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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 26, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and sima kotecha. our headlines today: anyone arriving in the uk from spain now has to self—isolate for two weeks after quarantine rules changed overnight. it follows a sharp rise in spanish coronavirus infections: travel plans for thousands of britons have been thrown into chaos. we could go on holiday, we cannot come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. that just come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. thatjust wouldn't be possible. for some holidaymakers, relief at landing home late last night before the restrictions kicked in.
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it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what is going on. we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight. good morning. it's the final day of the premier league season and it's going to be a nail—biter for fans of aston villa, watford and bournemouth. only one of those three teams will stay up. the weather is not looking too bad at all for most of us on sunday. there are a few showers in the forecast not talking about the downpours of yesterday. i think a pretty decent day for most. good morning to you. it's sunday july 26. our top story: british holidaymakers returning from spain, including the balearic islands and the canary islands, will have to quarantine for two weeks from today amid fears that the country could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. the measure, announced just yesterday evening, applies to all four nations of the uk. the foreign office is also advising against all—but—essential travel to mainland spain. andy moore reports.
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face coverings are required at all times. some of the last flight arriving from spainjust times. some of the last flight arriving from spain just minutes before the midnight deadline. these women had brought forward their departure to avoid quarantine. it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what is going on. we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight. monday and we just got the next flight. how do you feel you miss the deadline by 30 minutes. happy days. the news will come as a bitter blow to the —— tens of thousands of british holidaymakers already in spain and those planning to head there soon. this couple have already made a decision not to travel. although we could go on holiday, we had booked holidays, we can't come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. that just back and then stay in the house for two weeks. thatjust wouldn't be possible. so we can't then go on holiday because we can't come back and quarantine for two weeks. the
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new foreign office advice comes in the wake of rising coronavirus infections in parts of spain, especially in catalonia and neighbouring aragon and nevada. the government says difficult choices have to be made. whenever a decision is made, there will always be people who have just left the uk. there are always people behind and in front of the line. so there is no magic time at which to do this. the thing that we have to do this. the thing that we have to do is do it as soon as we are certain about the data and feel certain about the data and feel certain that it is time to act. and we ta ke certain that it is time to act. and we take the advice from the joint biosecurity centre very seriously indeed. and we don't delay when those signals come in. the advise against all but essential travel applies only to mainland spain. and everyone returning from any part of the country will have to self isolate for two weeks. the level of infection is lower in some parts of spain. the regional
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governments of the canaries and the balearic islands are asking to be excluded from the need to quarantine. the tour operator has cancelled its flights to spain. other airlines are continuing to operate for the time being. the aircraft operators association says the government should look urgently at the possibility of testing as an alternative to quarantine. this news will have a devastating effect more widely on confidence in foreign travel. if spain now, where next? we have reporters at gatwick and manchester airport this morning. andy moore is at gatwick. andy, what's been the reaction from the spanish authorities? quite a significant blow for them. yes, good morning. spanish authorities say they respect the decision of the british government, but they emphasise that spain is a safe country and they say the
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coronavirus outbreak is thunder control. the foreign office here is warning against all but essential travel to mainland spain. that means if you do decide to go, your insurance may be invalid. if you wa nt to insurance may be invalid. if you want to go to the canary islands of the balearic islands, that is your individual choice. infection levels asi individual choice. infection levels as i sat in that report vary a lot across spain. the canary islands say infection levels there are some of the lowest in europe. together with the lowest in europe. together with the balearic islands, they say they should be excluded from this quarantine, so they are lobbying to try to achieve that. also worth saying really that this decision to impose quarantine at midnight last night, that is a uk wide decision so it applies to all the devolved administrations of scotland, wales, northern ireland and england. across—the—board if you are coming back from spain you will have to go into self isolation, very stringent, you should avoid public transport if at all possible, and when you are at home for two weeks, you are not even allowed to go out for exercise.
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absolutely. for now, goodbye. we will keep up—to—date with you. we can speak now to our reporter, adam mcclean, at manchester airport. adam, how have airlines and travel companies responded to this? good morning. airlines including british airways have criticised the new measures as yet, another blow for british holidaymakers. the uk's largest tour operator has cancelled all flights that were due to depart for spain today. the trade body airlines uk hazardous morning that shows why regional travel corridors need to be considered so that travel to safe pa rt need to be considered so that travel to safe part of the red country can continue. we also need to see the introduction of testing at uk airports, they say, that those who are covid negative can continue to travel without the need to self isolate upon arrival. this news emerged yesterday evening, giving travellers in spain just hours to return back to the uk and avoid that
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quarantine. the snap changing the rules because into question i think the usefulness of that at that list asa the usefulness of that at that list as a planning tool holidaymakers when they are deciding where to go, as many who are in spain now probably didn't expect to have to quarantine on their arrival back here in the uk. adam, thank you very much. i am sure we will be hearing from you throughout the day. let's talk about some of the political implications of all of this. we're joined now by our political correspondent helen catt. helen, this is quite a sudden change for the government — why now? big implication that we are hearing therefore both sides of this, and also the travellers caught up in it. just bring us up—to—date with what ministers have said, why the sudden change? it is in response to the spike of infection rates in spain, and the uk government has said it has always been clear that it would change the rules, the exemptions if you like if it needed to on these
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exemptions i have a people coming back from various countries. if you think actor when it was brought in, the point of quarantine, the government said, was to stop its imported cases of coronavirus from other countries now that the rate is lower here. initially, when quarantine was brought in in the beginning ofjune it applied to virtually every country in the world and there was a lot of pressure from the industry, and also from conservative backbenchers to try and make that more targeted, to make sure there were places people could go where they wouldn't have to come back and self isolate to try and protect the industry. that is where they listed exempted countries came from. each devolved administration, each nation is able to set its own list of countries, and actually, scotla nd list of countries, and actually, scotland didn't have spain on the intellectual list. it only added in recent days. i think the questions that will be asked are wasn't obvious to people that actually things could change this quickly, you could be on your sun lounge and find you are coming back to 14 days
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of self isolation. the government is asking people to be sympathetic, and one quick thing to add, the department of transport is in charge of running these agreements, and actually, the transport secretary is one of the people caught up in this, he flew off to spain yesterday. thank you so much for now. prescriptions for cycling are set to be included in the government's plans to tackle obesity in england. full measures will be set out tomorrow and are expected to include a 12—week plan to encourage people to lose weight and a ban onjunk food tv adverts before 9pm. it comes after public health england found being overweight puts people at greater risk from coronavirus. speed limits through most roadworks on england's motorways will be raised to increase traffic flow and ease driver frustrations. it's being raised from 50mph to 6mph. —— 60mph. highways england say they carried out trials over the last 18 months to show that the safety of motorists and road workers could be maintained with the increased speed.
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hurricane hanna has made landfall in the us state of texas with officials warning of life threatening storm surges. heavy rainfall and winds of nearly 90mph have struck coastal areas south of the city corpus christi. residents in some communities have been told to leave their homes. the state governor has issued a disaster declaration for 32 counties, saying the coronavirus outbreak would complicate the work of the emergency services. people heading to wales's national parks are being warned their cars could be towed away after many were found parking illegally. police say around 60 vehicles were turned away from the base of snowdon yesterday. 180 fines were issued last weekend because of illegal parking. the queen has completed another first of her reign due to the lockdown, this time conducting a virtual unveiling of a new portrait of her. it was commissioned by the foreign office as a tribute to her service to diplomacy and was painted by the artist miriam escofet.
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although nothing escapes her majesty's attention, though — during the unveiling, she was quick to point out that the teacup featured in the painting had no tea in it. not great. not great. not like us this morning. these coffee cups are full this morning. good morning to you. you are up—to—date with the headlines. let's ta ke up—to—date with the headlines. let's take a look at what is happening on the front of the newspapers this morning. the sunday times has details from a new book detailing the duke and duchess of sussex's life in the royal family, which is being serialised in the paper. it's called finding freedom. the mail on sunday also leads with the same story. it claims close friends of the duke and duchess of cambridge had "done all they possibly could" to welcome meghan into the royal family. meanwhile, the telegraph carries the new portrait of the queen, commissioned by the foreign office. and the most read story on the bbc news website this morning is the story that speed limits through most roadworks on england's motorways will be raised
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from 50mph to 60mph. we will talk more about all of those stories throughout the programme this morning. a teenagerfrom cumbria has unearthed a piece of wartime history and it has caused ripples on the other side of the world. max hazelhurst was looking for wildlife when he found an australian dog tag from the second world war. he has since tracked down the owner's family. it isa the owner's family. it is a walk max hazlehurst will never forget. the 13—year—old was searching for bugs and snakes on the la ke searching for bugs and snakes on the lake district when he discovered something rather special. the path gets rocky and there was ice, about that much. i picked it up thinking it was a dog collar or something like that and i saw the actual tag bit which had the name on. he had found a second world war dog tag or
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military identification label thought to have been lost appear in the 1940s. max and his family put the 1940s. max and his family put the details on social and soon discovered it belonged to ernie wills, a warrant officer with the royal australian air force. it is pretty amazing. i wasn't expecting to find that when i came up here. max also discovered ernie's surviving family who live near perth in australia, and the story has reverberated around the globe. three australian sisters have told of their disbelief after a piece of their disbelief after a piece of theirfamily‘s wartime their disbelief after a piece of their family's wartime history was uncovered on a mountain in northern britain. the fact he showed his mum and his mum has put it on facebook... as you can see, we are emotional, but we are very, very excited. today, max had the chance to chat with one of ernie's grateful daughters. next, how on earth did you find that tag? i wasjust looking around, i was looking for
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adders. you have made our family so happy. we are just beside ourselves. with excitement and tears and, you know, we are so proud of you. he loved... because he was a geologist, loved... because he was a geologist, love spending time, a lot like you, i think, exploring the environment around him. that is why we think he would be so proud of you. sadly, ernie died at the age ofjust 43 in a car crash near alice springs. but thanks to a cumbrian schoolboy, his family now have another memory of him to treasure. it does feel quite good, to give them an end. just something for them to remember him by, yeah. hello, tom. there you are! i was miles away. there is only one topic
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this morning, when we saw you were on with us, we were discussing your hairand we were on with us, we were discussing your hair and we were both in agreement that we think it looks epic. wow. that is quite an introduction. epic hair. i tell you what, it has been very a8— 52%. hair. i tell you what, it has been very 48- 52%. i have seen, but i love that you are holding firm and you are not bowing to any pressure. well done. know, including yours. no pressure from me whatsoever. it has been pretty wild hair weather, hasn't it? yes, yesterday, and actually, later on in the morning i will show you some footage of the tornado that actually just skirted the outskirts of northampton yesterday. i haven't got the video ready just yet, but yesterday. i haven't got the video readyjust yet, but it is pretty good. if you tune in later on you will be able to see the final cloud whipping up some debris. the weather ruffled our feathers a little bit
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yesterday. the rain was pretty heavy as well. i am pleased to say that todayit as well. i am pleased to say that today it is not actually going to be quite as dramatic. they will be some sunny spells around. i think more sunshine than rain. here is the weather system that brought all of that rain, particularly across southern areas, yesterday, but not exclusively. you can see there is a gap in the weather front or between the weather fronts, so that is the weather that we have got around this morning and later today. a few showers, yes, in the forecast. they will be probably moving to scotland later in the morning and if you squint you can just about pick out these little blobs of blue here and there. but clearly it is looking pretty clear across the uk. temperatures around 23 in london, a little bit fresher, though, in the north. a fine end to the day, a beautiful sunset out there. beautiful skies on the way this evening. later tonight it looks as though the clouds will increase and we are expecting another bout of rain to arrive into... well, broadly
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speaking let's call it western areas and northern ireland towards the early hours of monday morning. and this is another weather system. you can see this one across scandinavia, this is the next one coming our way for monday. this one will also bring some quite blustery weather. i know the weather has turned really u nsettled the weather has turned really unsettled this month. i knowjuly to some of us is a bit of a disappointment and here we go with another bout of rain for monday. a real mixed bag on top of that, really gusty winds as well, but out towards the west later on monday afternoon the weather is going to improve. i will leave with goodies. the weather is going to be settling down for the week and towards the end of the week we could be coming back to nice, warm, summer like weather. i say summer like. thank you so much. more from tomasz a little later, and more on hurricane hanna. time now on breakfast
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for the latest technology news, with click. hey, welcome to click. now, as more and more places start to open up here in the uk there are some people who are starting to think about whether travelling or going abroad for a summer holiday is a possibility, and is safe. and that's why today, lara is not at home, she is at an airport. after months in isolation the idea of coming to a bustling airport, let alone getting on an actual plane can be slightly unnerving. here at heathrow things are much quieter than usual, but they are doing everything they can to try and make the place covid—safe, with a fair bit of help from technology. let's go and take a look. these robots were previously used to kill off hospital—acquired infection, but now there
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is one in each terminal, deployed to disinfect. mapping its route and focusing on the most common touch points. it uses uvc light, and viruses don't have an immune system to uvc, and that, in effect, stops it from replicating and kills the virus. the only way we could safely see it lit up and working though was through the window of this conference room. there is a good reason we couldn't go in, for the first few seconds that it is on, the room smells of burning skin, apparently. that's just from anything that may be laying around in the office. so, to avoid any nasty burns, it needs to get its work done when no—one is around. its motion and vibration sensors double—checking that no—one has appeared unexpectedly.
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but at least it is pretty speedy. in the airport here, this robot can disinfect 18,000 square metres in a minimum space of two and a half hours. it disinfects, not cleans, so it is nice to send this into say a washroom, disinfect it, then it is safe for the cleaning staff to go in, then they can clean. in an airport it is notjust about cleaning overnight. a place like this is usually pretty busy and that means that people's hands going on the same surfaces quite a lot, especially somewhere like an escalator. the solution here could also lie in a uv light. this escalator has been retrofitted with one underneath the belt, so it means that every time it goes round, it is being sanitised. and the whole route we take through the airport seems to have been carefully considered. stickers on lift buttons, wrappers on escalator handles, so think about your antibacterial spray but from a virus point of view. you wrap that around the escalator handle and it basically gives
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you several months of virus—free touching, and what we do is we have a technical check that we can make, our biotechnicians do this on a regular basis to see what the viral load is on those touch points, they can make sure that that wrapper is working and fully functional. it is used in a number of different places. we have them on lift buttons, escalators and also importantly on trolley handles. there is also mandatory mask wearing, and other safety features are being trialled, like this camera detection system tracking people's temperatures. the only thing that seems to be missing right now is, somewhat unsurprisingly, the passengers. google's pixel buds have finally come to the uk this week, nine months after they were first announced. so, so i've been seeing how
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they stack up next to some other big brand wireless earphones. the apple airpods pro and the snappily—titled sony wf1000 xm3s. i am wearing the pixel buds now, and google has designed them to lie flat in your ears, so they have a low profile, which i appreciate, because you don't catch them if you are taking off your shirt or if you are wearing a hat. all three of these come with a case that recharges your earbuds. google's is designed to look like a stone, which is very nice, and it fits in that tiny extra pocket in yourjeans. sony's case is the outlier, because it's comparatively huge. i'm not a big fan of this rose gold effect lid, because the paint has started to chip off. the big question of course is, how do they sound? i was never the sort of person to spend about £200 on a pair of headphones. until about two years ago my boss convinced me to buy these, because the audio quality and the noise cancellation were outstanding. and i never regretted it, because i wore them every day on the way to work,
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on flights, things like that. and the sony in—ear buds come fairly close to that sound quality. when i got the airpods pro, i was disappointed, because they cost more than any of these other headphones. but theyjust didn't sound as good. everything sounded a little bit duller. the pixel buds probably ran somewhere in between in terms of audio richness, but there is a problem with these. whatever i'm listening to, whether it's spoken word or music, there is a low level, quiet hissing noise the entire time, almost like you are listening to songs on a cassette tape rather than a clean digital copy. and it's most noticeable if you are listening to music in bed at low volume. not everyone can hear it. my housemate couldn't hear the hissing noise but i could, and so could lots of other people complaining on the google message boards. for a sound product, that's a fundamental problem. another weird thing about the pixel buds is that they don't have noise cancellation, and the sony and airpods pro both have really good noise cancelling for something so small. the pixel buds are at the end of the price scale where i would
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expect to have it. here is a quick look at some of the other features. the sonys come out top for battery life, and i've never had a problem with any of these running out, because they all recharge when you put them back in the case. the pixel buds and airpods pro have the added bonus of a wireless charging case, and both of them are also sweat resistant, while the sonys are not, although i used to wear them at the gym all the time, and they haven't broken yet. one little thing i'm really glad that the pixel buds get right is that they play the low battery noise at the same volume as the music you've been listening to, which is really important if you are trying to fall asleep. for some reason i cannot understand, the airpods pro play a really loud low battery noise, even if you are playing music at the quietest volume and so many times, i've fallen asleep with these in, and then suddenly... battery alert noise it makes mejump out of my skin every time. apple, please fix this! but that is a small issue compared to the hissing on the pixel buds. google says the hissing is rare, and it will fix it with a software update, but these first came out in the us in april and it's still not fixed, so i suppose we'll
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have to wait and see. now, are you counting down to the next generation of video games consoles and will you be team xbox or team playstation? that decision often rests on the exclusive games and franchises that each offers. the sony line—up for the ps5 has achieved universal acclaim from the gaming community but nothing xbox has revealed so far has set pulses racing but all that could be about to change, thanks to the biggest franchise xbox has, halo. mark chislow has been finding out more. halo hero the master chief is xbox's not so secret weapon in the next generation console showdown with playstation. the new game, halo infinite, has action centred around the master chief, now battling a foe called asheron, tackling a bad—tempered space bad guy who leads the distinctly
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unfriendly—sounding banished. i sat down with bonnie ross, head of things halo at microsoft and phil spencer, head of xbox, to talk about the master chief's next gen outing. so as far as halo infinite next—gen consoles are concerned, is it all about graphics so sharp you can see sweat on the brow of an alien before you dispatch them, with zero load times, or is there more to it than that? obviously you've got ten times the processing power, but for us, it's about the universe, and it's about the suspension of disbelief. we've spoken before, notjust in halo but in video games, about how agency, player choice, is one of those things that really connects you to the story. you now have more choice in the decisions that you make
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as master chief, which i do think, in the long run, it is a mechanism for connecting you more to the story that is there. halo infinite is arguably the biggest and most important launch title for the new xbox. to date, it has generated about £5.5 billion in sales, shifting 77 million copies across the franchise lifetime. big numbers. the first halo: combat evolved released for the original xbox back in 2001. developed by bungie, it combined storytelling and satisfying combat, and for the time, incredibly lush visuals. successful sequels followed before developers bungie departed microsoft games studios and went on to make their own sci—fi looter and shooter, destiny,
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which left 3113 industries to produce halo four and five, both commercially successful games which had a mixed response from fans. i think with halo four we told a beautiful story, i'm proud of what we did with campaign, but we fell down on multiplayer, we were probably trying to do some me too, trying to focus on what other games were doing versus thinking about halo. with halo five it is like we reversed our learning. with halo 5, it's kind of like we reversed our learning. i think the halo five story is a fine story, i think it is a great halo story with master chief at the focus, but then in multiplayer, i'm incredibly proud of what we did with multiplayer. so, third time up at the bat, i hope that we are learning together and making sure that we get it right this time. it is a new game on a new console, so the master chief has some new kit to play with, including this — the grapple shot.
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and the drop shield, which provides the chief with temporary cover. on this evidence, xbox seems to have got some of its mojo back. we'll find out if it is enough to face down the challenge playstation 5, when xbox series x launches later this year. that was marc. certainly looks like the next—generation console war is hotting up. that's it from us, though, for the moment. from me on the sofa, and from lara at arrivals... as ever, you can keep up with the team throughout the week on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter, @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello. this is breakfast with
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ben thompson and sima kotecha. good morning to you. let's bring you up—to—date with our main story this morning. british holidaymakers returning from spain, including the balearic islands and the canary islands, will have to quarantine for two weeks from today amid fears that the country could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. we can speak now to humphrey carter, the news editor of the majorca daily bulletin. thank you forjoining us, humphrey. good morning. what is the mood like there? it has only been several hours since this news broke that this was going to happen. i am not sure if you had really had the chance to speak to many people. what do you think the mood is like? how are people feeling? it is going to bea are people feeling? it is going to be a major, major kick in the teeth. iam in be a major, major kick in the teeth. i am in majorca. i am in covid free majorca. i have just i am in majorca. i am in covid free majorca. i havejust had a i am in majorca. i am in covid free majorca. i have just had a swim i am in majorca. i am in covid free majorca. i havejust had a swim in the ocean, i am in a covid free hotel. it is my first break since the pandemic study on march 1a, i
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haven't stopped work. it is not fair. ithink haven't stopped work. it is not fair. i think it is very, very cruel because people are talking about spain in general, and the spikes are in catalonia and aragon, but u nfortu nately for in catalonia and aragon, but unfortunately for headlines like aragon and in catalonia and on the news in the media, and with all due respect, most people in the world don't know where catalonia... perhaps aragon, they don't know where it is, so that's just put spain. and it is not fair. i think this is very, very harsh and very, very cruel because majorca is covid free, hotels are covid free, it is my first experience of the covid free hotel, i have been here 2a hours and quite frankly the protocol is fantastic. the sanitation... i am watching them now. they are de— sanitising the sunbeds and getting everything ready. everything... it is perfect and it is not a big deal.
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during the hotel, you wear a mask, but you are in the hotel for five minutes, you are up to your room and back down on the whole idea is you are outside was a look at the backdrop. i have just are outside was a look at the backdrop. i havejust been in the ocean. this is what people can come for. it is very harsh and very unfairandi for. it is very harsh and very unfairand i think for. it is very harsh and very unfair and i think it shows very badly on the management the british government that they are holding spain and other countries to ransom for their mismanagement or the pandemic. that is how i see it right from the start. i'm free, you live in spain, don't you? can you give us an idea of how many people are actually there in terms of tourism. have you seen a lot of tourists there? do you think people are coming to spain now? no. they were coming, the reaction to the wearing of masks did lead to a wave of cancellations, maths wave of
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cancellations, maths wave of cancellations, but three, four days later, borisjohnson cancellations, but three, four days later, boris johnson decided, cancellations, but three, four days later, borisjohnson decided, kind of volu nta ry, later, borisjohnson decided, kind of voluntary, introduce the same kind of thing. itjust doesn't stack up. spain has been in the strictest lockdown measures in europe, it has worked. obviously there are going to be spikes, mainly young people because they are going out partying because they are going out partying because they are going out partying because they cannot go to nightclubs because they cannot go to nightclubs because they cannot go to nightclubs because the nightclub is closed, and family reunions are also a problem, but they have it under control. but what they don't really need now is other countries making life more common “— other countries making life more common —— and accommodated. everybody loves to come to spain. i don't know what the weather is for people in the uk looking up their window, but i am sure they haven't got a backdrop like this. if you wa nt to got a backdrop like this. if you want to make the effort to travel, it is worth travelling, and majorca is covid free. the hotels are covid
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free. everybody is doing everything they can, everybody is respecting they can, everybody is respecting the laws and i think it is a real kick in the teeth and it is a short and cheap way out from the uk government. thank you, humphrey. i think a lot of people will be empathising with your feelings there. thank you so much for talking to us this morning. we are going to talk much more in the programme as well about what you should do if you have a holiday booked over the next couple of days due to fly out to spain, later in the summer, what your rights may be when it comes to things like cancellation or getting your money back. we will talk about that a little later. this morning, let's checkin little later. this morning, let's check in with what the sports news is. it is the end of quite an unusual premier league season this year. all kinds of records broken. the longest, probably strangers premier league season in history. as you say, this afternoon it all comes to
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a close. every team will play their final match at 4pm and there's still lots to be decided. it looks like leicester city against manchester united will decide the final champions league spot, but the real drama will come at the bottom of the table. only one of bournemouth, watford or aston villa will stay up, as patrick gearey reports. time is short for those above the trapdoor. but on sunday, there will be 20 seconds i feel like ours. moments that may endure in memories for years. the equations for aston villa, watford and born with are different. a goal in one place changes the faith of others. hopes, worries and millions of pounds in the mix. surely hard not to look at your phone. it depends on the time when it is, what is happening in our game. there is a lot of different
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things and different emotions on the sideline we are going through. our entire focus will be on trying to beat west ham, but we will also be mindful of what is going on elsewhere because it can change during the game. although you want to know the other scores, it has a detriment effect on your performance and your mindset as well. it takes your focus of what is happening in front of you. but born with neither co mforta ble front of you. but born with neither comfortable win. it would only say thatis comfortable win. it would only say that is real and what would both lose. and aston villa victory in over west ham could be enough to save them unless watford thrashed arsenal. all will be fighting the fear of failure. dark that have gathered through the season but must be forgotten for this one day. you focus so much on trying not to lose, what happens is you start to play very negatively a very defensively, and everything is about making it perfect to not make a mistake. what happens then is thatjust adds further to the pressure and that is when mistakes happen. this then is a
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time for heroes, although capable of calm amid the chaos. in 1994 everton we re calm amid the chaos. in 1994 everton were heading out of the top flight for the first time in 40 years. 2—0 down against wimbledon, i am stuart scored twice to help them snatch victory and safety. what on earth did that feel like? to have gone to every possible emotion in 90 odd minutes there was incredible. i really, really never have seen anything like that. people were crying on the pitch at the end of it. i was just so relieved that i wasn't part of a side that took a great football club down. this will be our last day like no other. it will be missing its heartbeat with no fans in the ground to urge, celebrate or warn. the players will be on their own. the only sounds are their voices and the ticking of the klopp. —— clock. best of luck to all the fans waking up best of luck to all the fans waking up with that horrible feeling and a
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bit of their stomach this morning. —— pit. england took control of the deciding test against the west indies on day 2 at old trafford. it didn't start well for england, though, as they lost four early wickets for just 18 runs. but stuart broad steadied things with the bat, hitting the third fastest test half—century for england off just 33 balls, taking the home side to 369. and broad got his side off to the perfect start with the ball, taking a wicket in just the second over. england then took control with five more wickets, this the last of them from chris woakes, to leave the west indies 232 runs behind on 137/6. it isa it is a really strange environment we are in. we don't have any match practice, especially as bowlers, behind us. i think my love that in the middle before last week was in january. there is no real close history to fall back on. but trying to think of positive things that i had done at the wanderers with woody, striking the ball, gave me
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confidence to play that way. stuart broad with a point to prove perhaps. and enable won a record third king george race at ascot. ridden by frankie dettori, the favourite stormed clear to beat sovereign. with only three runners, it was the smallest ever field for this race. it was also a record equalling seventh win for dettori 25 years after his first. history made yesterday for both horse and jockey. not great conditions as you can see there at ascot. look at pictures like that and you can kind of understand why people have taken a punch to go to spain, can't you? what are you suggesting? —— punt. more fun the cricket later in the programme. if you are just programme. if you arejustjoining us, we are talking a lot about spain today. british holiday makers in spain were told yesterday that they'll have to quarantine for 14 days when they head home after a surge in coronavirus cases in the country. big questions for people who are heading there now. already there,
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maybe have a holiday plan. —— planned. we can speak now to alina o'keeffe, who is on holiday in marbella, and lisa francesca—nand, who is a travel blogger and is in fuengirola. good morning to you both. give me a sense of what you have been told. you flew out just yesterday. how sense of what you have been told. you flew outjust yesterday. how is it and what have you been told? good morning. yes, iarrived it and what have you been told? good morning. yes, i arrived yesterday andi morning. yes, i arrived yesterday and i realise probably a few hours later that there will be a quarantine on my return to the uk, which is very unfortunate because it has totally ruined the holiday. it is family time and i haven't seen my family for many months, since last year because of the lockdown. so it is quite a sad situation, really. and we willjust go to lisa. you are
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a travel blogger. just tell me a bit about tourism there at the moment. have people been coming to spain freely? do you feel that it has become busy, and will this impact businesses there at the moment? become busy, and will this impact businesses there at the moment7m has been a really unusual time to be in spain. i have been here two weeks now, i flew out just before the quarantine rules were actually lifted. it was noticeably quieter. it is actually quite pleasant in a way, full of spanish. i know that sounds ironic because we are in spain, and it is full of spanish holidaymakers. the beaches are getting busier. but it is not bad when you go down there. people wear masks in the street when they are walking around, even doing exercise. i have been stopped by the police a couple of times. i have been afraid of the police. they are quite strict here and they stopped me for not
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wearing my mask properly because i was having a walk when i was running. at night, people are in the bars and restaurants and you don't have to wear masks there. at first i noticed very few british people or holidaymakers around, just spanish holidaymakers around, just spanish holidaymakers and i have now started to theatrical of more people coming back in. this feels a little bit rushed, it feels like it will be absolutely devastating for the travel industry, and also here, we're seeing bars and restaurants that have been well established here that have been well established here that are now closed. a massive hotel here on the seafront is closed, i have no idea when that will be reopening. they haven't seen when it is likely to end. we don't know any of those details at the moment. it will have a further impact, i am afraid. alina, i think will have a further impact, i am afraid. alina, ithink you will have a further impact, i am afraid. alina, i think you could hear their what lisa was saying, and clearly for people like you want holiday, it has huge implications for when you get back to the uk and what i think for you is going to be
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a four holiday suddenly turns into a three—week trip or a break from any sort of work. i know you were looking for a job. i think it is quite frustrating that there were such short notice in terms of the quarantine being imposed on the return. i had a lot of meetings planned and also it is my birthday coming up, so it will mean i have to come back, so it is very frustrating. the social distancing i think is quite respectful here and not every region in spain has the same number of cases, so it would be nice if there was an option to have, depending on where you return from to go into quarantine. i understand it is very hard to track. and i think there is a lot of growing concern about whether they can be those more localised lockdowns and
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localised rules put into place. but i wonder, talk to me about when you get back to the uk. you will come according to the rules, spend 14 daysin according to the rules, spend 14 days in isolation. you intend to do that, and what will it mean for the next two weeks for you looking for a job, for example? yes, of course, i will follow the rules. i understand how important it is to keep yourself safe, and especially others around you. i will just have to reschedule everything. i have to reschedule it online, because that is kind of how we survived the last few months, and it is possible. it isjust survived the last few months, and it is possible. it is just not as easy or straightforward. it also means i will not be able to see my friends when i return, and that makes me sad, because it is my birthday.
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well, happy birthday in advance. i am sorry you are having to spend it in that way. but it is good to talk to you. thank you to you both this morning. it is a difficult situation, isn't it? back to tomasz and his hair. we are not going to... i. going on about it, sorry. tomasz, give us some good news. if we can't go on holiday to spain, tell us it is going to get better here. go on holiday to spain, tell us it is going to get better harem go on holiday to spain, tell us it is going to get better here. it is going to get better eventually. it will eventually. i will take that. before we get to the uk forecast, i wa nt before we get to the uk forecast, i want to show you how dramatic the weather was yesterday, not in kansas. this is actually... well, it gives it away, the label there. on the outs outskirts of northampton, this is a tornado, and attached down, so it officially is a tornado. when itjust down, so it officially is a tornado. when it just occurs down, so it officially is a tornado. when itjust occurs in the sky it is often referred to as a funnel cloud and if you look, there is a little bit of debris coming up here. you can see bits and pieces. not a
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particular powerful one, but those are the sorts of clouds we had yesterday that created these turbulent conditions. we are not really expecting that, it really does sort of flare up here. you can see the big rotation, 70 mph plus winds, not the biggest tornado, but quite troublesome. anyway, today we are going to see a mixture of sunshine and showers. we are not going to see those volatile clouds that we had yesterday. so i think a much better day in store. in answer to ben's question earlier on, yes, it is going to get better. and you can see we are in between weather systems today. this is the satellite image from the last few hours. this is that weather system from yesterday. there is another one heading our way a little bit later on this evening and overnight. but until then, you can see the weather is actually not too bad at all. the obvious sign is here you can see a lot of greenland. that means fairly clear sky. a few scattered showers here and there. and on the whole,
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actually, not a bad day out there —— green land. temperatures will get up to 23 celsius, which is maybe a fraction below the average for the time of year, and around the high teens across the north. it looks as though it is going to be a beautiful end of the day, especially towards the east. and i think the sunset will be such that it will be eliminating the skies this evening. so there will be some beautiful sunset pictures tonight if you do ta ke sunset pictures tonight if you do take them. towards the west, early hours of monday morning, we have got the next band of rain. so it does improve today, and then tomorrow, it goes once again. because we have another low. low pressure means that the areas rising into the atmosphere, creating clouds. we have got weather fronts, so here is the low pressure coming in. you can see these lime greens, that is heavy rain moving to ireland, northern ireland, into western parts of the uk, but not everybody gets the heavy rain tomorrow. these are wind gusts in the arrows here. that is pretty strong forjuly, 40 mph plus winds,
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whipping some trees around here and there. temperatures are shade lower tomorrow because we have got that cloud and rain and by the end of the day things will improve as this low pressure monday night into tuesday clears away towards scandinavia. and i think by tuesday the weather should be improving. back to you. we will take that, tomasz. thank you. we will speak to you later. now on breakfast, it's time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode, rounding up the best movies available for viewing in the home and in cinemas. remember them? the big movie news this week
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was that the release of christopher nolan's tenet has been delayed yet again due to coronavirus. yet despite the shock waves caused by that announcement, uk cinemas are starting to welcome back patrons, with movies like the killer crocodile picture blackwater abyss now playing in theatres, and the russell crowe action unhinged still due to open wide on the 31st. this week, the us indie pick st francis takes a delayed bow in nearly 100 uk cinemas. i'm tired. you just started walking. will you carry me? let's go back and get the stroller. no! we're almost there, it won't take long if you carry me. the park is really close? come on. you're sweaty.
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# i wonder where friends... the brilliant future debut from writer and star kelly o'sullivan, this is a vibrant and emotionally engaging tale that dresses a subversive self—determination manifesto in the clothes of a ditzy, bittersweet comedy about midlife disappointment. have you nannied before? i've babysitted...sat. do you know how to open this? o'sullivan plays bridget, a 30—something waitress who finds herself facing an unwanted pregnancy at around the same time that fate conspires to offer her new employment as a nanny. francis? will bridget‘s avowed child—phobia prevent her from caring for six—year—old francis, and what will her employers, one of whom is devoutly religious, think of her decision to have a termination? directed with loose—limbed intimacy by alex thompson, st francis is refreshingly frank on a number of subjects that mainstream cinema is often considered to be taboo. from menstruation and postnatal depression, to birth control and abortion. your sperm are probably super fast.
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that's a compliment. thank you, thank you so much. i appreciate that. it's also terrifically funny and heart—warming, with intimate hand—held cinematography giving us the impression that we're eavesdropping on genuine conversations and encounters. but what's most impressive is how much the incidental details of this frank and feisty film ring true. why was she angry? because she was born into a patriarchy and it effing sucked. what's a patriarchy? it's where men are in charge and women have to do what they say. like michaela coel‘s outstanding tv series i may destroy you, st francis expands the representation of women's lives on screen in a manner that's so casual, you hardly notice it's happening. i am proud of you. i'm so proud of you, frannie. whispering: i'm not frannie right now. oh, sorry. i loved st francis, and i have no hesitation in recommending it. it's well worth a trip to the cinema. # i once was lost,
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but now am found... all right, well, that was neither amazing nor graceful. also opening in a number of uk cinemas this week is stage mother, in which jacki weaver plays maybelline, the director of a conservative texas church choir, who inherits a san francisco gay bar when her estranged son dies. maybelline's husband is a straight—arrow stick in the mud who refused to accept his son's sexuality, causing the family to split apart. are you ricky's mum, from texas? but now, maybelline sees a chance to make peace with the past to become a surrogate mum to the boys in the band, and turn a rundown drag show into a crowd—pulling success. back in the 90s, films like priscilla, queen of the desert and to wong foo, thanks for everything, julie newmar provided multiplex—friendly portrayals of drag culture, along
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with mike nichols's the birdcage, a star—studded us remake of la cage aux folles. and, whatever those films' flaws, they seemed at the time broadly ground—breaking. but, in the age of rupaul‘s drag race, it's hard to see what ground, if any, is being broken by stage mother. there's literally nothing new or original about splinters director tom fitzgerald's movie, from a script by brad henning, which is content to simply tick every well—meaning stereotypical box. thanks heaven, then, forjacki weaver, who was oscar—nominated for recent hits like animal kingdom and silver linings playbook, and who brings a much—needed dose of oomph to a film that, although good—hearted, borders all too often on the bland. there's both a theatrical and virtual release for il traditore, the traitor,
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a sprawling drama about tommaso buscetta, a member of the sicilian mafia who turned informant, shedding light on the inner workings of the cosa nostra. in competition at last year's cannes film festival, marco bellocchio's ambitious, if not always enthralling drama depicts buscetta and his family from whom he was separated by geography and imprisonment, and some of whom he lost to a catalogue of internecine mob violence. the most intriguing scenes are those between buscetta and judge falconi, with these two men from opposite sides of the law finding unexpected kinship and respect.
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there's weird theatre too in the courtroom scenes, in which buscetta testifies while mafiosi who watch from behind bars, jeering, gesturing, and occasionally taking the stand. it's an epic story, which was the italian entry for the 92nd academy awards' international feature category, but which for me lacked the kinetic energy with which, for example, scorsese's goodfellas took a true—life crime saga and turned it into something genuinely cinematic. this is a place you come where you can dance and scream and be with your own kind, and where everything is possible. but how do i get there from here? transformation is at the heart of how to build a girl, adopted by screenwriter caitlin moran from her autobiographically inspired bestseller. what a beautiful day! i regret to say that, despite my best intentions, today has been another
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miserable one. well, missy, i've had plenty of those. beanie feldstein plays johanna morrigan, a studious mid—90s schoolkid with dreams of becoming a writer, who discovers that an unbridled enthusiasm for the annie soundtrack isn't what the hip rock press are looking for. have a free t—shirt. good god, it's a child catcher. so, she reinvents herself as bad girl dolly wilde, a top—hat—wearing whirlwind who wins awards for writing the kind of scathing reviews that make her feared and famous, but also leave her feeling empty and unfulfilled. like gurinder chadha's blinded by the light, how to build a girl has a rough—and—ready energy that's hard to resist, sprinkling its streetwise tale with elements of ecstatic musical fantasia. however awful it is on earth, it's always summer. it's a credit to feldstein that the wobbliness of her wolverhampton accent never comes between us and her character. instead, we simply get on board
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with her adventures, as she resolves to rip it up and start again. you're both mad asjesus, and you two abroad? come on, we're going out. how to build a girl is available on amazon prime. from wolverhampton to paris, for alice, the prize—winning feature debut from australian writer—directorjosephine mackerras. emilie piponnier is the woman with a child and an apparently loving husband who suddenly disappears after squandering all their money on high—class prostitutes. facing foreclosure on her home, alice turns to the very escort agencies to which her husband was addicted, finding a new line of work which proves
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unexpectedly liberating. originally written as an english—language film set in london, alice has a somewhat rose—tinted view of sex work that sits comfortably, or uncomfortably, within a certain strand of chic cosmopolitan french cinema. what raises us above the level of mere movie cliche is the efficiency in which mackerras evokes the personal and financial catastrophe facing our heroine in the first act. we really do get the feeling of watching someone's life suddenly falling apart, thanks in no small part to emilie piponnier‘s performance. plaudits too to martin swabey, who is eerily convincing as the perfect partner who turns out to be a loathsome creep. alice is available on selected digital platforms. # trolls, they want to have fun. # yeah, trolls just want to have fun...
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back at the beginning of lockdown, trolls world tour was one of the first major studio films intended for cinema release, but instead went straight to streaming services. poppy, you know you can't go back on a pinky promise. from monday, you can on it on dvd and blu—ray to watch over and over and over again. a prospect that will doubtless delight some kids while terrifying their parents. a pinky promise! dang! i'll leave you with news that bong joon ho's oscar winner parasite is back at the curzon mayfair in london and on curzon home cinema in the black—and—white addition unveiled at the rotterdam film festival earlier this year. according to director bong, all the characters look even more
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poignant, and the distinctions between the different spaces where the families live, with all the shades of grey, are even more tragic. that's it for this week. thanks for watching the film review. stay safe, and i'll be back next week. i apologise. good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and sima kotecha. our headlines today: anyone arriving in the uk from spain now has to self—isolate for two weeks after quarantine rules changed overnight. it follows a sharp rise in spanish coronavirus infections: travel plans for thousands of britons have been thrown into chaos.
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although we could go on holiday, we cannot come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. thatjust wouldn't be possible. but for some holidaymakers, there's relief at landing home late last night before the restrictions kicked in. it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what is going on. we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight home. good morning. it's the final day of the premier league season and it's going to be a nail—biter for fans of aston villa, watford and bournemouth. only one of those three teams will stay up. a thousand fans will be coming here to watch a test event for counter cricket. —— county. the weather is not looking too bad at all for most of us on sunday. there are a few showers in the forecast but we're not talking about the
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downpours of yesterday. i think a pretty decent day for most. hello to you. a very good morning. it's sunday july 26. our top story: british holidaymakers returning from spain, including the balearic islands and the canary islands, will have to quarantine for two weeks from today amid fears that the country could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. the measure, announced just yesterday evening, applies to all four nations of the uk. the foreign office is also advising against all—but—essential travel to mainland spain. andy moore reports. face coverings are required at all times. manchester airport saw some of the last flight arriving from spainjust minutes before the midnight deadline. these women had brought forward their departure to avoid quarantine. it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what's going on in there. it's mad, isn't it? yeah, we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight home. how do you feel about the fact you've just missed that deadline
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by 30 minutes? i'm glad. i can't stay for two weeks. so, yeah, happy days. the news will come as a bitter blow to tens of thousands of british holidaymakers already in spain and those planning to head there soon. this couple have already made a decision not to travel. although we could go on the holiday, because we'd booked holidays, we can't come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. thatjust wouldn't be possible. so we can't then go on holiday because we can't come back and quarantine for two weeks. the new foreign office advice comes in the wake of rising coronavirus infections in parts of spain, especially in catalonia and neighbouring aragon and navarre. the government said difficult choices had to be made. whenever a decision is made, there will always be people who have just left the uk. there are always people behind and in front of the line. so there is no magic time at which to do this. the thing that we have to do
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is do it as soon as we are certain about the data and feel certain that it is time to act. and we take the advice from thejoint biosecurity centre very seriously indeed. and we don't delay when those signals come in. the advice against all—but—essential travel applies only to mainland spain. but everyone returning from any part of the country will have to self—isolate for two weeks. the level of infection is lower in some parts of spain. the regional governments of the canaries and the balearic islands are asking to be excluded from the need to quarantine. the tour operator tui has cancelled its flights to spain. other airlines are continuing to operate for the time being. the aircraft operators association said the government should look urgently at the possibility of testing as an alternative to quarantine. this news will have a devastating effect more widely on confidence
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in foreign travel. if spain now, where next? andy moore, bbc news. we have reporters at gatwick airport and in madrid this morning. andy moore is at gatwick. andy, how have airlines and travel companies responded to this? you raise some of the questions in your piece about where next. that's 12 first of all about spain. ? let's talk first of all about spain. that is right. here at gatwick airport, there should have been a flood by tui to malacca this morning. that one has been cancelled. tui has cancelled all its flights to spain. easyjet does have a flight to malaga this morning. they are running flights at the moment. i think the government said that these our corridors could open
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and close, but i don't think anybody expected it to happen with just a few hours notice, and that has caused quite a lot of anger. a lot of holidays of course start on a saturday and the holiday magazine is saying if this decision was made 48 hours earlier, then people would have had a little bit of time to think about it. people who are now in spain may have decided in fact they wanted to cancel the holiday to avoid this two weeks of quarantine. some of the airline operators and the travel company is also saying there should be more regional, more nuanced lockdowns, not this countrywide clampdown, because, as we know, infection rates vary quite a lot in different parts of spain. but this has come into effect so anybody coming back now into gatwick airport for six now is —— six hours now, came into effect at midnight, they will have to enter the quarantine, this very strict self isolation. for now. thank you.
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guy hedgecoe is in madrid for us this morning. another blow to the spanish economy. guy, what's been the reaction from the spanish authorities? the spanish foreign ministry has said that it respects this decision and said that it is maintaining contact with the uk authorities. but it has also said that spain is a safe place to visit and that any coronavirus outbreaks that there are in the country are very much localised and are under control. it seems very keen to try and underline the idea that there is not a major crisis in the country, but clearly, this is a huge setback in the spanish tourism industry. the british market is the single largest market for spain. last year for example around a quarter of foreign visitors to spain were british. so thatis visitors to spain were british. so that is a huge blow for the tourism industry, which in turn is extremely important for the spanish economy.
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absolutely. this is a problem that much of europe is facing at the moment. thank you for explaining it. so those are some of the implications. but why the sudden change overnight? we're joined now by our political correspondent helen catt. good morning to you. helen, this is quite sudden change for the government. we are hearing what it means for travellers and for hotel firms and airlines. what other politicians saying about this. the uk government has said it has been clear that it could be changing this list of countries which are exempt from quarantine, and it probably helps to think back to last month when quarantine was introduced in the uk. then it applied to virtually every country in the world and there was a lot of pressure from the industry, from conservative backbenchers to make it more targeted and that is where this list of exempted countries came from. countries considered to be of a similar risk to the uk. because there has been spiked in spain, it is now seen as
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riskier, and that is why quarantine has been reimposed. i think the big question is going to be whether it was clear enough to people that it could be imposed so quickly, that within a matter of hours you could look at coming back and facing 14 daysin look at coming back and facing 14 days in self isolation. the government is asking employers to be sympathetic to those people in this position. labour says the government needs to set out full details of how people affected will be given support. this does apply across all formations. each of them are allowed to set their list of countries, and spain was not on scotland by the original list. it was only added in the last few days. it is created has been able to change. there is one other thing. one of those people affected, slightly ironically, is the man in charge of the department transport, the transport secretary, who flew off to spain yesterday. we are told he will continue his trip as planned and will isolate in—line with a on his return. helen, thank you. prescriptions for cycling are set to be included in the government's plans to tackle obesity in england.
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full measures will be set out tomorrow, and are expected to include a 12—week plan to encourage people to lose weight and a ban onjunk food tv adverts before 9pm. it comes after public health england found being overweight puts people at greater risk from coronavirus. speed limits through most roadworks on england's motorways will be raised to increase traffic flow and ease driver frustrations. it's being raised from 50mph to 60mph. highways england say they carried out trials over the last 18 months to show that the safety of motorists and road workers could be maintained with the increased speed. hurricane hanna has made landfall in the us state of texas with officials warning of life—threatening storm surges. heavy rainfall and winds of nearly 90mph have struck coastal areas south of the city corpus christi. residents in some communities have been told to leave their homes. the state governor has issued a disaster declaration for 32 counties, saying the coronavirus outbreak would complicate the work of the emergency services.
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the queen has completed another first of her reign due to the lockdown, this time conducting a virtual unveiling of a new portrait of her. it was commissioned by the foreign office as a tribute to her service to diplomacy and was painted by the artist miriam escofet. although nothing escapes her majesty's attention, though — during the unveiling, she was quick to point out that the teacup featured in the painting had no tea in it. not good. all about the detail. good morning. we will get more on our main story now. british people travelling back from spain will again have to quarantine for 14 days when they return home after a rise in coronavirus cases in the country. what does this mean for holidaymakers there, and those who were due to fly out today? zeta hill is on holiday in majorca, while malcolm eggar
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was supposed to be flying out to alicante this morning. we can speak to them both now. thank you so much forjoining us. zeta, what is the mood for people feeling at the moment? personally, how are you feeling hearing this news? good morning. ithink how are you feeling hearing this news? good morning. i think the general feeling is that things over here have been incredibly safe. i have actually felt safer here than i had in the uk at my local supermarket, and i think also the feeling that it has been very short notice, to change plans on returning to the uk, now we found the information out yesterday evening, some of the people in the hotel were travelling back this morning, so i hadn't left very long for us to make arrangements and we get home. hadn't left very long for us to make arrangements and we get homelj hadn't left very long for us to make arrangements and we get home. i will actually ask you about that. when you get home, how do you feel about being in quarantine for two weeks? have you made any arrangements? is it disrupted your plans?|j
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have you made any arrangements? is it disrupted your plans? i am really fortu nate it disrupted your plans? i am really fortunate because i am a teacher and iamon fortunate because i am a teacher and i am on summer holidays, so i am least effective. even the basic plans, but i had plans to see my family, visit my niece who was six months old, to see my sister who was going to come from newcastle to visit, and just little plans like that to change. and obviously for the health and safety of everyone in uk and spain it is more important than small plans like this. but i am more concerned about people who have to go to work tomorrow or who have made childcare arrangements, for them to go to work tomorrow. they are more significant than my small personal plan. stay with us. i want to bring in malcolm who was due to fly out this morning. good morning to you. i imagine quite a bit of disappointment in your household this morning. tell me what you have been told by the travel company. well, i mean, we stopped back in la st well, i mean, we stopped back in last night ready for our flight today, and we saw the headlines that
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came out about there was going to be the two week quarantine that was going to happen as from today. and then we got the further news that put midcentral travel, and we were due to fly out to alicante today, so obviously for us we were thinking the flight is going to be cancelled, but we have heard nothing. we're out with ryanair, and we have heard absolutely nothing. at the moment we are in limbo. it is fairly frustrating, fairly upsetting as well. it was notjust frustrating, fairly upsetting as well. it was not just a frustrating, fairly upsetting as well. it was notjust a holiday, but visiting my wife's parents who she hasn't seen obviously this year, because not being able to get out there before, with the lockdown earlier on there before, with the lockdown earlieron in there before, with the lockdown earlier on in the year, so very frustrating, very upsetting. but no information whatsoever as to what we can do, whether our flights are
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cancelled, whether we have to cancel the flights, if we can get a reappointment. so very, very disappointing. malcolm, we have lost your picture for now, but i am going to persevere, because hopefully you are back. what is interesting about this is, and stay tuned through the programme, because we will have loads of advice later for people in exactly your position about what you should do, whether you will get your money back, whether you should be compensated. i just want to us clearly, the government has said this is to keep people safe and protects people. you must understand that what they are trying to do here is to stop people getting ill. absolutely, and being in contact with the family over in australia as well, very much the same. you know, the authorities in spain saying it is very safe. there are no outbreaks in certain areas, it all seems to be around the major cities. but we can understand decisions to obviously close travel over there, but it is just the timescale, and it is
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really, really frustrating, the fact that it comes with no further information. so for us as a family, who have paid out for flights and everything else, we are left in limbo, and it is that mental cost to everything at the moment, as well. it really is. i mean, this was a holiday, as i say, to go and see family. there is that hold mental health side to it, again. we have just come out of lockdown. my wife isa just come out of lockdown. my wife is a frontline nhs nurse, so she has been absolutely threw it over the past few months. so we needed this break as much as anything else. but we understand the situation we are in. it isjust the fact that it is not easy news to take, especially in the timescale that has been provided and the lack of further information. and zeta, back to you, briefly, before we finish, do you agree with malcolm? do you think there is an understanding among people that the government has done this because of safety issues, that they are trying to protect the british people, or do
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you think there is more anger and frustration? i think everyone understands that they needed to be as safe as possible. however, i would reiterate the point that when we first came out here and my family asked me how do you feel out there, i feel asked me how do you feel out there, ifeel more asked me how do you feel out there, i feel more safe here than i asked me how do you feel out there, ifeel more safe here than i did in the uk. the guidance that is being followed here is being followed absolutely to the letter of the law. facemasks being worn at all times, hand sanitiser compulsory upon entering shops or restaurants or the hotel we're staying in, the cleaning protocols of the hotel are incredible. there are 1—way systems to get in and out of the pool, the brea kfast to get in and out of the pool, the breakfast buffet is served to you so we are not touching things. so i find it illogical that, in a place where there are very few cases, and where there are very few cases, and where we have been following social distancing, facemasks and hand
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washing and all of the safety regulations to the letter, i have to quarantine for 14 days when i get home, where as people in the uk who haven't followed those guidelines would have no consequences at home. yes, ican would have no consequences at home. yes, i can understand your feeling there. thank you so much for being so honest and speaking to us. zeta and malcolm, wish you all the luck. let's talk about the implications for travellers and travel companies. what does it mean for the firm is responsible for getting us there and the hotel industry as well? we can speak now to sean tipton from the trade association for tour operators and travel agents, abta. good morning to you. give me your initial reaction to this. so this news imaging late last night, not much notice for the industry, and it could have a huge, huge impact. yes, spain is incredibly important for the british tourist industry. it is the british tourist industry. it is the single largest market for us. we send something like 18 million people to spain on holiday each year
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and it did come at very short notice. so something that our members will have to deal with as they have been dealing with all these problems over the past few months. ijust these problems over the past few months. i just want to say in terms of the people you spoke to there, i think some very sensible views there. the man going off to alicante, because there. the man going off to alica nte, because he there. the man going off to alicante, because he is travelling to mainland spain, the foreign office very clear that people shouldn't be travelling to mainland spain. what happens there is you will have rights to basically rebook your flights at different dates or have a refund of your money. that is very clear. i know he said he hadn't heard anything from the airline, but thatis heard anything from the airline, but that is what i would expect them to do, and it is the same if you have a package holiday booked as well. so people won't lose out in that sense but there are some quite distinct issues in terms of where you are going. so if you are travelling to the spanish islands such as majorca, ibiza, the advice has not changed and you will have to quarantine when you get back home. thanks for clearing that up. it is really important, isn't it, and
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particularly of course that difference now any advice about not travelling, but where you will need to quarantine coming from. two very separate things that we need to make clear. do we have an idea of how many british people are in spain right now? it is very difficult for us to tell, because look, this has not been a situation we have been through before. have you got an idea of how many are there right now?m is difficult to say. obviously normally speaking in july, is difficult to say. obviously normally speaking injuly, there would be millions of british holidaymakers there. but because of everything that has happened, numbers would be considerably lower. and not everybody, even though the restrictions were lifted to spain, not everybody would want to get on a plane and travel. the people we were hearing from a very keen on going, but the numbers will be very low, in the thousands, as i said, but not anywhere near as many as what we would normally see. it is disappointing, the spanish have done a very good job of controlling the coronavirus and as we have heard from one of your viewers there, they have been taking it very, very seriously. the one thing about this, the advice has changed very quickly,
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but it could go the other way as well. we could have the decision reversed very quickly. this is not abta's decision to make, it is the government's. we have been saying to the government all along that if they are going to make reviews, they need to be based on the best possible medical advice and they keep a very close eye on things. it is also something maybe we should look at in future, rather than doing blanket bans on entire countries, look at regional bands, because we have precedent for that. the foreign office in many instances already says there are destinations you can't travel to certain parts, in turkey you can't go across the borderfrom turkey you can't go across the border from syria —— borderfrom syria regional turkey you can't go across the borderfrom syria regional bans. obviously the change in advice applies to spain this morning but this could potentially be disappointing if people decide not to travel elsewhere given the risk that they may suddenly be added to the list. how difficult will it be for the whole travel industry now to
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convince people to travel, even though it is deemed to be safe? well, if you look at the general trend, it is going the other way, to more countries being added to the list where you don't have to quarantine, so that is generally the way forward. but of course you may get situations where it goes the other way, as well. i think the main thing that i would say, that if you are concerned about these kinds of issues, that you really should look at booking a package holiday. if the foreign office advice changes, your tour operator is obliged to either let you transfer to another destination, get a refund of your money or wait for the situation to improve. they have to do that. if you book it independently, it is not so straightforward. that is where people's money can be at risk. uncertainty doesn't help, but the general trend has actually been positive and i would hope that if you are going away, that is what we are generally seeing. we might see in spain —— as in spain that it goes the other way, but maybe not entire
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destinations, or maybe areas that could be an issue. gratefulfor your time this morning. we are going to have some advice for you if you are caught up in all of this, about whether you will get your money back, where you might get a refund, and what your rights are through all of these changes. we will talk about that later. tomasz is back with us again. tomasz, give us some good news. tell us about that sunshine we are hoping to see imminently, please. we are, it has risen. that is for sure. we have got some good news. good morning to you and good morning to you listening in. the weather in the next few days is going to improve. now, yesterday, some of us had a deluge. it really did not feel like july at all. today the weather is looking better. you can see why, because this is the weather system that was over us yesterday. today we're going to be in between weather systems. so have got this big gap in the cloud. this
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is the next area of cloud and rain thatis is the next area of cloud and rain that is heading our way but it won't arrive until tonight and into tomorrow. so let's enjoy that fine weather. here is your sunshine right from the word go. it is not clear blue skies by any means today. we have scattered fair weather clouds and scattered slightly bigger clouds which are bringing a few showers in the forecast through today almost anywhere, but at least most of the time, the weather will be dry and sunny. 23 in london the top temperature today but fresher in the western isles of scotland, around 14. so this is the weather through this evening, clear with a beautiful sunset out there tonight, and then the clouds increase. you are seeing the clouds increase. you are seeing the thickening cloud and outbreaks of rain getting into western parts of rain getting into western parts of the uk, certainly by the end of the night, just about nudging into the night, just about nudging into the lake district and also northern ireland. but eastern scotland and many other north—eastern areas of the uk should just about stay dry. so monday we have got that next area of low pressure heading our way, not very much like july of low pressure heading our way, not very much likejuly at all. on top of that, if you look at the wind
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arrows, spinning into this area of low pressure, that is the gusty weather that is also going to accompany this weather system. it is going to sweep across the south. further north, as well, we're going to have the heavy rain. so in the afternoon, heavy rain in the north of the country, whereas in the south it is going to be cloudy and windy. it is going to feel cool tomorrow. it is going to feel cool tomorrow. it is going to feel cool tomorrow. it isa it is going to feel cool tomorrow. it is a real mixed bag. 21 in london, 16 in glasgow, but notice that later in the weather is actually improving on monday, as this weather system pulls out into the north sea, and then once again, we are in between weather systems. so the big gap in the clouds heading our way. i think by the time we get to tuesday a lot of sunshine, again, across the uk. anotherfine to tuesday a lot of sunshine, again, across the uk. another fine day with those temperatures probably a little below par for the time of year, mostly in the mid—or high teens, to around about 22 celsius. there is
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some good news as we head towards the end of the week. it looks as though things are going to be warming up. certainly by the time we get to thursday into the mid—20s, and by the time we get to the end of the week, by friday, i wouldn't be surprised if we hit 30 degrees again across the south. not everybody likes it, but it is warming up. at least it is looking that way. c, who needs spain? exactly, stay here! thanks, tomasz. see you later. now, you cricket fan? no. quick answer. live cricket may have been back for a few weeks, but today marks the first step towards crowds coming back to watching sport. the oval will host 1,000 fans in a pilot match between surrey and middlesex. let's find out more from katie shanahan, who is there for us this morning. good morning. it looks glorious, and hopefully may some fans, finally. yes, exactly. a wonderful day for it as well, as this is going to be a huge day for sport, as finally we
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will be able to see fans welcomed back into the grounds for the first time in england since march. so within a few hours to go, 1000 fans will be taking to their seats to watch this county cricket match between surrey and middlesex. it's the first of a number of trials that the first of a number of trials that the government are using to try to get fans back into stadiums. but it is going to look very different. for example, yes, there's going to be 1000 fans, but it is compared to the 25,000 capacity. 1000 fans, but it is compared to the 25, 000 capacity. they 1000 fans, but it is compared to the 25,000 capacity. they are only going to be using one stand, and at all times, fans must make sure they are socially distanced. so if they are from separate households, they have got to sit in every other row. they have also got to make sure that they keep two seats free at all times, if they are from separate households, to make sure they are not breaking those social distancing guidelines. but the good news is the bars will be open, the food will be available, the pa system will be going, and the big screens will be on. so a lot to
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look forward to. let's speak to someone who has helped organise this whole event, the chief executive of the surrey county cricket club. richard, just explain how big today is for sport and to finally see fans coming back into grounds. for us it isa coming back into grounds. for us it is a really big day. we haven't had supporters on this ground since september 2019. it has been a really long wait. what we are really pleased about is that we are part of this first phase of the trial, and hopefully there will be more evidence to come as the summer progresses because demand is exceptional. when we make tickets available to our members for this game, which is only a friendly, the phones ran off the hook. we had 10,000 calls on the first hour. people are very keen to come back. because just explain to us how difficult today has been for you and
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the staff, to make sure the ground is ready with, i am hearing, fans will have to come and make sure they have completed a medical questionnaire before even entering. yes, we have given them guidance as to what to expect. we have a ticketless system so they don't have to hand over tickets as they come m, to hand over tickets as they come in, and then effectively, aside from the seating areas, we are really adhering to the social norms we see elsewhere, whether they are at shots or translations. we are confident that people are becoming accustomed to this new way of living, and we hope this is the start of... we have two months left of the summer and we hope we can get as many people in as possible over the next couple of months. and why do you think a cou nty months. and why do you think a county cricket match is being used as the first sport to trial the return of crowds? i think certainly here at the oval we are used to hosting big events with the world cup last year and the ashes, and we have tried to maintain or we have ke pt have tried to maintain or we have kept the oval open throughout lockdown. we have had players training, and we have almost seen are gradual, phased return through the lockdown process anyway. so when
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the lockdown process anyway. so when the government asked us, we were delighted to step forward. richard, best of luck for today. enjoy it, most importantly. this marks the first of a number of trials, world snooker championships as well, and if it goes well, and there are positive signs, then hopefully we can get more fans back into stadiums. but as you can tell, there isa stadiums. but as you can tell, there is a real excitement here at the oval. thank you, katie, and i am incredibly envious of your position this morning. it looks gorgeous. we're just this morning. it looks gorgeous. we'rejust deciding, because it this morning. it looks gorgeous. we're just deciding, because it is cricket, everyone very polite and colla pse cricket, everyone very polite and collapse quietly, no shouting. then ben thinks it is because people are sleeping, but i disagree.
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hello. this is breakfast with ben thompson and sima kotecha. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: holidaymakers returning to any part of the uk from spain, including the balearic islands and the canary islands, will have to quarantine for two weeks from today. the measure was announced yesterday evening amid fears that spain could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. it applies to all four nations of the uk. the foreign office is also advising against all—but—essential travel to mainland spain. we can speak now to dr andras szigeti from chelmsford who arrived in malaga yesterday. good morning to you. explain this because people will be fascinated by the journey you are about to embark on, you travel that yesterday, you we re on, you travel that yesterday, you were coming back when? well,
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tonight, unfortunately. we were planning to stay for ten days but we are leaving tonight. quite an expensive journey for what may be 24, 48 hours. altogether we spent about £600 for this trip, yeah, pretty expensive. so 1200. people this morning will look at this and, yes, we knew spain was on the list of permitted places to go to without having to quarantine coming back. there was always the risk it could be added. did you consider that before you went? i did consider it but i signed up for the government website so i was paying quite close attention to what is happening in spain. we have a couple of friends down here who sent us the most recent reports, and we did make the final decision and i am checking in on ourflight final decision and i am checking in on our flight yesterday morning. we waited until the very last minute. we arrived and bad news hit. can you just talk us through the decision process. you got there, you heard the news and then you decided
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that you were going to go back. talk us through that. look, i don't think we had too much option than returning because i am a private doctor, i need to work. if we stayed for ten days after that, we would have been another 12 just at home. i cannot allow that. very quickly as and as we landed we heard the news, we went on the website of our flat provider and we changed our flight and came back. there was basically no other option to consider. what are you going to be doing when you get back home? this is obviously disrupted your plans of lying on the beach, hopefully we will have some decent weather here. yes, indeed! the plans are going to be staying at home, being in quarantine, probably reading, trying to relax. for a person who has worked all through the lockdown, this is probably the most devastating news that you can get. but, yeah, we need to cope with that. as a doctor, you must
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appreciate the medical reason that the government says that this is necessary , the government says that this is necessary, to protect the spread of the virus and it is important that people are able to quarantine when they come home. there clearly is a lot of disappointment and frustration, but this is based on medical evidence, isn't it?|j certainly hope so, yes. and i strongly encourage every single person who is returning to follow the government guidelines when they return to the uk. is there an argument that when you do come back, perhaps... i would just throw this out there. perhaps you could be tested in a week or so, and...” will probably go back to work. and if that test comes back negative, do you think the two weeks quarantine isa you think the two weeks quarantine is a bit too long? it is probably too long, especially for the key workers, as we are. i am actually hoping that some kind of guideline will come out the key workers and maybe we can go back to work a bit
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easier. there is great confusion on the government website at the moment who is eligible for a shorter quarantine and who isn't. we tried to find them information but we haven't been able to find anything. what we did this morning, we look through all our options and let's see what the government can say today. just a word on the practicalities of you getting back. how easy was it for you to find a return flight? we know many airlines have been cancelling their outward flights so there are not necessarily the aircraft in the right place to get people back. we certainly hope that tonight we will be able to get back. the flight seemingly is still in operation. we haven't got any notice from the airline that it is cancelled. we found probably the last couple of places on the plane back tonight so i think it will be very difficult for many people to go back to the uk tonight or in the next upcoming few days. we wish you well, safe trip back and enjoy what is left of your very short holiday.
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we are going to the beach! and we return tonight. take care, guys. thank you for your limited time this morning. he has to get back to the airport! he has to get back to the airport! he has to get back to the airport! he has a very busy day ahead. it shows some of the implications. absolutely. moving on to sport. how are you doing? very well, thank you. watching that, it struck me that somewhere in the country there will be someone whose tea m country there will be someone whose team is going to be relegated from the premier league today and perhaps who's holiday to spain has been cancelled as well the last 24 hours. really bad couple of days. commiserations to anyone who is finding themselves in that situation today because it is a final day of the premier league season. liverpool have run away with the title, there's still plenty to be decided elsewhere. leicester versus manchester united is a huge match for both sides as they try and secure champions league football for next season, but the real drama will come at the bottom of the table. only one of bournemouth,
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watford or aston villa can stay up. bournemouth are three points from safety, while villa go into their game against west ham with the upper hand, but only just. they're outside the bottom three on goal difference from watford. it promises to be a nervy afternoon for the managers involved. it means we can control our own destiny, and that is what we wanted to have going into the own —— last game. it would looking like we would have to rely on others. results went our way have to rely on others. results went ourway in have to rely on others. results went our way in the week and we end up above the dotted line at the moment, but most importantly, to be above that dotted line after the match on sunday. we know we have to win the game to guarantee that. we will be going all out to win as we have done. we can only prepare for what we can prepare for, and that is to get ourselves right, in the right frame of mind to try and get a result on sunday. we can't really think about different limitations of transit up
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for that. we have to get ready for what we need to do. it looks difficult but it is not impossible, and! it looks difficult but it is not impossible, and i think, as i said, just going to the final game with a chance to stay up is where we needed to be. we have that now and we have to be. we have that now and we have to do our bit now and see what happens. best of luck to all the fans tuning england took control of the deciding test against the west indies on day 2 at old trafford thanks mainly to stuart broad who starred with both the bat and the ball. broad, who was left out of the opening match of the series, hit a rapid half century and took two wickets, asjoe lynskey reports. this is stuart broad pollock 140 a test match. still gets bored of leading england from the front. since his return to the side, broad has turned this series around. at the start of day two, england faced an onslaught. (commentator) cleaned him up! the west indies were
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inspired, taking four morning wickets for just 18 runs. inspired, taking four morning wickets forjust 18 runs. that brought the veteran to the crease. broad clubbed his way to a half—ce ntu ry broad clubbed his way to a half—century in just 33 balls. the ninth man in but holding when's total up to 369. broad public outing flourishes come every so often, but bowling like this happens most matches. to get craig brathwaite was a breakthrough. now, west indies had a breakthrough. now, west indies had a fight to stay in the game. john campbell was set on 32 whenjofra archer sent one down. he couldn't control it. archer breached the biosecurity bubble and missed the second test. now he is back in a pastry oh that will take on the world. soon, archer, broad andjimmy addison all had their wickets. england's experienced heads have put them in control. finger has gone up! we wanted to control the scoreboard today and we prove that we can do
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that. i love watching jimmy ball, love being on the field with him. you can learn so much being up there with him, and i think we bring the best out of each other when we are on the field together. the west indies will resume today hoping to just stay in touch. the hopes of a win tojoin —— bring joy back home i now ever more distant. and enable won a record third king george race at ascot. ridden by frankie dettori, the favourite stormed clear to beat sovereign. with only three runners, it was the smallest ever field for this race. it was also a record equalling seventh win for dettori 25 years after his first. of course, knows spectators at ascot. no spectators at the cricket. we saw katie talking about the return of live crowds at the oval for a test event, and it has been so frustrating, having that series deciding test cricketjust down the right —— road from here at old trafford and all is empty seats. i know you would have been snapping up
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those tickets if you could. when i got here yesterday, i see the blood blood from a distance. what is going on underneath those floodlights? exactly! i heard one of the commentators say they were going to have a five course meal last night! i was thinking, blimey. i wish i could be part of that. anyway... moving on. we will be back. thank you. back to this morning's main story now, and from midnight last night, travellers returning to the uk from spain will have to quarantine for two weeks. we're joined by steve slater, who has been living in spain throughout the pandemic, but is due to return home next friday. how do you feel about having to quarantine for two weeks when you get back? who are you staying with, where are you going to be? pretty annoyed, really, because we have been here since march, came here three days before the lockdown and then we endured the harshest
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quarantine. lockdown in europe. so we feel safer here, everybody is doing what they should do, social distancing, wearing masks, so it is pretty annoying that we have to go back uk where a lot of people have ignore the advice, and who quarantine for another two weeks. we are in in an area, there are a very few cases down here, and people even do social distancing on the beach. not very pleased. do you feel that the rules that have been put in place have been done so for your own safety? is there something that you understand and appreciate, that your quarantine on your return is done by the government ministers for your own safety? i am sure it is. however, i am own safety? i am sure it is. however, iam not
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own safety? i am sure it is. however, i am not clear what the quarantine rules mean. are we allowed to go out and shop? my partner and myself live in an apartment, so we have to go and get our own shopping. we are both retired, so are we allowed to go out and do shopping on our own or separately together? in spain, we couldn't go out shopping together during the lockdown. , so unless we are told what we can do, i am not sure is quite sure how it can work. we hear about the infection rate in spain rising. it seems to be rising in other parts of europe as well. is it pleasing for you to come back to the uk at the moment where the rate does seem to be rising? there are two reasons, really. we never planned to be here injuly and august. it is too hot for us. so we a lwa ys august. it is too hot for us. so we always planned to come back really in may, but we had five flights cancelled and we managed to get this
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one for next friday, so that is one of the main reasons we are coming back. we also want to see family and friends, and obviously we won't be able to do that, i guess.|j friends, and obviously we won't be able to do that, i guess. i hope you can get back soon and see those family and friends that i know you are so eager to spend some time with. thank you. thank you very much. the change in government advice comes after a recent spike in coronavirus infections in spain. nearly 1,000 new cases were reported on friday. daniel lopez—acu na is an epidemiologist and joins us now from his home in northern spain. daniel, good morning to you. give me a sense of what you have been told there, and i want to get onto the state of the health situation in spain ina state of the health situation in spain in a moment. but first of all, your reaction to this news that people will have to quarantine when returning to the uk from spain. two in my perspective, it is not justified epidemiologically. it is not based on sound evidence, and it
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is unnecessary and unfair. i would like to summarise it that way. and the reason why i am saying it is because, at least in 14 regions in spain, the incidents, the number of cases per 100,000 people, is lower than in the uk. —— incidence. and yet there are specific spikes in some areas of spain, and experts would say it is very difficult to enforce local lockdowns and local restrictions based on where people have been and that is why the country—wide rule is necessary. do you appreciate that? do you understand that? no, i don't agree. i think it is possible to pinpoint and to differentiate. it is indeed the case that there are regions with big spikes, without layers that have been out of control, where there has been out of control, where there has been community transmission or extended community transmission
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re—established because of the proliferation of the infections. it is the region of catalonia, the region of aragon and the region of navarre. measures will have to be taken there, probably they will have to be draconian measures there in terms of again confining and reducing mobility, but that doesn't mean that this is being applied and will be happening to the rest of spain. soi will be happening to the rest of spain. so i think we need to understand, well, what is the real situation? in my perspective, the decision has been kind of across—the—board, for all spain, when it is not necessarily the case. authorities are clearly nervous. they want to make sure that any spike in new cases is stopped pretty quickly to avoid the problem getting out of hand. looking at the numbers, more than 900 new cases recorded in spain on friday. i mean, do you see
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that that could be the start of a second wave? we have talked a lot about it, but it is very difficult to see where that begins, if indeed it isa to see where that begins, if indeed it is a second wave. i don't think so. we are observing all over europe and we will be observing it as well in the uk. it is happening in france, it is happening in germany, that we have spikes, we have outbreaks of what we could call residual transmission of the virus. let's remember that we are facing a disease, a pandemic, that has a silent transmission, where the asymptomatic positive cases can transmit the disease. and this is exactly what is happening now, that many of these positive, asymptomatic people are passing the disease from one another. and the moment that we reopen borders in the schengen space, the moment we permit mobility within the country, in the case of
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spain, some of these asymptomatic cases move and transmit the disease, and can generate an outbreak. but in my perspective, it is likely to be controlled reasonably, most of the outbreaks, and we need to have a much more intensified action in these three areas where we have community transmission, and where measures are being taken and will probably be taken in a draconian way if necessary. and briefly, for us, we know there has been a lot of pressure on the authorities to open up pressure on the authorities to open up the economy, to get businesses working again, hotels open, bar is open. do you feel it was too soon to lift the lockdown? well, in my perspective the decision that was made at the end ofjune by the european union and the associated countries in connection with the epidemiological considerations, uk was one of them, maybe they went to soon into reopening the tourism flow
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all over europe, not necessarily taking into account the health security considerations that would have to be taken. because it was expectable to have the situation that we are facing all over europe. this is why i don't think we are dealing with a second wave of the epidemic, where the virus has been massively reintroduced. we are dealing with the residual transmission, but it is clear that we needed to have much more intensive measures in terms of health protection, in terms of use of the mask, and especially avoiding the gatherings, avoiding the massive events, and the interaction of people, because this is what transmits the disease. daniel, it is good to talk to you. thanks for your thoughts this morning. daniel is an epidemiologist in northern spain, for us. hello, tomasz. it was
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chucking down in buckingham today. is that the technical term? there is another one, shedding it down, even though i don't know what shedding really means, clouds shedding rain. is it going to chuck down some more? in little bits, i think, today. is it going to chuck down some more? in little bits, ithink, today. but broadly speaking, no, it is going to bea broadly speaking, no, it is going to be a better day compared to what we had yesterday. today we are calling it sunny spells and scattered showers across the country, almost anywhere. now, this is what brought the heavy rain, all of that chucking it down, yesterday. weather systems moving out of the way, we are in between these clouds now. you can see this clear a gap across the uk. so most of the time today the sun will be shining, and any showers, i
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think, will be brief. they won't be as widespread or as heavy as they we re as widespread or as heavy as they were yesterday. you can see a few, fleeting, across scotland, some across the lake district, the pennines, maybe one or two across the lake district as well. northern ireland should be mostly sunny. today's temperatures will get up to 23 in london, a degree also below the average, and around about 17 in glasgow. all in all a pretty good day on the weather front today. it is going to go downhill overnight across western areas of the uk. the clouds are going to increase, the breeze is going to freshen off the tip of cornwall and southern wales, and we are expecting the next weather system to bring this very unsettled spell of weather early on monday morning and throughout much of monday. so monday, tomorrow, is not looking great. it is because this area of low pressure is basically going to be sitting on top of us, slowly moving across the uk, and with it comes strong winds across the south of the country, a really blustery day forjuly. gusts of wind will be in excess of 40 mph in places. heavy rain across the northern half of the uk, broadly speaking. you can see some lime green colours there indicating where the heavy rain is going to be. now, temperatures again lower than average because of the cloud, the
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rain and the wind. 21 degrees in london, 16 degrees therein glasgow and belfast, but later in the day. the weather will improve on monday. the weather will improve on monday. the evening could end up quite bright on monday, once this low pressure moves out of the way. the next spell of settled weather is expected on tuesday. tuesday broadly speaking is going to be a fine day across the uk. fairly fresh winds blowing out of the north—west there, which means it is not going to be all that warm. around about 16 there in glasgow and belfast, maybe 22 in london. the end of the week is warming up. back to you two. thank you, we will take that, tomasz. if you've been affected by the changes to quarantine rules for travellers from spain, what are your rights when it comes to travel insurance and going back to work? we can try and answer some of these questions now with employment law expert katie palmer and malcolm tarling from the association of british insurers. good morning to you both. katie, i
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wa nt to good morning to you both. katie, i want to start with you, because this is fascinating, that people may have booked two weeks off work to go on holiday and suddenly they find they need four weeks off work. how will that work, who is responsible, will you get paid? it is difficult for employer and employee, it has come very quickly overnight. it is very much context dependent on you have to look at the specifics of the situation. the first thing your employer and employee should do is speak about the extended period of leave or self isolation of 14 days, and the options around that. because there are various options, homeworking, possibly an extended period of annual leave, unpaid leave, all of which are available, and it is about having that open and honest discussion about which is right for the employer and employee alike. briefly, that assumes you are already aware and the rules have come into force overnight, so there is not an awful lot you can do about it. what if you still want to go and
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you have not yet left? that is a different conversation, isn't it, because you are going fully aware you have to take off much longer. very much so, added complexity, i would say. if you are there already, you are there and you have to deal with the 14 day isolation period. but if you go knowing you are going to have to take 14 days extra, then i think the first thing i would be considering as an employee is is that right for me? specifically when the foreign office are advising against non—essential travel, it may be that that situation goes away naturally, because an employee doesn't want to go, but if they go knowingly and they want to book that holiday, the employer is within their right to refuse that request if they have the justification to refuse, you are business critical, for example, and needed within the workplace. it is a conversation employers and employees should be having now about whether that is right for the business. and malcolm, moving onto travel insurance, for those people who need to fly back early, will then travel insurance coverage? i think the first port of call for people in this very difficult situation is to talk to
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their tour operator, travel agent or air carrier to see if they can get arrangements to get them back to the uk. the government are currently saying that people do not need to return home early, and while in normal circumstances some travel policies may cover you for disruption so if you incur additional costs in getting back home you may be covered, many policies of course have been issued since the covid pandemic was declared and are going to have some exclusion clauses. so really travel insurance is not going to be your first port of call in these circumstances. i would say that if you are already in spain and you are concerned about your travel insurance, that should continue as normal divided that when you started your journey you are normal divided that when you started yourjourney you are not normal divided that when you started your journey you are not travelling against government bias. talking about those covid clauses, can you just give us a bit more detail about what people have to be careful about when they are booking those flights? well, i think people should, and this may be stating the obvious, read the policy and check exactly
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what they are covered for. if you have got an annual policy that was taken out prior to covid being declared a pandemic then you may have wider cover. but for many policies taken out after the pandemic was declared, there are going to be some related exclusion clauses. so for example you are probably not going to be covered if you cancel your holiday due to covid—19, because at the time you book your holiday it was a known risk and the way it is priced is based on the fact that you are being covered against risks that are known to you. but i think really the key bit of information here is to check your policy and if necessary talk to your policy and if necessary talk to your insurer so you know exactly what you are covered for. if you are in spain at the moment and also if you have a holiday booked and you are worried about the status of insurance, because if you do travel against the government advice, you're probably going to invalidate your insurance. that is not going to bea your insurance. that is not going to be a good move for anyone. that is incredibly useful. you know, there
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has been a backlog of refunds in the last few months. we have heard stories from people who are saying they are struggling to get their money back from tour operators or travel agents. for you, do money back from tour operators or travelagents. foryou, do you money back from tour operators or travel agents. for you, do you think that that backlog is going to continue? is it going to make the situation worse? i think everyone hope that backlog is, wherever they are, in terms of getting your passport through or refunds, will be sorted as quickly as possible. it is worth mentioning that insurers have already paid over £275 million in cancellation claims, even though, as isaid, cancellation claims, even though, as i said, they are not normally the first port of call for someone in this very difficult situation. kate, a word on leave, because i know a lot of employers are quite keen for their staff to use their annual leave, because not many of us have been using it so far. can your boss force you to take it? in this instance, if you end up having to ta ke instance, if you end up having to take off another two weeks, can they make you use your annual leave?m is embedded within the working time
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regulations, and you can give double the amount of notice of the period of leave booked to a period of leave you want them to book to enforce that annual leave period. so there have been a lot of employers, a lot of our peninsular clients, have pretty much enforced annual leave over the pandemic. as you say, very few of us have taken it so it will apply and can apply for this period of self isolation as well. malcolm, kate, really good to talk to you. thank you for your advice this morning. we will talk more to you in the next hour. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and sima kotecha. our headlines today: anyone arriving in the uk from spain now has to self—isolate for two weeks, after quarantine rules changed overnight it follows a sharp rise in spanish coronavirus infections — travel plans for thousands of britons have been thrown into chaos. we could go on holiday because we've booked holidays. we can't come back and then stay in the house for two weeks. thatjust wouldn't be possible. for some holidaymakers — relief at landing home
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late last night, before the restrictions kicked in. it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what's going on in there. it's mad. we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight home. it's the final day of the premier league season and it's going to be a nail—biterforfans of aston villa, watford and bournemouth — only one of those three teams will stay up. today marks a real step forward for fa ns today marks a real step forward for fans returning to live sporting events. there will be 1000 fans here at the oval to watch a test event for county cricket. well, on the whole the weather's not looking too bad at all for most of us on sunday. there are a few showers in the forecast but we're not talking about the dampers of yesterday. i think a pretty decent day for most. it's sunday the 26th ofjuly. our top story. british holidaymakers returning from spain —
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including the balearic islands and the canary islands — will have to quarantine for two weeks from today, amid fears that the country could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. the measure — announced just yesterday evening — applies to all four nations of the uk. the foreign office is also advising against all but essential travel to mainland spain. andy moore reports. pa: face coverings are required at all times. manchester airport saw some of the last flights arriving from spainjust minutes before the midnight deadline. these women had brought forward their departure to avoid quarantine. it was crazy. it all happened so quickly. no—one knows what's going on in there. it's mad, isn't it? yeah, we were supposed to come back on monday and we just got the next flight home. how do you feel about the fact you've just missed that deadline by 30 minutes? i'm glad. i can't stay for two weeks. so, yeah, happy days. the news will come as a bitter blow to tens of thousands of british holiday—makers already in spain, and those planning to head there soon.
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the general feeling is that things over here have been incredibly safe. i've actually felt safer here than i have when i was in the uk in my local supermarket. and i think, also, the feeling that there has been very short notice for us to change plans and return to the uk, now that we found the information out yesterday evening, some of the people in the hotel i'm staying in were travelling back this morning. so it hasn't really left very long for us to make the necessary arrangements when we get home. the new foreign office advice comes in the wake of rising coronavirus infections in parts of spain — especially in catalonia and neighbouring aragon and navarre. the government said difficult choices had to be made. whenever a decision is made, there will always be people who have just left the uk. there are always people behind and in front of the line. so there is no magic time
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at which to do this. the thing that we have to do is do it as soon as we are certain about the data and feel certain that it is time to act. and we take the advice from thejoint biosecurity centre very seriously indeed. and we don't delay when those signals come in. the advice against all—but—essential travel applies only to mainland spain, but everyone returning from any part of the country will have to self—isolate for two weeks. the foreign office advice is very clear — that people shouldn't be travelling to mainland spain at the moment. so what happens then, you have rights, basically, to re—book your flights on a different day, or have a refund of your money or be given a credit against a future booking, so that's very clear. but there are some quite distinct issues in terms of where you're going. so if you're travelling to the spanish islands, such as majorca, ibiza or the canaries, the foreign office advice hasn't changed there — you can still go, but there's still that requirement for wherever you're going in spain that you will have to quarantine when you get back home. the level of infection is lower
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in some parts of spain. the regional governments of the canaries and the balearic islands are asking to be excluded from the need to quarantine. the tour operator tui has cancelled its flights to spain — other airlines are continuing to operate for the time being. the aircraft operators association said the government should look urgently at the possibility of testing as an alternative to quarantine. this news will have a devastating effect more widely on confidence in foreign travel. if spain now, where next? andy moore, bbc news. we will update you on that story throughout the programme. we have reporters at gatwick and manchester airport this morning — andy moore is at gatwick. andy, what's been the reaction from the spanish authorities? another blow to the economy there.
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yes, a huge amount of tourism obviously between spain and the uk. the authorities in madrid say they understand the british decision but say they are on top of this problem. it is still safe, they believe, to travel to spain, and they are dealing with local coronavirus outbreaks. the foreign office advice says you should only travel to mainland spain for essential travel. that means that if you do, you probably will not be covered under your insurance. if you decide to cancel your flight you might lose your flight money. difficult decision for people to make. also, as we had in my report, a lot of variation in those infection rates within spain. very high towards the border with france, lower, within spain. very high towards the borderwith france, lower, much lower in places like the canary islands and the balearic islands. in fa ct islands and the balearic islands. in fact the canary islands, together with the balearic islands are launching a bid to try to overturn
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this ban on travellers to their areas. they want exemption from it. it is worth mentioning, of course, that this is a uk wide decision. all the governments, the devolved governments, scotland, northern ireland, wales, all working together on this one. i think we understood that this average might open or closed, but for it to happen with just a few hours notice like this has caused a lot of anger amongst travellers coming back from spain and heading off to spain. thanks, andy. all the details there from spain from our correspondence. let's talk about some of that anger amongst travellers. we can speak now to our reporter adam mcclean at manchester airport. lots of frustration, i imagine. what sense are you getting there about how clearly this has been communicated with people may be turning up at the airport or who have flight due to go today? good morning. airlines, including british airways, have described the new
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measures as yet another blow for british holiday—makers. uk's largest tour operator, has cancelled its lights to spain. one aircraft on the ground behind me was due to leave for malaga with passengers in the last few hours. the trade body airlines uk have said in a statement that this shows why regional travel corridors need to be considered so that safe travel to parts of a red country can continue. they also say, we also need to see the introduction of testing at uk airports so that those who are covered negative —— covid negative do not need to self—isolate on return. this news emerged yesterday evening, giving travellers in spain a very short time to return and divide the quarantine. this calls into question
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the usefulness of this exemption list is a tool of choosing an destination for a trip aboard derry abroad and that will no doubt cause concern among airlines. consumer groups say this morning that many simply would not have travelled, had they known they would have to isolate on their return from spain. absolutely. adam, thank you. we will talk to airlines uk in about 20 minutes, the group that represents airlines, about their reaction because clearly huge implications. we know tui, for example, one of the biggest holiday companies, now no longer flying out so lots of questions about how to get people back. we will talk to them in around 20 minutes. we're joined now by our political correspondent helen catt. we had about this happening yesterday around midday and then it was confirmed later in the evening. why did it happen then, why not earlier or later? the uk government
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has said it has always been clear that it could take countries of the exempt list. it is worth thinking about where this exempt list comes from in the first place. last month, the government imposed these quarantine restrictions and when it initially did that it was virtually for every country in the world and there was a lot of pressure from conservative backbenchers, from the industry, to make that more targeted. the government came up with this list of countries that we re with this list of countries that were considered to be of a similar or lower risk to the uk where it could be exempted. interestingly for scotland, spain was not on the list initially but was added in the last week. now with the spike of infections in spain, that has changed. the question will be for the government, did they make it clear enough to people how quickly this situation might change? they have said they urge employers to be sympathetic. thanks, helen. our reporter mairead smyth is currently on holiday in majorca and we can speak to her now.
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thank you so much forjoining us. look at that backdrop. lovely pool. tell us, mairead, about your situation. how do you feel about returning back and having to quarantine for two weeks? we have been really lucky to be here in the first place and when we decided to travel it was at a time when we were able to do so under government guidance, and our holiday was booked injanuary, guidance, and our holiday was booked in january, long guidance, and our holiday was booked injanuary, long before i did any reporting on covid—19. the decision to come on holiday was really based on all of the right decisions. we didn't want to take any risks. when we came here we knew it would be a very different holiday, a socially distant holiday if you like. when we arrived we knew things were different here. masks were already mandatory on majorca the week before they were introduced in the uk. shops, when we came here, masks were the first thing we had out of our bags. the same when you go shopping. what is different here is how quiet it is. it is really quite sad to see
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that we have been out for a lunch and that lunch out in a restaurant in majorca it was my first real out since before lockdown in the uk. we didn't want to risk going out for dinner ora drink didn't want to risk going out for dinner or a drink before we came on holiday so it is a very different experience. everything is very quiet, very clean, very compliant. hand sanitiser and masks everywhere will stop also in supermarkets. but the streets are quiet and this place really relies on tourism. it is one of the biggest destinations. york is one of the most popular destination for tourists across the country and this will really affect this place. when we arrived, the host that greeted us, he thanked us for coming. they need us to be here. this will have a huge impact on this tiny island and when you think about it, 35% of the balearic economic output is tourism. without these flights arriving here it will have a huge impact. you asked how i feel
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about quarantine, and helen mentioned we need very compliant employers. my employer is the bbc and obviously i will be able to work from home, thankfully i am in that position, but there are some of the people who are not. so many people made the decision to come on holiday, thinking they would be able to go back and return to work because quarantine was not in effect at that time. at the time we travelled the government said that reviews of quarantine would be every three weeks. that has changed. of course it has to, this virus is not something anyone has ever dealt with before. this is a very different situation for us. we have been so lucky to have got away on holiday in the first place. another week here, we will enjoy it and when i return i will be holed up in a bedroom working from home, i imagine, for another two weeks. just briefly, i know you said it is difficult to get a real sense because it is so quiet, but what are people there telling you? are they frustrated, are they acknowledging it, where it is happening and they will have to do this when they get back?|j
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happening and they will have to do this when they get back? i am in a villa. iam this when they get back? i am in a villa. i am with my family and family that we connected with before we went on holiday, so we formed our social bubble. we have not been interacting with tourists and that is entirely different to how it would have been before. we would have been on the beaches, in the restau ra nts. have been on the beaches, in the restaurants. that restaurant we were at was quiet, it felt very local in terms of the clientele. the staff all in masks, hand sanitisers everywhere. they really want to keep this place clean. i am intrigued by the gold is one behind you. it's coming infora the gold is one behind you. it's coming in for a look. is that yours? i love it! i will not do any moves on it for you but... it really wants to get involved this morning. have fun while you are there, mairead, we will see you soon. that looks like a lot of fun. it's approaching 8:15am. brea kfast lot of fun. it's approaching 8:15am. breakfast on bbc news. the weather isn't too bad, is it? its not too
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bad today at all. certainly compared to yesterday. over the next few days it will be warming up. the end of the week could be nearly 30 degrees once again. not everybody likes that. today we have sunny spells and scattered showers. what do scattered showers mean know it means most of the time there will be plenty of sunshine around, with fair weather cloud, and here and there, scattered across the uk, there will be a few showers and you mightjust catch one. some of us will end with a dry day. you can see the scattered showers, blobs of blue across almost anywhere across the uk. but plenty of fine, bright, sunny weather around through most of the afternoon. 22 degrees in london, 19 in newcastle, a bit fresh yet whether showers are more frequent and the breeze is stronger in the western isles. beautiful end to the day and then tonight we are expecting the weather to go downhill again. this next weather system is coming our way. you can see where
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the rain is moving across ireland into western parts of the uk and on top of that the winds were strengthened, meaning monday will not be pleasant at least for a time. i don't think it will be a wash—out from dawn until dusk, or is it dusk until dawn? my goodness, i'm not going to think about that now! here we go. the rain moving across the uk during the afternoon and by the end of the day it looks as though it is going to improve across the west of the uk. yes, it is a dawn until dusk. 21 degrees on monday in london, around 15 degrees in glasgow. that's it, back to you. thank you, tomasz. as always, nice to see you. spain is one of the most popular summer destinations for british holidaymakers. but now, many face the decision to either cancel their planned trip, or quarantine for two weeks on their return. but what does this mean for businesses there?
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sara canals is a journalist in barcelona, we can talk to her now. give us a sense of what it is like there now is the news sinks in that one of the most popular sources of tourists could disappear once again overnight. what are businesses telling you? obviously this is not positive news for the tourism industry and for the british people or spanish people that were about to plan their vacations. let's remember that the announcement three weeks ago of the averages were well received at a time when spain was reopening to tourists. hotels now have been registering a lot of cancellations here. it is very difficult to spot tourists in the street. this new wave of outbreaks have really put the sector in danger again. if we take a look at the figures, we have 280 active
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outbreaks at the moment. most are under control but still spain registered at 2200 new cases, three deaths in the last day, and the situation, even if it is very different depending on the region, catalonia has been hardest hit, with barcelona a very popular place here, especially during the summer, being the most affected region here. some talk about how young people have been going to bars and night clubs in certain parts of spain, and that may have triggered an upsurge. how is it affecting those businesses, and what have you heard about that? it has been really negative, as we have seen here most of the outbreaks have seen here most of the outbreaks have originated in parties and social gatherings amongst young people. so buyers and terraces and nig htclu bs have people. so buyers and terraces and nightclubs have really suffered as consequences. actually in barcelona, the city implemented new measures a week ago but they were reinforced on
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friday. they announced nightclubs would be closed not only in barcelona but in the entire catalan region. terraces will be shut down starting at midnight which is actually the time when they start to welcome tourists and locals here who wa nt to welcome tourists and locals here who want to go and have a drink in the night. it is really going to be very difficult in the city of barcelona, over the summer and with the outbreaks and with the cases that keep rising. good to talk to you. thank you for your time. appreciate yourtime, thank you for your time. appreciate your time, thank you. let's talk now to the travel editor of the independent, simon calder, who's at gatwick airport this morning. thank you, simon, forjoining us. can you give a synopsis about the scene there at the moment, lots of flights cancelled, i take it? well, actually, no. there is quite a lot
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of flights operating to spain and they take two forms. you have easyj et they take two forms. you have easyjet which is operating absolutely normally to spain. that airline has said that if you don't wa nt to airline has said that if you don't want to go because suddenly you will have to quarantine for two weeks when you get back, then you can get a voucher or transfer your flight to a voucher or transfer your flight to a later time. you will not get a cash refund. the uk's biggest holiday company, tui, will not be operating a number of its package holidays to spain. i understand they basically are going to be cancelling everything. however, the aircraft are still going out because, of course, there are many thousands of people on holiday in spain and they are going to come back and they are going to have to fill in one of these passenger locator forms. they will then have to go straight home and self—isolate at home for two weeks. the first time they will be able to step out of their front door is on the 10th of august. of course
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none of them signed up for this. they were expecting just a lovely holiday. but suddenly with a few hours' notice they are finding they will simply have to quarantine and there is no argument, i'm afraid. thank you, simon. must be sad for those people. thank you very much for your time. a ban on junk food adverts before nine o'clock, cycling prescriptions from gps, and a 12—week weight loss plan are all expected to part of the government's strategy to tackle obesity in england. the full details of the better health campaign will be released tomorrow. we can speak now to professor jonathan valabhji, who is the nhs sorry, we don't have the professor. just talking, then, i think it must be so sad for these people who now have gone on holiday to spain and have gone on holiday to spain and have had to come back, some of them, and quarantine for two weeks. as we have been discussing with people, the fact that they don't know whether they will get paid, whether
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their employers will give them sick pgy- their employers will give them sick pay. it is a tough situation. the issueis pay. it is a tough situation. the issue is that on one hand there is the medical issue about keeping people safe and making sure that when they return they do not risk spreading this from areas where infections are high, but at the same time we know the economy was trying to get on its feet. hotels reopening, flights getting back to normality. as we are hearing earlier, big implications from travel firms and as we were just hearing there, for the local economies that rely on so many british tourist going there, huge applications. i know we will talk more about that later. we will talk about your rights when it comes to cancellations and refunds and that sort of thing. we will return to that story about obesity, as well. the government's plan to help tackle obesity by prescribing, amongst other things, prescriptions to go cycling. 8:22am, that bring you up—to—date with other weather. —— other news. the teenager from cumbria has unearthed a piece of wartime history that has caused ripples on the other side of the
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world. it is a great story. max hazlehurst was looking at wildlife when he found an australian airman's dog tag from the second world war. he has since tracked it down, the only‘s family, as well. peter marshall this report. it isa it is a work max hazlehurst will never forget. the 13—year—old was searching for bugs and snakes and black and fell in the lake district when he discovered something rather special. the pot gets really rocky andi special. the pot gets really rocky and i may be so about that much of it, so i picked it up, ithought maybe it was a dog collar or something and then i saw the actual tag bit which had the name on. he had found a second world war dog tag or military identification label thought to have been lost up here in the 1940s. max and his family put the details on social media and soon discovered
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it belonged to ernie wills, a warrant officer with the royal australian air force. oh, i was pretty amazed, to be fair. i wasn't expecting to find that when i came up here. max also discovered ernie's surviving family who live near perth in australia, and the story has reverberated around the globe. three australian sisters have told of their disbelief after a piece of their family's wartime history was uncovered on a mountain in northern britain. the fact he showed his mum and his mum has put it on facebook... as you can see, we are emotional, but we are very, very excited. today, max had the chance to chat with one of ernie's grateful daughters. max, how on earth did you find that tag? i was just looking around, i was looking for adders. you have made our family so happy. we are just beside ourselves. with excitement and tears and, you know, we are so proud of you. he loved... because he was a geologist,
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loved spending time, a lot like you, i think, exploring the environment around him. that is why we think he would be so proud of you. sadly, ernie died at the age ofjust 43 in a car crash near alice springs. but thanks to a cumbrian schoolboy, his family now have another memory of him to treasure. it does feel quite good, to give them an end. just something for them to remember him by, yeah. let's return to the story we just mentioned a few moments ago, news the government will unveil what it is calling a better health campaign. details released tomorrow. in it, amongst other things, prescription for cycling to help reduce diabetes and obesity. let's speak now to professorjonathan and obesity. let's speak now to professor jonathan valabhji, the and obesity. let's speak now to professorjonathan valabhji, the nhs national clinical director for diabetes and obesity is —— good morning. how significant is this? we
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know it is a growing problem and wa nt know it is a growing problem and want the government is keen to tackle because of the long—term implications. but is a prescription for cycling the answer? will that tackle this issue? i think we are in a position. we are up two thirds of the adult population who are overweight and obese and what has gone this into sharp focus is that we now know obesity and being overweight is an independent risk factor for the overweight is an independent risk factorfor the more overweight is an independent risk factor for the more severe outcomes associated with the coronavirus. we know, for example, that it independently predicts the risk of dying from coronavirus stock tragically, you know, we have had many deaths as a result. obesity is also the major modifiable risk factor type two diabetes and over 3 million people across the country have type two diabetes. within the nhs we have developed a type two
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diabetes prevention programme which we launched a few years ago and already we have had several hundreds of thousands of people pass through. it promotes weight loss, healthier eating, healthier living, more physical activity, and the weight loss we have seen in the programme is that wee bit as much as we might have expected, which is we see prevention of type two diabetes, reduced incidence of the disease, in the longer term. the real important milestone, as of this week, will be the fact that people will be able to access the type two diabetes prevention programme themselves by logging onto the diabetes uk website, assessing their own risk via something called the know your risk tool, and you can see your own risk tool, and you can see your own risk of type two diabetes, entering a few it's of information like your age and ethnicity and your weight.
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it will give you your risk or, if thatis it will give you your risk or, if that is above a certain threshold, you will then be able to self refer into the programme. most of this programme has been delivered face—to—face in groups and of course with the social distancing and the pandemic situation, we have had to transform that into remote delivery to your doorstep, if you like, by telephone or in video conferencing. and so people cannot only assess themselves, self refer, but they can access the programme without that social contact that people are very anxious about. before, people are having to go via their gp, really, to access the programme. and in particular they were needing a blood test which, again, we know people are fearful of the social contact that that might involve. we think this is an important milestone and i really keen that people, if they feel they are at high risk, do access the tool, self assess and
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refer themselves into the programme. i wanted to ask about that idea of having to refer yourself. it is about acknowledging you have a problem and seeking help for it. let's touch also won a couple of the other elements of this, which is a potential ban on junk food adverts on tv before the 9pm watershed. outlaw them online entirely. things like promotions on snacks or unhealthy snacks, they would be curbed. is that enough? on the other extreme, is that too draconian, is this the nanny state, the governance getting too involved in what we choose to eat? every single action we ta ke choose to eat? every single action we take is likely to have an important but small impact. and the more actions we have in our portfolio, the more we are likely to see some of the parts of something quite substantial. we have a problem. as i mentioned, we have two thirds of the population in the overweight or obese range. that is important for a whole host of reasons. we know obesity in the
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long—term predisposes to type two diabetes, heart attacks and strokes and arthritis and a whole host of things. but we now know that even a short—term there are important consequences, and we know that people who are overweight or obese are ata people who are overweight or obese are at a significantly higher risk of realising the more severe outcomes of covid. there is a real opportunity, at the moment, where i think people are receptive to additional measures, and so i think the fact that the government is prepared to announce a package of a host of different manoeuvres to help the situation is really positive. really positive for us in the nhs, as well, of course. the consequences of obesity, such as type two diabetes, consume a lot of resources within the nhs and cause a lot of suffering. we know type two diabetes, for instance, is one of the most common causes of blindness, kidney failure and limb amputation,
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leg amputation. it is devastating. we now also know that both type two diabetes and our own research that we protect in may, is that people with type two diabetes are at double the risk of one of the tragic consequences, which is dying of covid. if we can put people on this programme on our type two diabetes prevention programme, it should stop them developing it and those consequences, but even the shorter term it will support them, reduce the risk of the more severe consequences of covid. they are never more relevant, both of the broad package to tackle obesity, as well as the nhs type two diabetes prevention programme. is good to talk to you this morning. jonathan valabhji, the nhs national clinical director for diabetes and obesity. thank you. an important proposal to try to tackle that growing number of people suffering from those conditions. diabetes and all the
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related issues that he was telling us about. don't go anywhere. a great 30 minutes to come. the headlines to come as well. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sima kotecha. it's 8:32am. good morning to you. holidaymakers returning to any part of the uk from spain —
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including the balearic islands and the canary islands — will have to quarantine for two weeks from today. the measure was announced yesterday evening amid fears that spain could be experiencing a second wave of coronavirus. it applies to all four nations of the uk. the foreign office is also advising against all but essential travel to mainland spain. we can speak now to rob griggs. he's from the trade body airlines uk. representing airlines across the country. good morning to you. what do you make of this, a blow to airlines who are trying to get back to some sort of normal summer service? it is, a big blow, spain is one of the largest markets for uk passengers and as you say, only a few weeks ago when the first batch of travel corridors were introduced from the uk which meant you wouldn't have to quarantine on arrival, or us, that was where recovery of the sector was able to begin. before that, essentially, airlines across the country had been grounded for the country had been grounded for the best part of three months. it is a big blow and for us, it speaks to the importance of various things
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like testing, or regional aspects, whether or not quarantine it should apply to all of the country or certain parts that are affected. there are those sorts of things which i think are really urgent for us to look at. lots of people talking to us this morning, passengers that are due to fly today over the next week, tourists who have already made it to spain and face that quarantine coming back, telling us it's frustrating, where they are it seems safe, cleanliness has been improved, it seems that there is very little risk and yet there is very little risk and yet the whole country is facing this measure. would you like to see regional air corridors, if it can be enforced? yes, i think for us that isa enforced? yes, i think for us that is a really key part. we back the idea of voluntary testing, doesn't necessarily have to be on arrival, you can read before you leave and it's important for two reasons, testing would enable countries where quarantine would still apply as a whole to enable individuals to come back without any quarantine if they
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test and that something trialled in various parts of the world but i think it's important to enable countries that are on the goat list, people able to fly, they will have the added reassurance they would be able to take a test when they come back. for us, the testing element is important at the regional aspect, as you say. if the whole country isn't necessarily affected in the same way, can we be a little bit more specific and whether that should apply, a little bit more flexibility going forward. are you worried about the impact this will have on the travel market more generally? quite clearly, these restrictions apply only to spain but they don't necessarily instill confidence you can go to other countries, perhaps italy, germany, greece, and not face the same problem when you get there? indeed. we know it's going to take a while to recover from the current crisis, it's something we've never faced before. consumer confidence is going to be a huge part of that and
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a lot has been done with making sure flying is safe as possible and health and cleaning measures on the airports and in the air but clearly, the possibility that we might have a travel corridor taken away, it adds to additional uncertainty which is why we think if we can explore as fa st why we think if we can explore as fast as we can't things like regional air bridges to different parts of the country or testing, these would add further reassurance to passengers, hopefully as the overall situation improves and we can return to something like normality but clearly, we are away away from that. some will say this morning with shouldn't have too much sympathy for people who took the first opportunity to go on holiday, given the risks, they knew what those risks were. but should we have any sympathy for these people?” think we should. you know, the government advice was clear, the advice of change, these travel corridors were in place and they are in place for a good reason, notjust
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for the in place for a good reason, notjust forthe uk, in place for a good reason, notjust for the uk, vacations are a huge pa rt of for the uk, vacations are a huge part of the economy, generates a huge number of jobs, part of the economy, generates a huge numberofjobs, in part of the economy, generates a huge number ofjobs, in aerospace, trade, getting people flying back to normal is a huge part of the overall recovery be fully backed government in making sure not a moment was lost in doing that. as i say, from now, it's important to think of ways we can and as much confidence as possible going forward, but absolutely, our thoughts are with those affected this morning because very little notice last night, people having to adapt to that now. rob, good to talk to you. thank you. kat has the sport this morning. england going into the third day to day of the test match. they do, we dodged the rate yesterday, horrible forecast. none of that rain really affected the cricket at all. good news for england. england go into day
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three of the final test against the west indies in a strong position today, after reducing the visitors to 137—6 ayesterday. we can speak now to former england international isa guha who's now part of the bbc‘s cricket team at old trafford. good morning to you! more sunshine, hopefully, for manchester today and england on top on day three, thanks in large part to the veterans, stuart broad, james anderson, both of them had been left out of the series, both of them with a point to prove. it's a formidable partnership, over 1000 wickets together, the best partnership in history. no question of that, we wondered whether we would see them together again, wonderful site to get them out there in the middle, opening the bowling, causing problems once again. to add to chris works and jofra archer, fabulous quartet, we know ben stokes has got a bit ofa quartet, we know ben stokes has got a bit of a niggle, it might not feature too much with the ball in this test match but england on the
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front foot. in a great position to win back the trophy, weather permitting. i win back the trophy, weather permitting. lam win back the trophy, weather permitting. i am very hopeful at the moment, little bit cloudy outside. i'm hopeful of a full day 's play today, tomorrow not looking good. if they can bowl out the west indies without them getting another 33 runs, they might be able to put them in again which is something they might consider. going to be a big ask, isn't it, the west indies playing brilliantly during the series but going back to broad and anderson, so much of the focus has been on the ashes test next year, the bowling attack. focus onjofra archer, stuart broad and james anderson being left out of the conversation but do you think we will see them feature in an ashes series? respectively 39 and 35 at the end of next year. absolutely, i would not rule them out, i think
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there will be a day night test and you want them in on your side. broad fights fire with fire, you want to throw the ball to him in a tense situation, the first test usually played at brisbane, hostile crowd, i've seen it before on a number of occasions. the crowd getting stuck into england. of course, you've got a very different feel to your side when certain players are available. hopefully we can wrap them up in cotton wool when it comes to australia. i was there for the last ashes series, it was pretty horrendous. they lost 4—0. know ben stokes. it would be great to have him there. yes, going to be an exciting contest, i cannot wait for it to unfold. coronavirus, the pandemic permitting, it's really exciting prospect for english cricket at moment, the depth that we have in the bowling ranks. the
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batting a little bit more in experience but you are hoping with some more test matches under their belt they can prove to be a force to even try and win the ashes next year. i've got to ask you before you 90, year. i've got to ask you before you go, the return of crowds at the oval, test event being held today, 1000 fans allowed into the ground to watch a county match. the crowds returning but how has been at old trafford for a test series without a crowd and how welcome back will people be in the stands? yes, slightly strange, i have to be honest. when you gotjofra slightly strange, i have to be honest. when you got jofra archer steaming in and pulling 90 miles an hour and you haven't got a single peep from anyone in the crowd, it's pretty crazy. last year, at lord's, iremember him pretty crazy. last year, at lord's, i remember him running into bill at steve smith and i went and sat in the stands, usually has quite a nice buzz and the feeling you get, the atmosphere around you, you've got
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this incredible action, this drama happening in the middle, nothing quite like it. fingers crossed, it all goes well at surrey today. and i know, i think people were waiting for 90 minutes to get tickets on the phone, desperate to get hold of that chance to actually go and watch some live cricket. you know, it will be fantastic. i understand they are going to pull out all the stops, beverages available, food, like normal. hopefully it works out and we will be getting back to crowds very soon. hopefully the weather holding off at the oval and at old trafford, you and the team. highlights on bbc one later this evening. it's been the longest and probably the strangest premier league season in history but this afternoon it all draws to a close, and it promises to be a nailbiter. every team will play their final match at 4pm and there's still lots to be decided — especially at the bottom of the table. only one of bournemouth,
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watford or aston villa will stay up. bournemouth are three points from safety, while villa go into their game against west ham with the upper hand — but onlyjust. they're outside the bottom three on goal difference from watford. super tight down at the bottom. meanwhile, the battle for who'll play champions league football next season will also be decided, with two of the sides involved going head to head. fifth placed leicester host manchester united who are third, and there's just a point between them. chelsea are currently in the final qualifying spot of fourth — they take on wolves there will be fans across the country this morning waking up, perhaps after a sleepless night, perhaps after a sleepless night, perhaps too nervous to eat their brea kfast, perhaps too nervous to eat their breakfast, best of luck to all of you, although there can only be one winner. thank you, i love that interview. enjoy that. she's great, isn't she? she is indeed. thank you. see you in a little bit. let's return to the top story, it's
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approaching quarter to nine. if you arejust waking up approaching quarter to nine. if you are just waking up this morning approaching quarter to nine. if you arejust waking up this morning holidaymakers across spain will be affected by new rules that came into force at midnight last night — they'll now have to quarantine for 14 days when they return to the uk. let's speak to sean and maria wilkinson now who landed in alicante yesterday. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. not long to digest the news, how are you feeling? it's a bit of a shock, i must admit. it wasn't expected, the plane was full, hardly a seat. lots of people in the same boat. yes, you know, if that is what the decision is, that is the decision, we have to live with that. as your holiday staying as it was, you are going to spend some time there, come back and quarantine or do you want to come back to the uk sooner like some people may have heard from today? we are going to stay, definitely. we are booked for ten days, we will see that out,
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unless something changes and you are instructed to go back beforehand. trust the government will get it right. we will do what we are told. do you work? when you do get back are you going to have to get your employer to let you have that time off, i mean, obviously, you will have it, but i presume you would like to be paid? yes, for me, personally, it doesn't really affect me,| personally, it doesn't really affect me, i work from home quite often. and have been for the last five or six months like most people. i've been lucky enough not to need to go on furlough, i have kept busy. but slightly different for yourself.” ama slightly different for yourself.” am a dog home border, i have dogs booked in when i get home. i don't know how i am going to go home with that, they have got to be walked and i cannot leave the house.” that, they have got to be walked and i cannot leave the house. i know you say you will continue the holiday, you will quarantine when you get back. would you have still chosen to go had these rules been in place before you flew yesterday? no, i
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don't think so. probably not. sorry to interrupt. i wonder what your travel firm have told you and have you had any communication from them in terms of what you might do next? and we will come under that idea of whether you would begin a second. no communication. to be honest, it isn't a package, we booked the flight isn't a package, we booked the flight ourselves with easyjet. so you don't really get any instruction from them. and we just booked a villa where we are staying in the resort. again, you don't get any communication that way. it is a private contract. it's really sad, just looking at you both, it is your first day on holiday. and you don't look like you normally would on your first day! it would be delighted. you seem upset. no, i wouldn't say we are upset, we are going to make the most of the time while we are here, spine is different at the moment. everybody has to wear masks
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inside and out and that's been followed by everybody, religiously, we have not seen anyone breaking the rule over here. we do the same when we are outside. you feel safe. we willjust go try and enjoy it while we can. thank you both so much for joining while we can. thank you both so much forjoining us, i hope you manage to have a lovely holiday and when you get back, i hope you managed to get back to work and do what you need to do. thank you. thank you. lots of change for everyone involved, quite clearly. the decision to remove spain from the uk's quarantine exemption list comes amid fears the country could soon experience a second peak in coronavirus infections. and that is why they are doing it, they hope this would stop anyone bringing it back to the uk. a thousand new cases were reported on friday. epidemiologist mike tildesley joins us now. thanks so much forjoining us this morning. first of all regarding how the disease spreads, do you think
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the disease spreads, do you think the right decision has been made, quarantining people when they get back from spain for two weeks? well, if we look at the number of cases, spine hit about its lowest number of cases per day rammed about the middle ofjune, cases per day rammed about the middle of june, when cases per day rammed about the middle ofjune, when we were getting around 200—300 reported cases every day, now one month later that has increased by about a factor of seven oreight, a increased by about a factor of seven or eight, a little bit of variation but it has increased significantly. obviously there is a concern here we are starting to see a rise and obviously, lockdown has eased in spain as it has in other countries and we might expect to see this but it's actually really important with control, such as these restrictions, people coming in from spain, we react rapidly to that because what we want to avoid in our own country as we start to see cases rising as a result of people coming back from a high incidence country where infections are rising and bringing infections are rising and bringing infection back here. how do you think you can reduce these spikes
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without going into lockdown? is there a way of doing that is lockdown, in your opinion, the only answer? unfortunately, this is one of the problems. of course, we went into lockdown in march, on a nationwide scale and of course, we did that for a very good reasons, we we re did that for a very good reasons, we were doing that to protect the health service, reduce the number of deaths. the consequence of that, unfortunately, is as you come out of lockdown, relatively few people have been infected as a proportion of the entire population of the country so there is always the risk you are going to start to see cases rising. the hope and of course the current uk plan is that that can't be managed by local intervention measures, you start to see cases rising ina measures, you start to see cases rising in a particular region, you react locally, you increase testing and if necessary, but in local lockdown is that there is the state we are in at the moment, if we can't manage that hopefully we can continue that. but of course, if we start to see cases rising significantly you might see larger
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lockdown s coming back. it's palpable when you are out and about some people are still feeling very fearful, here in the uk. what are the chances of a second surge? we are hearing so much about perhaps the colder weather bringing another surge of coronavirus? what are your thoughts? this is extremely difficult to predict right now, unfortunately. i think over the next couple of weeks, we know there was a whole range of intervention measures that started to be relaxed during july and over the next couple of weeks we start to see the effect of that in the data as it comes in to see whether there has been a significant rise in the number of cases. as i said, we are in the face at the moment we can hopefully manage this locally but of course, we are seeing rises in cases in other countries in europe and there is the fear as we get into the winter months, when people are inside more, potentially in closer contact with each other, we could start to see cases rising again. i would say, we are clearly not out of
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the woods yet, it's important we monitor rises in cases as they occur and react rapidly, that is the key, if we can react rapidly with local lockdown, hopefully we won't see a large second wave occurring over the coming months. how much of the danger do you think these european countries that are seeing a rise at the moment, germany, spain, how could that affect us? we saw initially, with italy, it was out of control, then just weeks later, we sought the ripple effect here in the uk. absolutely. i remember talking about this back in march. we always had the idea we were about 2—3 weeks behind where italy wasn't of course that proved to be true. we started to see cases rising similarly but with that sort of lag. again, we are ina phase, with that sort of lag. again, we are in a phase, we look at other countries who might have come out of lockdown slightly earlier than us, spine is one of the more extreme cases but we are seeing slight evidence of cases rising also in
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france, germany. so it is a concern that we may find ourselves in a similar phase and a couple of weeks. again, as! similar phase and a couple of weeks. again, as i said, it's important we monitor that and are prepared to react rapidly if we do see that occurring. thank you so much. a really good and useful synopsis on what we could expect here in the uk, so thank you for that. we should be absolutely clear this morning, two bits of what might appear to be sort of conflicting advice, one is that the travel advice, against all but essential travel applies to mainland spain. that means perhaps you wouldn't be able to get travel insurance because the foreign office advice is do not travel to mainland spain but that does not apply to the islands so if you are off to majorca, menorca, ibiza, you will have to quarantine, 14 days of isolation if you return from any further including the islands. that's why there is confusion this morning, but to be really care, quarantine applying to everywhere in maine and spain, the islands, the
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foreign office advice only applies if you are going to mainland spain. i hope that clears it up. here's tomasz with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. if people are not able to go to spain, given these new rules, there is some good news in your forecast? i new rules, there is some good news in yourforecast? i hope! there is, actually. towards the end of the week, from mid week onwards, we start to see the weather improving across the uk. it could even hit 30 degrees across the south by the time we get to friday! summer weather eventually going to return but in the short term, i think it's still a mixed bag although having said that, today will not be bad at all, just a few scattered showers and on the whole, i think a lot of blue sky, fine day on the way. this is the weather yesterday, all of that loud, moving out of the way. a big gap across the country, allowing all of that sunshine to come through but more cloud heading our way, that's not going to arrive until later this evening and overnight. lets enjoy
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today. plenty of sunny spells on the way, some scattered showers, it's not going to be a dry day by any means, once in a while there might be one or two showers popping up almost anywhere across the country. decent showers, 22 in london, around 19 in belfast, a bit fresher where the breeze is stronger and the showers more frequent in western scotland. fine evening, end to the date but watch this next weather system coming in, cloud increasing broadly across western parts of england and wales, could be quite a wet end to the night in places like belfast, much of western wales, the la ke belfast, much of western wales, the lake district, certainly. north—eastern scotland, i think, clear skies through the night and into tomorrow. tomorrow, this low pressure at sitting right on top of the uk, not going to feel likejuly so tomorrow for many of us it will bea so tomorrow for many of us it will be a disappointing day. clearly a lot of cloud, you can see the outbreaks of rain, pushing more
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across into northern parts of england and into southern and eastern scotland. to the south of that, it will be dry, some rain around still but it is the wind, these arrows indicate the wind gusts in excess of 40 miles an hour. cool day obviously with all of that, 21 in london, 17 in belfast but notice, by the end of the afternoon, it will improve on monday as this weather system improve on monday as this weather syste m m oves improve on monday as this weather system moves away. by tuesday, it looks as though the weather is going to be settling down and to state will bring some sunshine! there it is. back to you. thank you so much and have a lovely day, whatever you are up to and some good news in that forecast! if you are not able to make it out to spain. my perfect end to the programme live cricket may have been back for a few weeks, but today marks the first step towards crowds coming back to watching sport. the oval will host 1000 fans in a pilot match between surrey and middlesex. let's find out more from katie shanahan, who's there for us this morning.
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katie, looking glorious and finally, they can open the doors to some fans. yes, finally, going to be a huge day for sport, i'm down here at the oval, finally, fans will be welcomed back into grounds for the first time in england since march. ina first time in england since march. in a couple of hours, 1000 fans will be taking their seats to watch this cou nty be taking their seats to watch this county cricket match between surrey and middlesex. going to be the first ofa number of and middlesex. going to be the first of a number of trials the government are doing to try and get fans back into stadiums but it's going to look different. going to be 1000 fans compared to 25,000 capacity, only going to be using this one stand, fa ns going to be using this one stand, fans are going to have to make sure they are socially distant, sitting in every other row, as well as using two seats, keeping two seats free either side. hand sanitiser will be available with masks also optional, each fan has had to complete a
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medical questionnaire before entering the ground. the good news is that boris will be open, the food will be available, the public address system will be going and the big screens will be on. let's talk to two people lucky enough to come to two people lucky enough to come to this event. we will talk to steve, a vicar, and surrey cricket fan and mark, the cricket commentatorfor fan and mark, the cricket commentator for syria as well. steve, starting with you, how excited are you to finally watch some live cricket? really excited, real buzz in the air, i was so happy i was able to open the church a couple of weeks ago and today, just as excited, the cricket ground over the road from the church and where i live is finally open for cricket. we cannot wait to hear the sound of leather on willow, the community really up for this. i cannot rememberthe really up for this. i cannot remember the local community being so excited about a cricket match, we haven't had one for a long time, it's great we are physically able to be in the ground. mark, as a
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commentator, how different has it been watching sport with no fans and how crucial are they to this spectacle? i think it's great they are letting fans in. it's not the same without fans. and i'm like a kid at christmas, it's like christmas day for me. i've been desperate to do some commentary, i was lucky enough to be here on wednesday night for the women's game and the thought of seeing the players back out there, playing cricket, with fans inside the ground, it's what we've all been waiting for so this is like christmas morning for me. i'm just very, very excited. enjoy today. this marks the first of a number of trials, glorious goodwood as well as the world snooker championships, hopefully, if we can't get this going, positive signs to the government, what fans can come back into stadiums but there is a real sense of excitement here at the oval, the first real step to getting fa ns oval, the first real step to getting fans back into stadiums. katie, thank you, your impressive jacket matches exactly the seats was that
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deliberate? katie, thank you. so good to see you. thanks for your company this morning. breakfast will be back tomorrow morning from six. enjoy your day, goodbye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. anyone arriving in the uk from spain now has to self—isolate for two weeks — because of a spike in cases there. the short notice change came into force at midnight in the uk. some british tourists rushed to get home. we were due to arrive at 20 past midnight, so we were a bit like... and then we made it two minutes
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and the pilot announced it

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