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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 3, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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the un says thirty eight people have been killed in myanmar — in the worst day of violence since protests began against the military coup. witnesses say soldiers fired on protesters without warning. a decision by the states of texas and mississipi to drop mask—wearing requirements has been described as "neanderthal thinking" by president biden. he warned that relaxing rules prematurely would put us advances in the battle against covid—19 at risk. britain's finance minister has laid out a series of covid relief measures, whch will take the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 1960s. they include a big rise in corporation tax, from 2023. buckingham palace says it's concerned by allegations that meghan, the duchess of sussex bullied staff when she was living in britain.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejenny kleeman from times radio and the ft�*s whitehall editor sebastian payne. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... starting with the ft and the first of many images of the chancellor with his red briefcase. it says the two year bill for covid will exceed four hundred billion pounds. the metro goes with an aerial shot of mr sunak — saying he's gambling 65 billion on there being a quick recovery from the crisis. there he is again on the guardian — which says the strategy is to spend now and pay later. mrsunak is joined by his team in number 11 on the times — which says taxes are being raised
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taxes to the highest level since the sixties. the telegraph crunches the numbers on the red box describing the budget as a five year tax grab. the express headline sets an optimistic tone — but does go on to say that millions will be hit with the higher taxes. the mail shows mr sunak masking up — but leads on the queen ordering an inquiry into those bullying claims against meghan markle. and the scottland edition of the paper also avoids leading on the budget. it covers nicola sturgeon�*s admission that mistakes were made in the handling of complaints against alex salmond. so let's begin... lots of papers is always discussing the budget but various different takes on it. will start with the times because they've got, first times because they've got, first time i seen this picture. quite an interesting image. it's a mock—up i'm assuming. it's real. sorry, i
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haven't got the hard copies on looking at a digital image. you know what, that's why we all need to buy a paper. because you all need the real thing. the highest tax levels for 50 years according to the times. i think this looks like a sort of escher drawing. it was circulating on social media today. the times focusing on the fact that down the line where all going to be paying for this incredible span that is happening in the short term to get us over the coronavirus emergency us over the coronavirus emergency measures. us over the coronavirus emergency measures. that rishi sunak is taking. it is quite extraordinary to hear today that you have a conservative chancellor boasting about how much he spent and talking about how much he spent and talking about raising corporation tax was up of course none of this was unexpected. so much of what was in the budget was leaked or preparing everybody for what we were going to be hearing from the chancellor
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today. be hearing from the chancellor toda . ,., ., ., be hearing from the chancellor toda. ., ., , ., be hearing from the chancellor toda. ., ., , ., ~ today. the son of a similar take. a similar line — today. the son of a similar take. a similar line slightly _ today. the son of a similar take. a similar line slightly opposite - today. the son of a similar take. a similar line slightly opposite take. | similar line slightly opposite take. only way is out. sebastian, i'll let you take this away. i only way is out. sebastian, i'll let you take this away.— only way is out. sebastian, i'll let you take this away. i think the sun is really trying _ you take this away. i think the sun is really trying to _ you take this away. i think the sun is really trying to get _ you take this away. i think the sun is really trying to get to _ you take this away. i think the sun is really trying to get to the - you take this away. i think the sun is really trying to get to the point l is really trying to get to the point that rishi — is really trying to get to the point that rishi sunak has make a huge amount_ that rishi sunak has make a huge amount of— that rishi sunak has make a huge amount of money to try to boost the economy— amount of money to try to boost the economy in— amount of money to try to boost the economy in the medium term. this whole _ economy in the medium term. this whole thing — economy in the medium term. this whole thing has to be seen in the context_ whole thing has to be seen in the context of— whole thing has to be seen in the context of the coronavirus. this was mr sunak— context of the coronavirus. this was mr sunak proper covid budget although he is given six many budgets — although he is given six many budgets since last year to deal. i think we've lost you sebastian. while we try and work out what's going on with sebastian's line bring us up to date. same point of view in a slightly different way from the sun. ~ , ,., y a slightly different way from the sun. ~ , ,., , ~ a slightly different way from the sun. ~ , ,., , . ., a slightly different way from the sun. �* , ~ ., ., a slightly different way from the sun. , ~ ., .,, sun. absolutely. were going to be su orted sun. absolutely. were going to be suaported but _ sun. absolutely. were going to be supported but one _ sun. absolutely. were going to be supported but one day _ sun. absolutely. were going to be
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supported but one day we - sun. absolutely. were going to be supported but one day we have i sun. absolutely. were going to be supported but one day we have to | sun. absolutely. were going to be - supported but one day we have to pay for it. this is a gamble. a gamble on us recovering, the independent office for budget responsibility says that we are going to be making a swifter recovery than initially expected. there believe that we should be back by the middle of next year and unemployment levels will be as bad as first feared. we need to recover in order for enough of us to be paying the taxes. it's quite clever, all of this. rishi sunak has managed to not break any manifesto promises. obviously the conservative manifesto written before anybody had any idea that there was going to be any idea that there was going to be a pandemic. in that manifesto they promised thing i promise not to raise income taxes will top they've not raise income taxes but they've done something clever by freezing the tax threshold for them in real terms would mean that more than a million people will be paying tax by the end of the parliament. and more than a million people will be in a higher tax bracket by the end of
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parliament was very, he used the word on his six times. he wants to make it clear that this wasn't a stealth tax rise he was leveling with people, this was very much part of his presentation that he was being honest. one might say if you have to remind people that you're being honest six times maybe your ears should print out. he's found a way of raising revenue without explicitly raising income taxes. that leads us very nicely onto the ft. we've got the sketch there swishy richie sweeps in with goodies as he outdoes his boss on honesty. the paper also going through those finer details of what we were hearing earlier on today. indeed. to ick u- on hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what _ hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what i — hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what i was _ hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what i was at _ hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what i was at an - hearing earlier on today. indeed. to pick up on what i was at an earlier, | pick up on what i was at an earlier, it is the _ pick up on what i was at an earlier, it is the most— pick up on what i was at an earlier, it is the most extraordinary budget for a conservative chancellor to give _ for a conservative chancellor to give it — for a conservative chancellor to give. it was full of big spending
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promises. _ give. it was full of big spending promises, text sizes down the tracks and its— promises, text sizes down the tracks and it's no— promises, text sizes down the tracks and it's no surprise the two historic— and it's no surprise the two historic comparisons being made tonight— historic comparisons being made tonight one is 1970 for, that was the last— tonight one is 1970 for, that was the last budget to raise corporate tax and _ the last budget to raise corporate tax and second is the late 19605 which _ tax and second is the late 19605 which was — tax and second is the late 19605 which was the last time britain had tax burden— which was the last time britain had tax burden of 35% gdp. i think really— tax burden of 35% gdp. i think really this— tax burden of 35% gdp. i think really this showsjust tax burden of 35% gdp. i think really this shows just how much coronavirus has scarred the uk's economy— coronavirus has scarred the uk's economy and dented the public finance — economy and dented the public finance was up this is not the budget— finance was up this is not the budget rishi sunak would want to give _ budget rishi sunak would want to give he — budget rishi sunak would want to give he is — budget rishi sunak would want to give. he is by heart a right wing conservative who would like to be cutting _ conservative who would like to be cutting taxes and making more business — cutting taxes and making more business friendly environment. that's— business friendly environment. that's not— business friendly environment. that's not what he's been able to do here _ that's not what he's been able to do here as _ that's not what he's been able to do here as you — that's not what he's been able to do here. as you always get the budgets as we _ here. as you always get the budgets as we have _ here. as you always get the budgets as we have on the sketch on our front— as we have on the sketch on our front page — as we have on the sketch on our front page tomorrow, there's a lot of smoke — front page tomorrow, there's a lot of smoke and mirrors about how you disguise _ of smoke and mirrors about how you disguise things. but the main thing here is— disguise things. but the main thing here is that there are some big tax rises _ here is that there are some big tax rises coming down the tracks to pay for the _ rises coming down the tracks to pay for the fact— rises coming down the tracks to pay for the fact that mr sunak is going to spend — for the fact that mr sunak is going to spend £65 billion over the net
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two years— to spend £65 billion over the net two years supporting jobs, investments, recovery from covert and that _ investments, recovery from covert and that brings it well over £350 billioh— and that brings it well over £350 billion spent dealing with the pandemic so far. he said several times— pandemic so far. he said several times in— pandemic so far. he said several times in the comment these are the biggest _ times in the comment these are the biggest figures out in uk history outside — biggest figures out in uk history outside of the first and second world — outside of the first and second world war. these really are unprecedented times both politically and economically. mr sunak dealt with it _ and economically. mr sunak dealt with it pretty deftly in the house of commons. there is this question that once _ of commons. there is this question that once we — of commons. there is this question that once we get past this year and next year— that once we get past this year and next year the most immediate effects of the _ next year the most immediate effects of the crisis, what comes next? because — of the crisis, what comes next? because they are big questions about the future _ because they are big questions about the future of the uk's economy, how you encourage business and what that looks like _ you encourage business and what that looks like post bragg said. let�*s looks like post bragg said. let's have a look _ looks like post bragg said. let's have a look at _ looks like post bragg said. let's have a look at the _ looks like post bragg said. let's have a look at the sketch - looks like post bragg said. let's have a look at the sketch in - looks like post bragg said. let�*s have a look at the sketch in a bit more detail. it facetiously picks out that rishi sunak has these handy slogans, according to manson he says last year was eat out to help out and now this time round it's the
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handy slogan is helped to grow. yes he likes his — handy slogan is helped to grow. is; he likes his slogans and this is another three world slogan. our government loves a three word slogan. he also says all the time i'm going to level with you, he has his catchphrases. but it's this idea that we need to do what we can to prime the economy now and the taxpayers are going to pay for it in future. these super deductions announced today, this is a very expensive initiative but it's a way of encouraging businesses to invest now. to not put off investment to the future. just to try and get the economy back on its feet as quickly as possible. so tax revenues can be raised in the future.— raised in the future. let's have a look at the _ raised in the future. let's have a look at the york _ raised in the future. let's have a look at the york shire _ raised in the future. let's have a look at the york shire post - raised in the future. let's have a | look at the york shire post which raised in the future. let's have a i look at the york shire post which is focusing in on more of the detail. it's looking at free ports and these town funds which i'm quite keen to talk to you about because you've
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been looking into areas of england that have moved away from the labour party and with this town funds scenario. just explain to us what the allegation, the current is that allegations rishi sunak has been doing and concentrating support and conservative voting areas. this doing and concentrating support and conservative voting areas.— conservative voting areas. this is all art of conservative voting areas. this is all part of the — conservative voting areas. this is all part of the johnson _ conservative voting areas. this is i all part of the johnson government leveling _ all part of the johnson government leveling up programming to address regional— leveling up programming to address regional inequality and this is a programme designed to look at those places— programme designed to look at those places that feel left behind, use the phrase with the parts of england, those towns that have suffered — england, those towns that have suffered from deindustrialization. they heavily backed brexit in 2016 and many— they heavily backed brexit in 2016 and many voted conservative the first time — and many voted conservative the first time in 2019. and pay back that day— first time in 2019. and pay back that day at boris johnson, first time in 2019. and pay back that day at borisjohnson, rishi suhak_ that day at borisjohnson, rishi sunak obviously looking at what they can do _ sunak obviously looking at what they can do to _ sunak obviously looking at what they can do to improve those places. these _ can do to improve those places. these are — can do to improve those places. these are a _ can do to improve those places. these are a couple of examples of
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this in_ these are a couple of examples of this in the — these are a couple of examples of this in the budget. first is treachery north. the treasury which is the _ treachery north. the treasury which is the economic decision—making body is the economic decision—making body is the _ is the economic decision—making body is the most _ is the economic decision—making body is the most laundered centred, that's— is the most laundered centred, that's going to be set up eight major— that's going to be set up eight major second headquarters in darlington, in the northeast of england — darlington, in the northeast of england. that will eventually house 750.000 _ england. that will eventually house 750,000 officials from different departments. that idea is to diversify— departments. that idea is to diversify opinion making and breaking with people in the johnson government see is an overly metropolitan mindset. the second thing _ metropolitan mindset. the second thing is _ metropolitan mindset. the second thing is free ports. eight have been announced — thing is free ports. eight have been announced. these are special economic— announced. these are special economic zones which allow for lower taxes. _ economic zones which allow for lower taxes, looser regulations, special fuhdihd — taxes, looser regulations, special funding. the idea is to encourage infrastructure and places from the east midlands to teesside. they're going _ east midlands to teesside. they're going to _ east midlands to teesside. they're going to be getting free ports. critics— going to be getting free ports. critics say they don't actually at generate — critics say they don't actually at generate new economic wealth that you shunted from one place to another~ — you shunted from one place to another. in the uk has had free ports— another. in the uk has had free ports restore delete that before but they were _ ports restore delete that before but they were shot down in 2012 after concerns — they were shot down in 2012 after concerns of tax evasion. the town fun, _ concerns of tax evasion. the town fun, you _ concerns of tax evasion. the town fun, you name it found thatjohnson
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started _ fun, you name it found thatjohnson started the — fun, you name it found thatjohnson started. the leveling out fun, the leveling _ started. the leveling out fun, the leveling up funk, at the town fund they are _ leveling up funk, at the town fund they are all pots of money to try and improve those areas. the towns found _ and improve those areas. the towns found has— and improve those areas. the towns found has made its first allocation in the _ found has made its first allocation in the budget. not coincidently, an awful— in the budget. not coincidently, an awful lot _ in the budget. not coincidently, an awful lot of those places, i think 40/44 — awful lot of those places, i think 40/44 are — awful lot of those places, i think 40/44 are all conservative voting areas _ 40/44 are all conservative voting areas. critics will say this is pork barrel— areas. critics will say this is pork barrel politics. and this is rishi sunak— barrel politics. and this is rishi sunak pushing cash towards tory voting _ sunak pushing cash towards tory voting areas. you can also look at the electoral arithmetic and say the people _ the electoral arithmetic and say the people that voted jory in 2019 voted because _ people that voted jory in 2019 voted because they were promised leveling up because they were promised leveling up and _ because they were promised leveling up and these are poorer places. that's— up and these are poorer places. that's how— up and these are poorer places. that's how the tory voting coalitions change. it's much more working _ coalitions change. it's much more working class. in fact this is exactly. _ working class. in fact this is exactly, rishi sunak is doing what was promised here. this allegation of pork— was promised here. this allegation of pork barrel and will probably stick— of pork barrel and will probably stick for— of pork barrel and will probably stick for a _ of pork barrel and will probably stick for a little while to come. jenny— stick for a little while to come. jenny let's— stick for a little while to come. jenny let's get your feedback on what sebastian was saying when it comes to this specifically when we are looking at the york shire post. i find the phrase
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are looking at the york shire post. ifind the phrase pork are looking at the york shire post. i find the phrase pork barreling very funny for that i don't quite get it. this idea that they have this conservative party was somehow rewarding those seats with particular kind of favor. you have to look at what, if you were keir starmer and you're going to criticise this budget what you would be able to criticise on his opposite difficult one because it's not a typical conservative budget at all. of course the raise in corporation tax, we knew that was coming. but the chance aren't managed to fend off criticism by saying that it wasn't going to be for several years. keir starmer is criticism is now it is not the time to raise corporation tax. which is kinda crazy when you got a labour party leader saying that and a conservative chancellor hoarding tax rises. what is he doing for the redwall, what is he doing for the nhs, what is he doing for this green revolution? should we not be using,
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this is an opportunity to rebuild in a different way. yes rishi sunak has managed to fend off criticism, he's been ignoring those redwall seats but this package of measures. when it comes to other things like the care system, the nhs and of course green measures, there wasn't any mention at all. no mention of brexit which is amazing given that we are supposed to be making our country attractive to corporations. this rise in corporation tax is going to make as the ft says, going to give us a high rate of tax on the other advanced economy. how are we meant to be encouraging all this international business to come to our shores now that we can if we are raising corporation tax? ida our shores now that we can if we are raising corporation tax?— raising corporation tax? no direct mention, raising corporation tax? no direct mention. we _ raising corporation tax? no direct mention, we talk— raising corporation tax? no direct mention, we talk about _ raising corporation tax? no direct mention, we talk about the - raising corporation tax? no direct mention, we talk about the free | mention, we talk about the free ports but no direct mention when it comes to brexit.— ports but no direct mention when it comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up. — comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up. l _ comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up, i thought _ comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up, i thought the _ comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up, i thought the term - comes to brexit. your thoughts. just to come up, i thought the term pork| to come up, i thought the term pork barreling _ to come up, i thought the term pork barreling actually comes from america _ barreling actually comes from america. in congress the ward pork is not _
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america. in congress the ward pork is not referred to as meat to general— is not referred to as meat to general substance of issues. that gives— general substance of issues. that gives the — general substance of issues. that gives the idea that you're shoving it all in— gives the idea that you're shoving it all in a — gives the idea that you're shoving it all in a barrel and kicking it toward — it all in a barrel and kicking it toward your constituents. on a separate — toward your constituents. on a separate point, i do think this is eventually— separate point, i do think this is eventually about brexit because keir starmer _ eventually about brexit because keir starmer did mention it. this is a really— starmer did mention it. this is a really tough budget for keir starmer and you _ really tough budget for keir starmer and you heard him trying to respond to this _ and you heard him trying to respond to this saying when we take all of our maths — to this saying when we take all of our maths down rishi sunak mask will fall down _ our maths down rishi sunak mask will fall down. then will see the real chancellor. maybe rishi sunak will revert— chancellor. maybe rishi sunak will revert to _ chancellor. maybe rishi sunak will revert to right—wing type at that point _ revert to right—wing type at that point but — revert to right—wing type at that point. but he doesn't that's a real problem — point. but he doesn't that's a real problem for labour because he's spending — problem for labour because he's spending money and raising taxes. those _ spending money and raising taxes. those are — spending money and raising taxes. those are all left—wing things to do. those are all left—wing things to do the — those are all left—wing things to do. the problem politically is it pushes — do. the problem politically is it pushes labour evermore left words. you can't _ pushes labour evermore left words. you can't see how that's going to be a good _ you can't see how that's going to be a good strategy. with regards to brexit. _ a good strategy. with regards to brexit, free ports where the most notable _ brexit, free ports where the most notable mention of brexit within the budget— notable mention of brexit within the budget because this is mr sunak policy— budget because this is mr sunak policy that we could take advantage with after— policy that we could take advantage with after leaving the eu. you are actually _ with after leaving the eu. you are actually allowed to have free ports
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without _ actually allowed to have free ports without actually being in the eu but it depends on what defines them, what _ it depends on what defines them, what rules— it depends on what defines them, what rules they have and we don't know _ what rules they have and we don't know the — what rules they have and we don't know the details on that. that will come _ know the details on that. that will come the — know the details on that. that will come the track. but i think it is remarkable that all of the economic impact _ remarkable that all of the economic impact from you leaving the eu will be dwarfed by coronavirus and for proponents of brexit you could say is quite _ proponents of brexit you could say is quite a — proponents of brexit you could say is quite a lucky thing because you'll— is quite a lucky thing because you'll never be able to pinpoint exactly — you'll never be able to pinpoint exactly what was brexit and what coronavirus was up i think opponents of brexit— coronavirus was up i think opponents of brexit find that very frustrating. it's interesting that neither— frustrating. it's interesting that neither side skipped over it because covid _ neither side skipped over it because covid has _ neither side skipped over it because covid hasjust dwarfed everything. as the _ covid hasjust dwarfed everything. as the chancellor himself said when he was compared with other cheek chancellors he's saying none i have had a pandemic to deal with. he's got a point. thank you for the pork barreling explanation. we've all learned from that. final couple of papers daily mail has also rishi sunak mask tax rate but the focus is what is happening with the royal family and what the paper is
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describing is an unprecedented inquiry into allegations of bullying by the duchess of sussex. tram inquiry into allegations of bullying by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about — by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about this. _ by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about this. one _ by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about this. one is _ by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about this. one is i _ by the duchess of sussex. two things are say about this. one is i think - are say about this. one is i think the leaks from the palace which of course are, they coincide intentionally, we don't know if i was cynical i would say they are deliberate. they coincide with the coming appearance of harry and meghan with an interview with oprah winfrey. going to be shown on british tv on monday it's being shown on the us in a matter of days. the timing of this is very suspect stop there been a lot of leaks about allegations of meghan bullying her staff. there's also been very strange things like today about meghan wearing some unethical earrings that have been given to her as a wedding present by mohammed bin solomont which of course has been connected with jamal khashoggi. lots of little league which i think are perhaps beneath the palace to be trying to tarnish harry and meghan
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just before this very big interview. the other thing i would say, it's ironic that this is about allegations of bullying. when you think about harry, harry gave an interview with james gordon of the late, late show trailed over the weekend. with excruciating rapping where he was wrapping from the fresh prince of bel air. beside that he was talking about he felt he had been bullied by the british press. and the part of the reason why they were in america is because of the bullying system he says racist bullying system he says racist bullying that his endured. it is ironic that bullying allegations are being used at the moment as mod to throw at the couple during a very sensitive time.— throw at the couple during a very sensitive time. indeed a sensitive time. we sensitive time. indeed a sensitive time- we will— sensitive time. indeed a sensitive time. we will await _ sensitive time. indeed a sensitive time. we will await that - sensitive time. indeed a sensitive time. we will await that interviewj time. we will await that interview with oprah winfrey as well. final paper is the scotsman for top this one is we've got rishi sunak at the bottom but of course the lead is
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nicola sturgeon with the first minister insisting she had no reason to want to get salmond. this is the inquiry into her governments unlawful handling of harassment complaints of her predecessor. had some really intense testimony being given by nicola sturgeon today. indeed it really was a marathon session— indeed it really was a marathon session photo i arrived at work and nicola _ session photo i arrived at work and nicola sturgeon was speaking by the time i_ nicola sturgeon was speaking by the time i left _ nicola sturgeon was speaking by the time i left the office at night she was still— time i left the office at night she was still speaking as well. it was almost _ was still speaking as well. it was almost a — was still speaking as well. it was almost a nine hour hearing session. it's almost a nine hour hearing session. it's hard _ almost a nine hour hearing session. it's hard to— almost a nine hour hearing session. it's hard to think of any other politician _ it's hard to think of any other politician who'd be able to go that hole _ politician who'd be able to go that hole to _ politician who'd be able to go that hole. to answer questions. she obviously— hole. to answer questions. she obviously got a bit rattled at some point _ obviously got a bit rattled at some point but — obviously got a bit rattled at some point but generally kept on top of that _ point but generally kept on top of that this— point but generally kept on top of that. this whole row is also very much _ that. this whole row is also very much going _ that. this whole row is also very much going into the weeds and our foursome _ much going into the weeds and our foursome who said what and what legal _ foursome who said what and what legal advice was given at what particular time here. legal advice was given at what particulartime here. it strikes legal advice was given at what particular time here. it strikes me that there — particular time here. it strikes me that there is actually no real smoking _ that there is actually no real smoking gun here. having picked up on the _ smoking gun here. having picked up on the highlights of what mr orton
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said today, i thought she defended herself— said today, i thought she defended herself pretty ably belief was that she is— herself pretty ably belief was that she is very on top of the detail. she spoke _ she is very on top of the detail. she spoke more in sadness than about alec salmond. he said he shouldn't -et alec salmond. he said he shouldn't get away— alec salmond. he said he shouldn't get away with it she said he hasn't shown— get away with it she said he hasn't shown any— get away with it she said he hasn't shown any contrition for his acts in the past _ shown any contrition for his acts in the past there wasn't some explanations don't quite tally for top l'm _ explanations don't quite tally for top i'm sure will be picked up in the future — top i'm sure will be picked up in the future by scottish parliamentarians here. having my view is _ parliamentarians here. having my view is that— parliamentarians here. having my view is that i don't think ms. sturgeon _ view is that i don't think ms. sturgeon will be resigning over this _ sturgeon will be resigning over this the — sturgeon will be resigning over this. the biggest change of her is that this — this. the biggest change of her is that this whole row and the split between — that this whole row and the split between salmond and sturgeon will actually— between salmond and sturgeon will actually damage the smp and the polls _ actually damage the smp and the polls. when it comes to may scottish parliament _ polls. when it comes to may scottish parliament election they might not -et parliament election they might not get a _ parliament election they might not get a majority. at that point you can see — get a majority. at that point you can see there being a lot of anger from _ can see there being a lot of anger from activists and you lost our best opportunity to get scottish independence. that could actually be more damaging for her. this is going to keep _ more damaging for her. this is going to keep continuing for some time. it doesn't _ to keep continuing for some time. it doesn't quite pass the headline test yet. doesn't quite pass the headline test yet i_ doesn't quite pass the headline test yet. i cannot tell you in one
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sentence _ yet. i cannot tell you in one sentence who has done what wrong here _ sentence who has done what wrong here it's _ sentence who has done what wrong here. it's reallyjust become a war of attrition — here. it's reallyjust become a war of attrition between the two cabinets who dominate scottish politics — cabinets who dominate scottish politics for the past 15 years. in the meantime if you point out politics for the past 15 years. ii the meantime if you point out we've got the elections coming up in the next few months. for the time being thank you so much. especially going through with a budget and pork barreling will, it's now my ambition to get that into conversation. have a very good and enjoyable rest of the evening. as always our thanks to you as well for joining us here on this addition of the papers. good evening, i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. we start in scotland where rangers are four points away from winning the title after a late win over livingston. manager steven gerrard, on the brink of his first league title,
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was sent off at half time for comments he made to the referee who'd booked alfredo morelos earlier. and it was morelos who came up with the winner three minutes from the end, a 1—0 win that moves them 18 points clear of celtic again. elsewhere, stjohnstone got an equaliser three minutes from the end to stop hamilton getting a win that would have moved them off the bottom of the table, it finished one all. second placed manchester united have dropped more points in the premier league tonight, to give hope to the sides chasing champions league football next season they drew 0—0 with crystal palace at a very foggy selhust park. patrick van aanholt almost won in it for palace late on. united are 14 points behind the league leaders manchester city. leicester city stay third behind united after a1 all draw at burnley. the home side were in front early thanks to matej veedra, but leicester, who have a number
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of key players missing, found an equaliser half an hour later thanks to kelechi iheanacho — both sides hit the post in the second half but couldn't find a winner. too many times, they weren't precise enough with their passing, so that's something that needs to become better. but from a physical perspective, we gave everything in the game, played lots of games, quick turnaround from the weekend against a team that will always test you physically, so i was pleased with that aspect. i thought the second half, once we got going, we looked like a team that could go and win the game. so, yeah, but that's ok, it's a point, and we move on. aston villa's top four hopes took a hit tonight as they were beaten by the bottom side sheffield united. david mcgoldrick with the goal on the half hour mark. philjagielka was sent off with over half an hour to play but chris wilder's side held on for a rare win, they are still 12 points from safety. a big game between the top two in the championship tonight, the leaders norwich are ten points clear after beating brentford 1—0.
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emi buendia with the goal for the canaries, elsewhere third placed watford were 2—nil winners over wycombe. swansea got a 96th minute winner from the penalty spot at stoke. manchester city are in control of their last 16 women's champions league tie, after a commanding win over fiorentina. city are unbeaten in 11 matches in all competitions and it didn't take them long to get on the scoresheet. lauren hemp with the opener in just the second minute of the game that was closely followed by a goal from ellen white with a great finish past the keeper, and city further increased their chances of reaching the quarter finals with a third late on — sam mewis heading home. the second leg is in florence next thursday. it was a good night for chelsea in their first leg too. they beat atletico madrid 2 nil at kingsmeadow. fran kirby with chelsea's second goal.
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andy murray has been beaten in straight sets by fourth seed andrey roublev at the rotterdam open. murray lost on his atp tour comeback in montpellier last week, and his frustration was evident tonight as roublev won the first set 7—5. murray never recovered and lost the second set 6—2. he's now ranked 123rd after returning from that serious hip injury. the fourth and final test between india and england starts on thursday in ahmedabad. the third match ended in just under two days. much of the talk during the series has been about the pitches in india — something both captains are keen to play down. when the ball seems on a particular pitch, and they get batted out 40 — 50—60, they never talk about the pitch, they talk about that batting. what space are we talking from, and what is the idea behind continuing this narrative and what purpose it
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serves people who keep continuing this conversation, which is quite one—sided. we know that the likelihood is it is going to spin and it will spin relatively early on in the game. and we should not be scared of that. the most important thing if we go in there with confidence, especially as a batting group, we go in there and we are very clear about how we want to play and we play with our bat and we trust our defence and we will be clear when we get opportunities to score and take them and we are not scared to put bowlers under pressure and make it difficult for the same batters. and rotate the strikers as well as we can. thats when we are at our best. —— when we do that, that's when we are our best. meanwhile, england's women have taken a 1—0 lead in their three match t20 series against new zealand in wellington.
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nat sciver starred with bat and ball. she was one of four bowlers who took two wickets as new zealand were restricted to 96 all—out she then hit an unbeaten 26 to guide her side to their target with four overs to spare. danni wyatt top scored with 33. a massive win, really tough wicket. we found it tough. yeah, really delighted with the win. the bowlers bowled exceptionally well, took we talk about starting well and we did that today. the bowlers bowled exceptionally well, took wickets and that was a massive ticket. wickets, it was a massive tick. so, yeah, it was really nice to get out there and placed our first t—20. and that's all the sport for now. more on the bbc sports website. but for me and the team, good night. hello missed out they are at the moment not quite as much fog around showers can find more to the southeast and east anglia. though should clear away on thursday morning. could be a bit of snow over the highest ground. that line of rain and drizzle will head into northern england. macy's guys quite
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grey and cloudy but generally dry temperatures will be around six to 8 degrees. the winds picking up upa bit up a bit through the day north easterly breeze pushing that line of light rain or drizzle to the evening and then later on we should start to see the cloud beginning to thin and break up. sunshine at times on friday, we'll tend to find the cloud tending to build and spread out a bit more through the day. that's not going to help the temperatures, of course. and again, those temperatures will be around 6—8 celsius. winds will be lighter but still the same chilly air that was sitting in so those temperatures will be around six or 7 c.
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this is bbc news. i'm kasia madera with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the violence escalates in myanmar — 38 people have been killed on wednesday, the united nations calls it "shocking". president biden warns against ditching coronavirus guidelines — including mask—wearing — as some states lift their restrictions... the last thing we need is neanderthal thinking that in the meantime, "everything's fine, take "off your mask, forget it." it still matters. counting the cost of the pandemic, a series of measures that will take the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 1960s. and, buckingham palace says it'll investigate claims that the duchess of sussex bullied some members of her staff.

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