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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 27, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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as cancers grow in the body, changes happen in the dna of the body. what happens is those tumours start shedding fragments of that dna into the bloodstream and what the grail this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk testis the bloodstream and what the grail test is able to do is detect those and around the world. fragments of dna and they have very a call for a rethink over specific patterns associated with them which mean that we can tell england's covid tier system but the government defends placing most of the country under tougher whether or not it is likely to be a restrictions after lockdown ends. cancer and moreover, if it is, where in the body that signal is coming if people do follow the rules, from so we can actually help the if we do make the tiered system doctors to figure out where to look work, then as i say, there is every reason to believe so they can determine very quickly that they could de—escalate and go down a tier in time for christmas. northern ireland has entered a two whether there is a cancer there and week lockdown from today as stricter move on to treating it. what is the covid—19 restrictions come into force. the british government asks the uk medicines regulator to assess real liability so far as far as you the oxford vaccine — bringing the vaccine one step closer know? clinicaltrials to a possible rollout real liability so far as far as you know? clinical trials have real liability so far as far as you know? clinicaltrials have been real liability so far as far as you know? clinical trials have been done largely in the united states and these have shown that the test works do get in touch with your thoughts on the different with a very high level of accuracy in terms of being able to predict restrictions in place around
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the world and the latest whether someone does have cancer or on vaccine development — i'm on twitter it's @annita—mcveigh. not. and moreover a very low level of what is called false positives, donald trump says he will leave in other words not saying someone the white house if the electoral has a cancer when they do not. can college formally confirms joe biden as next us president. certainly i will. you give me some numbers on reliability? the false positive rate and you know that. is less than 1%. which is very low but i think that there will be a lot of things happening between now and the 20th of january. for any test, any diagnostic test. a lot of things. indian farmers protesting against a new law are driven back by tear gas as they attempt to march into new delhi. a bbc investigation has discovered we have had great difficulty that british clinics are offering so—called "virginity tests" which have been condemned by the world health organisation previously in oesophageal cancers, and the united nations. lung, pancreas, it is able to detect those cancers with a sensitivity of argentina bids farewell something like 75% at early stages. to diego maradona in buenos aires — as one of the greatest footballers from going from a position with of all time is laid to rest at a private ceremony outside the capital. nothing, we should be able to detect and coming up — there's the majority at an early stage. what no better time to talk about families after a "hugely
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challenging" year — is the risk of false negatives? the duchess of cambridge's message as she launches major there are obviously going to be new research on parenting. some. the mammography programme we use for string breast cancer only detects about two out of every five breast cancer. no such thing as a test which would detect every cancer case. but the sorts of sensitivity hello and welcome if you're numbers we are seeing a very watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us missing. this is why we want to now for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. anger is growing amongst conservative mps here in the uk after the government said that the two highest levels of coronavirus restrictions would be confirm. how many have been trialled imposed on nearly all of england, when the lockdown ends on wednesday. in the us? over 100,000. 165,000 seven tory mps from kent — which will face the most severe measures — have written complaining people in england, it will take to the health secretary that the blanket restrictions three years to get the results. will are unfair and "risk undermining you have an idea before that of the public support" — they say they've
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success rate or not? we will monitor secured a meeting with matt hancock. these maps show which areas of england are in which tiers before and after the current lockdown; from next wednesday 32 million how things are going as we progress people will be living under tier 2 restrictions, but we want to do it properly and and 23 million under tier 3. confirm it is clinically performing in the way we expected to at that level but also want to show the tier 2 restrictions means no implementation of this can be socialising indoors, with people outside your household or support bubble. cost—effective for nhs. we will be doing that as part of the pilot. are but you can meet up to six people outdoors. restaurants and pubs can open there some cancers it cannot detect? but only if they serve a substantial meal. in tier 3 — the most as we have shown from the studies it severe restrictions — there is no mixing indoors, meeting outside is only permitted in a public space and restaurants can detect about 50, not every type of cancer. the vast majority it does look like it can pick up at least and pubs can only provide takeaway some of those. why some and not others? it is really or delivery services. jonathan blake reports. the end of the national lockdown may be in sight but there are still hard times ahead. the prime minister warned yesterday most parts of england would face tighter restrictions than before when the three tier system returns.
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i know that this will bring a great about... it performs better in some deal of heartache and frustration, especially for our vital hospitality sector, our pubs, our than others. these happen to be in restaurants, our hotels. those cancers that are very lethal in so many ways, the soul and because the vast majority of all of our communities, which continue cancer deaths in the uk and is to bear a disproportionate share showing very good performance in those. obviously it could make a of the burden. massive difference because early detection is so important. it is from next wednesday, really critically important. the vast majority of england will be under the high or very high covid alert level, tiers two and three. in all those places, no household mixing will be allowed indoors. only cornwall, the isle of wight and the isles of scilly will be placed under looser restrictions in tier i, or medium risk. less than 2% of the population. many conservative mps are angry we cannot have tess at the moment about the new system, arguing it is unfair that areas for the vast majority of cancers with relatively low numbers of cases have been lumped together which affect 80% of people in the with places where the virus is more widespread. uk. what has major work different some have called for a rethink,
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and want to see more of the evidence and potentially more successful? decisions have been based on. there have been really fantastic even tier 2 is going to be immensely advances particularly in two areas damaging for a lot of businesses, in the last two years or so. the and limits people's freedom first is the whole field of to meet their family and friends. genomics, which we have heard a tier 3, of course, even worse. great deal about throughout the media for the last several years. but by forcing so much the second is the ability through of the country into those what is called machine learning. really tough restrictions, very sophisticated computer especially places where the rates of infection have been falling programmes that can analyse patterns to much lower levels, of change is a ten minute level. it i think the government has given itself a much harderjob. is those patterns we are really while the rules will be relaxed over detecting anally fragments of dna five days at christmas, across the uk, allowing three that we see in the blood through the households to mix indoors, genomic tests. you initially worked on this in the us, a california there is a warning for anyone hoping for a hug from granny or grandad. —based team. why are you testing in would i encourage someone to hug england? there are a couple of and kiss their elderly relatives? no, iwould not. reasons why it is so important to do it here. first as we know we have a it's not against the law, and that's the whole point, problem in the uk. we know the you can do it within the rules that are there. but it does not make sense because you could be carrying cancer is a very large cause of the virus and if you've got an elderly relative, that would not death in the uk and is projected to
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be the thing you'd want to do. become the biggest cause of death the hope in government is that mass very become the biggest cause of death very soon. become the biggest cause of death testing will help some areas move very soon. one in two of us will down a tier before too long develop cancer in our lifetimes but but there is little expectation of much change we also know on average we do not until at least the new year. perform as well as some other jonathan blake, bbc news. countries. really important work done by cancer research uk has shown our political correspondent the reason for that, primary reason, iain watson's at westminster — he gave me more details of the growing opposition is on average we tend to detect there to the measures. light. there is a really great opportunity to work with the nhs to see if we can address this and of course the nhs has a large what i think is interesting is that population system where we can there is a kind of perfect storm really look in detail as to how this brewing against these measures that the government could be bringing in, could be best rolled out, and certainly on the conservative actively the purpose of this pilot. benches. there was a vote on tuesday and looks like there will be a what would you say to the critics sizeable rebellion, perhaps a that say the nhs should not be symbolic victory for the rebels if they can be seen to wipe out boris johnson ‘s 80 seat majority and make investing in such a test before it has been proven in large—scale it reliant on the opposition. the clinical trials? firstly, reasons for the rebellion, as you has been proven in large—scale clinicaltrials? firstly, it has suggest, are manifold but i think first of all, there was some shock about the numbers of people put into been tested in large—scale trials, tier 3 restrictions next week, published in journals and at major
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around 8 million living under those scientific conferences. the nhs is restrictions before national lockdown in england, 23 million now facing those restrictions as of the not funding this pilot. as a result middle of next week. what's also worried people, you mentioned of demonstrating this and the cost ideological reasons, but certainly effectiveness of this that the nhs the infringements on personal will begin paying for it. finally, liberty is worried some mps, steve baker, used to be involved in the if successful, what kind of cut in european research group, now a cancer deaths could we be seeing? leading light in the covid recovery our modelling suggests we could group, the crg, has talked about the reduce the number of late stage authoritarianism of the government, public measures they are introducing and he is very good at organising diagnoses by nearly half. which would have the effect of reducing rebellions, got a track record. the cancer deaths in the uk by around other reason i think some people are one fifth. all cancer deaths, that upset, not definitely going to rebel is. that would be a very substantial but thinking about it, they are number, many thousands a year. best worried about the way the tiered restrictions have been imposed, in of luck with it. everyone will hope kent, lancashire, lincolnshire, all it goes as well as possible. thank being lumped together into tier 3 and yet within those counties, the prevalence of the virus is low in some areas, high in others and they said the government should be taking you. afar said the government should be taking a far more localised approach and a pile of former cabinet ministers who
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are making these points including greg clark, damian green, who are northern ireland has going to be meeting the health re—entered a two—week lockdown secretary matt hancock in the coming and non—essential shops have closed. cafes, hairdressers days to present their views. set and beauticians have also shut — against all of this, perhaps just seven days after they were allowed to re—open following the last lockdown. our ireland correspondent chris page unsurprisingly, a little bit earlier this morning, the communities secretary robertjenrick tried to give people some cause for hope and reports from belfast. said we could be reviewing these measures on december the 16th, it is possible some people who find there will be no more scenes like themselves in tier 3 now might get an early christmas present. there this for a fortnight. it could not have come at a worse time. we will will be a meaningful review on or around the 16th of december, we will happily go through to the end of review the evidence against the five test for every local authority area february. but to take away two weeks in the country, listen to the views out of the four pre—christmas, it is in local councils, there are directors of public health and just a wrecking ball to retail. the there's a directors of public health and there'sa numberof directors of public health and there's a number of places which are quite finely balanced across the new lockdown is due to last until country today which could have been, just two weeks before christmas and or there was a strong case to be in here at belfast city centre it feels a tiered system 1 degrees lower than a lot busier than usual during these where they've ended up at on the last few hours before the shops balanced judgment, they are in the tiered system above so in those shut. i am shopping for my
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places, and perhaps others in the country, if people do follow the grandchildren and my own children. rules, if we do make the tiered the clock is ticking, unfortunately. syste m rules, if we do make the tiered system work, and as i say, there is we will see what happens after the every reason to believe they could de—escalate and go down the tiered next two weeks. the clock is syste m de—escalate and go down the tiered system in time for christmas. de—escalate and go down the tiered system in time for christmasm looks as though borisjohnson will ticking. services such as be relying on labour to get these hairdressers have been trying to make the most of the pre—lockdown measures through a vote next demand. they have been closed more tuesday. that is pretty significant, than most other businesses this isn't it? it is and it looks that year. i am using savings i would way as things stand. one thing that might defuse or at least limit the size of the conservative rebellion have used for future life from as the government promised to everything to do with my daughter produce an economic impact through to my husband. now it is assessment of the measures ahead of the vote. this has been a key demand used. ministers say it is painful of many of the potential rebels that but paramount. these are hard asks, wa nt to of many of the potential rebels that want to see notjust health reasons, if you like, but the economic impact as we have said before, but what we can achieve over these next two of the restrictions and how people weeks makes it as normal as christmas as we can possibly get to. who have conditions other than covid it might be cupping in the health the start of december is said to be service as well. the government trying to come and meet them to some difficult but there are positive signs. the rate at which the virus extent, if people don't like what they see, it mightjust harden the has spread his falling. it is now
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resolve. lower than in england and wales. northern ireland has re—entered a two—week lockdown donald trump has made comments that and non—essential shops have closed. seem to be the closest he's come so far to conceding defeat cafes, hairdressers in the us presidential and beauticians have also shut — just seven days after they were election three weeks ago. allowed to re—open despite repeating his unsubstantiated claim following the last lockdown. that the election was rigged, our ireland correspondent chris page he said he would leave the white house if the electoral college confirms reports from belfast. president—electjoe biden's victory. the college is due to meet seasonal shopping is being suspended in two weeks' time. in northern ireland. from today, there'll be no more mark lobel reports. scenes like this in towns and cities for a fortnight. welcome to america's mayor. thank you, mayor giuliani, the devolved government has told for being here. most shops to shut because it's just this wednesday at this public hearing on the election classified them as nonessential. in pennsylvania, donald trump's lawyer rudy giuliani revealed his the owner of this jewellery store team were checking graveyards says the closure couldn't have to confirm their unsubstantiated come at a worse time. claims that thousands of mail—in ballots were submitted by dead people. president trump on the phone we'd happily close from the 24th through to the end of february. was sounding jubilant. we wouldn't bat an eyelid on it. but to take away two weeks out of the four pre—christmas, it's just a wrecking ball to retail. this was an election the new lockdown is due that we won easily. to last untiljust two we won it by a lot. weeks before christmas. applause. yet here he is a mere 24 hours and here in belfast city centre, later, when a reporter asked it does feel a lot busier than usual the question on everybody's mind.
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during these last few hours before the shops shut. well, i'm really busy at the minute, so i am, certainly i will. and you know that. shopping for my grandchildren and my own children. but i think that there will be a lot the clock is ticking. of things happening between now unfortunately, like everyone else, and the 20th of january. we will see what happens a lot of things. after the next two weeks. massive fraud has been found. close contact services such as hairdressers have also been trying to make the most we're like a third world country. of pre—lockdown demand. so what does donald trump focus they've been closed for longer than many other businesses this year. on between now and inauguration day? on thursday, he took i'm literally using my own savings that i had, like, that i've to the golf course. used for future life, for everything to do # young man, there's no need to feel with my daughter and my husband. down. ..# but unfortunately, i've on saturday, had to use it all now, he's planning another one of his now so it's dwindling away. familiar outdoor airport rallies in georgia, ahead of a senate run—off there. ministers say the restrictions and next week donald trump says are painful but paramount. the distribution of coronavirus these are hard asks, vaccines in america will begin — as we've said before. given first to frontline but what we can really achieve over workers, medical personnel, these next two weeks is as normal a christmas as we can possibly get to. and senior citizens. the start of december is set to be difficult. but there are some positive signs striking an altogether different tone this thanksgiving isjoe biden. in this part of the uk. it's a personal sacrifice that each
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the rate at which the virus of our families can make and should is spreading has fallen. make to save somebody else's life. it's now lower than in england and wales. but it's also a shared sacrifice chris page, bbc news, belfast. for the whole country. a statement of a common purpose that says we care about one another and we're all in this together. we can speak now to glyn roberts who is chief executive of retail ni. as he prepares to enter the white house in less than two months' time, he and his wifejill appealed good to have you with us. ijust to americans to stay—at—home. wonderfirst of all, good to have you with us. ijust wonder first of all, because we had that period of one week between the but america has only one president at a time and this unconventional last lockdown and this new circuit one still wants everyone to know breaker, was there a notable difference in the number of people who is still in charge. getting out and about to shops to ta ke getting out and about to shops to take advantage of that window, if you want to call it that? good don't talk to me that way. you're just a lightweight. morning. there certainly was, if you don't talk to me that way... like, a storm before the camp this i'm the president of the united states. week and it was entirely predictable don't ever talk to that would happen because obviously the president that way. all right, i'm going to go people wanted to try and get their with another question. go ahead. mark lobel, bbc news. christmas shopping completed before the circuit breaker and of course there is also a significant amount 20 years ago today — ten—year—old damilola taylor of shoppers that were not confident was stabbed to death on his way home that we would be able to reopen on the 11th of december as well so that from the library in south london. it was a crime that shocked the nation — fuelled this surge that we saw in and for his family and friends, the past few days. obviously, that
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it's a day that continues to bring back painful memories — has implications for the r figure in the transmission of the virus but it as adina campbell reports. was entirely predictable that we would have this surge before today so this specific path is the path that me and my brother took when we met damilola ‘s circuit breaker. for the last time. would have this surge before today 's circuit breaker. interesting you say you have concerns about whether grace boyega was one of the last people to see damilola taylor alive. this will have an impact on transmission of the virus. albeit i remember asking him if he wanted me to walk him that retailers have been trying very home because obviously ha rd to that retailers have been trying very hard to make sure people can shop i was with my brother. so it is two people and one safely but we've all been in shops where other shoppers are not person, but him being him, "oh, no, i'm fine. behaving sensibly on the retailers i'm just going to go can only do so much, can't they? home with my grandma." he likes to run and skip. so we didn't see anything, we didn't absolutely. we have put forward our feel like anything would happen. the ten—year—old nigerian schoolboy own five—point plan for safer and had only been in the uk a few months responsible shopping and we've also provided guidance to our members before he was killed. grace says she and damilola quickly about what they need to do if our became best friends. their birthdays were staff member or customer tests positive but i think as well, we just three days apart. have a big job of work to do ahead of the reopening date of the 11th of almost every day, monday to friday, school times, december. we put forward to the i was literally, me and damilola executive they need to establish in the playground, in class. after school, library covid marshals, public and sanitising units in town centres, times, and whatnot. it was me and damilola. also a covid compliance kitemark at
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signage on front of businesses to this is the last place ten—year—old reassure customers that those businesses are fully compliant with damilola taylor was seen on cctv all the regulations so we need to just before his death. work very fast to get that in place he left the library here in peckham and moments later was attacked for i think the reopening. we are and stabbed in the leg, just a few hundred metres away from here. engaging with ministers of the time. he never made it home. obviously the timing of this, as chris put forward in his piece, we are losing two weeks of the golden period, this is the time of year for our members make a very significant amount of their profits and to lose two weeks and i had a call from an independent retailer a few days ago and he said i have survived the troubles, three or four recessions, his life was brutally cut shortjust before his 11th birthday. ijust don't troubles, three or four recessions, i just don't believe troubles, three or four recessions, ijust don't believe my business is going to be there, christmas and his family and friends left thatis devastated, with fear in the peckham going to be there, christmas and that is soul destroying because community and a nation in shock. these are local, small business owners that have put their life, he collapsed and bled their soul, their savings into these to death in this stairwell. businesses and then to see them two brothers, danny potentially closing their doors in a and ricky preddy, who werejust 12 and 13 at the time, very short space of time. as we and part of a gang, were eventually
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speak, this is about saving as many convicted of manslaughter in 2006. jobs, as many businesses as we can. 20 years on, his father says you know yourself, northern ireland isa you know yourself, northern ireland the pain will never go away. is a small business economy, this circuit breaker will i still break down, disproportionately get those small traders and one of the biggest i still feel the pain. things we have picked up is the sheer resentment that the large i still, when i look at other, supermarkets can continue to sell you know, young people growing up, things like clothes, books, so long successfully, you know, it independent retailers who sell it always reminds me that damilola the very same products, are being forced to close and that is unfair. could have been a doctor. it's such a difficult that is an ongoing point of situation that for the rest contention, isn't it? as we heard in of my life i have to live the report one of the people being with it, you know. interviewed, the phrase thatjumped out, this is a wrecking ball to and then die with it. peckham now looks very different. retail. i wonder, out, this is a wrecking ball to retail. iwonder, given out, this is a wrecking ball to retail. i wonder, given that you have only a small window after this period between then and christmas, new homes have replaced the dated tower blocks and the area continues to be regenerated. what more can the executive do to but grace says the same help in that period with time problems still exist. i don't think it's stopped, shorter to do anything else, to i don't think it's changed 100%. introduce new measures and what more you can build new buildings it can do to help beyond christmas? and stuff, but, you know, i think things like covid marshals, public and sanitising, scores on the if it's not helping the people,
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if people don't have access to it, door in terms of covid compliance it doesn't really change anything. i still love peckham, would be a very welcome development because that is also good tackling i still come back to peckham. but there's just too many memories the virus but it's good about that i feel like i have to just leave it here, creating consumer confidence to and move on with my life. return to the high street so i think adina campbell, bbc news. what the executive needs to do a a bbc investigation has discovered step up its engagement with that british clinics business, we've seen that in the last few days. it needs to work with us instead of doing stuff to us and i'm very concerned you are seeing civil servants rushing through regulations, not talking to remembering danilova tyler who was stabbed to death 20 years ago today business, not following it through and obviously a lot of the civil servants, talented people as they are, don't know anything about business so there is an ongoing concern that we are seeing the executive rush things through remembering damilola taylor. without a proper impact assessment, a bbc investigation has discovered that british clinics without a proper impact assessment, without a proper dialogue with are offering so—called "virginity business and that fundamentally tests" which have been condemned by the world health organisation needs to change. and of course, i and the united nations. the investigation was carried out think what we have said at the start by bbc newsbeat as part of our 100 women series. of this festive period, this would critics say the controversial tests are unscientific as they cannot prove whether someone is a virgin be to the uk as a whole, directly to or not, and are intrusive and can be a form of abuse. shoppers, we need you, like no other rachel stonehouse's report discusses the issue frankly, and may be upsetting for some viewers.
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time before, to get out and support virginity testing involves the vaginal examination to check your local independent retailers if a woman's hymen is intact. because if you don't, if you don't, it's common in certain middle wastern and african those businesses will not be there countries, like morocco, egypt and iraq. come the new year and that is a very but it is also going on here in the uk. i had a very emotionally strong and powerful message to abusive relationship shoppers. you can change this, by with my parents, who wanted me to have an arranged marriage. making at special effort to go out they tried to isolate me and support those independent from my friends, and when i wore retailers, maybe do a little bit the clothes i wanted to, they would say i brought less in the big supermarkets, maybe shame on this family. doa less in the big supermarkets, maybe do a little bit less on amazon but this is one woman's story, which has been re—voiced by an actress supporters local entrepreneurs because they are your businesses, to protect her identity. they make up your high street and i one day, an elder from the community saw me out with my friends and said think it's so important we get that to my mum that one of the boys message across. we are out of time in the group was my boyfriend. but you've got your message across. there were lots of rumours thank you. in that community about it. my parents and the family of the man the uk government has they wanted me to marry said i had asked the medicines regulator, to start assessing to have a virginity test to prove the astrazeneca oxford university coronavirus vaccine, that i was still a virgin but some scientists have expressed so the marriage could go ahead. i was scared and i really did not concerns after the firm understand what it meant. provided two sets of data. i felt like running away was my only they say option, so that's what i did. that the highest efficacy — 90 percent — shown after people virginity testing is unscientific were mistakenly given a low dose and considered a violation of human then backed up with a standard one might not be a robust enough finding for permission rights, but it is not illegal in this country. to be granted for use. the charity karma nirvana supports
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victims of honour—based abuse astrazeneca has acknowledged that and forced marriage. further trial data might be needed. so, we have received calls on the helpline from victims that let's speak now to professor are concerned about this, david salisbury, former director of immunisation and it might be that they are at the department of health. worried that their families have thank you very much forjoining us, professor. do you think further data found out that perhaps they have is needed? yes, i do. we find been in a relationship or that they are not a virgin. ourselves in a very unusual position how does virginity testing feed into the wider context of honour—based abuse? many victims have, you know, where we've got two sets of data in very extreme circumstances, been killed and been victims from two different regimes of of honour killings. but for other victims, it might be administration, one of them is a that they are disowned by family. for some women, the fear of trying fairly straightforward two equal to prove they are a virgin can lead doses, one of them is an unusual way them to extreme measures. of giving a small dose first followed by a larger dose, which i don't recall us doing before, this so, i've ordered this hymen repair kit from amazon. has come about because of the my immediate reaction is that release into a clinical trial of, as you do not get a lot for your money. this kit cost over £100. it were, the wrong vaccine and that is not a good place to have started it looks like a pair of tweezers
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from. and we don't really know yet and then some gel, which i think is the vagina tightening gel. where we should be going with either i have no idea what this is going to be. i'm guessing it is meant two doses of a vaccine that 60% to be fake blood that you insert with the tweezers. effective, or two doses of a vaccine thatis effective, or two doses of a vaccine that is 90% effective but for which if i had ordered this we've got much less data. we will with the intention of using it, i would be so disappointed need more information. on that at what has arrived. latter scenario, the two in equal especially without any instructions whatsoever. there have been 69 hymen repair doses of the vaccine, we need, what, surgeries carried out on the nhs in the past five years. to be trialled on more people over a a quick search on google and i have easily found about 20 clinics greater period? to be trialled on more people over a greater period ? what to be trialled on more people over a greater period? what are you suggesting when you say more data is offering it privately. needed? we don't have the same none of them advertise virginity numbers and we will have much more testing online, but when called, statistical confidence in the two almost half of them said they could do it. high dose study than we will in the i don't understand why low—dose, high—dose study because it is not illegal in the uk. the numbers are so much fewer than the idea that the absence of part of the hymen means that you are not in that part of the study. i think a virgin, that idea... we will need to have more data. the that is wrong, first of all. it can be torn for various reasons. decisions are difficult for the if i said, this is torn, i need to repair it a little bit
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people who are going to recommend the use of the vaccine, the then i can give you a certificate. regulators, the nhra will come of that means actually i am giving course, look with great care at all a false certificate. despite international calls that they've got, they will ask for an end to a virginity testing, it continues to go on, with those offering it continuing whether the low—dose, high—dose, to make money from a practice that they've got, they will ask whetherthe low—dose, high—dose, is good to use in older people because which campaigners say violates a woman's human rights. rachel stonehouse, bbc news. none of the vaccine was used in older people. and then, there are choices to be made about what you do with the vaccine that you've got 100 a difficult new story. million doses of. all good feelings of loneliness among parents questions, all good points that you with young children have are making but is a vaccine, even at "rocketed" during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a study 62% efficacy, better than no vaccine led by the duchess of cambridge. more than half a million people and would be be looking at this in shared their experiences and would be be looking at this in an entirely different light if we of bringing up under—fives, hadn't already had news of the as part of new research commissioned by the royal foundation. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. pfizer and moderna vaccines? yes, if some have tyres there was no other vaccine around, and some have tracks. some precious quiet time for becky and all we had was 60% efficacy, and her son, ollie, who's three. that has to be better than nothing but if the same product can be used this preschool in peterborough has been a sanctuary, vital to the well—being to give 90% efficacy, that is really of them both.
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good news. we'd have 90% efficacy, a run by the charity family action, the duchess vaccine that is much cheaper and of cambridge is its patron. it provides practical that doesn't require this ultracold and emotional support to parents, chain for distribution. so the 90% from potty training to outdoor play, and has helped families results are manage the parenting chain for distribution. so the 90% challenges of lockdown. results a re really chain for distribution. so the 90% results are really important in trying to decide what the best thing there was days where it was just, do you know what, to do for the british public. and if i can't be bothered today. i'm not getting dressed today. but we got through it. there are 90% vaccines available, and what lifts you on days recommending as 60% one is a more when you feel like that? how do you get out of it? the stuff he comes outwith. difficult call. the logical it genuinely is him that pulls me out of it. conclusion of what you're saying, like, i sit there thinking, oh... given that there are 100 million doses purchased of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, is more trialling needed and potentially, i struggle. i can't cope. and then he'lljust look at me and he'll sayjust little things therefore, and i hesitate to use like, "are you all right, that word but you can advise me mummy?" and it changes the whole mood completely. whether it's the right word to use the survey is a look at early childhood. in the circumstances, and delay to 63% of people said they'd experienced loneliness, some people in the uk getting that which had become significantly worse in lockdown. 70% described feeling vaccine and indeed people around the world because we know this judged by others. particular vaccine is very much and only 10% of parents found time aimed at the developing world as to look after their own well—being.
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well? it seems to me that the first thing to do is use the vaccine that being briefed on the research we know has high efficacy, that we findings earlier this week, the duchess of cambridge has do have on contract, that is both described the work as a landmark public survey. so we've taken your input, the pfizer vaccine and the moderna and combined it with even more public research, vaccine, to use the high efficacy to produce the uk's biggest ever study on the early years. vaccine, to use the high efficacy vaccine in the people who are in this year has been a hugely high risk groups and that's the challenging time for us all, older people and people with medical and there hasn't been a more risk factors. they need to be important moment to talk about families. protected with the most effective vaccine possible. that will buy some during the summer, the duchess spoke time to try to get some resolution, to the bbc and met families to explain how the wrong vaccine got with young children, put into a clinical trial, how we including dad ryan and his daughter mia. particularly for first—time dads, can be confident that the right is it quite a daunting... ..daunting time? it's very scary. almost six months on, combination of doses can be used so mia has taken her first steps... oh, my god, yes! that we can protect the most people ..and enjoyed herfirst birthday cake, as ryan continues to cope with the pressure as expeditiously as possible. of being a single dad. you shouldn't like, judge someone, professor, very good to talk to you. or make someone feel conscious about the way they're parenting, because not everyone is perfect. donald trump has made comments that seem to be the closest he's everyone has their own mistakes, come so far to conceding defeat makes their own mistakes. so, it's easier said than done.
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in the us presidential election three weeks ago. despite repeating his unsubstantiated claim and i — but yeah, i do feel that the election was rigged, he said he would leave conscious when i'm walking around! the white house if the and if i tell my daughter off electoral college confirms president—electjoe biden's victory. in public, i'm like, oh, my god, ijust like, told her off, does that the college is due to meet make me a bad parent? it doesn't. in two weeks' time. it's telling them the rights mark lobel reports. and wrongs of things. they like brussels sprouts too? i never knew that. for the duchess of cambridge, supporting the early years community welcome to america's mayor. thank you, mayor giuliani, is now her priority. for being here. it's a long term commitment. she wants the survey results just this wednesday at this public to inform the work of everyone hearing on the election supporting young children in pennsylvania, donald trump's lawyer rudy giuliani revealed his and their families. team were checking graveyards it can really, hopefully, to confirm their unsubstantiated make a real difference to how we raise the current and next claims that thousands generations of children, of mail—in ballots were and make a difference submitted by dead people. president trump on the phone to to the world we live in. was sounding jubilant. so i think... this was an election that we won easily. ..for that reason i think we won it by a lot. it's a really important applause. piece of research. yet here he is a mere 2a hours the survey is a vast bank of data, the first—hand experience later, when a reporter asked of parents, with the aim the question on everybody‘s mind. of improving the lives of young children and those looking after them. daniella relph, certainly i will. bbc news, peterborough.
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and you know that. christmas lights have been switched but i think that there will be a lot on at the shard in london — in honour of nhs and other key of things happening between now workers who've worked and the 20th of january. during the pandemic. a lot of things. massive fraud has been found. the lights feature a morse code message, we're like a third world country. spelling out ‘thank you' — they were beamed across the capital in the nhs colours of blue and white. we might be gearing up so what does donald trump focus on between now and inauguration day? for christmas in the uk, but in the us, they've on thursday, he took just celebrated thanksgiving. to the golf course. take a look at these pictures. # young man, there's no need to feel down...# elephants at oregon zoo who are enjoying their own on saturday, he's planning another thanksgiving feast. one of his now familiar outdoor airport rallies in georgia, these giant pumpkins are grown ahead of a senate run—off there. especially for the occasion and weigh up to half a tonne. and next week donald trump says but as you can see...they‘re no the distribution of coronavirus vaccines in america will begin — given first to frontline workers, medical personnel, match for a full—grown elephant. and senior citizens. striking an altogether different tone this thanksgiving isjoe biden. it's a personal sacrifice that each of our families can make and should jane hill has the news that one. make to save somebody else's life.
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but it's also a shared sacrifice for the whole country. about the ttiieerr system and new the statement of a common purpose restrictions in wales. here is the that says we care about one another and we're all in this together. as he prepares to enter weather. the white house in less than two months' time, he and his wifejill appealed to americans to stay—at—home. dense fog patches across parts of east anglia... visibility has been but america has only one president at a time and this unconventional picking up since. we will keep some one still wants everyone to know low cloud and some mist across the west midlands and parts of east who is still in charge. don't talk to me that way. wales, otherwise weather brightening up wales, otherwise weather brightening up with some sunny spells coming you're just a lightweight. don't talk to me that way... through at times. southern coastal counties seeing some cloud. a weak don't talk to me... i'm the president weather front will bring some of the united states. don't ever talk to the president that way. all right, i'm going to go patches of light rain into the with another question. north—west of northern ireland and go ahead. north—west of northern ireland and north—west of northern ireland and mark lobel, bbc news. north—west of scotland. temperatures thousands of protesting indian might only reach 5 degrees where it farmers have clashed with police is misty. temperatures could go as as they march on the capital delhi. up to 50,000 have converged high as8 on the city from the states of haryana and punjab, is misty. temperatures could go as high as 8 degrees otherwise. despite police using water cannon and tear gas to disperse them. overnight mist patches forming. cold for these areas with a frost setting they're protesting over a series
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of new farm laws passed by prime in, temperatures dropping to minus minister narendra modi's government. three or minus four in the countryside. in the south, one of those nights where it will turn our south asia editor anbarasan ethirajan milder, as they could cloud comes is in london, and joins me now. in, some rain. generally high accorded to have you with us to talk pressure will be dominating both on about this. tell us more first of all about these laws which have been a saturday and sunday. on weathermen passed and of which are the cause of the protests. the government passed you through the weekend, keeping quite a lot of cloud around, some patches of light rain, more a new agricultural law earlier this especially on saturday. equally some year, about a couple of months ago, areas brightening up with some saying this was a watershed moment spells of sunshine coming through, for indian agriculture. this will wind generally white. for scotland, allow private investment and also northern england and perhaps boost the income of the farmers. northern ireland, a bright start india has been liberalising for the with some sunshine perhaps. because the bulk of england and wales a last 30 years in various sectors of start the day with some light rain the economy, to attract foreign patches drifting northwards for a investment and the economy has grown over the years but one area they time reaching southern scotland as we head into the afternoon. northern have been very, very careful was agriculture because you know, the scotla nd we head into the afternoon. northern scotland seen the best of any sunshine into the afternoon but some mist and fog patches lingering. majority of india ‘s 1.4 billion temperatures 12 degrees towards the people, depend on agriculture south, 5 degrees in the colder parts
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directly or indirectly and they of scotland. sunday is a quiet day. don't want market forces to sweep them away. as it happened in many lots of cloud around. some areas are other industries. that is why the seeing some shine, perhaps the government did not initiate many south—west, north—eastern areas of reforms but the indian prime minister narendra modi argued scotland, south wales. where it agriculture needs investment and we stays cloudy, temperatures around 8 degrees. on the cool side for this are always setting a minimum support time of year. thicker early next price, let the markets decide and this would boost the income of the week bringing the threat of rain farmers but the farmers unions are across western areas, driest weather towards parts of the south and unhappy. for example, in states like south—west. punjab, considered as the weight basket of india, people have been arguing that the government will end this minimum support price. to explain this, the government may give higher price when buying a tonne of weight and sell it at a lower price to the public in various forms of subsidies. and the farmers we re forms of subsidies. and the farmers were assured that they will be given certain amount of money for their produce and now they are worried the government might eventually end that and also, they are all small farmers. many of them, they formed
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less tha n farmers. many of them, they formed less than five acres, more than 80% of the indian farming community are small farmers and how can they negotiate with a huge company like walmart, companies which will enter into some sort of contract to buy their goods. that is some of the worries that the farmers have and thatis worries that the farmers have and that is why they want to make the point care, they have been protesting for the last few months, now they want to attract the attention of the nation and thousands have come near the capital the prime minister defends putting millions of people into high delhi. we hear the police have given coronavirus tiers next week, permission for the farmers to hold a peaceful demonstration in the when england's lockdown ends. grounds in delhi. it sounds as many conservative mps are angry that restrictions aren't though it's about trust, the farmers more locally targeted — borisjohnson says he understands simply don't trust that in the but the system needs to be simple. longer term, they will be paid what they see as a fair price for what i know it's very frustrating they see as a fair price for what they produce and therefore their income will suddenly plummet if it's for people who feel that there exposed to the market in this way. is a high tier area, what's going on to try and give them when there is very little incidence in their village, or the area. any reassurances because it's very clear from what's happening i totally understand why any reassurances because it's very clearfrom what's happening on any reassurances because it's very clear from what's happening on the streets that they don't feel people feel so frustrated. reassured so far? the indian but some conservatives say they'll vote against the government next
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week, we'll have the latest from westminster. government has made many promises also this lunchtime... shops and cafes are closed again, saying the minimum support price will continue for some time and also in another lockdown in northern ireland — just a week what they were saying is that after being allowed to reopen. middlemen who normally buy these produce like wheat and rice and 13,000 jobs are at risk — the arcadia group, which owns other grains from the farmers, they are taking a huge amount of commission. the farmers will be able to sell, if someone from a southern state can sell things to people in northern india, the same vice versa so this frees the farmers from the clutches of the middlemen and the farmers can send the goods to any pa rt farmers can send the goods to any part of the country. but the farming unions are not buying this argument andi unions are not buying this argument and i say we have seen this, how many of these small scale industries, weavers, potters, they have been wiped away by foreign competition because many of these goods coming from countries like china and we do not want that kind of thing to happen here because once this minimum support price goes, then we don't even have a guarantee, then we don't even have a guarantee,
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the market forces will decide the prices which means if the prices go down by 50%, there is no way we can get the money back we have invested. for the farming communities like in punjab and areana, they are attached to the land and the farming communities do not want their livelihoods to be taken away and there are already other problems like climate change. they are facing a huge debt issue, tens of thousands of farmers have killed themselves in different parts of india, for example, because they were not able to pay back their debts. they borrow money from village moneylenders and then with high interest, when the crops fail, they won't be able to repay the money and if you look at the statistics, staggering amount of farmers who have killed themselves, the farmers want these problems to be addressed first rather than expose themselves to the market forces. thank you very much for that report. the argentine football legend diego maradona has been buried in a private ceremony on the outskirts of the country's
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capital, buenos aires. his death at the age of 60 has triggered a huge outpouring of public grief in argentina. tens of thousands of people queued up to view his coffin in the presidential palace. our south america correspondent katy watson reports. followed to the end by his loyal fans, so many of whom couldn't believe or accept that the superstar footballer was dead. in the end, though, maradona, a man so often in the limelight, had a very private burial, laid to rest next to his beloved mum and dad. these past few days have been emotional in argentina. there's been a very public outpouring of grief for a man people saw notjust as the world's greatest footballer, but the country's finest ambassador as well. translation: it's a loss notjust for argentina but for the entire world.
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there won't be anyone like him ever again. as a kid, we all wanted to be maradona. i was born in the same hospital as him. translation: for me, he's not dead, he's still alive. he'll be in my heart forever. it was such big news, i wanted to come here no matter what. i managed it and i'm really happy. amid tears and sadness, there were lighter moments. chanting and singing to remember the good times. but as the day went on, emotions ran high as fans waited in line. at one point, they broke down the barrier and riot police were drafted in. the coffin had to be removed from public viewing to keep the peace. maradona wasn't perfect. he battled drug addiction, he had his flaws. but he came from nothing and neverforgot his roots. and argentinians say that he won't be forgotten either. katy watson, bbc news,
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in buenos aires. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... a call for a rethink over england's covid tier system but the government defends placing most of the country under tougher restrictions after lockdown ends. northern ireland has entered a two week lockdown from today as stricter covid—19 restrictions come in to force. the british government asks the uk medicines regulator to assess the oxford vaccine — bringing the vaccine one step closer to a possible rollout. donald trump says he will leave the white house if the electoral college formally confirms joe biden as next us president. indian farmers protesting against a new law are driven back by tear gas as they attempt to march into new delhi.
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and coming up, a bbc investigation finds women are being offered controversial "virginity tests" at british medical clinics. 20 years ago today, 10—year—old—damilola taylor was stabbed to death on his way home from a library in south london. it was a crime that shocked the uk — and for his family and friends, it's a day that continues to bring back painful memories — as adina campbell reports. so this specific path is the path that me and my brother took when we met damilola for the last time. grace boyega was one of the last people to see damilola taylor alive. i remember asking him if he wanted me to walk him home because obviously i was with my brother. so it is two people and one person, but him being him, "oh, no, i'm fine. i'm just going to go home with my grandma." he likes to run and skip. so we didn't see anything, we didn't feel like anything would happen.
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the ten—year—old nigerian schoolboy had only been in the uk a few months before he was killed. grace says she and damilola quickly became best friends. their birthdays were just three days apart. almost every day, monday to friday, school times, i was literally, me and damilola in the playground, in class. after school, library times, and whatnot. it was me and damilola. this is the last place ten—year—old damilola taylor was seen on cctv just before his death. he left the library here in peckham and moments later was attacked and stabbed in the leg, just a few hundred metres away from here. he never made it home.
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his life was brutally cut shortjust before his 11th birthday. his family and friends left devastated, with fear in the peckham community and a nation in shock. he collapsed and bled to death in this stairwell. two brothers, danny and ricky preddy, who werejust 12 and 13 at the time, and part of a gang, were eventually convicted of manslaughter in 2006. 20 years on, his father says the pain will never go away. i still break down, i still feel the pain. i still, when i look at other, you know, young people growing up, successfully, you know, it always reminds me that damilola could have been a doctor. it's such a difficult situation that for the rest of my life i have to live with it, you know. and then die with it.
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peckham now looks very different. new homes have replaced the dated tower blocks and the area continues to be regenerated. but grace says the same problems still exist. i don't think it's stopped, i don't think it's changed 100%. you can build new buildings and stuff, but, you know, if it's not helping the people, if people don't have access to it, it doesn't really change anything. i still love peckham, i still come back to peckham. but there's just too many memories that i feel like i have to just leave it here, and move on with my life. adina campbell, bbc news. remembering damilola taylor, killed 20 years ago today. a bbc investigation has discovered that british clinics are offering so—called "virginity tests" which have been condemned by the world health organisation and the united nations. the investigation was carried out by bbc newsbeat as part of our 100 women series.
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critics say the controversial tests are unscientific as they cannot prove whether someone is a virgin or not; and are intrusive and can be a form of abuse. rachel stonehouse's report discusses the issue frankly, and may be upsetting for some viewers. virginity testing involves the vaginal examination to check if a woman's hymen is intact. it's common in certain middle eastern and african countries, like morocco, egypt and iraq. but it is also going on here in the uk. i had a very emotionally abusive relationship with my parents, who wanted me to have an arranged marriage. they tried to isolate me from my friends, and when i wore the clothes i wanted to, they would say i brought shame on this family. this is one woman's story, which has been re—voiced by an actress to protect her identity. one day, an elder from the community saw me out with my friends and said to my mum that one of the boys in the group was my boyfriend. there were lots of rumours in that community about it. my parents and the family of the man
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they wanted me to marry said i had to have a virginity test to prove that i was still a virgin so the marriage could go ahead. i was scared and i really did not understand what it meant. i felt like running away was my only option, so that's what i did. virginity testing is unscientific and considered a violation of human rights, but it is not illegal in this country. the charity karma nirvana supports victims of honour—based abuse and forced marriage. so, we have received calls on the helpline from victims that are concerned about this, and it might be that they are worried that their families have found out that perhaps they have been any relationship or that they are not a virgin. how does virginity testing feed into the wider context of honour—based abuse? many victims have, you know, very extreme circumstances — been killed and been victims of honour killings.
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but for other victims, it might be that they are disowned by family. for some women, the fear of trying to prove they are a virgin can lead them to extreme measures. so, i've ordered this hymen repair kit from amazon. my immediate reaction is that you do not get a lot for your money. this kit cost over £100. it looks like a pair of tweezers and then some gel, which i think is the vagina tightening gel. i have no idea what this is going to be. i'm guessing it is meant to be fake blood that you insert with the tweezers. if i had ordered this with the intention of using it, i would be so disappointed at what has arrived. especially without any instructions whatsoever. there have been 69 hymen repair surgeries carried out on the nhs in the past five years. a quick search on google and i have easily found about 20 clinics offering it privately.
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none of them advertise virginity testing online, but when called, almost half of them said they could do it. i don't understand why it is not illegal in the uk. the idea that the absence of part of the hymen means that you are not a virgin, that idea... that is wrong, first of all. it can be torn for various reasons. if i said, this is torn, i need to repair it a little bit then i can give you a certificate. that means actually i am giving a false certificate. despite international calls for an end to a virginity testing, it continues to go on. with those offering it continuing to make money from a practice which campaigners say violates a woman's human rights. rachel stonehouse, bbc news. with me is dr meghan campbell, deputy director at the oxford human rights hub and law lecturer at the university of birmingham.
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thank you forjoining us. as we saw in rachel's report, 69 surgeries of this type carried out in the nhs over the last few years, and a number of private clinics also offering it. a lot of people will be surprised and astonished to know that this is even going on? surprised and astonished to know that this is even going 0mm surprised and astonished to know that this is even going on? it is not surprising, in some ways, even though it seems like it happens in other jurisdictions. though it seems like it happens in otherjurisdictions. as long as there is cultural value placed upon women's virginity or sexual purity, there will be a market or a need for virginity testing. so, essentially it isa virginity testing. so, essentially it is a cultural driver behind the demand for this? yes, it is tied to a lot of stereotypical, discriminatory attitudes on women's sexuality, on women's worth being connected to sexual purity. as long as those stereotypes are pronounced, the service will be seen as desirable for some people, understandably. ultimately, it is
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about controlling women's bodies, isn't it? yellow entirely. it is controlling their bodies, their expression of their sexuality. it is controlling how and when they have sex on what kind of sex is appropriate or inappropriate for women to have. it creates a culture of you feeling your sexuality is controlled or something that does not belong to you. do you think it could be considered to bea do you think it could be considered to be a form of abuse in itself? yes, it is a complete form of gender—based violence. these are exams that are not scientifically or medically necessary. even if a woman consents medically necessary. even if a woman co nse nts to medically necessary. even if a woman consents to it, we can question the veracity of that consent, if it has been shaped by cultural norms about sexuality. this can easily be seen asa sexuality. this can easily be seen as a form of gender—based violence. should this be made illegal, these procedures, or is there, with that, a danger that the procedures could be driven underground? that is a lwa ys be driven underground? that is always a risk. these reactions, in
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criminal law, making ita always a risk. these reactions, in criminal law, making it a crime, always a risk. these reactions, in criminal law, making ita crime, it isn't always the effective tool to eradicate the practice. it requires young women to come forward and say it has happened to them, they might have to get into difficult conversations with their family or their community, and break bonds that can actually be very difficult to break, and still have value for people. it is much more effective, and much stronger to work at changing cultural norms around virginity don't go with the hyphae handle criminal law. what work is going on around to change attitudes? the has been releasing reports talking about how to talk to health practitioners, around the lack of a need for virginity testing, sue targeted from that angle. also in developing toolkits to use to talk to community leaders, individuals, about women's sexuality, about the myths around virginity and women's sexuality. so, more community—based
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interventions, where the who is putting its energy and resources. interventions, where the who is putting its energy and resourcesm the uk, to what extent is that going on? obviously the un is looking at this on a worldwide basis, but in the uk, where this report is focused, what work is going on? so, thatis focused, what work is going on? so, that is hard to say. virginity testing in the uk, is the report said earlier, is not as well understood as it could be. there needs to be more open discussion about the fact that this is happening, which is why this report is so valuable. and then developing toolkits that are aimed towards the nhs and local communities. so there is still a lot of work to do, with cultural changes that are needed. thank you very much forjoining us to discuss this the prime minister has been visiting a science lab 55 million people in england will be placed on the highest levels of
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covid restrictions, when lockdown was lifted. the prime minister has been visiting a science lab in wiltshire this morning — he defended the the government's new restrictions i know it is very frustrating for people who feel they are in an area where it is a high tier, when there is very little incidence in the area. i understand why people feel so frustrated. at the difficulty is that if you did it any other way, first of all, you would divide the country up into loads and loads of very complicated subdivisions. there has got to be some simplicity and clarity in the way that we do this. the second problem is that, alas, our experience is that when a high incidence area is quite close to a low incidence area, unless you beat the problem in a high incidence area, the low incidence area, i'm afraid, starts to catch up. so, we've got to get the virus down. and
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that means following the guidance. but what i would really stress to everybody is that this is not the same as the tough measures, the lockdown we have been going through. on wednesday, we come out into a world where shops are open, where communal worship can take place, where gyms, swimming pools are open, personal services, hairdressers and so on. a lot of the economy opens up again. across all three tiers. plus, this is very important, we have the prospect of the vaccine coming down the track. but also, in the tier 3 areas, we have the added prospect now of being able to use community testing to drive the virus down. everybody, working together to squeeze the disease and kick covid out. and liverpool has been successful, it has definitely helped in liverpool. i don't want to
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exaggerate the importance of mass testing, but it has definitely helped in liverpool, it can help across the country. you mentioned mass testing. your communities secretary has admitted that you don't have the capacity to roll—out a mass testing in all tier 3 areas, so how long are some parts of the country being left languishing in tier 3? actually, we have tens, perhaps hundreds of millions of lateral flow tests coming into this country. we already have a huge, huge stockpile. the difficulty is not the supplies at the moment, it is actually working with local government, local communities to get them doing it. liverpool have already showed the way. we are now looking at barnsley, doncaster, other places around the country, where they want to pull together and do it. and, actually, just now, in this lab here at phe in porton down,
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we have been talking to some scientists who have been seeing real progress on a uk may —— made lateral flow test, so in the months ahead we will be making them in the uk as well. i don't think the supplies going to be the problem. the issue will getting everybody mobilised, to understand the potential advantages of mass community testing. borisjohnson, boris johnson, speaking at borisjohnson, speaking at a science laba borisjohnson, speaking at a science lab a short while ago. ethiopian prime minister abiy ahmed is expected to meet african union envoys to discuss the worsening conflict in the tigray region. federal troops have been deployed on the border with sudan to limit the flow of refugees fleeing the conflict. the ethiopian government says it's carrying out a major operation making a push for the capital, mekelle. anne soy has more from the border. in the city which borders ethiopia, i have been right to the border.
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i can see tigray across the river and we saw soldiers from the ethiopian federal army patrolling it. we were told they had just come there and this is an important route that refugees have been using to flee into sudan. that day there was a big drop in the number of arrivals in sudan and they are really worried as people are being dissuaded from crossing into sudan. however, authorities have now opened humanitarian access routes, we are waiting to see what shape that will take. aid agencies have been calling for access to tigray because it holds about 100,000 refugees and they have been running low on basic supplies like water and food. it's one of the biggest trading days of the year, but some big high street names have
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decided to shun the black friday shopping bonanza even though online spending in the uk is set to soar. last year, black friday spending in the uk totalled over £700 million our business presenter sima kotecha is here with the details. hello to you. before you start to talk about black friday, we are starting to see some potentially troubling news about the arcadia group. what can you tell us? yes, that's right. we arejust group. what can you tell us? yes, that's right. we are just hearing this now, so it is not confirmed, but we are seeing reports that the arcadia group, philip green is the owner, you might have heard that name before, a popular business figure, and his retail empire owns the likes of topshop, burton and dorothy perkins. we know he has been in talks with potential lenders about borrowing £30 million to prop up about borrowing £30 million to prop up his business. like many retailers, his empire has also been
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struggling. we have heard reports over the last few months about how retailers have been struggling prior to the pandemic, and the pandemic making the situation a lot worse for them, because there are fewer shoppers, because many shops have been closed. we are hearing reports that these talks have ended without success , that these talks have ended without success, and that administrators could be appointed as early as next week. this has not been confirmed yet, as i said, it isjust news week. this has not been confirmed yet, as i said, it is just news that we are hearing at the moment. and we will bring you the latest one we have that news. now talk to is about black friday? well, annita, as you know, black friday is usually one of the most popular shopping days in the calendar. but what has been normal about this year? not much at all. retailers are expecting shops not to
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be as busy in countries where they are open, here, we know there is a lockdown in place. but we know that online sales have been doing very well throughout this pandemic, as people have turned to purchasing their goodies on the comfort of their goodies on the comfort of their sofa at home. now, to speak to us about what this black friday holds is richard lem, the chief executive of retail economics. what can we expect from black friday? it is an unusual one, because the high street, in some places, is closed. where the high street is actually open, not many people are allowed in. sure, i think open, not many people are allowed in. sure, ithink this open, not many people are allowed in. sure, i think this friday, undoubtedly, this black friday will undoubtedly, this black friday will undoubtedly be the biggest online black friday. as you said, the second lockdown in the uk has set the pace of the shift towards online. so, many consumers are looking to shop online this black friday. as black friday is going to
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be unusual this year, compared to previous years, the traditional build—up of christmas spending is also going to be unusual. so, lots of christmas spending is being brought forward into the black friday period, and consumers are really utilising those discounts to ta ke really utilising those discounts to take advantage and by some of the black friday presents, because there is nervousness around various restrictions on whether they will be able to get hold of the gifts that they want. can we expect the discounts to be bigger than they usually are? well, i think every year what we see with black friday is that retailers and suppliers are taking a much more strategic and tactical approach to black friday. so, black friday planning, from a retailer perspective, happens right at the beginning of the year. they are working on specific lines, with specific suppliers, and they are a lot more targeted on specific
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products within specific parts of the market than they were previously, when it was four five years ago when retailers were kind of reactive, and there was a knee jerk reaction trying to protect market share and things like that. i think, overall, we expect discounting to be just more targeted thanit discounting to be just more targeted than it has been in previous years. just briefly, richard, how does the uk differto just briefly, richard, how does the uk differ to other countries in terms of black friday? do you think that other places around the world will do better today? well, i think the uk has got a very mature and sophisticated online market, and we have a lot of those underlying things that tie us together in terms of having a really strong online proposition, with densely populated cities, infrastructure that allows the delivery of products over this
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period. so, the thing about black friday, compared to other countries, that ties us all together is the impact of the pandemic, and that meaning that people are really moving on to online this year. 0k. thank you very much. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes hello, there. it's been quite a murky start to the day. we've had some fairly dense fog patches around across parts of east anglia, southern england, the south and west midlands, and into eastern areas of wales. but visibility has been picking up since. that said, we will probably keep some low cloud and perhaps a little bit of mist across the west midlands and parts of east wales. otherwise, the weather tending to brighten up, with some sunny spells coming through at times. so in coastal counties seeing some thick cloud on a few patches of rain here. a week weather front will bring a few patches of light rain into the north—west of northern ireland
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and north—western areas of scotland. where it stays rather cloudy and misty, temperatures may only reach 5 degrees. it will be a cold november day. in other places, where we see a bit of sunshine, temperatures could go as high as perhaps 8 degrees or so. overnight tonight, a few fog patches forming through the vale of york. north—east england, into parts of scotland, will also be cold for these areas with a frost setting in. temperatures dropping into the countryside, —3, —4. in the south, one of those nights where it will turn milder as thicker cloud works in, and that cloud will bring some patches of light rain. the rain is all tied in with these weak weather fronts, pushing northwards into high—pressure, and generally high pressure will be dominating both on saturday and sunday. so, on the weather menu, through the weekend, we are going to keep quite a lot of cloud around. there will be a few patches of light rain, more especially on saturday. equally, there will be some areas that brighten up with some spells of sunshine coming through. the wind generally staying light. for scotland and northern england, perhaps northern ireland, getting off to a bright start with some sunshine. further south across the bulk of england and wales, it's going to be a cloudy start of the day with a view patches
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of light rain drifting northwards with time, reaching southern scotland as we head into the afternoon. northern scotland seeing the best of any sunshine into the afternoon. there could be a few mist and fog patches lingering in a few spots. temperatures, 12 degrees to the south, maybe around 5 degrees in the colder parts of scotland. into sunday, well, it's a quiet day, weather—wise. there will, though, be a lot of cloud around. some areas seeing some sunshine. might see some of that pushing into parts of wales on the south—west, may be north—eastern areas of scotland. where it stays cloudy, looking at temperatures generally hovering around the 8 degrees mark. which is still on the cool side for the time of year. thicker cloud works in early next week, bringing the threat of some rain across north—western areas. the driest weather is likely to parts of the south and south—west. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: a call for a rethink over england's covid tier system but the prime minister defends placing most of the country under tougher restrictions after lockdown, saying there is a way out. with these tools a vaccine plus mass community testing, we have the ability not just to community testing, we have the ability notjust to keep this thing under control but to help areas to come down the tears and open it up. northern ireland has entered a two week lockdown from today as stricter covid—19 restrictions come in to force. fears grow over the future of sir philip green's arcadia group — as concern mounts about whether rescue talks have been successful. the government asks the medicines regulator to assess the oxford vaccine — bringing the vaccine one step closer to a possible roll—out. donald trump says he will leave
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the white house if the electoral college formally confirms joe biden as next us president. certainly i will. and you know that. but i think that there will be a lot of things happening between now and the 20th of january. a lot of things. a blood test that can detect more than 50 types of cancer, is trialled by the nhs. a bbc investigation finds women are being offered controversial "virginity tests" at british medical clinics. and coming up — there's no better time to talk about families after a "hugely challenging" year — the duchess of of cambridge's message as she launches major new research on parenting. anger is growing amongst
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conservative mps here after the government said that the two highest levels of coronavirus restrictions would be imposed on nearly all of england, when the lockdown ends on wednesday. seven tory mps from kent — which will face the most severe measures — have written complaining to the health secretary that the blanket restrictions are unfair and "risk undermining public support" — they say they've secured a meeting with matt hancock. these maps show which areas of england are in which tiers before and after the current lockdown, from next wednesday 32 million people will be living under tier 2 restrictions, and 23 million under tier 3. tier 2 restrictions mean no socialising indoors, with people outside your household or support bubble. but you can meet up to six people outdoors. restaurants and pubs can open but only if they serve a substantial meal. in tier 3 — the most severe restrictions — there is no mixing indoors, meeting outside is only permitted
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in a public space and restaurants and pubs can only provide takeaway or delivery services. jonathan blake reports. the end of the national lockdown may be in sight but there are still hard times ahead. the prime minister warned yesterday most parts of england would face tighter restrictions than before when the three—tier system returns. i know that this will bring a great deal of heartache and frustration, especially for our vital hospitality sector, our pubs, our restaurants, our hotels. in so many ways, the soul of our communities, which continue to bear a disproportionate share of the burden. from next wednesday, the vast majority of england will be under the high or very high covid alert level, tiers two and three. in all those places, no household mixing will be allowed indoors. only cornwall, the isle of wight and the isles of scilly will be placed under looser restrictions in tier 1, or medium risk. less than 2% of the population.
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many conservative mps are angry about the new system, arguing it is unfair that areas with relatively low numbers of cases have been lumped together with places where the virus is more widespread. some have called for a rethink, and want to see more of the evidence decisions have been based on. even tier 2 is going to be immensely damaging for a lot of businesses, and limits people's freedom to meet their family and friends. tier 3, of course, even worse. but by forcing so much of the country into those really tough restrictions, especially places where the rates of infection have been falling to much lower levels, i think the government has given itself a much harderjob. while the rules will be relaxed over five days at christmas, across the uk, allowing three households to mix indoors, there is a warning for anyone hoping for a hug from granny or grandad. would i encourage someone to hug
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and kiss their elderly relatives? no, iwould not. it's not against the law, and that's the whole point, you can do it within the rules that are there. but it does not make sense because you could be carrying the virus and if you've got an elderly relative, that would not be the thing you'd want to do. the hope in government is that mass testing will help some areas move down a tier before too long but there is little expectation of much change until at least the new year. jonathan blake, bbc news. the prime minister has been visiting a science lab in wiltshire where he defended the government's new restrictions and the accusation that it's a one—size fits all approach. i perfectly understand why people are frustrated and why they don't wa nt are frustrated and why they don't want the measures that we are obliged to recommend an institute. the difficulty is we are coming out of the tough lockdown measures on
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wednesday, with the incidence of the disease still are really pretty high, and it is about one in 85 people in this country have it. and what we all need to do is use in this tough tiered system which, as i was saying, it is a more relaxed by a long way than the current lockdown measures but use the tough tiering to drive the disease down both in the tier 3 and the tier 2 areas, until the vaccine comes on stream, which it will, we hope, over the next weeks and months. in the meantime, using that option of mass community testing to drive the virus down. that's what we want to do and i totally understand why people feel frustrated and i get that, but i
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really, really hope that people also understand that i think the vast majority of the british public want us to work hard, do the right thing and beat the virus together. on the timetable, scientific advisers have suggested it is unlikely areas will move down tiers in the next few weeks, can you be honest with people about the most likely scenario?|j think about the most likely scenario?” think it is true that it will be tough for a while, but obviously eerie viewpoint on the 16th, but there is the prospect —— that is a review point. there is the prospect of areas to move down the tiering scale and the most obvious example, gain, is liverpool, where you saw an area, particularly at liverpool city region had very high incidence,
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really very high, and they work together and follow the guidance, plus they did community testing, in the area where they did the community testing there was the biggest drop of all in the incidence. i really am optimistic that over the medium term, with these tools, a vaccine plus mass community testing, we have the ability not just to community testing, we have the ability notjust to keep this thing under control but to help areas to come down the tiers and open it up. one of the tory mps who has complained to the health secretary is the former cabinet office minister and mp for ashord, damian green — kent will be in tier 3 when the lockdown ends. look thanks for joining look thanks forjoining us, mr green. will you vote for these measures against? unless somebody produces some new and convincing evidence i have not seen yet i will vote against them. and we've got a
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meeting with matt hancock arranged for monday, so we will see what the government says then but if i had to vote now i would vote against. i don't at all disagree with what the prime minister was saying, with his analysis, that we need to bear down on the virus until the vaccine arrives but the point that i and others have been making consistently is that we should do it on a rational basis so instead of having these a wide county based areas where people are put in tiers, we should do it on a borough basis, in a place like kent, we have very large boroughs, largely rural, and in an area like mine, the incidence is less than it is in liverpool, which has just been released is less than it is in liverpool, which hasjust been released into tier 2. as it stands, the current policy, current allocation of tiers is just not evidence—based.
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everybody has seen the pattern and it is very difficult when you are in a rural area with low numbers to think why am i being clamped down on but would it not be quite difficult to police if it was borrowed by borough and also difficult to follow and inevitably people move between boroughs, from villages to towns to go shopping or whatever? of course people move across boundaries but they know where they live so they know what the rules are there and people move across county boundaries as well. in practical cases, if i am arguing the case for kent, the vast bulk of movement to work is into london for large parts of kent and of course london is in a lower tier than kent, even though, in my own example again, ashford has a lower incidence than 26 of the 32 london boroughs. as i say, what is happening, i can see the intent behind it but the way it is being done isjust irrational. how many
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supporters do you have? i think it needs 43 mps to vote against these measures for the government's majority to be at risk if it does not get labour party support. the a nswer not get labour party support. the answer is i don't know because obviously mps will be making their own decisions and there is very widespread discontent, as you've been reporting, over the past 24 hours or so. do you have an idea of numbers? i am not doing a whipping operation on this so everyone will make up their own minds. i note there are seven of us from kent have written to ask by meeting with matt hancock on monday, so that indicates the level of disquiet in this part of the country. i know other parts of the country. i know other parts of the country where there is equal concern. also we don't know what the labour party is going to do, they have not said yet. if i had to predict i suspect regrettably, i think these will go through but i think these will go through but i think there is very, very widespread
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discontent and we offered the government a way out, if you did it any more fine grained basis, you would get people more respectful of the rules because my underlying fear is if people are in an area where they think this very tight restriction should not apply to me, they are more likely to disobey the rules and one of the things i want eve ryo ne rules and one of the things i want everyone to do is to obey the rules so we can bear down on the virus. but if you have an area where people think it isjust but if you have an area where people think it is just unfair but if you have an area where people think it isjust unfair and but if you have an area where people think it is just unfair and wrong and pointless having restrictions here, then they are obviously less likely to obey them. is there a risk with that approach also if, for example, there are tougher restrictions in poorer areas that you get the country really divided up you get the country really divided up even more into a patchwork which might pit less well off people against everybody else and then you lose that sense of cohesiveness, the sense we are all in this together, which was successful earlier this year? yeah, and it is very
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important, but i don't think you reinforce social cohesiveness by saying to people, "we are going to lockdown your lives, but perhaps your livelihood at risk. because somebody else has got a problem." if you are in an area of the high incidence you will recognise that you need tough measures to take. tough measures taken. most people won't object to that. when you start saying, everyone has got to be in the same boat, that people start questioning it. just as, for example, we were all in the same boat with the national lockdown, and there is something slightly odd about the fact that the government is saying that the lockdown worked and yet in an area like kent and other areas, we went into it in tier 1 other areas, we went into it in tier iand other areas, we went into it in tier 1 and now it is finished we come out of it in tier 3. it is not obvious to anyone where i am what was
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achieved by that second national lockdown. can i ask you, matt hancock's meeting on monday, can he say anything to change your mind? evidence is what we want to see, both health evidence and proper economic analysis. we are asking for fa cts economic analysis. we are asking for facts and evidence and analysis. damien green, mp, thank you very much indeed. and to find out which tier your area will be in, you can use the checker on the bbc news website. just enter your postcode to see what the rules are. northern ireland has re—entered a two—week lockdown and nonessential shops have closed. cafes, hairdressers and beauticians have also shut — just seven days after they were allowed to re—open following the last lockdown. our ireland correspondent chris page reports from belfast. seasonal shopping is being suspended in northern ireland. from today, there'll be no more scenes like this in towns and cities for a fortnight.
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the devolved government has told most shops to shut because it's classified them as nonessential. the owner of this jewellery store says the closure couldn't have come at a worse time. we'd happily close from the 24th through to the end of february. we wouldn't bat an eyelid on it. but to take away two weeks out of the four pre—christmas, it's just a wrecking ball to retail. the new lockdown is due to last untiljust two weeks before christmas. and here in belfast city centre, it does feel a lot busier than usual during these last few hours before the shops shut. well, i'm really busy at the minute, so i am, shopping for my grandchildren and my own children. the clock is ticking. unfortunately, like everyone else, we will see what happens after the next two weeks. close—contact services such as hairdressers have also been trying to make the most of pre—lockdown demand. they've been closed for longer than many other businesses this year. i'm literally using my own savings
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that i had, like, that i've used for future life, for everything to do with my daughter and my husband. but unfortunately, i've had to use it all now, so it's dwindling away. ministers say the restrictions are painful but paramount. these are hard asks, as we've said before. but what we can really achieve over these next two weeks is as normal a christmas as we can possibly get to. the start of december is set to be difficult. but there are some positive signs in this part of the uk. the rate at which the virus is spreading has fallen. it's now lower than in england and wales. chris page, bbc news, belfast. i can speak now to colin neill who is chief executive of hospitality ulster. thanks forjoining us today. how was this next period of lockdown affect businesses that you represent? the hospitality industry in northern
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ireland had already been in lockdown for six weeks, at the end of this period it will be eight weeks, and our traditional white only pumps have only been open for three weeks since march. —— wets only pumps. it just seems to be relentless. we need decisions made in advance and we are not getting them. how many businesses are under threat in terms of not being able to keep going at all? it is very hard to get data but we managed to get all the major suppliers and crunch their credit risk analysis and we reckon what you're looking at somewhere in the region of 40% of all restaurants, probably in the 15% of pubs. 65,000 jobs depend on our industry and we reckon we would lose somewhere in the region of 20,000 of those. we are infailure
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the region of 20,000 of those. we are in failure and we really need government. we are asked to close and told to close but we are not given the financial resources to sustain closure and we are not given a definite date for reopening so we are a definite date for reopening so we a re left a definite date for reopening so we are left in limbo. what sort of financial aid would be needed, do you think? if you look... furlough. further is great for staff but it cost a business on average £30 per head per week to keep their staff u nfu rl head per week to keep their staff unfurl out. if you have 1000 staff that there is £30,000 —— keep their staff on furlough. we need the grant levels to recognise hospitality and ended hospitality right across the uk is unique, we have been closed more, we were open under restrictions more and we have higher staff levels. the grants need to be at least doubled, they need to work with us to cover the costs if they're serious about saving a huge industry uk wide. how much consultation or talks with those in
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government are you having at the moment on this and what is the response when you say you need more financial help? i have to say our government, the devolved government have been really good, i am continually on the phone or video calls with our first and deputy first, i have met our health minister, cmo on friday, we have really good engagement. one of the biggest challenges we face as the devolved governments do not have the financial firepower, devolved governments do not have the financialfirepower, they devolved governments do not have the financial firepower, they have limited budgets. now we are in pretty much total lockdown except for essential —— except for essential outlets in the retail sector that money has to be in further now. the chancellor took away the furlough bonus, the job retention bonus that many businesses had spent. so that it is a shortfall that they don't have comejanuary. we really need westminster to look seriously at hospitality right across the united kingdom because it is being the most severely impacted
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but it is not being given any special help other than what is available for everyone else. colin neill, thanks very much indeed. let's take a closer look at the impact the tiered system in england will have on pubs and restaurants. after the national lockdown, hospitality venues in tieri — the lowest level — will operate with table service only and the rule of six applies. in tier2 you will not be able to mix households inside and alcohol can only be served with a substantial meal. and in tier3 — pubs and restaurants will only be able to stay open for takeaway. i can now speak to ellie carcamo, who's the owner of caribe coffee in morpeth. i'm alsojoined by odette hume, who's the landlady of the red lion pub in berwick—upon—tweed. how are these restrictions affecting
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you? asa you? as a supplier to coffee shops we are seeing a drop in our coffee shop simply, seeing a drop in our coffee shop supply, we also supply restaurants. they are not buying as much and they we re very they are not buying as much and they were very much they are not buying as much and they were very much our they are not buying as much and they were very much our monthly bread and butter. we are having to push our retail side a lot more and make a lot of changes ourselves to sort of grow that side of our business. are you in tier 3 and the people you are supplying? we are in rural northumberland, the likes of newcastle, north of that. our numbers area newcastle, north of that. our numbers are a little bit lower and there is debate over whether we should be split. it is a little bit frustrating but we are trying to understand. odette are you also in tier 3, how are you coping? we are in tier 3, devastating news yesterday, considering, again, we are north of northumberland, our numbers are
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quite a bit lower than in liverpool and london who are in tier 2. do you have people coming from the towns nearby which have higher numbers, presumably that is the logic of putting everyone in an area into the same group? well, it is a holiday town, berwick, and the haven camps remained open throughout the summer which did not help. where we can come within myself, i try and keep the pub to our locals. but she can keep others out, can you? certainly cannot. how can we stop someone at our door saying, when you give us your postcode, please? how worried are you about getting through to the next few weeks or months, if the north—east is kept in these very severe restrictions? i have absolutely no idea. i have written to glen
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sanderson of the head of northumberland county council yesterday in an e—mail and he forwarded my e—mail on to those who are dealing with the covid budgeting for tier 3. what about you, ellie, are you keeping enough business flowing? this is only our second full year of business, at the start of the year we were really hoping for a lot more growth but i would describe what we're doing is surviving comfortably. our local have been fantastic, following us online and we are working very hard to keep it up and keep everybody buying from us so we are doing ok. odette, what about you, are you worried about losing jobs or even stay open? can you get through these incredibly few months we will hopefully a vaccine and the weather
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helps a bit? i'm hoping we can stay and get through the next couple of months. we are at wet sales pub only so months. we are at wet sales pub only so if we're going to tier 2 that will be our issue but we are going to try and sort something out that way. ok, thank you both are very much and all the best for your businesses and for yourselves. thank you. fears are growing about the future of arcadia, the retail group that includes topshop, burton and dorothy perkins. our business correspondent sima kotecha has more on this. they put out a statement? that's right. i will get to that any moment but just to right. i will get to that any moment butjust to remind you about this group, arcadia. it is owned by the very controversial figure sir philip green. as you say got popular brands
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for into that empire, dorothy perkins, top shop and burton and they employ report say around 15,000 people, so if arcadia does go into administration those jobs could potentially be at risk. the back story is arcadia was asking for £30 million from lenders, we now those conversations were taking place. there are now reports saying those conversations have broken down and they have not been successful. there are concerns if that money is not given to arcadia it will struggle to survive. as we know from the previous few, previous recent months, retailers have really struggled during this pandemic, the high street was struggling beforehand, then the pandemic exacerbated the problem. arcadia have just put out a statement in the last couple of minutes. it says, "we are aware of the recently despicable —ish and surrounding the future of
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arcadia. the force close at —— we are aware of the recent speculation. the force closure of our stores has had a material impact on trading. as a result, the arcadia boards have been working on a number of contingency options to secure the future of the group's brands. the brands continue to trade and other stores will be open again in england and the republic of ireland as soon as the government cover 19 restrictions are lifted. " this is not a story we have not heard in the last few months, so make retailers going through similar situations at the moment. at the end of the day, this is aboutjobs for many people who work in these stores, who make their living from working on that high street and so i am afraid if this happens, more job high street and so i am afraid if this happens, morejob potentially at risk. very worrying for those involved. thanks very much for now. a blood test designed
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to detect more than 50 types of cancer at an early stage, is to be trialled by the nhs in england. more than 165,000 patients will be offered the tests from next year — officials say early detection has the potential to save many lives. jim reed reports. checks for many types of cancer currently mean this, an mri or ct scan, to look for a tumour and then a biopsy. often, though, that can mean treatment is left late. some diseases like pancreatic and ovarian cancer are typically diagnosed at stage three or four, when the disease may have spread, and options are limited. les maiden was 62 when she fell ill. it took almost a year to diagnose pancreatic cancer. she lost her life just months later. it's too late for my sister, but it's not too late for others. and i passionately believe that early diagnosis will make a difference. the nhs is now planning to try out
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a new test in england. developed by the californian firm grail, it's designed to detect molecular changes in the blood caused by 50 types of cancer in people with no obvious symptoms. 165,000 participants aged between 50 and 79 will be asked to pilot the tests over the next three years. we want to be one of the first health services in the world to see whether this simple blood test can detect those cancers when treatment will make the biggest difference. but critics of the plan say the technology is unproven and there are real questions about the accuracy of blood tests for cancer. the nhs says if the pilot is successful, the scheme could be expanded to anotheri million people in england from 2024. jim reed, bbc news. joining me now to discuss what the test could mean for cancer patients and their treatment, is dr chris macdonald, head of research at the charity pancreatic cancer uk. do you think this trial is a good
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idea? yeah, absolutely, ithink there is cause for optimism even if it is caution. for pancreatic cancer, it is the most lethal form of common cancer, half of those diagnosed will die within three months of that diagnosis. those are awful statistics, so those survival rates aren't such because people are diagnosed at at late stage where they cannot receive curative intervention, for example, surgery that could potentially cure them. the reason why people are diagnosed it is because we just don't have a great way of diagnosing pancreatic cancer earlier. for example, pancreatic cancer has very vague and nonspecific symptoms such as weight loss and back pain, stomach problems which are really difficult to pick out of symptoms associated with many other conditions and cancers and so it is difficult to pick up the early signs but also we don't really have great tools in the hands of our
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health care professionals, gps, hospital doctors, to be able to pinpoint and then refer and to quickly and effectively diagnose people at the earliest possible stage of pancreatic cancer. this announcement from simon stephens and the nhs today is very welcome. primarily the fact that the nhs is focusing on early detection in pancreatic cancer and other types of cancer is really welcoming and follows a lot of our work and investment within research on early diagnosis and detection. generally there is a lot of promise within this study as well and even if a small amount of the promise can be realised, it could be a real game changerfor difficult to realised, it could be a real game changer for difficult to diagnose cancers such as pancreatic. does it need three years to get the results? i think need three years to get the results? ithink sir need three years to get the results? i think sir simon stephens are saying it would be 2024 if this trial was successful, to expand to 1
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million people, lots of people will be thinking i would love to have that test. the should also consider the fact that this is cautious optimism. we are... this is a pilot, we are very optimism. we are... this is a pilot, we are very much testing whether or not the screening programme can work effectively on a population level within the uk. it is right to take time to make sure that we are effectively diagnosing people and this is done to the benefit of people's health because otherwise you could potentially come as many critics have pointed out, you could inadvertently diagnose people inappropriately because of the a ccu ra cy inappropriately because of the accuracy issues. or you could miss cases as well, you can get false positives and negatives. indeed. but we should really remember that this is still a test and still being piloted within the nhs, it has not been adopted straightaway, i think
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it isa been adopted straightaway, i think it is a screening test and not an out and out diagnostic. therefore, your are potentially, it is a referral tool, almost got towards better and more specific diagnostic tools for specific cancer types. in early detection, frankly, the great has been the enemy of the good in ha rd to has been the enemy of the good in hard to diagnose cancer types such as pancreatic and even a small step in the right direction would be cumulatively getting towards a significant difference for those people diagnosed with the most lethal form of common cancer, pancreatic cancer. i -- why do you think other countries got similar developments and economies, the better i can certainly do —— do better i can certainly do —— do better in cancer? we have incredible resources in nhs which has been shown over the past year but it imposes its own kind of delivery problems within all of that. sometimes there are intrinsic problems within the way your health
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ca re problems within the way your health care services function from country to country. that could be part of it. but i think it is a fact as well that this is being screened and developed in the uk it says a lot about the uk, that we have a really rich in research and clinical cohort within the uk and we have incredible resource of the nhs, which is obviously incredible at treating people but also is an incredible research resource as well, and unlike anywhere else in the uk, in the uk is an incredibly rich test for these screening processes. finally, briefly, there has been a lot of concern about people not going for checks because of covid, are you seeing that in the late diagnosis of pancreatic cancer as well? i think there is... we would suggest for pancreatic cancer, if you have any of the symptoms
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associated with pancreatic cancer, weight loss, stomach pains, back pains, consistently, do not feel you are putting anyone in the nhs or any other systems out by going to your doctor and gps and discussing concerns because we have seen, specifically in cancer types, in cancer during covid macro —— during covid people have not been getting the diagnosis they need at the right time so we would greatly encourage people not to wait and take symptoms to their gps people not to wait and take symptoms to theirgps and people not to wait and take symptoms to their gps and to their doctors and hopefully get it rolled out and if not go for further tests and get it diagnosed as early as possible. doctor chris macdonald, let's hope these trials are successful, they could be a game changer. thank you for your time. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin.
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former club napoli added the tribute la st former club napoli added the tribute last night, thousands of fans gathered outside and the ground was lit up in his honour, diego maradona. there was a minute's silence and napoli are planning to rename their stadium after him. england could be drawn in a world cup qualifying group with wales and either northern ireland or scotland for qatar 2022. the seedings have been confirmed for the european section — and england are in the top pot, alongside the world's number one—ranked team belgium and reigning champions france. wales will be in pot two, with northern ireland and scotland in pot three, along with the republic of ireland. 55 teams will be split into ten groups of five or six, when the draw is made on december the 7th. clubs are trying to work out how best to reopen their gates to fans, after the government's announcement
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of the tier structure. supporters will be allowed back in from next wednesday, in areas outside tier 3. getting money in through the turnstiles is crucial for many smaller clubs — and although some bigger clubs will still find themselves out of pocket, it's being seen as a positive move. we will lose more money u nfortu nately we will lose more money unfortunately but we see this as an important way to help build confidence with fans, to test our systems and hopefully then to be able to work to bring more fans back sooner. there is a long way to go, we know that, but for smaller clubs further down the pyramid this is a lifeline. it will not eradicate their losses or turn them into profit, it will simply add to our losses but we have to start somewhere and this is a way to build confidence. england's cricket tour of the netherlands has been postponed, due to continuing uncertainty around the covid—19 pandemic. the one—day series was scheduled to start next may, but it's been put back by a year. the royal dutch cricket association said playing the three matches
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with no, or very few, spectators, wasn't a viable option. the series was due to be part of the first men's cricket world cup super league, featuring the netherlands plus the 12 full members of the icc. after a rough old rugby league season, disrupted by covid—19 cases and matches called off we still have a super lleague grand final tonight — with two of the sport's great rivals, smashing into each other. wigan warriors take on st helens, the reigning champions. it's too early for fans to be back, but the teams will still relish the occasion — and the chance to lift the big prize when they run out in hull. definitely more enjoyable playing in front of a packed stadium. it's definitely been missed by the boys. but i think we've got used to it. everyone's got their head around that, and, yeah, the final, definitely missed that atmosphere. but there's still a lot at stake and there's still a lot up for grabs. so i think when you look back,
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it might not be the most memorable game, but it's still pretty special to win a grand final. the players deserve all the credit we can give them, they have taken the risk, going back to work when others were not, playing each other. they have done that without crowds and with a lot of restrictions and a lot of things put in place, obviously further protection. it adds to the mental load and the difficulty of what is already a tough season. they have done that really well. promises to be a exciting finale. that's all the sport for now but there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest from first practice at the bahrain grand prix. significant differences have to be resolved with michelle barnier over
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fishing and more. here is the prime ministers speaking earlier today. the likelihood of a deal is very much determined by our friends and partners in the eu who, you know, there's a deal that to be done if they want to do it, which would, i think, benefit people on both sides of the aisle. sides of the channel. but let's be absolutely clear. this country can prosper and will prosper mightily in either event. and if we have to come out with a so—called australian style model, australian relationship with the eu, we will make a great success of it. i'm not going to. i'm not going to i'm not going to comment on that, you know, where everybody's working very hard. but, you know, clearly there are substantial and important differences still to be to be bridged. but we're getting on with it.
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the labour leader, sirkeir starmer, is to mee with muslim representatives from his party who say he needs to take tough action on islamophobia within its ranks. it comes after a report commissioned by the labour muslim network found one in four muslim party members had directly experienced islamophobia and 44% saying they didn't believe the labour party took the issue seriously enough. let's speak now to the shadow speaker of the house and chair of the labour muslim network afzal khan. what sort of direct experiences of islamophobia have you found within the labour party? a high number of people saying there are issues. how they are getting on within the party, how they think the party has responded to their needs and some of
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the languages used. clearly this is an issue which is in the wider society, we have seen this issue, increase of islamophobia, year after year. we also have experienced this within the labour party. so it is an issue. what exact examples within the labour party? individual members, their experience of being a members, their experience of being a member and how they are being treated in the party, the complaint process , treated in the party, the complaint process, how long that is taking. could you give me any specific exa m ples of could you give me any specific examples of what you mean? specifically people who have joined the labour party, attend their meetings and want to make progress. for example, people wondering if
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they belong here or not. we have a party which is clearly antiracist but they feel they are not being listened to. how would you distinguish islamophobia from racism? what makes it a specifically focused on religion?” racism? what makes it a specifically focused on religion? i think we are saying this is a form of racism. the definition of british muslims in parliament came up two years ago. it says this is a form of racism and this is how we look at it. it is intertwined, this relationship. what are you now how sir keir starmer, under new leadership, new management, what do you want him to
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do, and can he bring about change?” think the response from the leadership, the party i believe has been positive. they have also accepted our recommendations. what we are hoping is, like today we will be meeting with the top leadership, how this can be implemented. there has to be increased awareness within the party and we need to be looking at reaching out to the wider community in this sense as well. and also to make sure we have procedures which are transparent which people have confidence in. do you think the labour party treats islamophobia in the same way it treats anti—semitism? the same way it treats anti-semitism? as far as i'm concerned any form of discrimination has to be treated equally and the
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leadership has shown it means business, there is... it is not a cce pta ble business, there is... it is not acceptable in the labour party or in society we have this discrimination. we are hearing news that arcadia, the retail empire owned by sir philip green, is on the brink of collapse. administrators could be appointed as soon as monday. the company employs some 13,000 people and has over 500 shops. it is understood sir philip is unlikely to buy back any of the assets from administrators. if it goes into administration next week, it is understood the shops will continue to trade as normal whilst a buyer, or buyers, for the brands are sought. these are well—known shops
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like topshop, many on the high street. that has just been sent into our business correspondent, emma simpson. arcadia looks like it is on the brink of collapse, the philip green empire. the uk government has asked the medicines regulator, to start assessing the astrazeneca oxford university coronavirus vaccine, bringing the uk a step closer to a possible rollout. but some scientists have expressed concerns after the firm provided two sets of data. they say that the highest efficacy — 90 percent —shown after people were mistakenly given a low dose then backed up with a standard one might not be a robust enough finding for permission to be granted for use. astrazeneca has acknowledged that further trial data might be needed. professor david salisbury, former director of immunisation at the department of health says further data is needed. we find ourselves in a very unusual position where we have got two sets
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of data from two different regimens of data from two different regimens of administration. one of them is a sort of fairly straightforward two equal doses. one of them is an unusual way of giving a smaller dose followed by a larger dose, which i do not recall us doing before. this has come about because of the release into a clinical trial of as it were the wrong vaccine. and that is not a good place to have started from. and we do not really know yet where we should be going with either two doses of a vaccine that is 60% effective or two doses of the vaccine which is 90% effective but for which we have much less data. donald trump has made comments that seem to be the closest he's come so far to conceding defeat in the us presidential election three weeks ago.
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despite repeating his unsubstantiated claim that the election was rigged, he said he would leave the white house if the electoral college confirms president—electjoe biden's victory. the college is due to meet in two weeks' time. mark lobel reports. welcome to america's mayor. thank you, mayor giuliani, for being here. just this wednesday at this public hearing on the election in pennsylvania, donald trump's lawyer rudy giuliani revealed his team were checking graveyards to confirm their unsubstantiated claims that thousands of mail—in ballots were submitted by dead people. president trump on the phone was sounding jubilant. this was an election that we won easily. we won it by a lot. applause. yet here he is a mere 24 hours later, when a reporter asked the question on everybody's mind. certainly i will. and you know that.
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but i think that there will be a lot of things happening between now and the 20th of january. a lot of things. massive fraud has been found. we're like a third world country. so what does donald trump focus on between now and inauguration day? on thursday, he took to the golf course. # young man, there's no need to feel down...# on saturday, he's planning another one of his now familiar outdoor airport rallies in georgia, ahead of a senate run—off there. and next week donald trump says the distribution of coronavirus vaccines in america will begin — given first to frontline workers, medical personnel, and senior citizens. striking an altogether different tone this thanksgiving isjoe biden. it's a personal sacrifice that each of our families can make and should make to save somebody else's life. but it's also a shared sacrifice for the whole country.
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a statement of a common purpose that says we care about one another and we're all in this together. as he prepares to enter the white house in less than two months' time, he and his wifejill appealed to americans to stay—at—home. but america has only one president at a time and this unconventional one still wants everyone to know who is still in charge. don't talk to me that way. you're just a lightweight. don't talk to me that way... don't talk to me... i'm the president of the united states. don't ever talk to the president that way. all right, i'm going to go with another question. go ahead. mark lobel, bbc news. a bbc investigation has discovered that british clinics are offering so—called "virginity tests" which have been condemned by the world health organisation and the united nations. the investigation was carried out by bbc newsbeat as part of our 100 women series. critics say the controversial tests are unscientific as they cannot
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prove whether someone is a virgin or not, and are intrusive and can be a form of abuse. rachel stonehouse's report discusses the issue frankly, and may be upsetting for some viewers. virginity testing involves the vaginal examination to check if a woman's hymen is intact. it's common in certain middle wastern and african countries, like morocco, egypt and iraq. but it is also going on here in the uk. i had a very emotionally abusive relationship with my parents, who wanted me to have an arranged marriage. they tried to isolate me from my friends, and when i wore the clothes i wanted to, they would say i brought shame on this family. this is one woman's story, which has been re—voiced by an actress to protect her identity. one day, an elder from the community saw me out with my friends and said to my mum that one of the boys in the group was my boyfriend. there were lots of rumours in that community about it. my parents and the family of the man they wanted me to marry said i had to have a virginity test to prove that i was still a virgin
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so the marriage could go ahead. i was scared and i really did not understand what it meant. i felt like running away was my only option, so that's what i did. virginity testing is unscientific and considered a violation of human rights, but it is not illegal in this country. the charity karma nirvana supports victims of honour—based abuse and forced marriage. so, we have received calls on the helpline from victims that are concerned about this, and it might be that they are worried that their families have found out that perhaps they have been in a relationship or that they are not a virgin. how does virginity testing feed into the wider context of honour—based abuse? many victims have, you know, in very extreme circumstances, been killed and been victims of honour killings. but for other victims, it might be that they are disowned by family. for some women, the fear of trying to prove they are a virgin can lead them to extreme measures.
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so, i've ordered this hymen repair kit from amazon. my immediate reaction is that you do not get a lot for your money. this kit cost over £100. it looks like a pair of tweezers and then some gel, which i think is the vagina tightening gel. i have no idea what this is going to be. i'm guessing it is meant to be fake blood that you insert with the tweezers. if i had ordered this with the intention of using it, i would be so disappointed at what has arrived. especially without any instructions whatsoever. there have been 69 hymen repair surgeries carried out on the nhs in the past five years. a quick search on google and i have easily found about 20 clinics offering it privately. none of them advertise virginity testing online, but when called, almost half of them said they could do it. i don't understand why it is not illegal in the uk.
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the idea that the absence of part of the hymen means that you are not a virgin, that idea... that is wrong, first of all. it can be torn for various reasons. if i said, this is torn, i need to repair it a little bit then i can give you a certificate. that means actually i am giving a false certificate. despite international calls for an end to a virginity testing, it continues to go on, with those offering it continuing to make money from a practice which campaigners say violates a woman's human rights. rachel stonehouse, bbc news. feelings of loneliness among parents with young children have "rocketed" during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a study led by the duchess of cambridge. more than half a million people shared their experiences of bringing up under—fives, as part of new research commissioned by the royal foundation. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. some have tyres and some have tracks.
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some precious quiet time for becky and her son, ollie, who's three. this preschool in peterborough has been a sanctuary, vital to the well—being of them both. run by the charity family action, the duchess of cambridge is its patron. it provides practical and emotional support to parents, from potty training to outdoor play, and has helped families manage the parenting challenges of lockdown. there was days where it was just, do you know what, i can't be bothered today. i'm not getting dressed today. but we got through it. and what lifts you on days when you feel like that? how do you get out of it? the stuff he comes outwith. it genuinely is him that pulls me out of it. like, i sit there thinking, oh... i struggle. i can't cope. and then he'lljust look at me and he'll sayjust little things like, "are you all right, mummy?" and it changes the whole mood completely. the survey is a look at early childhood. 63% of people said they'd experienced loneliness, which had become significantly
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worse in lockdown. 70% described feeling judged by others. and only 10% of parents found time to look after their own well—being. being briefed on the research findings earlier this week, the duchess of cambridge has described the work as a landmark public survey. so we've taken your input, and combined it with even more public research, to produce the uk's biggest ever study on the early years. this year has been a hugely challenging time for us all, and there hasn't been a more important moment to talk about families. during the summer, the duchess spoke to the bbc and met families with young children, including dad ryan and his daughter mia. particularly for first—time dads, is it quite a daunting... ..daunting time? it's very scary. almost six months on, mia has taken her first steps... oh, my god, yes! ..and enjoyed herfirst birthday cake, as ryan continues to cope with the pressure of being a single dad. you shouldn't like, judge someone,
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or make someone feel conscious about the way they're parenting, because not everyone is perfect. everyone has their own mistakes, makes their own mistakes. so, it's easier said than done. and i — but yeah, i do feel conscious when i'm walking around! and if i tell my daughter off in public, i'm like, oh, my god, ijust like, told her off, does that make me a bad parent? it doesn't. it's telling them the rights and wrongs of things. they like brussels sprouts too? i never knew that. for the duchess of cambridge, supporting the early years community is now her priority. it's a long term commitment. she wants the survey results to inform the work of everyone supporting young children and their families. it can really, hopefully, make a real difference to how we raise the current and next generations of children, and make a difference to to the world we live in. so i think... ..for that reason i think it's a really important piece of research. the survey is a vast bank of data, the first—hand experience of parents, with the aim
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of improving the lives of young children and those looking after them. daniella relph, bbc news, peterborough. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. the uk's negotiator on brexit david frost has been tweeting saying he is looking forward to welcoming michel barner and his team to the uk and resume face—to—face talks tomorrow. he says we will work hard to get a deal. a number of tweets coming in. he says they are trying to talk about controlling our borders, substance a control system and controlling our fishing waters. substance a control system and controlling ourfishing waters. the factors we now have been disputed
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and still being discussed. a number of commentators have said that next week, we keep hearing about deadlines, but next week is crucial simply because of the time taken to get through an agreement and the end of the year is fast approaching. more of this if we can in the current hour. it's been quite a murky start to the day. we've had some fairly dense fog patches around across parts of east anglia, southern england, the south and west midlands, and into eastern areas of wales. but visibility has been picking up since. tending to brighten up. that said, we will probably keep some low cloud and perhaps a little bit of mist across the west midlands and parts of east wales. southern coastal counties seeing some thick cloud on a few patches of rain here. a weak weather front will bring a few patches of light rain into the north—west of northern ireland and north—western areas of scotland. where it stays rather cloudy and misty, temperatures may only reach 5 degrees.
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could be eight in prices. some frost in rural areas, temperatures dropping to —3 or —4. turning mild through the night in the south. some patches of light rain.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 12: a call for a rethink over england's covid tier system but the prime minister defends placing most of the country under tougher restrictions after lockdown saying there is a way out... with saying there is a way out... these tools, a vaccine mass with these tools, a vaccine plus a mass community testing, we have the ability not just to mass community testing, we have the ability notjust to keep this thing under control but to help areas to come down the tiers and open it up. if you are an area with a high incidence you will recognise that you need tough measures, it is when you need tough measures, it is when you start saying, everyone has got be in the same boat that people start questioning it. on the brink of collapse. fears grow over the future of sir philip green's arcadia group — administrators could be appointed
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as early as monday. northern ireland has entered a two week lockdown from today as stricter covid—19 restrictions come in to force. the government asks the medicines regulator to assess the oxford vaccine — bringing the vaccine one step closer to a possible roll—out. a blood test that can detect more than 50 types of cancer, is trialled by the nhs. and coming up — there's no better time to talk about families after a "hugely challenging" year — the duchess of of cambridge's message as she launches major new research on parenting. ministers have been defending the decision to place most of england into the two highest levels of coronavirus restrictions,
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when the lockdown ends next week, amid growing anger amongst conservative mps. seven tory mps from kent — which will face the most severe measures — have written complaining to the health secretary that the blanket restrictions are unfair and "risk undermining public support". they say they've secured a meeting with matt hancock. these maps show which areas of england are in which tiers before and after the current lockdown, from next wednesday 32 million people will be living under tier 2 restrictions, and 23 million under tier 3. tier 2 restrictions mean no socialising indoors, with people outside your household or support bubble. but you can meet up to six people outdoors. restaurants and pubs can open but only if they serve a substantial meal. in tier 3 — the most severe restrictions — there is no mixing indoors, meeting outside is only permitted in a public space and restaurants and pubs can only provide takeaway or delivery services. jonathan blake reports. the end of the national lockdown may be in sight but there
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are still hard times ahead. the prime minister warned yesterday most parts of england would face tighter restrictions than before when the three—tier system returns. i know that this will bring a great deal of heartache and frustration, especially for our vital hospitality sector, our pubs, our restaurants, our hotels. in so many ways, the soul of our communities, which continue to bear a disproportionate share of the burden. from next wednesday, the vast majority of england will be under the high or very high covid alert level, tiers two and three. in all those places, no household mixing will be allowed indoors. only cornwall, the isle of wight and the isles of scilly will be placed under looser restrictions in tier 1, or medium risk. less than 2% of the population. many conservative mps are angry about the new system, arguing it is unfair that areas
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with relatively low numbers of cases have been lumped together with places where the virus is more widespread. some have called for a rethink, and want to see more of the evidence decisions have been based on. even tier 2 is going to be immensely damaging for a lot of businesses, and limits people's freedom to meet their family and friends. tier 3, of course, even worse. but by forcing so much of the country into those really tough restrictions, especially places where the rates of infection have been falling to much lower levels, i think the government has given itself a much harderjob. while the rules will be relaxed over five days at christmas, across the uk, allowing three households to mix indoors, there is a warning for anyone hoping for a hug from granny or grandad. would i encourage someone to hug and kiss their elderly relatives? no, iwould not. it's not against the law, and that's the whole point, you can do it within the rules that are there.
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but it does not make sense because you could be carrying the virus and if you've got an elderly relative, that would not be the thing you'd want to do. the hope in government is that mass testing will help some areas move down a tier before too long but there is little expectation of much change until at least the new year. jonathan blake, bbc news. the prime minister has been visiting a science lab in wiltshire where he defended the government's new restrictions and the accusation that it's a one—size fits all approach. i perfectly understand why people are frustrated and why they don't want the measures that we are obliged to recommend an institute. the difficulty is we are coming out of the tough lockdown measures on wednesday, with the incidence of the disease still are really pretty high, and it is about one in 85
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people in this country have it. and what we all need to do is use in this tough tiered system which, asi was saying, it is more relaxed by a long way than the current lockdown measures but use the tough tiering to drive the disease down both in the tier 3 and the tier 2 areas, until the vaccine comes on stream, which it will, we hope, over the next weeks and months. in the meantime, using that option of mass community testing to drive the virus down. that's what we want to do and i totally understand why people feel frustrated and i get that, but i really, really hope that people also understand that i think the vast majority of the british public want us to work hard, do the right thing and beat the virus together.
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on the timetable, your scientific advisers have suggested it is unlikely areas will move down tiers in the next few weeks, can you be honest with people about the most likely scenario? i think it is true that it will be tough for a while, but obviously the review point on the 16th, but there is the prospect of areas to move down the tiering scale and the most obvious example, again, is liverpool, where you saw an area, particularly liverpool city region had very high incidence, really very high, and they worked together and followed the guidance, plus they did community testing, the area where they did the community testing there was the biggest drop of all
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in the incidence. i really am optimistic that over the medium term, with these tools, a vaccine plus mass community testing, we have the ability notjust to keep this thing under control but to help areas to come down the tiers and open it up. one of the tory mps who has complained to the health secretary is the former cabinet office minister and mp for ashord, damian green — kent will be in tier 3 when the lockdown ends and he says as things stand he won't be voting with the government on this. we've got a meeting with matt hancock arranged for monday, so we will see what the government says then, but if i had to vote now i would vote against. i don't at all disagree with what the prime minister was saying, with his analysis, that we need to bear down on the virus until the vaccine arrives, but the point that i and others have been making consistently is that we should
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do it ona rational basis, so instead of having these a wide county—based areas where people are put in tiers, we should do it on a borough basis. in a place like kent, we have very large boroughs, largely rural, and in an area like mine, the incidence is less than it is in liverpool, which has just been released into tier 2. as it stands, the current policy, current allocation of tiers is just not evidence—based. everybody has seen the pattern and it is very difficult when you are in a rural area with low numbers to think "why am i being clamped down on?" but would it not be quite difficult to police if it was by borough and also difficult and inevitably people move between
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boroughs, from villages to towns to go shopping or whatever? of course people move across boundaries but they know where they live so they know what the rules are there and people move across county boundaries as well. in practical cases, if i am arguing the case for kent, the vast bulk of movement to work is into london for large parts of kent and of course london is in a lower tier than kent, even though, in my own example again, ashford has a lower incidence than 26 of the 32 london boroughs. as i say, what is happening, i can see the intent behind it but the way it is being done isjust irrational. how many supporters do you have? i think it needs 43 mps to vote against these measures for the government's majority to be at risk if it does not get labour party support. the answer is i don't know because obviously mps will be making their own decisions and there is very widespread discontent, as you've been reporting, over the past 24 hours or so. do you have an idea of numbers?
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i am not doing a whipping operation on this so everyone will make up their own minds. i know there are seven of us from kent have written to ask for a meeting with matt hancock on monday, so that indicates the level of disquiet in this part of the country. i know other parts of the country where there is equal concern. also we don't know what the labour party is going to do, they have not said yet. if i had to predict i suspect, regrettably, i think these will go through but i think there is very, very widespread discontent. and we've offered the government a way out. sir philip green's retail group that includes topshop, burton and dorothy perkins — is on the brink of collapse. it's believed administrators could be appointed as early as monday. the group employs about 13000 people and has over 500 shops.
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our business correspondent sima kotecha has more on this. this will be very worrying, given the number of jobs at this will be very worrying, given the number ofjobs at stake. absolutely. sir philip green is a name many people will have heard before, he is a controversialfigure and, as you say, he is owner of arcadia which runs various popular high street brands such as burton, dorothy perkins and topshop. what happened here was he asked lenders for £30 million so he could continue with his business, money was turned down and now there are questions over its survival. as you say, administrators could be sent in as early as monday. we understand arcadia is on the brink of collapse and that is putting around 13,000 people's jobs at risk. they have 500
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stores across the country, belonging to its brands, incredibly worrying times. we now the high street was struggling before the pandemic, the pandemic made the situation worse. we got a statement from arcadia a little while ago and it says we are aware of the recent speculation surrounding the future of arcadia. the forced closure of our stores for sustained periods as a result of the covid—19 pandemic has had a material impact on trading across our businesses. as a result the arcadia boards have been working on a number of contingency options. as i said, we know that money it had asked for was not given to it. all eyes will be on what happens over the next few hours to see if they will release another statement before the end of play today or whether next week will dictate what happens next. many thanks indeed.
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face—to—face brexit talks are due to restart this week. they were suspended after a colleague of michelle barney tested positive for coronovirus for both sides say they are still significant differences to be dissolved over borders, government and fishing. boris johnson said the uk would work hard to get a deal ahead of the end of the transition period. the likelihood of a deal is very much determined by our friends and partners in the eu. there is a deal that to be done if they want to do it. which would i think benefit people on both sides of the channel. but let's be absolutely clear, this country can prosper and will prosper mightily in either event. if we have to come out with a so—called australian style model, australian relationship with the eu will make a great success of it. look, i'm not
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going to comment on that. everybody is working very hard but clearly there are substantial and important differences still to be bridged. but we are getting on with it. we are getting more information on restrictions on the covid front in wales, will hear from restrictions on the covid front in wales, will hearfrom mark restrictions on the covid front in wales, will hear from mark drakeford who is speaking in cardiff cardiff in the next few minutes. what we are expecting about is new restrictions in the hospitality industry which will come into effect next friday. cinemas, bowling alleys and other indoor entertainment venues are expected to be closed. the sector has been working very hard to put measures in place to protect the public. that is according to the welsh office. more restrictions
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potentially ahead and for nonessential retail, hairdressers, gyms and leisure centres, they will continue to operate as now. these new arrangements will apply to the whole of wales. that information just coming in from one of our correspondence in wales, and we are due duty here in the next few minutes from mark drakeford, the first minister. you canjust minutes from mark drakeford, the first minister. you can just see some activity there at the podium. we will go to cardiff as soon as that begins. new restrictions expected to be announced, we will get those details very soon. the uk government has asked the medicines regulator, to start assessing the astrazeneca oxford university coronavirus vaccine, bringing the uk a step closer to a possible rollout. but some scientists have expressed concerns after the firm provided two sets of data. they say that the highest efficacy, 90% — shown after people were mistakenly given a low dose then backed up with a standard one, might not be a robust enough finding for permission to be granted for use.
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astrazeneca has acknowledged that further trial data might be needed. professor david salisbury, former director of immunisation at the department of health says further data is needed. we find ourselves and a very unusual position where we have got two sets of data from two different regimens of data from two different regimens of administration. one of them is a sort of fairly straightforward two equal doses, one is an unusual way of giving a small dose first followed by a larger dose, which i don't recall us doing before. this has come about because of the release into a clinical trial of, as it were, the wrong vaccine, and that is not a good place to have started from. we will go to mark drakeford's
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briefing in cardiff. a fall briefing in cardiff. afall in briefing in cardiff. a fall in cases after the 23rd of october, that was the result of the fire break period. you will see how in the last few days those figures have started to rise again. yesterday's 16 of have started to rise again. yesterday's16 of the 22 local authorities in wales recorded rises. in the seven day rolling case rate. the overall rate for wales is now 187 cases per 100,000 of the population, and it is arising. last week when i spoke it was 160 cases, and falling. thatjust shows us once again, how quickly the situation can change. with coronavirus. the bottom graph here shows the number of
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deaths each day from coronavirus. you can see how, in latejuly and august, we've managed to suppress daily deaths many days to zero. once the autumn began, that number began to rise and rise steeply again. we see a small fall as a result of the fire break period but the number continues to be at that high rates, and every one of those cases, every one of those figures come as we know, represents a family, and people who are grieving today. because of the coronavirus experience. behind those figures we are particularly concerned about the increases we are seeing in people under 25. every local authority other than one today saw a rise in the incidence rate amongst the under
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25—year—olds. over the course of this pandemic we have seen how the virus has spread, initially amongst younger age groups and then moving on to older and more vulnerable people. during the fire break and in the weeks immediately afterwards we saw the r numberfall the weeks immediately afterwards we saw the r number fall below one but latest calculations suggest it could be as high as 1.4 in wales today, further evidence that coronavirus is back circulating widely and quickly in our communities, the ground that we gain during the fire break period is being eroded. as the virus drives on normal human behaviour. we entered into the fire break in order to protect our nhs and hospitals. but the result of the recent days is that the hospital system in wales remains under sustained pressure.
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the next slide shows how the number of people with coronavirus in hospitals in wales has continued to grow week on week, the very top line, the grey line gives us the total number, and you can see how on the 23rd of september that number has steadily risen. it is made up of different components, the number of people with suspected coronavirus has been suppressed because of our testing regime. the yellow line is a number of people recovering from coronavirus, and that goes up because once somebody is so ill that they need a hospital bed with coronavirus, they stay in hospital forup to coronavirus, they stay in hospital for up to three weeks at a time. and in the top line, the orange line, pardon me, shows the impact of the fire break period, a stabilising the number of people with confirmed
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coronavirus. but not falling back in a way that would relieve pressure on our system. the latest figure that you see there shows that there are more than 1700 people with coronavirus in hospital in wales. at the end of september that was below 400. the rise of over 1000 people additionally in our hospitals putting enormous pressure on services and staff. yesterday i chaired a meeting of the social partnership councilfor chaired a meeting of the social partnership council for wales and we heard their first hand about the towel that coronavirus is taking on our colleagues in the national health service. we cannot claim freedoms for ourselves at the expense of their welfare and well—being. today our nhs goes on, providing care for thousands of
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people who need hospital care every day, including those with coronavirus, but i can only do this if we all act together to stem the flow of the virus and this is all the more important, of course, during the winter period when pressure is on the nhs are in any case the most intense of any part of the year. now, early this week i met with first minister from scotland and northern ireland and michael gove from the uk government to discuss a common set of arrangements for christmas. we agreed a five day period between december the 23rd and the 27th when travel restrictions would be lifted across the uk and up to three households would be able to form a christmas bubble. relaxing the restrictions will allow families to be together, may be for the first time this year. forjust a few days over the festive period. but there's a lwa ys over the festive period. but there's always the risk that when we come
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together we will spread or catch the virus. we therefore need to have as much headroom as possible as we approach the christmas period to enable that relaxation to take place. this week we have seen restrictions tightened and extended in many countries across the whole of europe. the uk government has announced a strengthened tiered system that comes into force in england from wednesday of next week and today northern ireland begins a new two—week lockdown period, in scotla nd new two—week lockdown period, in scotland has this week extended the highest level restrictions are there. we, too, now in wales need to use the coming weeks to reduce the spread of the virus and to create more headroom for the christmas period. that doesn't mean a return to fire break arrangements. but the cabinet has agreed to take further
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specific and targeted action to reinforce the current national measures that we have in place. we will focus on those places where we meet and where coronavirus drives. drawing on the recent evidence from sage about those interventions that have the greatest impact on the virus. any additional actions that we ta ke virus. any additional actions that we take will build on that for us advice but will be designed to meet the unique circumstances that we face here in our country. cinemas, bowling alleys and other indoor entertainment venues will now close. there will be new restrictions in the hospitality industry which will come into effect on friday of next week. i know just come into effect on friday of next week. i knowjust how hard the sector has worked to put measures in place to protect the public. and i
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know that this will be a worrying time for all those working in the industry. that is why over this weekend we will be working with partners to finalise the details of the new arrangements, and to put in place a further major package of financial support to respond to the challenges and changes faced in that industry. and i will be here again on monday to give further details of that whole package. just to be clear, nonessential retail, hairdressers, gyms, leisure centres and so on will continue to operate as now. the new arrangements will apply to the whole of wales. that is necessary because we need a further national effort to bring down the rates in those parts of the country where they are high and protect those areas from getting any worse, where we have sustained the advantages of the fire for longer. a
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national approach can continue to protect us all. none of us want to see further restrictions in our daily lives are in our economy. but we are facing a virus that is both cruel and relentless. especially in its pursuit of the most vulnerable. it is speeding up as we move further into winter and it thrives in all those places where we come into close contact with one another. by adding to the actions we are taking now, we can prepare responsibly for christmas. once again, i want to say thank you to everyone for all that has been done already. throughout this long and difficult year. as we move into 2021, we know there is some hope on the horizon, with promising research results now in a
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number of potential vaccines. together we are keeping wales safe. i'll take questions now as usual but as usual as well... studio: mark drakeford, first minister of wales announcing further restrictions in wales. he said cinemas, bowling alleys and other indoor entertainment will close, that will begin pretty much straightaway. there will be new restrictions and hospitality industry which will come into effect next friday. in one week's time. nonessential retail, hairdressers, gyms and leisure centres will continue to operate as now, the arrangements applying to the whole of wales, mark drakeford saying he wa nted of wales, mark drakeford saying he wanted to repair wales for the christmas period but he said that the virus spread was speeding up at the virus spread was speeding up at the moment. there have been eight firebreak but he thought the r number in wales could be as high as
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1.4 at the moment. of course, they are keen to keep numbers down i had of the christmas opening. he spoke a bit about the opportunity for families to meet, in conjunction with discussions across the uk nations. but of course they are announcing further restrictions on the advice of sage scientists, he said, to restrict movements in wales in the next few days. more of course online with all the latest updates there. some good news on another front, medically speaking. a blood test designed to detect more than 50 types of cancer at an early stage, is to be trialled by the nhs in england. more than 165,000 patients will be offered the tests from next year — officials say early detection has the potential to save many lives. jim reed reports. checks for many types of cancer currently mean this, an mri or ct scan, to look for a tumour and then a biopsy. often, though, that can mean treatment is left late. some diseases like pancreatic
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and ovarian cancer are typically diagnosed at stage three or four, when the disease may have spread, and options are limited. les maiden was 62 when she fell ill. it took almost a year to diagnose pancreatic cancer. she lost her life just months later. it's too late for my sister, but it's not too late for others. and i passionately believe that early diagnosis will make a difference. the nhs is now planning to try out a new test in england. developed by the californian firm grail, it's designed to detect molecular changes in the blood caused by 50 types of cancer in people with no obvious symptoms. 165,000 participants aged between 50 and 79 will be asked to pilot the tests over the next three years. we want to be one of the first health services in the world to see whether this simple blood test can detect those cancers when treatment
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will make the biggest difference. but critics of the plan say the technology is unproven and there are real questions about the accuracy of blood tests for cancer. the nhs says if the pilot is successful, the scheme could be expanded to another1 million people in england from 2024. 02:31:14,525 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 jim reed, bbc news.
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