sort of answer itself. adam, iam adam, i am loving your bob harris routine. whispering away there. he has to. you do not want to be the person on the campsite everyone is furious with. go through the tent door," furious with. go through the tent door " o furious with. go through the tent door," morning, campers!" what a way
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to be woken up. i'd tell you what... having just completed my first grown—up staycation, which we were forced to take because of lockdown, iam and forced to take because of lockdown, i am and absolute convert now. it was fantastic. we had the time of our lives. let's hear the case for staycations. we are joined our lives. let's hear the case for staycations. we arejoined now our lives. let's hear the case for staycations. we are joined now by dan staycations. we are joined now by da n yates staycations. we are joined now by dan yates from pitchup.com. give us the big sell to a sceptical camper, like me, why do you want to put someone under canvas? good morning. they have been up for a while. i can almost... it is a bit hard for me to argue why staycations aren't such a great thing. if you look at do you have a huge spectre of accommodation from glamping, tree houses, goats, domes, teepees, static caravans and luxury lodges, touring caravans, camping pictures, and if you want to
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go off grid, while camping. there's something for everyone. we have seen this year and off a lot of people who would have taken international holidays because of the strict restrictions that have been put in place until recently and still are for many countries, really rediscover —— really rediscover what is on the doorstep and we hope they will return in future years. looking at the pictures, it is more than a crummy overlap, some of the things you can stay in. are you seeing lots of people venturing out to stay in a ca rava n of people venturing out to stay in a caravan or campsite that may not have camp for quite a while or, indeed, ever? —— bivouacked. have camp for quite a while or, indeed, ever? -- bivouacked. there isa indeed, ever? -- bivouacked. there is a lot of pent—up demand for the 3.5 months of the season that lockdown took out. with this industry generally comes back to life after easter. lockdown came at the worst time. now we have two months to really make an entire yea r‘s months to really make an entire year's revenue, at least for the camping side of the industry. static
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ca rava ns camping side of the industry. static caravans and lodges tend to go on until october all year round. but, yes, it's very obvious that a lot of people at the moment, it is notjust a pent—up demand from traditional campers and caravanners, but new people who are experimenting, having previously holidayed abroad. it's great to see people discover options that are may be only a couple of hours away from them maybe for a short break, and it is not only extremely convenient but great for the environment. i think as people come out of lockdown we are seeing a lot of survey evidence that people are being drawn towards nature. they call them open our hotels, clearly i think the government's chief medical 0fficer think the government's chief medical officer said it was a biological truism that this type of outdoor holiday was better than indoor and people are never. crosstalk. it isa people are never. crosstalk. it is a nifty rebrand of a tent. crosstalk. the change in the regulations in england, making it easierfor people
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running campsites to keep them open for longer, a relaxation in the usual rules. you talk about the pent—up demand, i guess that helps with the supply that people would be rather keen to make the most of it. yes. absolutely. i was brought up in a holiday park anai took advantage of this very role in 1996, set up a 28 day campsite in north devon. so it is great to see these rules relaxed a bit to take you out of this situation and particularly to allow farmers, we have about 500 farmers on pitchup.com and the numbers have grown rapidly over the last few years. we have had a tough few years with all sorts of issues with me prices and a warm summer and a cool spring last year and last year farm business a cool spring last year and last yearfarm business income was a cool spring last year and last year farm business income was down 8%. diversification is down more than a quarter of farm income and it's great that farms have the opportunity not only to attract tourists to the farm, but to sell much of the produce. it is often possible to buy sausages, bacon,
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eggs, to have a tour of the farm and a lot of visitors are coming from urban environment so they would have had this type of experience before. when did you last spend the night under campus? -- canvas. they had to because my trip to the hay festival where i would have stayed under campus. i'm hoping to go to wales over the next few weeks. crosstalk. thank you very much. nice to talk to you. thanks to talk to you there. dan you. thanks to talk to you there. da n yates you. thanks to talk to you there. dan yates. enjoy your open air hotel. you can see the appeal of a unit ora hotel. you can see the appeal of a unit or a treehouse or whatever. let us check in with ben for the weather. we have seen the weather in the cotswolds and wirral. i want stayed in a hammock heart. how does that work? it is a heart. how does that work? it is a heart with hammocks in it,
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basically. —— hut. my hammock broke in the middle of the night. they had to sleet on the floor. if you want to sleet on the floor. if you want to camp or put an open air hotel somewhere, this hotel outside of stoke—on—trent doesn't look too bad. blue skies and sunshine as a start off this morning. it bodes well for a fine day in most parts of the uk. sunny spells, one or two showers, and an exception. we can see that on the satellite and radar picture. a lot of cloud in some outbreaks of rain down towards the south—east of england at the moment. this is a very slow moving weather front. it will hang around in some areas all day long. a cloudy and damp start across east anglia, into the london area, some spots was the southwest. it was not too bright up quite quickly here is the day wears on. brightening up through the midlands. we saw the sunny skies and stoke—on—trent, through wales, northern england, northern ireland, once out of the day, very chilly across some parts of northern
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ireland. cambridge is lifting with the strong sunshine. sunny skies for much of scotland as well. but we will see some showers here. she was getting going in the north—west. not as many as it was yesterday in northern scotland. as we go through the day, while the fringe —— al weather front hangs around the south—east, east anglia, the south—east, east anglia, the south—east, that if much of the day, brosque and it will be cloudy and damp all day long. further north and west we see the sunny skies, showers we re west we see the sunny skies, showers were scotland, one or two for northern ireland and northern england. a fairly cool fresh feeling day, 17— 21 degrees. a much better forecast for cricket fans at old trafford today. blue skies and sunshine for the most part. patchy cloud but it will stay dry. they hold a's play in prospect. as we go through the evening and tonight we finally lose the frontal system from the south—east then we see clear skies overhead. a few showers pushing into was the north—west of scotla nd pushing into was the north—west of scotland and temperatures will dip overnight. a little chilly if you spend it under campus. some spots in
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the countryside down to 5—6d. after that cool start, monday is a bright looking day. plenty of sunshine in most areas. there will still be some showers though, particularly in scotland, a few for northern ireland and northern england as well full up temperatures will still be just a touch below the average for the time of year. we're looking at highs of around 15 in aberdeen, may a 222 in london. as we head deeper into the week, high pressure tries to hold on —— maybe up to 22 in london. the frontal system putting in from the north—west will introduce some outbreaks of rain across north—western parts of the uk through the middle part of the week, warming up with highs of 23—24. back to you. did the hunt come crashing down in the middle of the night?m wasn't that dramatic. itjust got tangled up and tried to roll me out. they went for the floor instead. that is a lot less dramatic. not a
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suggested. the moral of this story is, if you're going to go camping, go on the south coast this week. exactly. thank you. cheers, hammock ben. we will see you later. let's take a look now at some of the week's stories from around the world. six months of record—breaking temperatures have fuelled massive forest fires in the siberian arctic this year. great plumes of smoke we re this year. great plumes of smoke were visible on satellite images last month. the red areas on this map showjust how exceptional temperatures have been. more than
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five degrees above average across much of siberia. that included the highest temperature ever recorded north of the arctic circle, a sweltering 38 celsius. and now a met 0ffice led international study has concluded this period of exceptional weather would have been impossible had the world not been warmed by man—made greenhouse gas emissions. in the winter of 2018, the uk experienced a beast from the east, a period of exceptionally cold and snowy weather. it shows us that what happens in the arctic doesn't stay in the arctic. there are six main weather systems around the uk and four of those six come from the polar regions orfrom four of those six come from the polar regions or from the arctic directly. so while a lot of this is uncertain, something happens and the arctic it's going to be reasonable to assume that something will happen in the uk to stop by today's report was yet more evidence that the growing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is
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changing our climate. what we are seeing really, is unprecedented. as the strongest result we've ever seen actually. we've never seen a change in the probability of an event of more than 600 times. we've never seen a result like that. many storms and floods in europe are also reckoned to have been driven by conditions in the arctic and we know the polar region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. the long—term impact that will have elsewhere is less certain. looking at the geological record we don't think we have had c02 levels decide for about 5 million years. so we really don't know what to expect into the future. we are in uncharted territory. the reduction of arctic seaice territory. the reduction of arctic sea ice cover and melting of the permafrost has accelerated during this year's heatwave. that will drive even more warming and, in turn, means we can expect more extreme weather around the world.
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the bustling capital addis ababa about is a testament. it is one of the fastest in the continent. with the fastest in the continent. with the growth comes a need for more electric power. but just the growth comes a need for more electric power. butjust outside the city is a completely different picture. tens of millions of ethiopians still live without access to electricity. this is easy over‘s solution, the grand renaissance dam. after almost ten years of construction it's nearly complete. 0fficials construction it's nearly complete. officials hope it will power the new factories and the villages. this is one of those villages.
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translation: we prepare everything using wood. we have to go to the forest looking for the ward. it's very tiresome. if we get electricity will be able to cooking and baking stove a nd will be able to cooking and baking stove and it will be clean. we are now covered in ash, we are getting poison from smoke, we are wrapped in smoke. her husband told me that he believes in the dam so much he bought government bonds to help fund the construction. he hopes even that small contribution will provide electricity for his village. authorities here in ethiopia have been consistent over the years in saying that the dam will in no way harm downstream countries like sudan and egypt. instead, they have often accuse cairo of trying to maintain arrangements from the colonial era that deny millions of ethiopians access to electricity. egypt wants
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ethiopia to guarantee its water supplies won't be reduced by the dam. for egyptians here this is a matter of life and death. many farmers have been struggling in recent yea rs farmers have been struggling in recent years with shortages of water and farms like this one might even disappear if things get worse. growing crops and blistering heat is a challenge now. not all of the farmers here have heard about the european dam, but they can't imagine losing more water in such a dry country. the nail is egypt's lifeblood. translation: we do not have enough water, especially in summer. during the day water pumps barely work because the water levels are so low. i don't know what's going to happen if we get even less water. egypt has accused ethiopia of acting unilaterally, disregarding the interests of downstream countries.
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translation: there is no egypt without water. we either have water or there is no future for us. decreasing our water share will kill us slowly. egypt has 100 million people and is growing fast. but time is running out for cairo. despite yea rs of is running out for cairo. despite years of negotiations, many technical and legal disagreements still remain unsolved. this man has been a farmer all his life. it is the only source of income. but this year, he has a large piece of land to build a
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school. translation: i educated myself. school. translation: ieducated myself. it was my dream to let children get education. that is why i did that. these excited schoolgirls can't work —— and a great way to be completed. for them, having a school is a dream come true. in this area, there are 1500 girls forjust one small school. the closest is in our‘s walkaway, which is why so many girls have dropped out. translation: i want girls to study to receive an education, and become doctors or teachers and educate other girls in the future. education is a priority for a country that has suffered decades of war. but schoolgirls face even more
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challenges. in some parts of the country but here, insurgency campaigns have closed girls schools. corruption has led to so—called ghost schools across the country, meaning money spent on schools which i never built. i myself do not trust the existing numbers about education. translation: here, we have more than 18,000 schools. is it really more or less ? surveys show 60% of afghan children who are not at the school are girls, and without an education they face a higher risk of that because the government is backing the school will be hoped to be open next year.
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imagine saying goodbye to your best friend. these girls have only a few hours left together. they will probably never see each other again. we gave her a camera so she would have a record of the life she is leaving behind. we have been visiting her in this refugee camp in lebanon every year since she was five. at first, she was keen to get back to syria as soon as possible. but her hopes of returning faded with every passing year of syria's
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war. the family fled here after a horrific chemical attack near their home. but they never got used to living like this. but not all of her family are leaving. her older sister and her two children are part of —— are not pa rt two children are part of —— are not part of the resettlement. like the vast majority of syrian refugees, they are stuck where they are. her mother says her children have lost seven years here, and every single family in the camp wishes they were leaving to.
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it is late now and finally time to go. the last farewells are full of pain. she barely knows what to feel. they have never been to an airport before. never been on a plane. these are tickets to another world. a global pandemic is just one new thing for this nine—year—old to experience. not since they had to abandon their now destroyed home in syria have they had keys to a place of their own. they seem awestruck by it all. no queue for a shared toilet here. the simple pleasure of keeping clea n. the simple pleasure of keeping clean. and outside, herfather is
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already busy. it has been an extraordinaryjourney from theory via lab and onto here. we have been asked to say where. there is some hostility towards immigrants. but rouaa's family have so much faith in this country. herfamily adore her family adore her, herfamily adore her, but her family adore her, but the quality of rouaa's new life will
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also depend on the warmth of the welcome she gets here. good morning. this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph he thinks any future outbreaks can be dealt with at a local or regional level. he compared the idea of another national lockdown to the "nuclear deterrent" — a tool he would not wish to abandon, but one he has no wish to use. two official photographs marking the wedding of princess beatrice and the italian count, edoardo mapelli—mozzi, have been released by buckingham palace. 0ne image shows the couple leaving the private ceremony at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. another shows them
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standing alongside — but still two metres from — the queen and the duke of edinburgh. the palace chose not to release a picture showing the bride's parents, the duke and duchess of york. two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two groups at thorpe park, in surrey, yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency services attended. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at 9:00 this morning. and the man himself is here to tell us what's in store. it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a foreign policy special, i think. it it is a bit of a foreign policy special, ithink. it certainly is. if you look at any of the serious papers, use a bridge and is involved ina double papers, use a bridge and is involved in a double diplomatic crisis both with russia and with china. i have been talking to the kremlin's new man in london and also to the chinese ambassador who will be here live, and listening to them will be
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the shadow foreign secretary and the foreign secretary himself dominic raab. it is where britain stands in the world press brexit. what a cracking line—up. look forward to that. what a time it is in terms of international diplomacy. this port is very much uk—based. yes, absolutely. we are talking about the uk —— ffa cup. —— fa cup. arsenal love the fa cup. they've won it more than any other team. but their 2—0 victory over manchester city last night was probably even sweeter for manager mikel arteta, beating his old mentor, pep guardiola. remember — arteta only left his job as pep's assistant manager at the end of last year, and now, he has a chance to mark his first season in charge with some major silverware. jim lumsden reports. it's wembley, but not as we know it. 90,000 seats all empty, fans replaced by banners.
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city didn't mind — a good week so far for them. their champions league ban overturned and still two cups to play for. arsenal still strutting from a defeat of champions liverpool, saw little of the ball for the first quarter of an hour before pierre—emerick aubameyang found a way through. the gunners were calling the shots with mustafi coming close to making it two. all of which gave pep plenty to ponder. his former number two, now in charge in the other dugout, was taking a leaf out of his book. although after the break, there were signs that the holders were maybe finding their feet. city were unbeaten in their last nine visits to wembley and mahrez would have fired them level but for the fingers of emi martinez. sterling had an opportunity...didn't seem to know much about it. city pounded away at arsenal, but suddenly on the counter—attack, they were further behind as aubameyang struck again. 2—0 it remained
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as a superb performance from arsenal took them to a 21st fa cup final. so, arsenal into their 21st fa cup final, and all in all they're having a pretty good week after last night's win and then beating liverpool in the league on wednesday. we had an incredible week. to beat the best two teams in europe in three days is something that doesn't happen in every day. credit to the players, the way they are standing, they are fighting, they are believing and the chemistry that they have generating between them to go through difficult moments in the game, but as well to play some really good stuff and to score the way we scored today. the only regret is we that didn't play the first half but we played the second half. and after you can lose, that we didn't play the first half but we played the second one. and in that way, we lost. it's happen, it's football. so mistakes in front of the goal when you meet the chances, it's part, but today was not that,
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the reason why we didn't win. so we didn't play good in the first half and in these knockout games, you don't have time against good teams. so, arsenal will face either manchester united or chelsea. that semifinal takes place this evening. united go into that game having already beaten them three times this season. both united and chelsea also have their sights set on champions league qualification with 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s side in fifth place, butjust a point behind the third—placed blues. this is a great chance to get to the final. we're just one step away, it's at wembley, so we're just focused on the fa cup and a trophy of course, that's massive for any player to win and any team to win, so that's — our main focus now is to get to the final. and then we'll look at west ham and look at leicester after that. of course it feels like we're in a slightly different position this year because of the circumstances of the season,
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but we have an opportunity and it's up to the players and ourselves to make the best of it on sunday. but we're playing a very good team, we know that, they're in good form. and whoever would await us in the final will be a very good team, so, the work is to be done. well, tonight's semifinal between manchester united and chelsea at wembley kicks off at 6 o'clock. it's live on bbc one and radio 5live with coverage beginning at 5:30. just one game in the premier league yesterday as norwich's miserable end to the season continued. already relegated, the league's bottom club lost their penultimate match of the season 2—0 against burnley and had two men sent off. burnley‘s second a moment to forget for norwich defender ben godfrey — he will not want to see that again. and after all of friday's excitement for leeds united, being promoted to the premier league next season, they were officially handed the championship title after brentford slipped up at stoke yesterday. brentford's defeat meant
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they wasted the chance to move into the second automatic place. they stay third, a point behind west brom with one game to go. no time for celebrations for leeds yet. they face derby later. some formula 1 to look forward to later as well with lewis hamilton starting on pole at the hungarian grand prix as he looks to claim his seventh victory there. incredible! it was another masterclass for hamilton during qualifying. mercedes were miles ahead of everyone else, but the 6—time world champion finished just ahead of team—mate valtteri bottas. it's the 90th pole of his career, hamilton admitting himself that that requires nothing less than perfection. thankful to everyone back home and the guys here that do such an amazing job, and valtteri doesn't make it easy for me at all, so it requires absolute perfection when it comes to doing laps, and qualifying like that
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is one of the things i enjoy most. england's danny willett is six shots off the lead going into the final day of the memorial tournament. the 2016 masters winner came back from a poor start to finish strongly and put him in contention in ohio. the spaniard jon rahm has a 4—shot lead on 12 under. he could become world number one today. i'd love to bring you some cricket now, but there wasn't any yesterday. instead, it rained in manchester all day, which meant play was abandoned on the third day of the second test between england and west indies without a ball being bowled. look at this — absolutely teeming it down! the good news — there's better weather forecast today. ben can tell you more, but the pressure is on england now as they try to square the 3—match series at old trafford. west indies will return to the crease 32—1 in reply to the hosts' first innings total of 469.
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i know ben has all the details. they can tell you a little of the weather forecast was not mostly sunny spells and manchester, 0% chance of rain. that is all we need to hear. you have cursed it now, you've cursed it! stealing and's breakfast, turning all meteorological honours. fancy doing politics? you can do it all. nothing about cumulus nimbus clouds? no, is too much me! no clouds, that is all we need to know in manchester. that's great news. we've heard how the professionals are getting on. now, let's see how the world of amateur sport is looking as the lockdown restrictions continue to ease. from covid—secure football and netball to the tricky question of how to socially distance a rugby scrum, mike bushell has been to visit some grassroots teams to see how they're preparing. back to training. after months without playing, the team is finally back together again.
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keep going, that's it, both feet, miles. whether you are nine or 69... you would not believe the pleasure that we old boys get from kicking this ball around. it's absolutely fantastic, the camaraderie between us all as well. it helps you with your mental health. i've missed it loads and it's really fun being back again. i'm happy to play again because i'm playing with my friends. but this is a far cry from what the hundreds of players who attend sessions at harborough town fc are used to, and that's even before they kick a ball. parents drop their children, wait there until we temperature the kids. two metres apart, we encourage them, they line up to have their temperature taken, we log itjust in case we need to track it back. 0n the pitch until now, players have only been able to pass the ball in socially distanced pods of up to six, while keeping their distance in drinks breaks, and no contact at all has been allowed.
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it's not easy for the children to recognise the distance but they are getting used to it. it's the new norm. we call it the new approach. but yesterday, the government approved the fa's plans for the next stage. from now on, competitive training sessions, which will include tackling, can take place in groups of up to 30 as long as the fa guidelines are followed, and competitive matches can be played from august. when the premier league came back on, it makes you want to play even more. and then when they finally said come back to training, yeah, you just want to get playing matches now. we can start to really prep, get prepared for the matches for the new season, we can start to get some contact, some tacklings and that's what they want. whatever drills and whatever we do at the moment, we have to finish with some shooting because that's what they want to be doing, scoring goals. this club may have come out of hibernation but it now faces a real battle to survive because normally the clubhouse is thriving raising money with weddings, parties, sports, elite therapy class running
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here, but it's all closed. already its estimated this has cost the club £74,000. add to that the £3,000 it has cost to make this whole site covid safe. for this club, going into hibernation, the bills weren't coming but we're waking up again now so now the bills do start coming and so it's that wake—up call, isn't it? it's going to be a big challenge, i think, for a lot of grassroots team sports to re—energise, but everyone is chomping at the bit to go. other sports face their own challenges as they return. in rugby, you have to handle the ball so it's sanitised, under new protocols, every five minutes. there's no tackling, of course, but the big debate in rugby is what to do about the scrum? you can't exactly socially distance in a rugby scrum, or indeed a ruck or a maul. grassroots clubs are keen to retain the elements that make rugby union unique but it's clear there will have to be compromise to make it less of a coronavirus risk. it may involve having perhaps only lower body tackles and reducing face—to—face contact. the rfu will submit its latest
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proposals to the government soon. i know they're looking at rule modification, but without the scrummage, without line—outs, without the contest for the ball, i don't think you're playing rugby union. if we remove everything, we might as well play something else and i think that would be dangerous. at the moment, especially with the two metre distance, how are you then going to bring in tackling or any of the contact elements? for us as women i think it will be starting with a touch game and working our way slowly up to a full contact. netball is also adapting. groups of six players two metres apart and here at bury, greater manchester, it's so farjust been fitness training without the ball, as the sport prepares to submit its next stage plans to the government for approval. clubs are exacting changes. it will be a case of limit that face—to—face marking, probably more outdoor netball, less people on the court physically because we can't, in a normal game, we have a lot of people
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in one small space. and from the 25th ofjuly when the leisure centres start to reopen, groups of up to six will be allowed to book courts as long as they follow the sport's guidance and each of their new safety protocols. for all these exports it is a gradual one step at a time return, with each one dependent on government approval. oh! it might take a while for the touch to come back but at least this is a familiar sight once more... ..with people back on the pitch together again. mike bushell, bbc news. fantastic. where there is a well there is a way with sport. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. i don't know have any marks out of ten you would give holly's attempted amateur meteorology. to be honest, it was pretty good. i should have just had a lie in. someone should have told me holly would be doing the weather as well. i don't know talking about a 0% chance of rain anywhere, that puts you in a pretty
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risky position, just in case the inevitable happens. but i think holly is right. there will not be any rain at the test match today. a far cry from the wet weather we had today and a beautiful start for many. that's the south—west of wales a short time ago. sunny spells, shower mostly across the north of the uk and then something a bit different down to the south—east. here we do have a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain. you can see that on the earlier satellite and radar picture. what we have is a very, very slow weather front. this will hang around across the south—east of the uk for hang around across the south—east of the ukfora hang around across the south—east of the uk for a good part of the day. certainly if you are about to head out and about, east anglia, the south—east, parts of the south was very cloudy. north cornwall and evan starting to break now. we welcome the midlands, northern england and northern ireland a bright sunny start. sunny skies ascending north across scotland as well. there will be showers here, getting going across the north and west of scotland. not as windy as it was yesterday across northern scotland. as you go through the gate we keep
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the showers blowing in across scotland, particular towards the north—west. 0ne scotland, particular towards the north—west. one or two getting down into northern ireland, the far north—west england, but manchester should stay dry. down to the south—east we stick with our band of cloud and patchy rain. very slow—moving. parts of kent it is likely to stay grey and out for a good part of the day. a fairly fresh feel to the weather. temperatures 17-21. we feel to the weather. temperatures 17—21. we zoom in to old trafford and we can see those fine conditions overhead, was spells of sunshine, 17- 18 overhead, was spells of sunshine, 17— 18 degrees. as those fine into the evening for most of us stop our weather front eventually clears away from the south—east corner. we keep themselves going through the night across scotland, but most spots will be dry with simply spell. it will into a relatively chilly night for the time of year. here are the town and city temperatures, in the countryside likely to get down to five or six degrees. a chilly start you tomorrow morning, but a great start. lots of sunshine on offer throughout the day. some showers
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again. some for northern ireland, something northern england, quite a few across scotland, particularly in the final. temperatures, if anything, a touch below par for this time of year. looking at highs of 50 degrees in aberdeen, maybe 21 in cardiff, 22 in london. further ahead, if you are off work this week, into your staycation we, high pressure fairly close by. that will keep things largely settled down towards the south. a frontal system putting in towards the north—west. that will introduce some rain across north—west above of the uk at times. down towards the south it will warm up down towards the south it will warm upa down towards the south it will warm up a little bit as we head towards the end of the week. chris and nina, back to you. thank you, ben. warming up back to you. thank you, ben. warming up towards august. thank you, ben. there's a common theme to the sunday papers this morning. nearly all of them feature front—page photographs of princess beatrice's wedding to the italian count, edoardo mapelli mozzi, which took place on friday behind closed doors. the newly—weds are pictured, along with the queen and the duke of edinburgh, but neither
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prince andrew nor his former wife sarah, duchess of york, are included on the officially released photographs. we're joined now by the royal commentator victoria murphy. a very good morning to you. the first private wedding for nearly 215 yea rs first private wedding for nearly 215 years from the royal family. how much of this would have been because of the circumstances around covid and how much of this would have been because of the spotlight on prince andrew? hello there, good morning. a very different kind of a wedding in very different kind of a wedding in very different kind of a wedding in very different times. it was held com pletely very different times. it was held completely secretly, we didn't know about it until after it happened. and we wouldn't have known about it as soon as we did if it wasn't for the fact a newspaper the sun found out and broke the story on friday and then the palace announced it. they had initially intended to keep under wraps for a little bit longer so as not to overshadow captain tom's investiture and that's why we didn't get photographs until friday. it was all was going to be held secretly. it was initially announced
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and we were told it would be in may, but that wasn't possible. and potentially they didn't want to rea nalysis potentially they didn't want to reanalysis something that may then have had to change again because of the changing circumstances at the moment. they have been told that this was in line with the couple's wishes but, obviously, as you say, there is no getting away from the fa ct there is no getting away from the fact that so much of the narrative around this wedding has been around the situation that prince andrew is now in around, you know, the ongoing reputational damage that his friendship with jeffrey reputational damage that his friendship withjeffrey epstein is causing him and the royalfamily and i think causing him and the royalfamily and ithink in causing him and the royalfamily and i think in not announcing it and holding it secretly, what it avoided was that sort of preamble that you get where everything is discussed and andrew's situation would inevitably have been a very big part of that situation. very difficult not to read into the fact that the duke and duchess are not featured in any of the photographs. who do you think would have taken the decision? yes. it's absolutely no surprise that that has been picked up on this
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morning and a lot of the newspapers and it is a very noticeable. normally we would expert to see photographs of the bridal party. it isa photographs of the bridal party. it is a different kind wedding and only two pictures a re is a different kind wedding and only two pictures are released. he is the father of the bride and the queen's son and we would have expected to see a picture of him in normal times. it really underlies the fact that prince andrew's situation right now is very different to the one that was in place when princess eugenie married, then he was very front and centre at the wedding and gave an interview about it. at the time he was a working royal, representing the queen on the world stage and had offices in buckingham palace. now that has been completely stripped away from him. he is described, interestingly, in the context of the swing voter —— buckingham palace as the bride's father. and that in the fact there are no photographs of him i think really underlies the fact that buckingham palace no longerformally represent him. he does not represent
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the monarchy publicly and they are not promoting him. ok, so we can read into that as a statement. aside from prince andrew, the royalfamily have been reasonably visible throughout the pandemic, as visible as you can be while maintaining two metre distancing. the queen taking pa rt metre distancing. the queen taking part in zoo meetings with service personnel, prince william speaking with homeless people. have they come across well of the past few months, do you think? i think they have. it is an interesting time. coronavirus it has highlighted inequalities and a lot of people are suffering. i think it is a time when an institution based on hereditary privilege has to be careful about how it presents itself. but i do think the royal family have been very keen to be very visible, they have absolutely embraced working digitally. that's quite something when you think basically the basis of theirjobs in normal times are to go out and about and meet people, to go out and about and meet people, to go overseas on behalf of the british government, and they are not able to do any of that and, really, for them
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to be able to be effective digitally is really quite something. i think there is such a loss of expectation for the queen any duty she has done over a number of years in the respect she has built up in her contribution early on in the pandemic of the big speech she made on coronavirus and the anniversary of ve day were very well received. it's kind of interesting because even though they are not out and about, in some ways people may feel that they have seen a little bit more of them, because what we're seeing of them now is them looking into cameras, we are hearing a lot of conversations that we might not hear otherwise in normal engagements. so in some ways people are getting to see a little bit more of their personalities. are getting to see a little bit more of their personalitieslj are getting to see a little bit more of their personalities. i think those images with captain tom will be some of the most enduring of the entire pandemic. just a final thought on what the princess was wearing, not everyone is that interested in tiaras and dresses, but the fact it was her grandma's
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the tiara, that she wore on her wedding day, just beautiful. yes. that is something people happy up on as well today. the fact that she wore a dress that belongs to the queen that the queen more in her younger years designed by norman hartnell. and then the tiara that the queen wore on her own wedding day. i think you can look at that as a real sign of affection for princess beatrice. the queen is head of state, she is also a mother and grandmother. i think that says a lot about the really nice relationship she has with her granddaughter. beautiful, victoria. we all love a bit of tiara chat. we do. it is eight o'clock. you're watching bbc breakfast. coming up in the next hour: most shops are trading again, but we'll hear from a retail analyst who says the sector remains in deep trouble as nervous consumers continue to stay at home. we'll talk to a gp who says she's receiving a lot of requests for exemption letters from patients who don't want to wear face coverings in shops, and she's
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rejecting most of them. that's all to come on the bbc news channel. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. have a good day. good morning welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today. boris johnson's approach to a second lockdown. he says he doesn't want one and it won't be needed even if there is another rise in coronavirus cases this winter. the royal wedding that took place behind closed doors. pictures are released of princess beatrice's ceremony on friday. the shops are open but are the customers returning? the challenge facing high streets as the uk emerges from lockdown. the student becomes the master. a double from aubameyang puts arsenal through to the fa cup final as manager mikel arteta outmanouevres his old mentor pep guardiola.
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good morning. there is some sunday sunshine on the way for many parts of the uk. a few showers around in the north and some cloud and rain and rain dragging its heels towards the south—east. i'll have all the details coming up here on breakfast. it's sunday, 19thjuly. our top story. borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph that he believes any future outbreaks can be dealt with at a local or regional level. 0ur political correspondentjessica parker is in our london newsroom. jessica, borisjohnson is sounding more positive than his chief scientific adviser did on friday. yes, not for the first time there
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appears to be some kind of contrast between what the prime minister is saying or what scientists are saying. people are increasingly having to eagle eye out for those differences. sir patrick vallance, the chief scientific adviser, sometime seen alongside boris johnson at the downing street press conferences, he was talking last week about how we are moving to this phase now where there will be more targeted measures at local outbreaks but he also did say that as winter approaches there is a risk national measures could be needed as well. this comes as today borisjohnson said he is very against a national lockdown. we know the impact on the economy has been huge, the impact on the treasury which has had to spend an awful lot of money trying to prop up an awful lot of money trying to prop up businesses through the recent months and of course to some extent the unknown impact on things like mental health, the backlog for the nhs intentionally hugely damaging but in likening the idea of another national lockdown to a nuclear deterrent, you get a sense ofjust
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how much boris johnson deterrent, you get a sense ofjust how much borisjohnson doesn't want to resort to that kind of measure. he says we won't be in that position again. soa he says we won't be in that position again. so a slight comparison there with what so patrick vallance has had. worth mentioning scotland, wales, northern ireland, they can go their own way on these issues but it comes their own way on these issues but it co m es after their own way on these issues but it comes after councils in england were given new powers to try to tackle local outbreaks. ministers will be given powers that are even more drastic to try to tackle local lockdowns and government planning more money into the nhs, expanding test and trays, expanding the flu vaccine test and trays, expanding the flu vaccine programme test and trays, expanding the flu vaccine programme all in the hope that as we approach autumn and winter, those colder months where respiratory viruses can fly, they wa nt to respiratory viruses can fly, they want to try and avoid those kinds of national measures. that is the hope but as we've seen with coronavirus things are never certain. jessica you have a pressing update on johnsonjunior‘s you have a pressing update on johnson junior‘s barnett. you have a pressing update on johnson junior's barnett. also in this interview, downing street released a photo, don't know if you can see it there, carrie symons and
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bell baby wilfred is 11 weeks old, and you used this phrase that the baby, you can see the back of his head, as a johnson head baby, you can see the back of his head, as ajohnson head of hair, so that they are, and taking part in a call with the midwives that helped look after them at university couege look after them at university college hospital. we are fully briefed on the morning's politics, jessica, thank you. johnsonian head of hair! chris: i had that briefly myself. buckingham palace has released the first official photographs of the wedding of princess beatrice and italian count edoardo mapelli mozzi. the private ceremony, attended by the queen and the duke of edinburgh, took place in secret at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. keith doyle has more. like thousands of couples, this was not the wedding they'd planned this summer. coronavirus meant princess beatrice's marriage to edoardo mapelli mozzi
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was a scaled—down affair held in secret. these, the first official photographs, show it was still an elegant event with flowers completely covering the archway of the royal chapel of all saints in windsor. beatrice's grandparents, the queen and duke of edinburgh, were among the guests, which numbered no more than 30 to stay within the government guidelines. prince andrew did walk his daughter down the aisle, but he does not appear in the official photographs released. he's taken a lot of flak over the past few months ever since that newsnight interview in november last year. he's come under a lot of fire, a lot of pressure, a lot of criticism, and he probably felt that it was time to be expedient, let the focus of attention be on his daughter. it is, after all, her day. and he'd keep out of the photographs. for the ceremony, princess beatrice wore a modified vintage dress belonging to the queen. she also wore the diamond fringed tiara, which the queen wore on her own wedding day in 1947.
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this was the first time the royal family were together since lockdown. the queen was seen later in the day, knighting captain sir tom moore. while this was not quite a normal royal wedding, one tradition for royal brides was followed — beatrice's wedding bouquet was placed on the tomb of the unknown warrior in westminster abbey. keith doyle, bbc news. two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two groups at thorpe park, in surrey, yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency services attended. the metropolitan police has released bodycam video footage of its officers being pelted with objects as they tried to disperse crowds at an unlicensed music event. bottles, canisters and a bicycle were thrown at police as they tried to shut down the event,
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in east london, on friday night. two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested. two officers suffered minor injuries. up to 3,000 new school places are being created for children in england who have special educational needs and disabilities. the places will be in so—called "free schools", which are funded directly by the government as opposed to being run by local authorities. jon donnison reports. under the government plans, there will be 35 new schools for children with special educational needs and disabilities — enough for 3,000 pupils across england. ministers say they want to put the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children first. but campaigners who've long criticised the lack of provision for children with special educational needs say it's not enough. cautious is the word i'd like to see implemented, but there are, i think, more than 3,000 children requiring special educational needs. the last figure was between 4,000 and 5,000. no timeline as to when the programme
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will be completed was given, but the government says the new schools will start to open from september 2022. labour says the funding is welcome but says cuts to school budgets have put huge pressure on support for vulnerable children. jon donnison, bbc news. spain's catalonia region has again recorded more than 1,000 covid infections in a single day. the surge led to tough new measures being announced on friday for an initial period of 15 days. earlier we spoke to our europe correspondent gavin lee, who said that discussions are ongoing about potentially closing the border between spain and france. across spain, in the last three weeks, they've had 150 separate clusters, localised outbreaks. there were two particularly bad ones where they put areas in lockdown, around the basque country, a place called a marina, which is on the coast, and about 150 miles from barcelona, just outside.
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both those places are in lockdown. now, because of the spread in the last few days, just to give you a sense of the numbers, for the whole of spain on wednesday there were just over 300 cases of covid—19 in that 24 hours. by thursday there were 580 across spain. yesterday more than 1000 cases just for the catalonia region alone. that has led, here in brussels, the spanish prime minister is here talking about the coronavirus recovery fund. he has been discussing this morning with emmanuel macron, the french president, to shut the spanish—french border. that is a possibility. all those people in and around barcelona, about 4 million people, have been told for the next 15 days, stay indoors, do your shopping online. they've closed gyms, cinemas, nightclubs. they are not closing bars and restaurants at this stage but, given the speed and scale of what appears to be a second spike, certainly in catalonia, these are the highest figures since may, there is an increasing possibility. the other thing to bear in mind,
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tourists have started to go back, along the main strips of barcelona we are seeing bigger numbers. this was just as spain's tourist season is getting going again. we've been hearing this morning about the prime minister's vow to get the country back to some kind of normality after the lockdown. but what does that mean — in practice — for our high streets? the retail and hospitality sectors have been among the worst affected by the pandemic. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been finding out how some shops and pubs are trying to stay afloat. nostalgia is a key part of this business. it's rhubarb and custard sherbet lemons. they're always the top favourites. since reopening their sweet shop in milton keynes... ..scott and his mum gillian have often found themselves looking back fondly to the good old days, pre—pandemic. we are a mile away from where we used to be. it is nowhere near as busy
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and the footfall in the shopping centre itself is, i think it was down 30%. we would get quite a lot of staff that work in the shopping centre coming in on their lunch break to get themselves some sweets or to take sweets home for their family so obviously that has impacted us quite a lot. they've launched a website so sweets can be delivered. they've noticed changes in customer behaviour. the customers that are coming in are spending more and although our footfall's down within the shop, their spend is up. why is that happening, do you think? i think people are coming in and thinking, well, i don't want to come in again this week so i'll buy it all now and i won't come in later. or perhaps they've been deprived of sweets for 12 weeks! the average spend per customer is up about 18%. has that been enough to offset the reduction? no, nowhere near, no. it's been incredibly worrying. st albans in hertfordshire, this business was set up in 1989
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but has become a shop of two halves. on this side of the shop, we tend to have all of our occasion wear, which people would normally buy for summer birthday parties, but this year, they've all been cancelled. most weddings are cancelled, people are buying far more casual clothes, more lower price points and things they can get some everyday wear out of. little dresses like this, £45 price point, has sold really well. face coverings are already compulsory in shops in scotland. from friday, they'll become mandatory while visiting shops in england as well. like most shopkeepers, we all have a written off making any money this year. shopping in shops for some people isjust too much. i've had one customer ask me to stand outside the shop while she had a look. i think this is going to be the hardest thing we've had to get through. down the road at the six bells pub, it's all change. so that was just one big car park.
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we've remodelled that and added about 70 odd seats to basically make up for the space we had inside, we're now completely outside. we've had to shorten menus, restrict the amount of drinks we serve just to make things quicker and easier for ourselves. for the first, i'd say, the first four weeks were really tough from a mental health point of view as well, myself and my whole family, we did struggle to see the light at the end of the tunnel. when we get into october—november time, it starts turning rainy, cold, etc, are people going to be willing to sit outside in the car park and have a drink? i'm not so sure. sean runs three other pubs nearby which have just reopened. st albans in particular has very old pubs, so they're very small and were never made for a socially distanced world. 0ur businesses are based on an 80% capacity as a minimum. so when we were suddenly at 20 or 30 or in some cases zero, there is no business. high streets may be filling up once more. trading conditions remain incredibly tough. tim muffett, bbc news.
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really tough time for so many retailers. i like the idea of people stockpiling suites. at such a big questions for plenty in retail. let's speak to retail analyst diane wehrle who's in milton keynes. good morning to you. how worried are you for the future of our high streets ? you for the future of our high streets? plenty were asking searching questions about their future before all of this and now a pandemic. i know. it is a really serious situation. we track footfall, the body of customer activity across all our retail estimation, the high streets, shopping centres and retail parks. whilst retail parks are 20% lower in terms of customer activity than they we re terms of customer activity than they were last year, high streets and shopping centres are around 60% lower. so the majority of people are
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not going into stores at the moment which is really tough for all of our retailers. how much is that do you think about people being nervous, as we we re think about people being nervous, as we were hearing in the report about venturing out, versus peoplejust not having much money, disposable income has collapsed because the economy is in such dire straits. that is a very interesting point because we are in this place of phony recession. we know a recession is coming and a lot of people are feeling quite affluent. a lot of people have been on furlough, receiving a salary and not spending anything, they've not been going out, the children haven't been doing activities, so they've had quite a lot of money in their accounts, plus some people have had a mortgage holiday yet they are still not going out and the surveys that have been carried out amongst consumers due indicate that it is about nervousness around covid and
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contagion, so, actually, the compulsory wearing of masks will hopefully give a lot of people comfort around that, to get them back into stores. i was going to ask you about face masks becoming mandatory from the end of this week, you already have to wear one in scotland, trying to work out the extent to which it'll be encouraging for people to head out versus the nature of how uncomfortable it can be when you are wearing one of those things for a long time. be when you are wearing one of those things for a long timelj be when you are wearing one of those things for a long time. i know, there is the debate about whether it'll help or hinder but actually i think people are very sensible and no one thought we would get used to queueing to get into stores but we do it quite readily, people are co mforta ble do it quite readily, people are comfortable with it, and they are willing to do it. so i think it is a case of getting used to the new reality of things. and i think the advantages of knowing you feel a lot safer, that everyone is working together towards avoiding contagion will give people a lot of comfort.
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also the people who are vulnerable are still not going out because they are still not going out because they are so nervous. so they can feel more comforted, they are more likely to go shopping. we have seen the likes ofjohn to go shopping. we have seen the likes of john lewis to go shopping. we have seen the likes ofjohn lewis and debenhams announcing store closures. i wonder how you would analyse this kind of news. is this a speeding up as a result of the pandemic of what was inevitable? in other words the flight inevitable? in other words the flight online, people buying more stuff on the internet rather than trudging down the high street. certainly retail stores have been having a tough time for a number of yea rs having a tough time for a number of years and consequently so have retail destinations. this we have seen online purchasing move from 20% of total retail sales to over 30% in three months. we are now exceeding the forecast for 2028 in terms of online sales. it isn't surprising that impact is felt very readily in
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bricks and mortar business. there was a lot of talk aboutjohn lewis reshaping its business. it is a very online driven business now. a lot of its shoppers buy online. debenhams has had issues before covid so all of those retailers struggling, inevitably that has been highlighted by covid and brought to bear early. any tips yourself and venturing out? have you been out and about in the shops with a face covering or not?|j have. i went out without a face covering. i have to say yesterday i went out with a face covering and not many people were wearing face coverings and i would have felt more co mforta ble coverings and i would have felt more comfortable had everyone else been wearing them as well. certainly, not nearly as many people are in shops as much as they were last year. but once we start to adopt face coverings, we will feel a lot more co mforta ble coverings, we will feel a lot more comfortable about going out. thanks
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for talking to us, appreciate it. i've just returned from scotland where facemasks are mandatory and it's very normalised. people have them on in the supermarket, take them on in the supermarket, take them off in the car, people get used to it very quickly. chris: isjust to it very quickly. chris: is just creating to it very quickly. chris: isjust creating habits, having it in your pocket, and you can go into your pocket. nina: we will be talking to a gp about how effective they can be and let's check in with ben for a look at the weather across the nation. how are you? very well, thank you. the weather might help to cheer you up because for most of us blue skies and sunshine on the way today, that is how we started the day for this weather watcher in lancashire. a slightly different type of weather down towards the south—east. hear from our earlier radar picture you can see this band of cloud with outbreaks of rain, a very slow moving weather front which will
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plague the southern and eastern areas for a good part of the day, certainly if you're out and about this morning through east anglia, the south—east, down towards the south coast, quite cloudy and damp but the south are starting to brighten up, the midlands brightening up nicely through wales, northern england, northern ireland, it isa northern england, northern ireland, it is a sunny start the day, and we follow those sunny skies up to scotla nd follow those sunny skies up to scotland but she was getting going already particular across the north—west. not quite as wind as it was yesterday across northern scotland. through the day, those showers becoming widespread across scotla nd showers becoming widespread across scotland but particularly in northern and western areas. one or two into northern ireland, may be the far north—west of england, cumbria, for example, and our frontal system hanging around in the south—east, parts of suffolk, essex, kent likely to stay grey and damp for a good part of the day. 21 degrees in london, a bit cooler and fresher further north and west but this is good news for cricket fans
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because a much better day at old trafford today, it should stay dry with spells of sunshine, temperatures up to 17—18. through this evening, finally we lose that band of cloud and patchy rain from the south—east, keeping the showers across scotland but most places dry with clear bub spells and considering it is july, with clear bub spells and considering it isjuly, quite a cool night. those are the temperatures for towns and cities but spots in the countryside will get down to five or 6 degrees, maybe even lower in sheltered places. a cool start to tomorrow, a bright start, lots of sunshine through the day. northern england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland will see some showers. a few showers at times in the north of scotla nd few showers at times in the north of scotland and those temperatures a touch below par in many spots, 15 in aberdeen, 22 he high in london. high pressure is what is bringing a largely dry start to the week for most of us and it'll stay with us particularly down towards the south. the further north and west you are,
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you will feel the effects of the frontal system bringing rain into north—western areas of the uk through the middle part of the week. it'll turn a bit warmer as well. before we get there, some sunday sunshine for most of us. face coverings, we were talking about them. if you are in england from friday, they will be compulsory in shops. as they already are in scotland. and you must remember to wash it, chris! get it on a hot wash. if you haven't got one by then, you will need a doctor's letter which has prompted a rush of enquiries to gps. doctor farrah sheikh is in cheshire. that is interesting, isn't it? talk us through the increase in the number of people looking for exemptions because interestingly at the moment we don't know what will qualify as an exemption. so, no, we
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don't know 100% but the number of patients we have seen across the country requesting exemption notes from gps haven't got any underlying problems that would prevent them from wearing a face covering so for example we know that certain people who have physical disabilities who mightfind it who have physical disabilities who might find it difficult to put a mask on or keep the mask on, it might cause them distress, they are exempt at the moment but we have notice in a significant increase in people who don't have any underlying problems requesting exemption notes so it isn't just problems requesting exemption notes so it isn'tjust my surgery. this has been happening across the country and it is causing issues in regards to the workload of gps because this isn't something we are used to and isn't something we will be able to provide. there is information online and also for example if you're going to be going on public transport for example on the tube, if you go on the tfl website, you can print out little cards to say you are exempt if you
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have mental health issues or physical issues. children under 11, they are exempt as well. if you rely on lip reading, it is important whoever is accompanying you isn't wearing a mask so you can communicate with them effectively. implicit in the fact people are asking for this exemption is they don't believe they are useful, they are not making a difference so what would you say to them?” are not making a difference so what would you say to them? i would say it is making a difference. and even if you don't want to wear a mask, i don't know anybody who does, think about other people as well, so we know coronavirus is spread with droplets in the air so if you are able to cover your mouth and your nose to prevent somebody else getting coronavirus, then i think it is important we do that. no one likes wearing masks but do you wear one for the sake of other people as well. some people believe there is only a use in wearing a mask if your
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symptomatic. if you are presymptomatic, there is no point so what would you say to that. the research is saying you don't even know when you are presymptomatic. presymptomatic would mean you might have coronavirus but you're not showing symptoms so if you're not showing symptoms so if you're not showing symptoms so if you're not showing symptoms you could be going about your everyday life, going into the shops, into your workplace, seeing vulnerable members of the society and not taking adequate precautions. so it would be prudent to wear the mask or face covering. there is so much we don't know about this virus, the winter months are just around the corner so how concerned are you about how the virus will behave once temperatures drop, once we are indoors a lot more? so, it is difficult to know exactly how it'll start behaving as the winter months come along. we are already prepping for this in general practice. we know that flu season is going to be with us imminently, our
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flu vaccination campaign usually sta rts flu vaccination campaign usually starts around 0ctober time so we are already starting to make plans for that. it'll be a completely different winter programme compared to previous years, we've got to think about social distancing, about whether there will be another lockdown in the wintertime, we know that respiratory viruses tend to be more common in the winter anyway so it isa more common in the winter anyway so it is a case of trying to get yourself as fit as you can be for those winter months. the prime minister talking about some sort of return to normal by christmas. how optimistic is that, do you think? i think it is optimistic, if you think about it. by then we will have had nine months of some kind of lockdown or restrictions in everyday activities i'm hoping by christmas time there will be some relaxation of these rules so we can spend some quality time with our family, friends and loved ones who we haven't seen that much this year. how realistic it's going to be i'm not sure. it is difficult at the
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moment of hospital trusts, isn't it, seeking to reopen, provisions for people with chronic and ongoing conditions putting pressure on you as well so how is that going to have an impact down the line? it is going to have a big impact across the whole of the nhs. we haven't been working to our full capacity since march, really, so it is trying to catch up with all the backlog, trying to get all the patients who need to be seen into the clinics but it is going to be a mammoth task.” would imagine day to day really difficult to say to patients whether it is worth taking the chance of seeing them face—to—face and risking the spread. it is hard because we haven't seen patients face—to—face since march so it is becoming difficult to maintain that relationship. i know that technology has its advantages but it is com pletely has its advantages but it is completely different to when the patient is sitting with you in the room. this might be the way forward,
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i'm not sure, but i'm hoping brighter days will come soon.” suppose the advice is just we have to get used to do this for the time being, we won't be seeing our gps face to face in the way we have done before. no, we are not, not for the time being. we hope we can get some face—to—face contact back as soon as possible but when it is safe for everybody, not only for gps, the members of the public, and for our staff as well. that is the most important thing, patient safety. if it isn't safe for you to come into the surgery and can deal with you over the phone or using video consultation, that is the best option we have at the moment. thank you so much, some very good advice especially on face coverings. thank you. admirably tidy carpet. nina: and not much clutter. chris: can only dream of that! we've got duclos lying about when you are walking barefoot. coming up in the next half hour...
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we'll be catching up with the army major who is walking from lands end to edinburgh without any shoes or socks, to raise money for research into his daughter's rare illness. he's barefoot, he's in basingstoke, and he's on bbc breakfast at 8:50. who would miss barefoot in basingstoke? chris: it's like a bbc drama, that, isn't it?
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hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. here's a summary of this morning's main news. borisjohnson has said he doesn't believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph he thinks any future outbreaks can be dealt with at a local or regional level. he compared the idea of another national lockdown to the "nuclear deterrent" — a tool he would not wish to abandon, but one he has no wish to use. two official photographs marking the wedding of princess beatrice and the italian count, edoardo mapelli—mozzi, have been released by buckingham palace. 0ne image shows the couple leaving the private ceremony at windsor‘s royal chapel on friday. another shows them
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standing alongside — but still two metres from — the queen and the duke of edinburgh. the palace chose not to release a picture showing the bride's parents, the duke and duchess of york. two men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a stabbing at an amusement park. police say a man in his 20s suffered a serious stomach wound after an altercation between two groups at thorpe park, in surrey, yesterday afternoon. visitors were locked inside the park while the emergency services attended. spain's catalonia region has again recorded more than a thousand covid infections in a single day, as residents endure new restrictions. the surge led to tough new measures being announced on friday for an initial period of 15 days. people in the regional capital, barcelona, are being asked to stay indoors, and gatherings of more than ten people are discouraged. those are the main stories this morning. let's check in with holly for a last
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look at the sport today. good morning to both of you. the first of the fa cup semifinals was played yesterday. not a tin foil trophy in sight. but one thing was familiar about last night. arsenal are into a record 21st fa cup final after beating manchester city 2—0 at wembley. for arsenal boss, mikel arteta, it meant getting one over on his old mentor. remember, he was pep guardiola's assistant manager until last december. but, thanks to a double from pierre emerick aubameyang, arteta's on his way to getting a bit of silverware to finish out his first season in charge. bear in mind, if arsenal were to win the fa cup that wouold mean automatic qualificaiton for the europa league. all in all a good week for arsenal — coming off the back of wednesday‘s all in all a good week for arsenal — coming off the back of wednesday's victory over the elague champions liverpool. we had an incredible week. to beat the best two teams in europe in three days is something that
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doesn't happen in every day. credit to the players the way they are standing, they are fighting, they are believing and the chemistry that they have generating between them to go through difficult moments in the game, but as well to play some really good stuff and to score the way we scored today. the only regret is we that didn't play the first half but we played the second half. and after you can lose, that we didn't play the first half but we played the second one. and in that way we lost. it's happens, it's football. so mistakes in front of the goal when you meet the chances, it's part, but today was not that, the reason why we didn't win. so we didn't play good in the first half and in these knockout games you don't have time against good teams. so, arsenal will face either manchester united or chelsea — their semifinal takes place this evening. united go into that game having already beaten them three times this season. both are under pressure in the league as well as they battle it out for champions league qualification. and only a point between them. this is a great chance to get to the final.
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we're just one step away, it's at wembley, so we're focused on the fa cup and a trophy of course, that's massive for any player to win and any team to win, so that's our main focus now, is to get to the final. and then we'll look at west ham and look at leicester after that. of course it feels like we're in a slightly different position this year because of the circumstances of the season but we have an opportunity and it's up to the players and ourselves to make the best of it on sunday but we're playing a very good team, we know that, they're in good form. and whoever would await us in the final will be a very good team, so, the work is to be done. that semifinal kicks off at six o'clock. it's live on bbc one and radio 5live with coverage beginning at 5:30pm. just one game in the premier league yesterday as norwich's miserable end to the season continued. already relegated, the league's bottom club lost their penultimate match of the season 2—0
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against burnley and had two men sent off. burnley‘s second a moment to forget for norwich defender ben godfrey. he will not want to see that again. some formula 1 to look forward to later as well, with lewis hamilton starting on pole at the hungarian grand prix as he looks to claim his seventh victory there. it was another masterclass for hamilton during qualifying. mercedes were miles ahead of everyone else, but the six—time world champion finished just ahead of team—mate valtteri bottas. it's the 90th pole of his career. this is what he had to say afterwards. thankful to everyone back home and the guys here that do such an amazing job, and valtteri doesn't make it easy for me at all, so it requires absolute perfection when it comes to doing laps and qualifying like that is one of the things i enjoy most. in golf, england's danny willett is six shots off the lead going into the final day
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of the memorial tournament. the 2016 masters winner came back from a poor start to finish strongly and put him in contention in ohio. the spaniard jon rahm has a four shot lead on 12 under. he could become world number one if he goes on to win. we may actually get some cricket today after day three of the second test between england and west indies was a complete wash—out. day four is looking a little more promising with clear skies forecast. henry moeran is at old trafford for us. that lost day was no help to england. it's now a race against time to try to level the series. it is but as you can see behind me things are looking much better today, clear forecast for the next couple of days and that will give england the best opportunity possible to level the series. the west indies at 32—1 responding to
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england's 469—9 declared so england need to take 19 wickets to win the game and ideally bolt the west indies out under 278. that way they can indies out under 278. that way they ca n e nfo rce indies out under 278. that way they can enforce the follow—on and give them enough time to win at the game. if this is a draw england cannot win the series, they could still draw it. west indies will still be thinking this is a huge opportunity, if they can say at this for a draw to put them in position for a win in england and a test series for the first time since 1988. given the situation they're in now, will england have any regrets? should they have been more ambitious with their declaration on thursday night? possibly. the innings we saw, while impressive in terms of longevity, there were questions as to whether they could have accelerated quicker to give england a platform with they could have bowled out west indies on the second evening for a couple of hours, take a three or four wickets
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and the equation to win the game today and tomorrow it would be that much easier. with a vulnerability that we saw what england's batsmen in the first match, perhaps just scoring that big total on the first innings will do wonders for the confidence ahead of a few busy weeks of test cricket. looking forward to it, and glad to see you cut out of your hotel room as well! and the weather is looking excellent when you are as well, that scheduled to start at 11am. i can't quite believe it after all these months of no sport. and the football on later on. thank you, holly. have a nice day. in the last few months, we've seen inside a lot of intensive care wards and gained some idea ofjust how distressing that environment can be for patients, who are often too weak and disoriented to talk.
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but a hospital in cambridge has developed a device to give those patients a voice and now it's about to be rolled out around the world. here's our science correspondent richard westcott. a stay in intensive care isn'tjust physical, it can take its toll on your mind, too. patients often say the most stressful and frightening thing is not being able to communicate with the doctors and nurses. we click this one to reorientate themselves. computer voice: you are in intensive care after your operation. which is where this new device comes in. where is your pain? lower leg. carol has just woken up from a 12 hour operation. she has tubes in her neck and she cannot talk. designed by a team at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge, this app is now giving her a voice. i need a deep breath.
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we've been allowed to come and talk to carol. she is in the covid—free ward, but we are still wearing full protective gear, which the bbc replaced. carol, thank you so much for doing this, i know you've just been through this enormous operation and you've only woken up this morning. it's incredible that you can do this for us. thank you very much. thank you very much for all. such a great thing, the tv. oh, i totally agree with you. i'm busy today, lots of fun. it's really nice that you can use humour, isn't it? it changes the way that we interact with them immediately. if you couldn't talk because of that, it is so much more difficult for us to have those basic human interactions. for me, the humour side of it is what makes the biggest difference. what are the things that have surprised you that patients have said, now they are able to have a voice? i think we were all surprised how many people were just thirsty. just a really simple thing.
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we know their mouths are dry, but that was the constant thing, thirst. so upping of the amount of times that we can give mouth care to people, ensuring that tiny thing just makes them comfortable, and it makes their breathing better, their heart better. lying there unable to communicate your problem can contribute to long—term post—traumatic stress, depression and anxiety. the evidence we have accumulating suggests that there might be an improvement in ptsd rates afterwards as well. basically less post—traumatic stress from being intensive care? correct. and we know not being able to communicate, as you would imagine, is a major source of stress. after years of development, funded by the hospital's charity, the app is about to be offered free in 12 different languages for use around the world. it is being used on covid wards, where patients on ventilators cannot talk.
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and some uk hospitals are starting to compare what their different patients as saying. the ipad is a godsend. i felt like i couldn't breathe, but can say it here. so they can all improve their treatment. we make the best team! the difference it must make to be able to express yourself clearly. just seeing those pictures in there, aside from the technology, just a reminder of the toll that it can exact. absolutely. iam going exact. absolutely. i am going to zipped off to read the news on bbc one for andrew marr so i will leave you in your capable hands. i will stay here until 9am but for now let's get the final check of the weather with bend. good morning. for most of you i have sunday sunshine on offer. this is how the day starts in the south—west of wales, blue sky, patchy cloud
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thatis of wales, blue sky, patchy cloud that is the theme for most. some showers for northern parts of the uk and towards the south—east something and towards the south—east something a little bit different. 0n the satellite and radar you can see where we had a band of cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain. very, very slow moving weather front, really dragging its heels as it creeps south—eastwards. if you are out and about throughout the first part of this morning, east anglia, south—east, towards the south—west, cloudy and damp but further north and west sunny skies for wales, northern england, northern ireland sorry to start the day. extending across scotland but also some showers here, to put some of which will be heavy. not as windy in northern scotland as yesterday's. showers will blow in across scotland, one or two could reach northern ireland, may be as far south as cumbria. this band of cloud will bring some patchy rain from
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suffolk and essex come into kent, london, sussex as we head through this afternoon. temperatures are cooler than yesterday in the south, 21 celsius. further north, 16 celsius for scotland and northern ireland. but a much better day at 0ld ireland. but a much better day at old trafford, not that would be hard after the washer yesterday. fine and dry and some sunshine. i am hopeful for a full day's play in the test match. into the evening we lose our pesky weather front from the south—east leaving clear skies overhead. still some showers for scotland, fairly cool night for the time of year, some countryside spots down to four celsius. tomorrow, starting off quite chilly, but bright. some sunshine. further north, northern england, northern ireland and scotland in particular, once again some showers, and some could be heavy. temperatures
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remaining low weather should be for the time of year. 15—22. mainly dry start for most because of high pressure. that will hold on into tuesday but this frontal system approaching from the north—west will eventually bring some rain across northern ireland, scotland, far north of england from wednesday into thursday. staying dry yourfurther south and turning a little warmer as well. that's all from me for this morning, have a great sunday. nina, it is back to you. earlier this month, we featured a story on breakfast about the thousands of children who have missed out on vital schoolwork because they don't have a computer or internet access at home. well, a bbc appeal has prompted a flood of digital donations to help pupils with their online learning. fiona lamdin went to meet one of them. for months, this has been charlie's classroom. alone with his textbook and his phone. i'm finding it very, very stressful and sometimes i find
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it too much that ijust don't do any work at all. following last week's appeal, a viewer put a brand—new laptop in the post. that's pucker, mate, that is. that's really nice. it is brilliant. it arrived while we were filming. now i can actually do all my homework, it's going to make my life a lot easier, so a lot more calming now. charlie's foster dad believes it'll improve his gcse results. it's just blew me away, to tell you the truth. it's amazing people can be that kind. i think it's life changing, really. to him, for what he can achieve, from having that to using his phone, it's unbelievable, really. it's astronomical. since our broadcast last week there have been thousands of donations. laptops, phones and tablets. and those are the ones we know about. many of you, like sue, have been going directly to your local school. sue saw the appeal last week. i've got two laptops sitting in the back of my office,
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and i felt that they would be much better employed being put to good use for the children. she rang her friends, encouraging them to give. that's amazing, sue. absolutely wonderful. thank you. today she has brought the donations to her local school. laptops can make a huge difference. that will be 12 families that will then be able to get their sons and daughters onto the internet, accessing the online learning that we've got. notjust now, but in the future. now, because someone has actually used their time and their effort to help me out like this, ifeel like it should put a lot more effort in to do my work. charlie never expected a brand—new laptop, but says it'll transform his education and is a complete game changer. fiona lamdin, bbc news. thank you to everyone who has generously donated. as fiona and charlie were saying, it is making an enormous difference to literally thousands of families. thank you.
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it's the start of the summer holidays for most children in england and wales this week and you won't be surprised that many uk campsites have seen a surge in bookings. 0ne company, pitchup.com, says it's dealing with double the number of enquiries compared to last year. 0ur reporter adam mcclean is at a "glamping" site in wirral. morning adam. you were whispering earlier because nobody was quite awake, you can use a louder voice now it is almost nine o'clock, can't you ? a louder voice now it is almost nine o'clock, can't you? good morning. i certainly can. i whispered my way through that outside broadcast to be considerate, it turns out half of them were already awake listening to us, not just listening, them were already awake listening to us, notjust listening, they are watching breakfast live on their mobile phones. they give us some coffee and food so all is forgiven. i can't understand why they wouldn't wa nt to i can't understand why they wouldn't want to come on national tv at 7am but never mind. let's have a look at the tents here. they are nestled in an area where christmas trees would
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normally be grown. andrea, you've been here for two nights, did you sleep well? absolutely brilliant. in amongst nature. i heard you were awake before when i was filming? just a little bit! have you had a good time? you really good time. we've explored places so close to home we've never been to before so it's been great. fields can be rented out for 28 days every year without planning permission and that has been doubled to 56 days as more people look to holiday inn at the uk. lindsay, you set up this site, what with into it? a lot of effort from the family and steve, the farmer, we collaborated and worked ha rd to farmer, we collaborated and worked hard to make the land rights for the tents and spread out due to the pandemic. what is the reaction that you had been? a really positive reaction from local people and
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people further afield and we've had a really good optic on pitch up so it's all looking really positive —— really good uptake. people have been relying on the local farms for the last few months for food shopping, there was a farm shop year for food shopping but you turn to tourism. yes, we did. we were organic farmers for many years and realised we had to diversify into tourism to survive. what is it like having campers waking up on yourfan? survive. what is it like having campers waking up on your fan?m you like people, it is fine. i happen to like people. it is very nice. we have farm trails, campsites, many different elements. weddings. the year. it is a joyous thing to do and we are very privileged people come here. ifeel very proud people want to come to come to my home and spend time here. what do you make of the change in rules 256 days, will that help
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farmers and many farmers like me have been closed down for several months and of course it'll help —— change in rules up to 56 days. months and of course it'll help —— change in rules up to 56 daysm will be a great help. many have had little or no and, like many businesses are for the last few months. you've seen a shift of back to basics, people appreciating things maybe we lost sight of. yeah, we've had to fine tune the farm attractions to covid—19, we had to dispense with certain elements, now we have things like the farm trail and pig racing and other things but what i found is people really enjoy the basic smoke, the view, the animals, the fields. —— enjoy the basic things and more. the government is encouraging people to holiday in this country, the prime minister has said he will be staying at home for his holiday. plenty of
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people will be and it is hoped that will give tourism a much needed boost. and why wouldn't the prime minister choose the wordl to holiday, adam? having looked at the gang by the campsite, i imagine it's going to be quiet day there! if you think walking 700 miles from lands end to edinburgh sounds tough, how about trying it without any shoes or socks? that's what major chris brannigan is doing to fund research into his young daughter's rare illness. we'll chat to chris in a moment but first let's take a look at his journey so far. about to take my very first steps on a 700 mile barefoot march. it's spectacular. people have been amazing so far. so many people have stopped at the side of the road, pulled into laybys to say, what are you doing? where are you going? giving them a flyer.
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so if you are one of those guys, thanks so much. cheering. thank you, guys. thank you. i have managed to make it onto the beach, which... yes, you have! ..which is amazing. 0ne, it's beautiful, but, two, it's also not hurting my feet so much. how are you feeling, boss? i'm so tired. really, really knackered. you've just got to stick your head down and remember why you're walking. and we can talk to chris before he sets off on today's leg of the journey. he's made it to basingstoke so far. very good morning to you. we will talk about your feet in just a moment but first about remind us why you're doing this, your daughter has a rare genetic condition, tell us why it's important to raise for that. my little girl is only eight
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yea rs old that. my little girl is only eight years old and has this really rare condition and when we got the diagnosis i ask the doctor what can we do, what treatments are there and they said there is nothing, you've got to learn to live with this. that never sat well with us. we've set up a charity and we hope to raise £400,000 to fund the first ever gene therapy for this condition to change her life and the life of other kids with this condition. how does it impact part life at the moment? in so many ways. when she was small she spent a lot of time in and out of hospital, it was a really frightening time for us as a family, particularly when i was deployed in afghanistan. we were not sure if she was going to make it sometimes. the sad reality in the uk one in three kids with a rare disease never reach their fifth birthday. kids with a rare disease never reach theirfifth birthday. her condition gets worse from puberty so we are in a race against time to save her
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life. it's clear why you are doing this, people might understand walking the length of the two nations, 700 miles, why do it barefoot? ! nations, 700 miles, why do it barefoot?! i asked myself that every day and every step is painful, i can assure you! because she just has a single gene mutation that makes her life really ha rd single gene mutation that makes her life really hard and makes her really exposed to the world in ways the rest of us don't have to considered so i thought it was only fairi considered so i thought it was only fair i do the same thing and expose myself to the world. every time i wa nt to myself to the world. every time i want to stop and think it is too painful to go on i remember i can jump painful to go on i remember i can jump ona painful to go on i remember i can jump on a taxi and go home but she cannot get better and if i stop we are not going to raise the money we need. that's amazing, that heightens your empathy with her come in a sense. how are your feet? we discussed earlier if we should look at them but we thought, this time in the morning, people having their
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brea kfast, the morning, people having their breakfast, not ideal! how are they? it is pretty painful. the uk roads are not it is pretty painful. the uk roads a re not really it is pretty painful. the uk roads are not really a friendly place for being barefoot. it is incredibly ha rd being barefoot. it is incredibly hard and there are points every day at work i really want to stop every timei at work i really want to stop every time i look at ourjust giving page, it gives me hope and everybody has been so incredibly generous to try and help her. you mentioned in the video will be so you've been incredibly supported by people along the way with have begun to recognise you, how important is that support? some people might assume i have a support team and it is a car along side are waiting for me but it is just me, i am running this off my mobile phone and my wife is supporting from home by looking after our three kids. people are probably food, drinks, the app spoke to me when i am running this off my mobile phone and my wife is
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supporting from home by looking after our three kids. people are probably food, drinks, the app spoke to me when i've been sat in a ditch feeling down about things —— they have come and spoke to me. people have come and spoke to me. people have been so generous and i've been moved by how kind they are. have been so generous and i've been moved by how kind they arem have been so generous and i've been moved by how kind they are. it makes a difference, especially when so many families are going through their own struggles. you started in land's their own struggles. you started in lands end and you need to get to edinburgh, you are now in basingstoke, percentage—wise, how far along are you? i think the whole journey is about 700 miles, i've donejust over 250, so journey is about 700 miles, i've done just over 250, so another 450 miles to go. the best of luck. maybe it will have a look at your feet when it comes to an end, if you are feeling brave enough! how can people help you out and done it, if they wish to? people can google hope for hastie and they can find atjust giving page where they can make a
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donation and read about our story. thank you so much for speaking to us. that's all from breakfast today. dan and louise are back from six o'clock tomorrow. enjoy the rest of your weekend.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more than a quarter of a million coronavirus cases in 24 hours — the largest single—day global rise in cases since the start of the pandemic. borisjohnson says that in the uk, he does not believe another nationwide lockdown will be needed, even if there's a second spike of coronavirus this winter. eu leaders meet for an unscheduled third day of talks on a post—coronavirus economic recovery plan. lebanon faces economic ruin as the country's currency loses 80% of its value against the dollar, resulting in soaring prices. and a record number of profit warnings issued by leading uk businesses that are listed on the london stock exchange. and the first official photos of the wedding

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