Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   BBC World News  BBC News  October 5, 2020 5:00am-6:01am BST

5:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm sally bundock. remarkable scenes outside the walter reed medical center, as president trump takes a short ride to greet his supporters. mr trump is being treated for coronavirus. earlier, doctors said they were pleased with his progress. he continues to look —— if he continues to look and feel as well as he does today, we could plan for discharge tomorrow to the white house where he could continue his treatment course. armenian and azerbaijani forces exchange heavy rocket and artillery fire as fighting intensifies over nagorno—karabakh — russia calls
5:01 am
for an immediate ceasefire. rescue operations are stepped up in france and italy after storm alex brings torrential rain and flash floods to many areas. good to have you with us. president trump has taken a short car trip to wave at supporters gathered outside the hospital where he is being treated for covid—19. mr trump arrived at the walter reed national military medical center on friday, hours after publicly revealing that he and wife melania were infected. doctors treating the president say he's continuing to recover well and might be discharged from hospital within the next 2a hours. our north america correspondent
5:02 am
davis willis reports. the us government's medical experts have advised coronavirus patients to stay in their room and only venture out if it is medically necessary. not this patient. accompanied by secret service agents in protective gear, president trump embarked on a slow drive around the walter reed medical center to wave to supporters who had maintained a vigil there since he was admitted three days ago. great patriots, in his words, and while the president himself was wearing a face mask, few of them were doing the same. he teased the trip on twitter after paying tribute to those who have been treating him. so it's been a very interesting journey was that i learnt a lot about covid. i learnt about it by going to school. this is the real school. this isn't the let's read the book school. and i get it. and i understand it. but something he hasn't learnt enough. an attendant at walter reed described the drive by as
5:03 am
an active political theatre that could cost the secret agents involved in their lives, that the irresponsibility is astounding. following several days of confusion and contradiction surrounding the president's condition, further details have emerged. despite seeing his continues —— emission continues improve, the medical —— in addition continues to improve, his blood oxygen continues to improve, his blood oxyg e n level continues to improve, his blood oxygen level dropped twice and he was given a steroid usually only for the very sick. conflicting information from the white house, the president's personal physician acknowledged he deliberately painted a rose—tinted picture of his patient‘s condition. painted a rose—tinted picture of his patient's conditionlj was of his patient's condition.” was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude the president has had over the course of his illness and the team. i didn't wa nt to illness and the team. i didn't want to give any information that might steer the course of the illness in another direction. and in doing so, you
5:04 am
know, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn't true. what is due the president is being aggressively treated with a cocktail of drugs as well as an experimental antibody therapy and of course —— and a course of remdesivir, which inhibits the ability of the virus to multiply. including dexamethasone, it works by calming the immune system but is rarely used on patients who are experiencing only mild symptoms of covid—i9. guidance from the world health organization specifies that dexamethasone is recommended for the treatment of those with severe and critical covid—i9, and particularly, those on ventilators. and despite being ona ventilators. and despite being on a five day course of remdesivir, the president because my doctors say he could because my doctors say he could be leaving hospital later today. with the president grounded, his democratic rival remains on the virtual campaign trail, five days after spending 90 minutes on a debate stage with president trump, joe biden
5:05 am
has tested negative for the coronavirus. senior democrats hope the president's diagnosis will change his attitude towards the coronavirus, but that remains to be seen. davis willis, bbc news, los angeles. let's speak to dr peter chin hong — professor of medicine at university of california, san francisco — an infectious disease expert. it looks like you are at work at the moment. thank you so much for being on the programme. first of all, what do you make of the drive by?” think it was very disappointing for me and my other colleagues across the country, and sing a president who is actually under active infection control and isolation, he is actively infected. he is still infected. he has reproducing virus. and to have him leave, go in an enclosed space that is not actually designed to keep away chemical weapons and bullets and subject his staff, his
5:06 am
secret service agents to potentially infectious viruses in an enclosed space is extremely disappointing. in a way, it sends out a message that you can go out and about, which is not really the case. we do not want people to go out and about who have covid—i9? exactly. we will never do that with our patients. if the president where my patient, we would never let him leave the hospital at this point. we do not even let patients' family members visit them once they have covid—i9 and are isolated at hospital. in terms of the drugs he is currently taking or being prescribed, what you make of the treatment he has received so far? so, you know, most people know there are two phases to the infection or disease of covid—i9. there is the infectious phase and the inflammatory phase. so, with the infectious phase he was pretty well and appropriately treated with remdesivir. he was
5:07 am
intermittently on oxygen, the cocktail has a lot of biological plausibility but that isn't enough robust controls data yet. he got it under compassionate use, not available to most people, but being the president he was able to get that with fda clearance on an individual basis. in terms of the steroids, usually, as your reporter mentioned, reserved for people with more oxygen requirements in the icu, thatis oxygen requirements in the icu, that is where the best cost efficacy is because the number needed to treat is eight, so you need to treat a patient is to say one patient‘s life in that severe category. but for patients on the oxygen, which could actually be harmful. and briefly, they are saying he may
5:08 am
be able to leave hospital today, monday, do you think thatis today, monday, do you think that is realistic, and what you think the prognosis is for the president? if the president we re president? if the president were my patient, i would not let him leave the hospital at this point. i think he has a 15- this point. i think he has a is- 25% this point. i think he has a 15— 25% mortality risk based on the data he has —— we have. he is older, slightly obese, mail, and by his current situation, intermittently on oxygen and the fact they have given him these three things, i am worried about him. and about 5— seven days after the course we know patients can literally fall off the cliff, get much sicker and go to the icu. he is not out of the woods yet. we appreciate you taking time out to talk to us today. doctor peter chin—hong, thank you. and we will have more on that story later in this programme. other news now: there's been a new surge in fighting between azerbaijan and armenia over the disputed territory of nagorno—karabakh, a week after the long running conflict reignited.
5:09 am
russia has called for a ceasefire. azerbaijan has threatened to destroy military targets inside armenia, in retaliation for a missile attack on its second city, ganja, which it says killed a civilian. until now most of the conflict has been between azerbaijan and nagorno—kara bakh itself, an area internationally recognised as part of azerbaijan, but where the majority of the population is ethnic armenian. our south caucasus correspondent rayhan demytrie has been following the latest developments. explosion azerbaijan's second largest city, ganja, was struck by an armenian rocket, killing at least one civilian, their authorities said. this marks an escalation in the week—long war, because fighting is spreading beyond the conflict zone. but the mood in ganja appears defiant. translation: we have no fear.
5:10 am
everyone is at home. victory is with us. we will go forward. we have never been afraid of the armenians. we, the people of azerbaijan, have always been tolerant and strong. in stepanakert, the capital of the disputed nagorno—kara bakh region, many civilian buildings have been damaged by the azeri bombardment. local residents have been forced to seek shelter underground. just today, azerbaijan started heavily attacking the capital city, stepanakert, targeting vital civilian infrastructures and civilian buildings with heavy missiles and aviation bombs — including with cluster bombs and cluster missiles — as a result of which we have civilian — many casualties. turkey continues to back azerbaijan in its campaign to recapture nagorno—kara bakh.
5:11 am
crowds in istanbul gather to show their support for the war. translation: my condolences to our martyrs and their families, but their blood will not remain on the grounds. we are conducting military exercises on our own lands. we want armenians to leave. karabakh is ours and it will stay ours. i'm really sad. god willing, everything will go much better. in yerevan, armenians that consider karabakh — which they call artsakh — a part of their homeland, have called for international community to recognise the territory's independence. we decided to do the flash mob in solidarity with our government, with our soldiers, and with the call that the foreign ministry would recognise artsakh as a kind of solution for this war. despite international calls for ceasefire, the latest attacks on civilian areas from both sides signal a dangerous new phase
5:12 am
in this conflict. rayhan demytrie, bbc news, tbilisi. french and italian rescuers have stepped up their search efforts after floods cut off several villages on the mountainous border, causing widespread damage and killing at least four people. others are still missing on the french side of the border after storm alex brought, torrential rains, winds of 180 kilometres an hour and flash floods to the area. paul hawkins reports. this was the picturesque town of breil—sur—roya in the french alps. but four months of rain in just one day meant devastating landslides have cut off the town. translation: all i worry about is my kids down the valley. i can't reach them. i have medicine, i have everything i need, but i'm not well. it's stress, it's anguish. rescue efforts are concentrated here with roughly 1,000 firefighters backed
5:13 am
by helicopters and the army, the french government declaring the wider region a national disaster zone. two hours' drive from here is the village of saint—martin—vesubie, population 1,400 — or at least, it was. it is also now cut off by the aftermath of storm alex, so many are leaving. translation: i left with this - a nightgown, and there you go. this is what i have left. what i have on me is not mine. i don't have a car anymore. we don't have anything anymore, like half the village. translation: i was on the top floor of the hotel, right next to the river. i realised it had doubled in volume, and then it spread out across the entire width of the hotel. it was scary. we could hear the creaking noises, the shaking because the rocks hitting the walls which were falling down, and being in the dark was even worse because we didn't
5:14 am
know what was going on. many are being evacuated by helicopter here to the city of nice, 55 kilometres south, where aid is being packed and sent out of villages across the region. meanwhile, a ito—minute drive from here along the coast of italy, the city of ventimiglia is also cleaning up. with shops and restaurants destroyed by the water, many are asking the government to declare a state of emergency. translation: look. it's quite a disaster. i have a lot of goods to throw away. and for the whole market, it's the same. it's a disaster. translation: this is the first time — i've never seen this before. i'm 45 years old and i've never seen that. 25 years that i'm at the market and i've never seen that! with both france and italy's economies badly hit by the pandemic already, this is the last thing they needed.
5:15 am
paul hawkins, bbc news. stay with us here on bbc news. still to come: the russian cleaner who won a local election without really intending to do so. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be, before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades exploded and a group of soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the parade, and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama.
5:16 am
i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. this is bbc news. our main story this hour: president trump has taken a short car trip to wave at supporters gathered outside the hospital where he is being treated for covid—19. let's have more on that story now. let's speak to our north america correspondent david willis. david, we heard earlierfrom the medical profession to say what the reaction is in terms of what the medics are saying. what about the political reaction in terms of his drive—by?
5:17 am
reaction in terms of his drive-by? well, i have to say that there has been a lot of criticism. it is the advice of the us government that if you have the coronavirus you should stay in your room and only venture out in the event of a medical emergency. well, not this particular patient. president trump went out wearing a cloth mask. the secret service detail that were with him were wearing medical grade masks and gowns. but many are saying that by doing this, the president put those secret service agents at risk, including doctorjames phillips. he is an attending physician at the walter reed hospital. he said that the president's drive—by was an act of political theatre that could cost the secret service agents involved their lives. the presidential limousine a p pa re ntly presidential limousine apparently is sealed against chemical attack. that means that any virus could spread very easily within it. doctor phillips said that the risk of
5:18 am
covid—19 transmission inside a vehicle such as that was as high as it gets. he said this is insanity, sally. absolutely, and we were hearing that earlier in the programme. but in terms of the benefit to the president in the run—up to an election, does he see that outweighing all this criticism we are hearing about? well, i imagine that the president is feeling that he needs to get out there. he is somebody who is -- out there. he is somebody who is —— has traditionally viewed illness as weakness, if you like. he didn't want to go to the walter reed hospital in the first place but his doctors basically pushed him into doing so basically pushed him into doing so and he feels that this could cost him electorally. what could cost him even more is the confusion that has been sown over the state of his health. we know now that he is being treated with a powerful steroid
5:19 am
called dexamethasone, which was developed in the uk and works by calming the immune system. according to the world health organization, that particular drug is only to be used on people who have very severe, critical symptoms of covid—19. its use on people with mild symptoms, in actual fact, its use on people with mild symptoms, in actualfact, could be harmful. it begs the question, does it not, if the president ‘s as his physician says continuing to improve clinically, then why does he have to be prescribed such a very powerful steroid? we also know as of today that the president had to be administered supplementary oxygen twice over the course of the three days since he was diagnosed with covid—19. so that has just diagnosed with covid—19. so that hasjust emerged. diagnosed with covid—19. so that has just emerged. a lot of u na nswered that has just emerged. a lot of unanswered questions, sally, and they continue to fall. indeed, they certainly do. for now, david, thank you. many countries are currently experiencing a rise in covid—19 cases but one region is going in the opposite direction.
5:20 am
according to the world health organization, confirmed cases in africa ave been decreasing for the past couple of months. one of the countries which has been getting international praise for the way it is handling the disease is senegal. since the first case was confirmed in early march it has managed to contain the pandemic. mayeni jones looks at how. friday prayers in the largest mosque. in the era of covid—19, some places of worship have been hotspots for the disease, but not here. senegal‘s experience of previous outbreaks, including zika, dengue fever and ebola has been crucial. i think the experience of senegal dealing with disease has been key to its current success , has been key to its current success, as the structure, the ecosystem for the disease has been reused and rear re— adapted to covid—19.
5:21 am
been reused and rear re— adapted to covid-19. there have only been 15,000 confirmed cases here and around 300 deaths. just 26 patients are on ventilators and infection rates are decreasing. rapid testing is the cornerstone of the country's containment strategy. lab capacity has been beefed up, and results come within eight hours. senegal has seen some small outbreaks. every him caught the virus along with 16 of his colleagues back in april —— ibrahim. initially the emergency call centre thought he had malaria. translation: they thought i wasn't sick. i told him my temperature wasn't particularly high, but i had lost my sense of taste and smell. they thought i was just scared because my colleagues had tested positive. raising awareness of the disease has united musicians and policymakers. the global index by foreign policy magazine gave
5:22 am
the country the highest possible score for its communication strategy, whether it is on the streets, through music, or in the country's masks, the messaging is clear. african countries like senegal have successfully avoided the doom and gloom predictions made at the beginning of the pandemic. the entire continent has only had about1 million cases. numbers peaked injuly, and although the africa centre for disease control says more testing is needed, the continent hasn't had the levels of coronavirus seen in other parts of the world. now, senegal is keen to maintain the progress made so senegal is keen to maintain the progress made so far. at the height of the pandemic, temperature checks were widespread, but these have largely been relaxed. but, with 4 million people expected to attend a religious pilgrimage this week, authorities here will have to remain vigilant. in russia, a village office cleaner has triumphed over her district mayor boss in a local election, but without really intending to. initially recruited to run as a technical candidate to make the election seem democratic, marina udgodskaya won by a landslide over
5:23 am
the incumbent mayor, who belongs to president putin's united russia party. voting against united russia in local elections is what the opposition politician alexei navalny believes will change the power balance. petr kozlov of the bbc‘s russian service reports in russia's kostroma region. this is the russian village of povalikhino, about 400 kilometres north—east of moscow. it is fairly quiet, rural and... moscow. it is fairly quiet, ruraland... my moscow. it is fairly quiet, rural and... my mobile phone does not have a signal. people go about their daily lives and nothing indicates for any political change. but changes here. povalikhino and surrounding districts recently voted in a new mayor. her name is marina udgodskaya and she is a bit different from her predecessor. for years, a bit different from her predecessor. foryears, marina udgodskaya worked as a cleaner in this building, the office of
5:24 am
the local authority. she never had any political aspirations. nikolai loktev represents united russia, the party of power and of president vladimir putin. he has been the mayor of the district for several years. in september he ran for re—election. to ensure victory, he picked the opponent himself. under russian law, there should be at least two candidates on the ballot. udgodskaya was what is called a technical candidate, a stand—in to make the election look real. translation: i asked the election look real. translation: iasked her and she agreed. had there been another option for a candidate, i wouldn't have asked her. people backed her. well done to her. i don't see anything unusual in her victory. i am grateful to her for accepting. and for the newly elected mayor, how did it feel to win?
5:25 am
translation: i feel fine. mayor, how did it feel to win? translation: ifeelfine. i mayor, how did it feel to win? translation: i feel fine. i was a bit surprised at first. if people elected me, i will work for them. with udgodskaya -- we followed udgodskaya on her first mission to a rural village. she met a voter who backs her all the way. translation: of course we believe in her. we are proud of her. we're sure she will do a greatjob. her. we're sure she will do a great job. tactical voting, supporting any candidate other than the ruling united russia party, is the idea promoted by opposition politician navalny, the man who claims his recent poisoning by novichok was orchestrated by president putin. the people of povalikhino may or may not support navalny, but the fact remains that they voted for a new face. could this be the road other villages and towns will follow?
5:26 am
there you have it. i think a lesson learned there. we have all the latest business stories coming up injust a moment. i will see you soon. hello there. well, the weekend was pretty much a wash—out for many of us. we saw a vigorous area of low pressure parked across the uk, bringing huge amounts of rainfall — over a month's worth of rain falling in many areas. it did lead to some localised flooding and some transport disruption and plenty of flood warnings remain in force. if you are concerned about where you live, then head onto the bbc weather website to check out all the details. but as we head into this new week, it does look like things will be a little bit quieter. still quite unsettled because low pressure will always be nearby, so we'll see further showers at times, but there will be
5:27 am
some sunny spells too. for monday morning, we have our area of low pressure still with us, but it is a slightly weaker feature. you can see fewer isobars on the chart as well, so it will not be quite as windy through today. temperatures starting the day off at around 8—9 degrees for many of us, but where we have more cloud out west, then around ten or 11 degrees. now, this weather front and our weather front will reinvigorate and push back into northern ireland, wales, the south—west of england through today, so it's likely to produce a wet day here. but elsewhere across the country, it's sunny spells and scattered showers, and some of the showers could turn out to be heavy, maybe even thundery. a slightly warmer day for many of us, particularly across the south—east. given some sunshine, we could see 16 or 17 degrees. through monday night, it looks like it stays pretty showery. longer spells of rain pushing from west to east, mainly across northern and western areas. again there will be some clear spells and where you see the clear skies, then temperatures will dip into single figures, otherwise holding in double figures where we have the rain and the cloud. our area of low pressure is still with us on into tuesday, drifting a bit further northwards, parking itself across scotland.
5:28 am
it means we'll see more of a gradient, more isobars developing across england, wales and northern ireland through the day. so a breezier day across the south. that will drive further showers into many south—western areas. again, some of them could turn out to be heavy and thundery pretty much anywhere, but there'll also be some good spells of sunshine in between. and those temperatures reaching highs again from 14 to around 15 or maybe 16 degrees across the south—east. so a similar story as we head on into wednesday as well, further showers at times. and then as we head on into thursday, there's signs of another area of low pressure moving through to bring some wet and windy weather.
5:29 am
5:30 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. ferme! the city of lights is closing down — paris gets ready for stricter measures to fight covid—19 with bars and cafes that don't serve food told to shut. and wake up and smell the coffee! as the pandemic closes coffee shops around the world, growers and roasters face a fight for survival.
5:31 am
hello again. time to focus on the top is nest stories. —— business. we begin in paris where bars and cafes are to shut for two weeks from tuesday in response to a surge in the spread of the coronavirus. the french capital has been re—designated a zone of maximum alert. however, restaurants and bistros that serve food as well as alcohol will be allowed to stay open, if they observe new health rules, like registering contact details from customers and shut their doors at 10pm. well, let's go to paris now and discuss this with tomasz michalski, associate professor of economics and decision sciences department, hec paris. clearly there is a public health problem in the french capital. talk us through the impact of these latest measures. so, the paris region, paris and suburbs, went into
5:32 am
the strictest level of restrictions. they start tomorrow. what happens is that any public places, in fact, that have, they are taking in public. so, for example, public venues that you can think of the different types here that do not have a strict protocol, will have to close down. that will have to close down. that will include restaurants in silk, yesterday, when the ministry agreed that they follow a special protocol to keep them open. bars will close. many other venues were already closed like gyms, various party rooms, etc. talk us various party rooms, etc. talk us through the economic impact of this is having. marseille and other parts of france are under very strict measures. the government is desperate to avoid another national lockdown. your thoughts on how
5:33 am
this is affecting the french economy? the philosophy of the government is to keep the pandemic under control. and they feel this is some planning problem. so they are taking into account the capacity of the hospital system, and they are introducing stricter and stricter measures. every time incidence is increasing, more hospital beds are used. remote working is now recommended. they are having a lot of psas and mask wearing is necessary. everything is done so that the lockdown is, erm, avoided. we are going to have — we hope the numbers stabilised. for example, in the paris area and marseille area, we will see if there is not going to be a new launch, still given the
5:34 am
prevalence rate of the virus in these areas. hospitals may be overrun in october or mid november. so then we should wait for other measures, perhaps, to kick in like school closures, full university closures, full university closures, perhaps some local lockdowns, because now it is much more localised than it was in march and april. but tomasz michalski, i am very keen to know how the french economy is faring while all this is going on. thejobs market has been supported by government schemes, but when these start to expire, what is the impact going to be? so, where the sectors are closed, hotels, discos, the government is keeping a lot of furloughing schemes. this is sector by sector. employment is still protected, if you will, and firms are enjoying very good
5:35 am
access to credit, that is based, for example, on past revenues. and they have very long—term loans they can potentially pay in the years to come. so if you have tightening of the measures, the government is promising to introduce new support measures. the bank of france did not, in the view of the new developments, updates its still highly negative view about the gdp growth for 2020, it still stands at —8.7%. we will see what happens on the first day. all right, we will have to leave it there. thank you forjoining us live, from paris. tomasz michalski, looking at the changes in paris and other cities in france. since the middle of last century, hong kong has acted as a gateway between businesses
5:36 am
in china and the west. mainland companies were able to access foreign money through the city, and in turn, international companies could easily do business with china. but is beijing's new security lawjeopardising hong kong's reputation as asia's financial capital? katie silver reports. riding the wave of china's meteoric economic rise in the last 40 years, hong kong has been able to move from cotton spinning and manufacturing into financial and commercial services, giving companies around the world a place to do their banking, borrow money and sell shares. hong kong has a lot to offer. low taxes, the fa ct lot to offer. low taxes, the fact money can move in and out of it easily, a stable business environment and a legal system based on that of the uk. it attracted companies from all over the world. what made hong kong so unique is really — it
5:37 am
really is having economic fundamentals family rested. its status as a global financial centre and the cash that has come with it has made hong kong what it is today, a thriving, busy metropolis. but with the protest last year which brought the city to a standstill and the city to a standstill and the imposition of the new security lawyer, hong kong's future as a global financial centre is endowed. beijing will control the future of hong kong, for good or bad. and i think that is one of the challenges we talk about. we'll hong kong remain an international financial centre? there are plenty of cities in the region that would begin to ta ke the region that would begin to take its place. enter stage right, singapore. the city seems an obvious contender. it has a stable government and offers many of the same benefits that hong kong does. low taxes, and easy business environment and lower rent stop but the size of its financial system is far smaller than hong kong's. its stock market is about one—seventh of the size of hong kong's. then you have
5:38 am
tokyo, a major financial centre already, but japan has tokyo, a major financial centre already, butjapan has high taxes and a language barrier. meanwhile, sydney is pouring billions of dollars into its own version of silicon valley, calling that area tech central, but high taxes and its geographic remoteness are a high challenge for it becoming a business hub. other contenders include angkor, taiwan and sold, or other chinese cities like shanghai and shenzhen. —— bangkok or seoul. the flow of money that comes out of hong kong on a daily basis and comes in and out of china is very hard to replicate. as long as the money is flowing, the bright lights of hong kong will stay on. katie silver, bbc news. let's tell you whether money is going today. financial markets in asia in the middle of their trading session. and on friday,
5:39 am
investors globally were trying to get heads around the fact the president of the united states has covid—19, he tested positive for coronavirus. that set markets on friday into a bit of a volatile session, to say the least. let's go to karishma vaswani in our asia business hub. so, how is today going? yeah, well, i think it would be fair to say that today investors are taking a bit of a positive note from the news coming out of president trump, and the fact the leadership team there is saying he looks to be getting out of the woods, that sign when he came out and he did the sort of drive around in his convoy, although, highly unusualfor someone in convoy, although, highly unusual for someone in that position, being seen again by many investors in this part of the world as perhaps a sign of positivity. and i think you have to underline the fact that because of all of the uncertainty amongst investors
5:40 am
in asian markets, around the world, in fact, in asian markets, around the world, infact, people in asian markets, around the world, in fact, people are looking for some kind of opportunity to get into the market when there had been that sell—off on friday. can see on your there that the nikkei and hang seng seeing a percentage gain. markets were closed on friday and didn't get a chance to react to that news, but that news coming through and positive sentiment that things may not be as bad as previously thought. one investor saying to me this is the position for now, this is the information we are getting at this point in time. if things do not go as planned, volatility will return to these markets. i can guarantee that. good to see you, karishma vaswani, thank you, karishma vaswani, thank you for your time. let's get some of the day's other news. norwegian oil workers have expanded their ongoing strike. the escalation is expected to shut oil and gas production at up to six offshore fields. that could reduce norway's petroleum production capacity
5:41 am
by as much as 330,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day — or 8% of the country's total output, according to the norwegian oil and gas association. london has banned indian taxi app ola over public safety concerns. the city's transport authority says the firm delayed reporting a number of infringements, including more than 1,000 trips made by unlicensed drivers. ola has 21 days to appeal the decision and will be able to still operate in london until then. the uk government has announced jobseekers will be offered coaching and advice on moving into growing sectors as part of a £238m employment programme, the government has said. job entry targeted support, as it is being called, is aimed at helping those out of work because of covid—19 for three months.
5:42 am
labour said the scheme "offers very little new support" and that it was "too little, too late". working from home is likely to be a permanent fixture for a majority of businesses, according to the institute of directors. its survey ofjust under 1,000 firms shows that 74% plan on maintaining the increase in home working. more than half planned on reducing their long—term use of workplaces. james hughes, chief market analyst at scope markets joins me now from his home in hertfordshire. he has been working from home. good morning. how do you find working from home? how is it going for you? well, i mean, my children have never been so well versed in the world of stock trading, probably more trained than i am these days. 0f trained than i am these days. of course the key thing is that these days, the majority, especially in the industry i am m, especially in the industry i am in, finance and trading, a lot
5:43 am
of the security systems are the key reason that for so many yea rs key reason that for so many years working in an office and being stuck away in an office was imperative, because of client information, because of the stock market numbers, the trading numbers, everything that went through had to be in a centralised place. i started in this industry 19 years ago. now the fact is all of those things have completely moved on now. everything has completely changed. working from home is just a case of pumping the security in and the data through a different place. and of course it is incredibly easy. so for companies like mine, there is definitely now a situation where they are looking at this and saying, well, being in the centre of london, being in the city of london, being in the city of london was imperative for a company like mine, but now having that office, having that postcode and actually being in the city of london really was
5:44 am
only four appearances' safe and cost more money than it actually brought in. what about the information and data you have access to? i can see you have access to? i can see you have your screens up and flashing lights etc, but companies can't afford to pay for a bloomberg terminal, which cost a n for a bloomberg terminal, which cost an armour all and a leg or a similar system —— costs and arm or a a similar system —— costs and arm ora leg, ora a similar system —— costs and arm or a leg, or a similar system, but are you able to access the data in the same way or the same speed? speed was a lwa ys or the same speed? speed was always the four of the situation. —— the core. and high—frequency trading and being closer to big data hives in order to get the fastest prices, —— data hubs, but such is the progress of technology, you don't even need to have your physical laptop, computer, close to those areas. you just need servers close to those areas. we know server rooms are packed around that area and
5:45 am
there aren't that many people who work in them. so of course there is a big difference in terms of the human interaction in how businesses work, from a human point of view. talking to someone human point of view. talking to someone face—to—face tends to get things done a lot quicker than sending a message or talking to each other on teams does. but what companies are having to do in this incredible situation, you are having to wait the amount of money that the company bringing in by the amount it costs. and having these big offices in the centre of london, especially in the city of london, costs and absolute fortune when it comes to the ransom. so it is an enormous issue. but then you have the situation where the likes of the city of london, as i say, i have worked in the city of london for 19 years, and going there over the last few weeks has been incredibly depressing. an incredibly sad to see the situation the city of london is in. there are so many companies that are not
5:46 am
multibillion pound trading companies or financial companies, small family run businesses or small restaurants which unfortunately are going to go out of business because people are not there. so there are two sides to this. there are two sides to this. there are companies who are making money, and looking to save money, and looking to save money going forward, and there are the other side of this where there is a human aspect to people not going back to the likes of the city of london. and just a quick word on market this week, brexit negotiations are ongoing, trumpet not out of hospital although he is said to be leaving soon. what will the week before financial markets? at the end of last week we were looking a totally different things are now of course everything at the start of the week is focused on donald trump's condition and how well he is doing and how much you read in, what is right and what is wrong, so i'd still be — until we hearfrom
5:47 am
is wrong, so i'd still be — until we hear from donald is wrong, so i'd still be — until we hearfrom donald trump himself, there won't be much movement away from the fact that everybody will focus on exactly what his health is like. of course there then there is the brexit discussion, which will be massive for uk companies and for the pound, we will see volatility they are. good to talk to you james, have a really good week. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: wake up and smell the coffee! as the pandemic closes coffee shops around the world, growers and roasters face a fight for survival. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on. they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be, before slobodan milosevic took power. the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade was reaching its climax, two grenades
5:48 am
exploded and a group of soldiersjumped from a military truck taking part in the parade, and ran towards the president, firing from kalashnikov automatic rifles. after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: president trump has taken a short car trip to wayward supporters gathered outside the hospital where he is being treated for covid—19. armenian and azerbaijani forces exchange heavy rocket
5:49 am
and artillery fire as fighting intensifies over nagorno—karabakh — russia calls for an immediate ceasefire. more than 5,000 jobs have been put at risk after cineworld, the uk's largest cinema chain, said it was considering closing all its venues. cinemas have been hit hard by big film releases being delayed — the latest being the newjames bond. here's our business correspondent katy austin most cinemas have now reopened, but social distancing is limiting capacity and many big budget films have been postponed. james bond. musical sting. struggling cinemas, or those who still hadn't yet opened, were hanging their hopes on the newjames bond film. on friday, its release was delayed for a second time, from november until next april. cineworld, which lost £1.3 billion in the first six months of this year amid the pandemic,
5:50 am
is writing to the government, saying the industry has become unviable. it is expected to announce that it will close its uk sites, potentially putting more than 5,000 jobs at risk. this afternoon, cineworld confirmed it was considering the temporary closure of its uk cinemas and those in the us, but said a final decision had not yet been reached. one cinema industry analyst told me he expects other chains to hibernate their sites. if they remain open, they have to demonstrate that they have got content to play. so perhaps some art house or independents have got a different stream of content but for the mainstream multiplexes globally, they have to make a sensible decision. without many big movies remaining in this year's schedule, experts are concerned that when delayed movies finally open, there'll be fewer places to show them. katy austin, bbc news. the global coffee market has
5:51 am
been caught up in the covid crisis as sales around the world have been volatile, hitting producers and the whole supply chain. in the early days of the global lockdown prices on the global commodity market climbed quickly as the world stockpiled. but subsequently prices fell as many of the world's coffee shops remained closed. so with this unpredictable market how are the producers and supply chain coping? joining me now is becky forecast, supply chain manager, fairtrade good to talk to you. from your perspective, how bad is currently? things are pretty bad for producers at the at the moment. the coffee market is a lwa ys moment. the coffee market is always very volatile, it is characterised by booms and busts, so at the moment, the covid—19 crisis has exacerbated
5:52 am
the existing vulnerability and supply chains for coffee farmers, and what we're seeing is consistently low prices making it difficult for coffee farmers to plan for the future, and they are living on very low incomes and that is something that the fair trade foundation that the fair trade foundation that we are fighting and addressing through something called the minimum price, which is through fair trade where you get a guaranteed safety net of a minimum income that the fibre will receive for their coffee regardless of what's happening in the market price. the fall in prices, as you mentioned, hugely hitting farmers. in terms of how they harvest the crop et cetera, is all that going to plan as normal or other impacted by staffing issues or restrictions, lockdown measures? yeah, there have been some challenges and it has depended largely on whereabouts in the harbour cycle the country was when the
5:53 am
pandemic hits, sofa countries in the regions of central america, they had largely already harvested so for them the challenges were to exporting the product, things like delays at ports, border closures calling challenges, and in other regions that had not harvested when the pandemic at the challenge has been more related to social distancing measures and logistics, and being unable to necessarily harvest in the quantities they would have done otherwise, but what i would say is that overall, most countries have managed to harvest and export their coffee which is great but maybe does not in the quantities that they normally would, so that is where the price becomes so important, that with low prices and potentially lower volumes that can bea potentially lower volumes that can be a really difficult combination for farmers. a small independent coffee shops, they are in a really difficult situation, many of them going under in terms of their own
5:54 am
business, but for the big players, the likes of starbucks, have they done anything, or how have they changed the way they operate to support the farmers?” changed the way they operate to support the farmers? i think a lot of the coffee retailers have had to adapt their models, so we have seen in a different promotional offers, changing from selling coffee out of home to selling coffee that can be enjoyed at home, whether that is through subscription services or takeaway services through apps, today has weather has been a big change. overall in the uk we are drinking 95 million cops of coffee a day, and even after the pandemic we are still drinking around that amount of coffee, we have just changed the way we are drinking it and where we are drinking it, so what is really important is the farmers are being, they are getting a fair deal for the coffee they are producing, so the companies that are
5:55 am
supporting farmers through this time other companies that are supporting industry of fair trade. thank you for your time and getting up so early, it's been really interesting to talk to you, and thank you for your company as well. have a lovely day. hello there. well, the weekend was pretty much a wash—out for many of us. we saw a vigorous area of low pressure parked across the uk, bringing huge amounts of rainfall — over a month's worth of rain falling in many areas. it did lead to some localised flooding and some transport disruption and plenty of flood warnings remain in force. if you are concerned about where you live, then head onto the bbc weather website to check out all the details. but as we head into this new week, it does look like things will be a little bit quieter. still quite unsettled, because low pressure will always be nearby, so we'll see further showers at times. but there will be some sunny spells too. for monday morning, we have our area of low pressure still with us, but it is a slightly weaker feature. you can see fewer isobars on the chart as well,
5:56 am
so it will not be quite as windy through today. temperatures starting the day off at around 8—9 degrees for many of us, but where we have more cloud out west, then around ten or 11 degrees. now, this weather front and our weather front will reinvigorate and push back into northern ireland, wales, the south—west of england through today, so it's likely to produce a wet day here. but elsewhere across the country, it's sunny spells and scattered showers, and some of the showers could turn out to be heavy, maybe even thundery. a slightly warmer day for many of us, particularly across the south—east. given some sunshine, we could see 16 or 17 degrees. through monday night, it looks like it stays pretty showery. longer spells of rain pushing from west to east, mainly across northern and western areas. again there will be some clear spells and where you see the clear skies, then temperatures will dip into single figures, otherwise holding in double figures where we have the rain and the cloud. our area of low pressure is still with us on into tuesday, drifting a bit further northwards, parking itself across scotland. it means we'll see more
5:57 am
of a gradient, more isobars developing across england, wales and northern ireland through the day. so a breezier day across the south. that will drive further showers into many south—western areas. again, some of them could turn out to be heavy and thundery pretty much anywhere, but there'll also be some good spells of sunshine in between. and those temperatures reaching highs again from 14 to around 15 or maybe 16 degrees across the south—east. so a similar story as we head on into wednesday, as well, further showers at times. and then as we head on into thursday, there's signs of another area of low pressure moving through to bring some wet and windy weather.
5:58 am
5:59 am
6:00 am
good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker our headlines today: president trump takes a ride in a motercade to greet supporters outside the medical centre where he's being treated for coronavirus. in a video posted from hospital, he says he now understands the virus. i learned a lot about covid, i learned it by really going to school, this is the real school, this isn't the real ‘let‘s read the book school', and i get it, i understand it.

101 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on