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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 5, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. plans to give nhs staff in england a 1% pay rise are dismissed by unions as a �*kick in the teeth�* — but ministers defend the proposal. our priority�*s had to be protecting people's jobs and livelihoods. because without those jobs and without those businesses continuing and people's employment continuing, we need that vibrant economy in order to fund the nhs. do you think nhs staff should be getting a 1% pay rise or is it not affordable? do let get in touch, you can tweet me @annitamcveigh or use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. confidence in the coronavirus vaccines is increasing across the world, according to a new report. the bbc finds people with asthma who are eligible for a coronavirus
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vaccine are being refused it by some gps who are not following government guidance. the premier league and english football leagure are urged to do more to tackle racist abuse from fans. and quarantine—free holidays in cyprus from may for british holiday—makers — if they've been vaccinated. good morning. welcome to bbc news. there's been a furious reaction to the government's proposed 1% pay rise for nhs staff in england. health unions have called the proposal a "kick in the teeth" for staff who have worked throughout the pandemic. a 1% pay rise would be below the rate of inflation forecast in the budget for next year —
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amounting to a cut in real terms. it would apply to all staff apart from junior doctors, gps and dentists. other public sector workers earning more than £24,000 a year have had their pay frozen. nhs pay is devolved, so there will be separate pay agreements for scotland, wales and northern ireland. the royal college of nursing says the pay rise in england would amount to just £3.50 a week extra in the take home pay of an experienced nurse, and called it "bitterly disappointing." and the labour leader sir keir starmer has called on the government to give what he calls the nhs's "covid heroes" a bigger pay rise. but ministers have defended the proposals, saying the covid pandemic had placed a "huge strain" on nhs finances, while the economic outlook "remains uncertain". we will be talking about this over the next few minutes. first this report
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from charlotte wright. it has been a relentless year for those working in the nhs, battling a health emergency like no other. so tough that, for ten weeks at the start of the pandemic, the public took to their doorsteps to show their appreciation for those on the front line. applause now the government has recommended a pay rise of 1% for nhs staff in england next year, which some have described as "a kick in the teeth." it's been a really difficult time. i know nurses that have been suffering with ptsd, i know people that have moved out of their homes and not seen families to protect their families from covid, nurses, and i honestly believe this is the final straw. the figure�*s been submitted by the department of health to an independent pay review body. it says anything higher would require re—prioritisation of funds. last night, the business secretary highlighted the difficulties currently facing all parts of the economy.
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nobody is doubting that the nhs has been absolutely first class in this whole pandemic. what i am suggesting is that the whole economy has been under huge pressure. when i look to people in the hospitality sector, aviation, retail, many of them are very worried that they won't even be in a job. trade unions have contrasted the chancellor's response with scotland and wales, where health workers received bonuses last year, but the government says more than a million nhs staff continue to benefit from deals which have delivered a pay rise of more than 12% for newly—qualified nurses, and will increase junior doctors' pay scales by 8.2%. it says while pay rises in other public sectorjobs are paused, in the nhs they are not, but some believe the proposal would actually leave them worse off. we don't come into the nhs, we didn't come into this job, i'm not a nurse for the money, but i am working harder than i ever have before, so just something that was in line with inflation, i'd be happy with.
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trade unions have also made submissions to the pay review body, which will make a recommendation in may. the government will then decide whether or not to accept it. charlotte wright, bbc news. we can speak now to our political correspondent, iain watson. good morning. undoubtedly this is a tough sell for the government, this proposed 1% pay rise. what has reaction been so far? mat proposed 1% pay rise. what has reaction been so far? not exactly ositive, reaction been so far? not exactly positive. i _ reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have _ reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have to _ reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have to say. _ reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have to say. i - reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have to say. i think- reaction been so far? not exactly positive, i have to say. i think it. positive, i have to say. i think it was measured on the richter scale it would be around ten, because the rhetoric has been pretty robust, naturally enough we have heard from the health unions and other groups in the health service, a pretty strong reaction. the royal college of nursing said it is pitiful, the british medical association, representing doctors, says it is a dereliction of the government's
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moral responsibility and the unison health union said it is the worst kind of insult. it has given an opportunity for labour to draw dividing lines with the government this week. because the budget looks initially to be polling as quite popular, that we have found the assumption the government is making is that nhs pay would rise by only i%, is that nhs pay would rise by only i%, and effectively what labour and some other critics are saying is that although it is above the rate of inflation now, well respected groups including the office for budget responsibility thing that prices could rise by 1.5% over the next year so some nhs staff would potentially face a paper—thin real terms. this has also given the opposition, if you like, to some extent the moral high ground. the government is fighting back and saying it is giving it because of the state of the economy and for fairness, they had treated any —— they had said that nhs staff have
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been treated more generously than other private—sector employees. this was nadine dorries this morning. 0ur priorities have had to be protecting people's jobs and livelihoods, because without those jobs and without those businesses continuing and people's employment continuing, we need that vibrant economy in order to fund the nhs, so our priority had to be keeping people in work. and i think itjust worth mentioning as well, you know, that in the private sector, many people are actually losing their jobs and has been on very much reduced incomes over the past year, and no one else, no other public sector employee is receiving a pay rise, and so it's against that backdrop that the government has decided, and all we can afford, is the 1%. now, this is not the final word on the i%, now, this is not the final word on the i%, because effectively this is part of the government's submission to an independent pay review body which will report back in may. the unions have also been putting
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forward their views to the pay review body and part of what it is allowed to look at our issues of recruitment and retention. nhs providers, which represents the hospital trusts and the royal couege hospital trusts and the royal college of nursing, say that unless there is a betterfinancial college of nursing, say that unless there is a better financial reward for those at the health service and recruitment and retention could be a real problem, so it is not impossible to pay review body would suggest an increase of about i% which gives the government another dilemma. do they ignore that, given the strong political reaction to the i% the strong political reaction to the i% suggestion now, or in their view do they reprioritise? to translate, that basically means making cuts elsewhere to pay for a more generous pay increase. it looks as though the political pain for the government will not be temporary, but chronic. thank you, iain watson at westminster. we can speak now to the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. thank you very much forjoining us. nadine dorries said in those
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interviews this morning that all we can afford is i%, she said the priority is protecting jobs and the vibrant economy with protected jobs is needed to fund the nhs. that vibrant economy with protected “obs is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? _ is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? no. _ is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? no. 80 _ is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? no. 80 shocking, - is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? no. 80 shocking, it. is needed to fund the nhs. that she have a point? no. 80 shocking, it is| have a point? no. 80 shocking, it is disgusting, appalling that they health minister want to impose upon nhs staff a i% increase which, if the expectations of inflation come true, is a pay cut for nurses, midwives, paramedics, hospital porters, all those nhs staff working so hard to say flights from covid, and working so hard to deliver our vaccination programme —— working so hard to save lives from covid. this is not affordability, we know we are in an economic crisis which we have to grow our way out of, and getting public—sector workers and nhs staff decent pay contributes to economic growth. we will not be able to cut
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our way of this crisis, we need to grow our way out of this crisis. it was so cowardly of rishi sunak to not announce this in his budget, to let it sneak out in the small print yesterday. he posted pictures of himself clapping for nhs staff, when it came to it, he is cutting their wages, that is appalling. h0??? it came to it, he is cutting their wages, that is appalling. how much would labour— wages, that is appalling. how much would labour propose _ wages, that is appalling. how much would labour propose instead? - wages, that is appalling. how much would labour propose instead? we| would labour propose instead? - would labour propose instead? - would honour the recommendations of the independent public sector pay with your body, nhs staff deserve a pay rise, not a pay cut, the independent review body listen to the trade union and the nhs leadership, they look at what is needed to discover that —— to deliver the care that people expect. we are already short of staff, the crisis facing the nhs is such that people are faced with making a choice between covid, or cancer
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care. that is not the country i want. care. that is not the country i want, , ., ., care. that is not the country i want. ., want. so you are confident the pay bod will want. so you are confident the pay body will recommend _ want. so you are confident the pay body will recommend more - want. so you are confident the pay body will recommend more than i want. so you are confident the pay l body will recommend more than 196? want. so you are confident the pay - body will recommend more than 196? if body will recommend more than 1%? if i was a health minister, my recommendation would be a pay increase, not a pay cut, for nhs staff. ' increase, not a pay cut, for nhs staff. , ,':' increase, not a pay cut, for nhs staff. , , i increase, not a pay cut, for nhs staff._ i would - increase, not a pay cut, for nhs staff._ i would say| increase, not a pay cut, for nhs| staff._ i would say a increase, not a pay cut, for nhs - staff._ i would say a pay staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise, not staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise. not a — staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise. not a pay _ staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise, not a pay cut, _ staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise, not a pay cut, and _ staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise, not a pay cut, and they - staff. 296, 396, 496? i would say a pay rise, not a pay cut, and they should i rise, not a pay cut, and they should make a recommendation based on what they think are the needs of the nhs. nadine dorries tried to imply that this is a process, if it is just a process they are engaging in, honestly and in good faith, they should tell us up front if they can honour the recommendations of the process. fundamentally rishi sunak want to cut the pay of the nhs staff. , ., ~ ., ., staff. the rcn is talking about a -a rise staff. the rcn is talking about a pay rise of— staff. the rcn is talking about a pay rise of 12.596 _ staff. the rcn is talking about a pay rise of 12.596 to _ staff. the rcn is talking about a pay rise of 12.596 to take - staff. the rcn is talking about a pay rise of 12.596 to take into - pay rise of 12.5% to take into account, they say, begin as they have not had a pay rise. in percentage terms, that is what i am
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trying to get, what is fair to you and what would be enough to recognise the contribution of health care staff in dealing with the pandemic? i care staff in dealing with the pandemic?— care staff in dealing with the andemic? , . , pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be — pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be looking _ pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be looking at _ pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be looking at a _ pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be looking at a pay - pandemic? i understand the nursing union will be looking at a pay rise i union will be looking at a pay rise of the cohort of nurses within the overall group of staff, there is overall group of staff, there is over a million staff. inevitably, given the different cohorts, paramedics, hospital porters, nurses, midwives, there are different staff on different levels and son will have different increases and expectations within an overall settlement, but i would argue they need a pay increase, because we had to retain staff, we are short of 100,000 staff, that is why the nhs needs to make a choice between covid care and cancer care at the moment, we need to invest in training opportunities, we need a decent settlement, bringing back
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proper bursaries and grants to recruit the nurses and midwives and other health practitioners for the future. we need to invest in the mental health support of our nhs, they are facing daily trauma and i really worry that many will be burnt out by the end of this pandemic if not already, the pay review body has to look at all of these different factors and make a serious recommendation on what they think is in the interest of the nhs. but recommendation on what they think is in the interest of the nhs.— in the interest of the nhs. but what did ou in the interest of the nhs. but what did you think— in the interest of the nhs. but what did you think that _ in the interest of the nhs. but what did you think that should _ in the interest of the nhs. but what did you think that should be? - did you think that should be? clearly you are not saying it will be 12% and you take into account the need to retain and encourage, recruit new people into the health care professions, but i wonder what you think is fair recognition, taking into account the need to protectjobs, which labour wants to do as well. ads, protect jobs, which labour wants to do as well. �* ., _, , ., do as well. a fair contribution would be _ do as well. a fair contribution would be to _ do as well. a fair contribution would be to say _ do as well. a fair contribution would be to say we _ do as well. a fair contribution would be to say we will - do as well. a fair contribution l would be to say we will honour do as well. a fair contribution i would be to say we will honour a do as well. a fair contribution - would be to say we will honour a pay rise and we need to go into negotiations and discussions with the nhs leadership and the staff
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bodies, the unions, unison, the royal college of nursing, we need to negotiate a fair pay rise but our principle position is that they deserve a pay rise. if i said to you it should be x percent, that is not discussing it with the trade unions and that is in —— undermining the independent body. the government has said to the independent body that it has to be i%, a pay cut. when nadine dorries says it is the process, that cannot be right, the government has already said it will be i%. we would engage in good faith with the independent pay review body and another recommendation based on the principle that nhs staff deserve a pay rise. principle that nhs staff deserve a -a rise. , ., . . principle that nhs staff deserve a -a rise. , ., ., ., a ., principle that nhs staff deserve a -a rise. ., ., �*, ., ,, ., ., pay rise. jonathan ashworth, shadow health secretary, _ pay rise. jonathan ashworth, shadow health secretary, thank _ pay rise. jonathan ashworth, shadow health secretary, thank you - pay rise. jonathan ashworth, shadow health secretary, thank you very - health secretary, thank you very much for your time. you have been giving me your thoughts on the proposed 1% pay rise for health care staff, nhs health care staff in england. brian winters says it is a joke, a total insult, we would not
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have got through the pandemic without the wonderful work of nhs staff, shameful. simon tells his despicable but entirely predictable. let me scroll up and the speed says there will be many who feel the nhs staff deserve more, but there will be many who have an equally reasonable expectation. surely a proper review of public service pay is required? thank you for your thoughts and keep them coming in about this and the other stories, on twitter, i will try to read out more of your comment throughout the programme. confidence in coronavirus vaccines is increasing across the world, according to a new report by imperial college london and yougov. a survey in 15 countries has been monitoring attitudes during the last four months, and found that almost six in ten people would take a vaccine if it was offered to them now. 0ur health correspondent naomi grimley has more. it isn't enough to have a steady supply of vaccine.
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countries also need to have enough people willing to take it to achieve herd immunity in the population. researchers at imperial college london have been tracking vaccine sentiment in 15 countries over the last few months, and this is what they found. the survey suggests that people in the uk are the most willing to have the vaccine, with 77% stating they would take it if offered now. france, singapore and japan have consistently remained among the least willing. in these three countries, less than 50% of those questioned would accept a vaccination, chiefly because of apparent worries about side effects. even in these countries, though, confidence has grown since november, when the first covid vaccines were onlyjust emerging. in fact, 9 out of the 15 countries in the survey saw vaccine confidence rising over the last four months. the team at imperial says it's heartening. what we can see now is that
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when we look back and compare our data in february to our data points in november, actually for most of the countries in our survey, confidence is increasing. we see more people that are willing to get the vaccine if it were made available to them, and we see fewer people say that they are worried about side effects potentially. so overall, it seems like a better story in terms of increased confidence across our 14 countries. the task for many countries will be overcoming the vast amount of misinformation online, which undermines vaccination programmes worldwide. naomi grimley, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... plans to give nhs staff in england a1% pay rise are dismissed by unions as a �*kick in the teeth�* confidence in the coronavirus vaccines is increasing across the world, according to a new report. the bbc finds people with asthma who are eligible for a coroanvirus vaccine are being refused it by some gps who are not following government guidance.
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cyprus is the first country to say it will allow british tourists, who have been fully vaccinated against coronavirus, to visit without further restrictions — from the start of may. if travellers can prove they had had both doses of a vaccine, they won�*t need to be tested on arrival or go into quarantine. travel abroad from the uk is currently only allowed for exceptional reasons — until at least may 17th. let�*s talk to our correspondent richard galpin. richard, tell us more about what cyprus is saying, and is a what sort of preset requires for people from the uk to come into the country? it is all a date unclear but it feels like to a certain extent cyprus has jumped the gun. —— it is on a bit unclear. they say british tourists will be allowed into cyprus from the
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1st of may as long as they have had both doses of the vaccine, which is crucial, and some sort of certificate to prove it. as far as i am aware, i do not think there is a certificate at the moment, maybe you would need to go to a gp to have something signed, but that is unclear at the moment. if they have this, there is no need to be tested on arrival in cyprus and no need to quarantine but the big block is that currently it is illegal for tourists, english tourists, to travel abroad.— tourists, english tourists, to travel abroad. cyprus is talking about the 1st _ travel abroad. cyprus is talking about the 1st of _ travel abroad. cyprus is talking about the 1st of may, - travel abroad. cyprus is talking about the 1st of may, but - travel abroad. cyprus is talking about the 1st of may, but as i travel abroad. cyprus is talking - about the 1st of may, but as things stand, the rules in the uk say travel is only allowed for exceptional reasons abroad... it is banned until at least may to 17th and we do not know the situation after that. it and we do not know the situation after that. , ., , and we do not know the situation after that. , . , , , , after that. it feels as if cyprus had jumped — after that. it feels as if cyprus had jumped the _ after that. it feels as if cyprus had jumped the gun _ after that. it feels as if cyprus had jumped the gun and - after that. it feels as if cyprusj had jumped the gun and there after that. it feels as if cyprus - had jumped the gun and there needs to be talked between the two sides to be talked between the two sides to try to work out what dates will
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be valid, but the british government is saying made to 17th at the earliest, but it totally depends on the situation with the prevalence of the situation with the prevalence of the virus around the country, will it be possible or not, it will not be known until closer to the time, it is a bit of a mess.— it is a bit of a mess. lots of unanswered _ it is a bit of a mess. lots of unanswered questions. - it is a bit of a mess. lots of unanswered questions. is l it is a bit of a mess. lots of unanswered questions. is it it is a bit of a mess. lots of - unanswered questions. is it the whole island of cyprus? i unanswered questions. is it the whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not totally _ whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not totally sure _ whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not totally sure but _ whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not totally sure but i _ whole island of cyprus? i assume so, i am not totally sure but i would - i am not totally sure but i would assume so. we i am not totally sure but i would assume so— i am not totally sure but i would assume so. ~ , ., ., assume so. we will try to get more detail as it — assume so. we will try to get more detail as it emerges, _ assume so. we will try to get more detail as it emerges, lots - assume so. we will try to get more detail as it emerges, lots of - detail as it emerges, lots of questions to be figured out. british gas engineers have gone on strike after overwhelmingly rejecting a new pay and conditions offer. the gmb union says the main reason for the action is that british gas didn�*t take the so—called "fire and rehire" policy off the table. the chief executive of british gas owners centrica, says the company needs to adapt to protect 20,000 ukjobs. many parents have been counting down the final days of home—schooling, as the long awaited return
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to the classroom for pupils in england begins on monday. students and everyone in their household will be offered regular lateral flow testing kits, to make face—to—face teaching as covid safe as possible. but what about those parents and children who�*ve been shielding — what does a return to school look like for them? well, we can speak now tojennifer dunstan — mum to nine—year—old rio — who attends a special educational needs school, and has been home—schooled for the past year. jennifer has also been shielding because of a weakened immune system and joins me now from sheffield. also i�*m joined by carly twigg, who has been home schooling her five—year old daughter, esme. esme is going back to school on monday. let�*s begin with you, carly, what has the last yet been like? very early in the school process for your daughter, does she have much expectation of what she is going back to? if expectation of what she is going back to? , ., expectation of what she is going back to? i. ., a expectation of what she is going back to? i. ., ,~' .,
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back to? if you ask her, her one thin is back to? if you ask her, her one thing is she _ back to? if you ask her, her one thing is she is _ back to? if you ask her, her one thing is she is really _ back to? if you ask her, her one thing is she is really excited - back to? if you ask her, her one thing is she is really excited to i thing is she is really excited to see her friends, thing is she is really excited to see herfriends, but when her teacher has asked, she was really excited to write cards, because that is her favourite thing, excited to write cards, because that is herfavourite thing, she excited to write cards, because that is her favourite thing, she sits and —— she said in class and writes cards. she is looking forward to getting back to normality, regardless of what you try and you, learning at home will always be very different from the play based learning at school.— different from the play based learning at school. how has it been for ou? learning at school. how has it been for you? how— learning at school. how has it been for you? how tricky _ learning at school. how has it been for you? how tricky have _ learning at school. how has it been for you? how tricky have you - learning at school. how has it been l for you? how tricky have you funded, or have you found it enjoyable? really, there are ups and downs with everything. home—schooling is no different. i am blessed to have employers who are very flexible, which has meant i have been able to set my workaround home—schooling so i have been able to do both. don�*t get me wrong, it is not easy by any stretch but you have to accept every
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day is different. yesterday was really challenging for me, anyone who has seen me on social media will have seen that i said not every day can be perfect, if today is rust and tomorrow will be better, it is already better than yesterday. —— if todayis already better than yesterday. —— if today is rough then tomorrow will be better. trying to parent and home—schoolers difficult, trying to work and home school is difficult, trying to parent, home school and work is a very new challenge. i think every parent will be nudging around, you take the ups and downs, the rough with the snooze —— will be nodding along. jennifer, what has it been like home—schooling rio? mi; nodding along. jennifer, what has it been like home-schooling rio? my son is autistic and — been like home-schooling rio? my son is autistic and has _ been like home-schooling rio? my son is autistic and has other— been like home-schooling rio? my son is autistic and has other related - is autistic and has other related issues — is autistic and has other related issues and _ is autistic and has other related issues and he thrives on routine, like a _ issues and he thrives on routine, like a lot— issues and he thrives on routine, like a lot of— issues and he thrives on routine, like a lot of people with these conditions, so to go from school five days — conditions, so to go from school
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five days a — conditions, so to go from school five days a week to, 0k, things are changing, — five days a week to, 0k, things are changing, we are learning at home, that was— changing, we are learning at home, that was tricky. once he was into the flow. — that was tricky. once he was into the flow, actually only the first two weeks also, we have a great routine — two weeks also, we have a great routine it — two weeks also, we have a great routine. it has been very difficult to make — routine. it has been very difficult to make sure that he was getting access— to make sure that he was getting access to — to make sure that he was getting access to a — to make sure that he was getting access to a well—rounded amount of subject— access to a well—rounded amount of subject but— access to a well—rounded amount of subject but the longer the pandemic has gone _ subject but the longer the pandemic has gone on, the better the plans have _ has gone on, the better the plans have been— has gone on, the better the plans have been in place from the school and other— have been in place from the school and other schools, of course, they have _ and other schools, of course, they have been— and other schools, of course, they have been sending work packs for the children— have been sending work packs for the children as _ have been sending work packs for the children as well as checking in with them _ children as well as checking in with them via _ children as well as checking in with them via video call or even in person— them via video call or even in person and _ them via video call or even in person and socially distance meetings, so a member of staff will stand _ meetings, so a member of staff will stand at— meetings, so a member of staff will stand at the other side of the garden — stand at the other side of the garden gate and chat with him, he has very— garden gate and chat with him, he has very much remained part of the school— has very much remained part of the school community, he has been learning — school community, he has been learning at— school community, he has been learning at home for the past year, but in _ learning at home for the past year, but in some — learning at home for the past year, but in some of his areas he has come on in _ but in some of his areas he has come on in leaps— but in some of his areas he has come on in leaps and bounds. he was not
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drawing _ on in leaps and bounds. he was not drawing or— on in leaps and bounds. he was not drawing or writing before the lockdown and he is nine, he would only write — lockdown and he is nine, he would only write under a lot of duress, but having — only write under a lot of duress, but having this calm, quiet time has benefited _ but having this calm, quiet time has benefited him as an individual with respect _ benefited him as an individual with respect to— benefited him as an individual with respect to his needs because he has had the _ respect to his needs because he has had the one—to—one support he clearly— had the one—to—one support he clearly needed, so now he is writing, _ clearly needed, so now he is writing, drawing and even painting. that is— writing, drawing and even painting. that is really interesting. i wonder how many of his fellow pupils have actually been in school throughout the pandemic? i know you are not planning to send him back next week because you have been shielding over the last year, i believe you have had one vaccination that you are waiting for your second jab before sending rio back? flil" waiting for your second 'ab before sending rio back? our household, workin: sending rio back? our household, working with _ sending rio back? our household, working with the _ sending rio back? our household, working with the school, - sending rio back? our household, working with the school, the - sending rio back? our household, working with the school, the plan | sending rio back? our household, l working with the school, the plan is that when _ working with the school, the plan is that when i— working with the school, the plan is that when i have had the second vaccine — that when i have had the second vaccine then two weeks for the antibodies and then he will be phased — antibodies and then he will be phased back into his learning with the rest _ phased back into his learning with the rest of— phased back into his learning with the rest of his peers. i cannot
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speak— the rest of his peers. i cannot speak for— the rest of his peers. i cannot speak for other individual parents but i _ speak for other individual parents but i know— speak for other individual parents but i know they certainly have not had all _ but i know they certainly have not had all the — but i know they certainly have not had all the children in during this time _ had all the children in during this time and — had all the children in during this time and during king lok cheung times— time and during king lok cheung times it — time and during king lok cheung times it has only been children of key workers, but the school has had to study— key workers, but the school has had to study close ones and twice half of the _ to study close ones and twice half of the school, it has not been open throughout— of the school, it has not been open throughout the whole time either for the majority, just for the key workers' _ the majority, just for the key workers' children, and quite rightly so. ., , workers' children, and quite rightly so. . , ., ., , ., so. carly, what conversations have ou had so. carly, what conversations have you had with _ so. carly, what conversations have you had with esme _ so. carly, what conversations have you had with esme about - so. carly, what conversations have - you had with esme about expectations when she goes back to school? it is tricky especially with little ones to talk about social distancing etc? i think we are really lucky because the school has done a programme of videos and assemblies this weekjust explaining things to the children. for us we have watched those assemblies with her and helped her
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to understand that actually going back will be very much like when she went in for the shortest term i have ever known earlier this year when she went in for one day before they close the schools again. she is pretty relaxed and happy with regards to that. i think the biggest change will come when she is able to start seeing friends and family outside school again, that will be the biggest and more noticeable change for her.— the biggest and more noticeable change for her. when the opening date for schools _ change for her. when the opening date for schools was _ change for her. when the opening date for schools was announced, l change for her. when the opening date for schools was announced, i appreciate that i should always say this, schools have been open throughout the pandemic teaching vulnerable children, children of key workers and so on, teachers have been very busy with that and online lessons, but when the dates for everyone to go backwards in and, i could see lots of gifs with parents celebrating on the doorstep. will you miss her being at home all day?
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absolutely. ijoke about you miss her being at home all day? absolutely. i joke about this, everyone does. it will be a lot easier and i will be able to work more easily, but i will her because she is a character and you can be in the middle of doing something, in the middle of doing something, in the middle of a sue barker: call, she will come for a cuddle and jump on my lap —— i can dm the middle of a zoom coal. == on my lap -- i can dm the middle of a zoom coal-— a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of _ a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of a — a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of a zoom _ a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of a zoom call. - a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of a zoom call. it - a zoom coal. -- i can be in the middle of a zoom call. it will. a zoom coal. -- i can be in the| middle of a zoom call. it will be really strange, at the moment there is myself, my husband and daughter working in ace home office. he is a tutor, it willjust be me again in the house. you can accent handy for a bit of extra home—schooling help if your husband is a tutor. jennifer, you are keeping rio at
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home and you get your second vaccine, how supportive is the school and the local authority? the ma'ori of school and the local authority? the majority of people may know by now that when _ majority of people may know by now that when it comes to the attendance fines, _ that when it comes to the attendance fines, it _ that when it comes to the attendance fines, it is _ that when it comes to the attendance fines, it is very much a postcode lottery— fines, it is very much a postcode lottery as — fines, it is very much a postcode lottery as to how your local authority _ lottery as to how your local authority has decided to approach the issue — authority has decided to approach the issue. ithink authority has decided to approach the issue. i think sheffield city council— the issue. i think sheffield city council had been pretty fair, they had said — council had been pretty fair, they had said they will not use fines in the first— had said they will not use fines in the first instance or as punitive action, — the first instance or as punitive action, and _ the first instance or as punitive action, and under the current government policy intercepted the discretion— government policy intercepted the discretion of individual head teachers to talk to families and weigh— teachers to talk to families and weigh up— teachers to talk to families and weigh up what situation would be best for— weigh up what situation would be best for each hassle. unfortunately, because _ best for each hassle. unfortunately, because it _ best for each hassle. unfortunately, because it is a postcode lottery, there _ because it is a postcode lottery, there might be a mother with the same _ there might be a mother with the same disabilities as me living in another— same disabilities as me living in another region of the country he will be _ another region of the country he will be facing fines for not sending children— will be facing fines for not sending children and, for trying to keep themselves and their family safe until there are more mitigate —— until—
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until there are more mitigate —— until there — until there are more mitigate —— until there are more mitigate —— until there are more mitigate —— until there are more mitigations of the risk— until there are more mitigations of the risk of— until there are more mitigations of the risk of catching the virus, so that is— the risk of catching the virus, so that is very— the risk of catching the virus, so that is very difficult to get my head — that is very difficult to get my head around. even the my counsel and my son's _ head around. even the my counsel and my son's head teacher and teachers have been_ my son's head teacher and teachers have been really fair and supportive of the _ have been really fair and supportive of the situation, i think there should — of the situation, i think there should be _ of the situation, i think there should be a national policy so everybody has the same rights and equality— everybody has the same rights and equality to be treated the same way if you _ equality to be treated the same way if you are _ equality to be treated the same way if you are a — equality to be treated the same way if you are a disabled parent or a parent— if you are a disabled parent or a parent of— if you are a disabled parent or a parent of a _ if you are a disabled parent or a parent of a disabled child, nobody should _ parent of a disabled child, nobody should be — parent of a disabled child, nobody should be facing potential criminalisation, for keeping themselves and their children say. rcatty— themselves and their children say. really interesting to hear from you, jennifer and carly, good luck for next week at the weeks ahead. take care. now, sarah keith lucas has the weather. it was quite a dry weather on the
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cards. a lot of cloud around but some semi—spells through the rest of the day. northern ireland and northern england having more in the way of cloud but still some sunshine. tempe does not great for the time of year. chance chancellor is to showers on the fluence between but also down towards the channel islands. into this evening on tonight, most plays are looking dry with clear spells and light winds. damages are good for quickly down to around about minus three, minus four degrees could be some showers around the thames street to start of the day tomorrow. anomaly dry after that. some frost and submissiveness. a little bitterly to the cause of the weekend with some sunshine. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines... plans to give nhs staff in england a1% pay rise are dismissed by unions as a �*kick in the teeth�* but ministers defend the proposal. our priorities have had to be protecting people�*s jobs and livelihoods. without those jobs and employment continuing, we need that vibrant economy in order to fund the nhs. confidence in the coronavirus vaccines is increasing across the world, according to a new report. the bbc finds people with asthma who are eligible for a coroanvirus vaccine are being refused it by some gps who are not following government guidance. the premier league and english football leagure are urged to do more to tackle racist abuse from fans. and quarantine—free holidays in cyprus from may for british holidaymakers, if they�*ve been vaccinated.
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confidence in the coronavirus vaccines is increasing across the world, according to a new report. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s mike. good morning. they�*ve enterred a critical session of play, in the 4th and final test, between india and england, with the match, delicately poised on the second day in ahemedabad. it was a great morning forjoe root�*s men, with pujara going cheaply and then ben stokes, delivering a real boost, for england, getting captain virat kohli, for england, getting captain virat kohli, out for a duck. then on the stroke of lunchjimmy anderson struck to remove rahane. england�*s bowlers were frustrated after lunch, but stokes got another huge wicket, this time opener rohit sharman for 49. india are closing in on england�*s total of 205. if england were to get
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a couple more wickets, it would make things very interesting. overnight, england�*s women wrapped up their t20 series over in new zealand. they restricted the hosts to 123 for 9, with freya davies taking a career best 4 for 23. opener tammy beaumont hit a quick 50, as england reached their target with 6 wickets and 16 balls to spare. england two up with one to play. at one point it was looking like we would have to chase 150 and they had got away from us a little bit, so that resilience from our team was exceptional. you cannot write them ask, they will come back harder after the first game so it was great that we got some wickets at the end and i am really pleased. it�*s not the record premier league champions liverpool expected or wanted to set, but they have lost a fifth, consecutive home match, for the first time in their history. this time it was chelsea inflicting the damage. the brilliant run and finish from mason mount, showed the renewed energy and confidence in the chelsea camp as they chase the top three, while in contrast, the mood of the champions, was summed up by mo salah who wasn�*t
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happy at being substituted with half an hour to go. they�*re now 7th and four points off the champions league places. it isjust... it it is just... it is just annoying to talk about the same things again and again. i have no smart explanations for it or whatever. it is tough. but we have to fight through this. everton are rubbing salt into liverpool�*s wounds by going so well at the moment. they are a point off the top four, thanks to a one nil win at lowly west brom. richarlison can�*t stop scoring at the moment. it leaves west brom, nine points from safety. just above them are fulham who showed plenty of fight, but an own goal, gave tottenham a 1—0 win, at craven cottage to keep them in the bottom three. it�*s the first time spurs have recorded consecutive league victories since november.
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now here�*s one for future sports quizzes — name the club to play in the final of the same cup, twice in a month. the answer spanish club athletic bilbao, who can win the same cup twice, next month. so, they were due to play real sociedad in last season�*s copa del rey final, before coronavirus, halted the competition. that final, will take place on 3rd april, and last night bilbao completed an aggregate win over levantey in this season�*s competition which means they�*ll meet barcelona in this season�*s final on 17 april. both games will be played in seville. rory mcilroy is joint leader, going into today�*s second round of the arnold palmer invitational in florida. the northern irishman, shot a 6 under parfirst round of 66, as did canada�*s corey conners. defending champion england�*s tyrell hatton is struggling on 5 over. i have watched tiger another year over the years on the way he played this course was he played it very
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conservatively, he took care of the past five sand that was usually good enough to get the job done. take a little bit of a leaf out of his book. and it�*s been a case of father like son, for tommy fleetwood, who�*s 2 under par. here he is getting little franklin into the swing of things, in a video fleetwood has shared on twitter. and the coaching is paying off, because the shot when dad is helping, is scuffed along the ground, but when left in control of his own shot. look at this. dad is impressed. before i go, a reminder you can watch the early action, from the first proper day, of the european indoor athletics, live on the bbc sport website and the app. it started at 9 o�*clock. that�*s all the sport for now. senior police officers have warned that the leaders of england�*s professional football leagues must do more to stamp out racist abuse within the game. the lead voice on football for the national police chiefs�* council, deputy chief constable mark roberts
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insists better co—operation is needed to increase the number of successful prosecutions. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. swansea vs manchester city in the recent fifth round of the fa cup. after swansea�*s defeat, online racist abuse was directed at their british—asian player yan dhanda. it did have a big effect on me, and i was upset, and i was angry. dhanda is one of so many players targeted by the trolls. others include the manchester united players anthony martial and marcus rashford. there are many more. 11 players from different clubs,
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but all in the same team as victims of abuse. whether it is instagram or twitter, i need these platforms to show me these people. this should be a matter for the law, shouldn't it? that should be something i they are doing hand in hand. deputy chief constable mark roberts is the face of the law, the lead on football for the national police chiefs council. the bbc has used the freedom of information act to obtain a copy of a letter he has written to the chairman of the english football league, rick parry. he sent a similar one to the chief executive of the premier league, richard masters. the league says mr masters was only made aware of it when we asked for a response. the letter calls for a joined—up approach to tackling racism, both at grounds and on social media. it was sent two months ago. neither organisation responded. the bbc contacted them both this week. since then, both have replied to the letter.
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mark roberts wants better co—operation from clubs to get access to players, vital in mounting a prosecution. we actually have some difficulty getting through clubs�* legal departments and player welfare teams. we have had experiences where a force has been making real attempts to try to get to a player, we have hit a wall at the club, and then publicly the player is asking why the police are not making contact. the fear is that when we return to grounds, we will see an increase in hate crimes at football. part of our plea to the leagues and clubs is that while we have got this short hiatus while we do not have fans in the stadiums, let�*s be ready. the premier league says it has been involved in regular discussions with the police, and it was doing everything possible to eradicate online abuse. and the english football league said it was looking at ways in which football and policing it could be better coordinated. june kelly, bbc news.
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the duke and duchess of sussex�*s highly anticipted interview with oprah winfrey is to be broadcast in the us this weekend. it has been a difficult few days for the royal family, with headlines dominated by meghan�*s comments that the palace could not expect her and prince harry to be silent if it was "perpetuating falsehoods" about them. jayne mccubbin�*s been looking at how media outlets around the world have been reporting the news. ijust i just feel it ijust feel it is going to end in tears. i just feel it is going to end in tears. ., , i just feel it is going to end in tears. . , ., i just feel it is going to end in tears-_ iti i just feel it is going to end in tears. . , . it is tears. the latest royal rift. it is makin: tears. the latest royal rift. it is making headlines _ tears. the latest royal rift. it is making headlines around - tears. the latest royal rift. it is making headlines around the i tears. the latest royal rift. it is - making headlines around the world. if you thought brexit was the jam, megsit is causing a whole load of trouble. , ., ., , ,, ., trouble. the tv stations know there is a hue trouble. the tv stations know there is a huge global— trouble. the tv stations know there is a huge global appetite _ trouble. the tv stations know there is a huge global appetite for - trouble. the tv stations know there is a huge global appetite for this - is a huge global appetite for this royal rift. it
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is a huge global appetite for this ro al rift. ., , is a huge global appetite for this ro al rift. .,, , is a huge global appetite for this ro alrift. , , .,_ royal rift. it has been unbelievably tou~h royal rift. it has been unbelievably tou . h for royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the _ royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the two _ royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the two of _ royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the two of us _ royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the two of us but - royal rift. it has been unbelievably tough for the two of us but at - royal rift. it has been unbelievablyj tough for the two of us but at least we had _ tough for the two of us but at least we had each other. no tough for the two of us but at least we had each other.— we had each other. no sub'ect was off-limits! cos i we had each other. no sub'ect was off-limits! cbs gave h we had each other. no sub'ect was off-limits! cbs gave it _ we had each other. no sub'ect was off-limits! cbs gave it an _ we had each other. no subject was off-limits! cbs gave it an extra - off-limits! cbs gave it an extra houn off-limits! cbs gave it an extra hour- with _ off-limits! cbs gave it an extra hour. with accusations - off-limits! cbs gave it an extra hour. with accusations flying . off-limits! cbs gave it an extra i hour. with accusations flying from both sides of _ hour. with accusations flying from both sides of the _ hour. with accusations flying from both sides of the atlantic, - both sides of the atlantic, audiences want more. b, both sides of the atlantic, audiences want more. a sussex spokesperson — audiences want more. a sussex spokesperson tells _ audiences want more. a sussex spokesperson tells abc - audiences want more. a sussex | spokesperson tells abc news... audiences want more. a sussex i spokesperson tells abc news... it feels like this is very carefully timed — feels like this is very carefully timed and there is a reason and they are trying _ timed and there is a reason and they are trying to — timed and there is a reason and they are trying to create an opposition to what— are trying to create an opposition to what they are going to say the opposition. to what they are going to say the opposition-— to what they are going to say the o- osition. ~ , . ., opposition. why are we now during about an investigation? _ opposition. why are we now during about an investigation? how - opposition. why are we now during about an investigation? how will i opposition. why are we now during | about an investigation? how will the r0 al about an investigation? how will the royal family — about an investigation? how will the royal family come _ about an investigation? how will the royal family come out _ about an investigation? how will the royal family come out of _ about an investigation? how will the royal family come out of this, - about an investigation? how will the royal family come out of this, who l royal family come out of this, who knows? but this is a significant moment. b. knows? but this is a significant moment. . ., ., , ., ., , moment. a famous constitutionalist once said don't _ moment. a famous constitutionalist once said don't let _ moment. a famous constitutionalist once said don't let daylight - moment. a famous constitutionalist once said don't let daylight in - moment. a famous constitutionalist once said don't let daylight in on - once said don�*t let daylight in on the magic. once said don't let daylight in on the manic. once said don't let daylight in on the magic-— once said don't let daylight in on the manic. , ., . ., , ., the magic. the programme airs on itv on monday night- _ bbc news has found that people with asthma who are eligible for a coronavirus vaccine are being refused it by some gps who are not following government guidance.
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an nhs england letter sent to gps in mid—february says people who have "ever had an emergency asthma admission" to hospital fall into priority group six, which is currently being vaccinated. but some patients are being told a hospital admission within the past 12 months is required. well, joining me now are sarah woolnough, chief executive of asthma uk and the british lung foundation, and sophie cairns, who suffers with asthma. welcome to both of you. first of all, why are we seeing different interpretations of the official guidance? remind us what this official guide and says, but why are we seeing different interpretations of it? ., ,, we seeing different interpretations ofit? ., ., . , of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if _ of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if you _ of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if you have _ of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if you have ever - of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if you have ever had i of it? thank you, the guidance is clear that if you have ever had a | clear that if you have ever had a hospital admission for your asthma or if you have had three courses of oral steroids in a three—month period, you should be considered in group six. the short answer is we do not understand why there are problems and we have a bit of an
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idea, we think some gp systems make it difficult to search that far back, they find it hard to look for hospital admissions several years ago. you also know that sometimes patients will have been admitted to hospital with their asthma and it has not been coded correctly on the systems but we really don�*t quite understand why the guidance is being misinterpreted by some gps. i think there are ratio different things going on. some gps are struggling with the criteria to find the right publishing of patients but some appear to bejust publishing of patients but some appear to be just misinterpreting publishing of patients but some appear to bejust misinterpreting it was not we have been contacted by thousands of people who are worried and frustrated, many of whom think they should be... should have been called for a vaccination but have not been yet. called for a vaccination but have not been yet-— called for a vaccination but have not been yet. lots of people with asthma being _ not been yet. lots of people with asthma being told _ not been yet. lots of people with asthma being told they _ not been yet. lots of people with asthma being told they will i not been yet. lots of people with asthma being told they will be i asthma being told they will be vaccinated, based on their age, nothing to do with the condition. yes, that is right. for those with asthma, they are either considered in groupfour, asthma, they are either considered in group four, group six, but the
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majority are being told they will be called based on age. and we are unhappy about that. we appreciate the guidance around the first priority groups, they have been very clear all along, priority groups, they have been very clearallalong, it priority groups, they have been very clear all along, it is about mortality reduction. there is evidence of increased risk for those with asthma ending up in hospital or ending up with severe complications and our call to government has been firstly, clear up this issue, it is causing huge frustration and delays. but also please consider vaccinating all those with asthma once you have done the initial one to nine priority groups because there is good clinical evidence including a new paper in the lancet today showing that those with asthma are at increased risk of hospitalisation and having to receive critical care if they develop covid.— if they develop covid. sophie, i believe this _ if they develop covid. sophie, i believe this is _ if they develop covid. sophie, i believe this is what _ if they develop covid. sophie, i believe this is what you - if they develop covid. sophie, i believe this is what you are i if they develop covid. sophie, i i believe this is what you are being told by your surgery, that you have
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told by your surgery, that you have to wait for your age group. titer? to wait for your age group. very much so- _ to wait for your age group. very much so. thank— to wait for your age group. very much so. thank you _ to wait for your age group. very much so. thank you for - to wait for your age group. very much so. thank you for having you. i was told _ much so. thank you for having you. i was told that — much so. thank you for having you. i was told that i— much so. thank you for having you. i was told that i was in group six because — was told that i was in group six because i— was told that i was in group six because i have been in hospital many times— because i have been in hospital many times as _ because i have been in hospital many times as a _ because i have been in hospital many times as a child with asthma but i gave _ times as a child with asthma but i gave them — times as a child with asthma but i gave them a called this week and i was told _ gave them a called this week and i was told i— gave them a called this week and i was told i am no longer in group sex, _ was told i am no longer in group sex, i_ was told i am no longer in group sex, iam— was told i am no longer in group sex, lam now was told i am no longer in group sex, i am now in my was told i am no longer in group sex, lam now in my age group, was told i am no longer in group sex, i am now in my age group, and not until— sex, i am now in my age group, and not until april, may orjune or later~ — not until april, may orjune or later. �* ., , not until april, may orjune or later. . . , , , not until april, may orjune or later. . . , ,, later. and that is despite your asthma becoming _ later. and that is despite your asthma becoming worse i later. and that is despite your asthma becoming worse in i later. and that is despite your| asthma becoming worse in the later. and that is despite your i asthma becoming worse in the last few months. it asthma becoming worse in the last few months-— few months. it has done. it is a variable disease, _ few months. it has done. it is a variable disease, everyone i few months. it has done. it is a variable disease, everyone is i variable disease, everyone is different _ variable disease, everyone is different. i have been quite calm for a _ different. i have been quite calm for a few— different. i have been quite calm for a few months and suddenly for no reason, _ for a few months and suddenly for no reason, just — for a few months and suddenly for no reason, just gotten worse and i have had more _ reason, just gotten worse and i have had more medication for that but even _ had more medication for that but even so, — had more medication for that but even so, i— had more medication for that but even so, i am getting communal, short— even so, i am getting communal, short of— even so, i am getting communal, short of breath and other symptoms meanwhile. ., short of breath and other symptoms meanwhile. . , ., ., meanwhile. have you said to the staff at your _ meanwhile. have you said to the staff at your gp _ meanwhile. have you said to the staff at your gp surgery - meanwhile. have you said to the staff at your gp surgery that i meanwhile. have you said to the | staff at your gp surgery that they have got this wrong, have you tried that approach?— have got this wrong, have you tried that approach? without trying to be a nuisance. — that approach? without trying to be a nuisance. i— that approach? without trying to be a nuisance, i have _
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that approach? without trying to be a nuisance, i have tried _ that approach? without trying to be a nuisance, i have tried to - that approach? without trying to be a nuisance, i have tried to tell i a nuisance, i have tried to tell them — a nuisance, i have tried to tell them i— a nuisance, i have tried to tell them i do _ a nuisance, i have tried to tell them i do not understand why i am classified _ them i do not understand why i am classified as not at risk. and in an a-e classified as not at risk. and in an age group — classified as not at risk. and in an age group where no one else seems to have the _ age group where no one else seems to have the same risk as me. i try to clarify— have the same risk as me. i try to clarify i_ have the same risk as me. i try to clarify i was — have the same risk as me. i try to clarify i was in hospital every three — clarify i was in hospital every three months as a child for up to a week— three months as a child for up to a week at— three months as a child for up to a week at a — three months as a child for up to a week at a time, sleeping and oxygen tents because i could not sleep without — tents because i could not sleep without assistance for my breathing. and i_ without assistance for my breathing. and i had _ without assistance for my breathing. and i had bronchitis and pneumonia a number— and i had bronchitis and pneumonia a number of— and i had bronchitis and pneumonia a number of times and probable have lun- number of times and probable have lung scarring, even so, i was told very— lung scarring, even so, i was told very clearly — lung scarring, even so, i was told very clearly i_ lung scarring, even so, i was told very clearly i am not going to be on a priority— very clearly i am not going to be on a priority group at all, i am says two with— a priority group at all, i am says two with my age group. the keyword here is that — two with my age group. the keyword here is that people _ two with my age group. the keyword here is that people who _ two with my age group. the keyword here is that people who have - two with my age group. the keyword here is that people who have ever i here is that people who have ever had an emergency asthma admission should be prioritised. what is your advice to anyone speaking to their gp, like sophie has been trying to, and they are trying to make that point that they think the gp surgery may be interpreting the guidance incorrectly? i may be interpreting the guidance incorrectly?— incorrectly? i think we are now ururin incorrectly? i think we are now urging all— incorrectly? i think we are now urging all of— incorrectly? i think we are now urging all of those _ incorrectly? i think we are now urging all of those with - incorrectly? i think we are now| urging all of those with asthma incorrectly? i think we are now i urging all of those with asthma who think they should be in priority
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group six to... who have not been called to contact their gp and to speu called to contact their gp and to spell out the criteria. we have also contacted the royal gps to raise the issue and others in government. we think the need to be an urgent communication out to gps to clarify the guidance but also to help find these people, if gp systems are not quite fit for purpose in this regard. it also speaks to gps being able to use their clinicaljudgment, to urge on the side of caution and cast the net widely if there are patients with asthma in a practice who they are slightly worried about because as we have heard from sophie, asthma is a changeable condition and we want all those that should be protected to receive a vaccination. should be protected to receive a vaccination-— vaccination. you mentioned the government _ vaccination. you mentioned the government was _ vaccination. you mentioned the government was you _ vaccination. you mentioned the government was you are - vaccination. you mentioned the government was you are due i vaccination. you mentioned the government was you are due to j vaccination. you mentioned the i government was you are due to have another meeting with the government about this. we another meeting with the government about this. ~ , , ., ~ another meeting with the government about this. ~ , , ., ,, ., about this. we did speak to the government — about this. we did speak to the government yesterday - about this. we did speak to the government yesterday and i about this. we did speak to the government yesterday and we i about this. we did speak to the i government yesterday and we raised this concern in very strong terms.
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we are very disappointed they have not moved on phase two of the roll—out yet and we are submitting additional clinical evidence as i say there is another paper in the lancet talking about all those with asthma being at an increased chance of hospital asian and developing more severe disease or needing critical care and thejcvi have been clear, they will consider other criteria is that we hope the government will listen to this message and make sure that we capture all those with asthma that are not already captured in group four or group six as we continue to roll the vaccination amount. goad four or group six as we continue to roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both — roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both of _ roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both of you. _ roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both of you. thank _ roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both of you. thank you i roll the vaccination amount. good to talk to both of you. thank you very i talk to both of you. thank you very much for your time. i have been asking you to send me your thoughts on this. chris says he
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has had a vaccine. but i was assured it was more to do with the local area getting through the list extreme you quickly and having them to use. this is something that people have been saying, there seems to be a bit of a post code lottery when it comes to actually getting a vaccination early, if you have got asthma, irrespective of your age and clearly some gp surgeries are following the guidance that sarah was talking about. and others are not appearing to do that. someone with a colourful twitter handle says my gp surgery is overwhelmed by cause. i struggle to get an appointment was by don�*t know why they don�*t use the extra flu jab lists. this person says they have not had it as yet. do send in your thoughts on that store with muggle
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story. any of the stories we are covering today you can do that on twitter. as ever, we will try to read out some more of your comments. we are interested to hear what you have to say on those stories. the chinese premier, li keqiang, has opened the annual meeting of parliament with a warning to the world against interfering in hong kong. in his address to the national people�*s congress, mr li said the government in beijing would resolutely guard against such moves. the gathering in the great hall of the people, which largely rubber stamps official decisions, has been told that hong kong�*s electoral system is to be completely overhauled. china has tightened its control of the territory since pro—democracy protests caused sustained disruption in 2019. our china correspondent, robin brant, is following the congress from shanghai. it is quite clear almost two years after those protests began in hong kong that beijing is introducing further measures which will almost
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certainly be approved by this annual meeting of the people�*s congress that are going to further erode the remnants of democracy that remains in hong kong. what we are seeing is plans to introduce the power for a committee of beijing supporting politicians in hong kong to be able to screen candidates that want to stand for election in hong kong, a kind of millie parliament, the legislative council, they will be able to directly elect representatives as well, all of this is about further diluting any sense of credible democracy there and further consolidating beijing�*s hold over that institution. we have seen china�*s premier, the number two politician in the country kick off the meeting today with a speech which is mainly about the economy but he talked yet again about the significance of patriots, those loyal to beijing being the people who represent hong kong�*s 7 million
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people and a further warning as well, this comes every year, but it is more potent as you, a further warning that beijing continues to guard against foreign interference stop it believes those protests were fuelled, aided and abetted by the uk, the us may be, and this is all in an issue that hong kong was a vs future, beijing regards it being absently caught which kind of sort —— sovereignty, integrity. a decision by italy to block the export to australia of a quarter of a million doses of the astrazeneca jab has been criticised by the government in canberra. the italian authorities said they were acting because the manufacturer had failed to meet its contractual commitments to the eu. australian ministers said they had already received 300,000 doses of the astrazeneca vaccine, which would last until domestic production was under way. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, is in sydney. the australian government does not
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seem to be too alarmed by what happened. they say that losing one shipment is not going to derail the roll—out. in fact, the roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine here in the country started today and as you say, the country did receive 300,000 doses of that vaccine. we did however hear earlier from the finance minister, simon birmingham, who said there is disappointment and frustration that this happened interestingly, he commented to say that this shows the fortunate position that australia is in, compared to the desperation in other parts of the world, clearly referring to italy and the yield. the country is still quite reliant on those shipments coming in but we did hearfrom the health minister who said that the domestic production of the vaccination is due to start by the end of the month with a million doses per week. pope francis is set to arrive in iraq later for the first ever
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papal visit to the country. he hopes to use the trip to reassure christians who were persecuted by the islamic state group and deepen ties with the muslim world. but the visit comes amid a pandemic and growing security concerns in iraq. our middle east correspondent, martin patience, reports. it was once the capital of the so—called islamic state. now, in a stunning reversal, it is set to host the pope. much of the city now lies in ruins but pockets are being rebuilt. and here, the archbishop inspects the latest restoration work. in his church, he keeps a broken statue of the virgin mary, a reminder of the horrors they have enjoyed. he is a religious leader in a country with a christian population that is now a quarter of what it was 20 years ago.
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translation: the visit of the pope is not only significant to christians but all iraqis. when it times to security and logistics, it will be a mess but the most important thing is thatjoy enters everybody�*s hearts. in cities across iraq, preparations are well under way. including here, where pope francis is expected to meet iraq�*s shi�*ite cleric. but some question the wisdom of a papal visit in the middle of a global pandemic to a country where security remains a serious issue. and that means many christian iraqis like this woman will have to watch the country�*s first papal visit from their own homes. translation: we do not feel safe in iraq. we are
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a religious minority here and we see a religious minority here and we see a four hour lives in the lives of our family. the story of ourfamily. the story of iraq�*s once our family. the story of iraq�*s once flourishing christian community is now one of exile and even a successful visit by the pope is unlikely to change that. now, sarah keith—lucas has the weather. hello, it was quite a chilly, fresh start of the morning, but for most of us, the weather is set fair for the next couple of days. largely high—pressure bringing dry, settled conditions, a bit of sunshine coming through. a fair amount of cloud in general. but it will continue to feel quite chilly out there today. that is all down to the fact that we have got a cold air mass with us at the moment, so the blue colours showing that cold air mass. there has been a weak cold front working its way south overnight and through the course of the morning. we will continue to see the winds coming in from a north or north—easterly direction for many of us. quite breezy through the english channel,
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particularly towards the channel islands. the odd isolated shower. just one or two isolated light showers around the east coast of england as well, perhaps in lincolnshire, there could be a flake of snow in the north pennines and southern plans. but most places looking predominantly dry. some sunshine for scotland, down towards the south—east of england as well. temperatures about five to 8 degrees but a fair amount of cloud later on in the day. this evening and tonight, light winds and clear spells, so it is going to be another cold night to come. the chance of a few more showers around the east coast. patricularly down towards the thames some estuary, showers piling in here. temperatures down to about minus three, minus four degrees first thing tomorrow. particularly chilly through parts of the east midlands, i think. this area of high pressure stays with us as we head on into the weekend but it is just starting to slip away towards the south, particularly by sunday, allowing some slightly milder air and some weather fronts to move in from the atlantic. during saturday, one or two showers for the far south—east of england, essex, kent, for instance also a few spots of rain for the western isles and the northern isles. but elsewhere, predominantly dry. sunny spells, again a fair amount of cloud around. temperatures for most
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of us still not great, about six to 8 degrees, but turning milderfrom the north—west and that theme continues into sunday as well. we have got a bit of rain and breezy conditions arriving from northern western scotland. much of the uk though, another dry day, some sunshine, a fair amount of cloud. temperatures about six to 8 degrees, but nine, possibly 10 degrees with that milder air working into far north—west. into next week, eventually, we will wave goodbye to high—pressure and we will open the doors to see atlantic weatherfronts moving in. this one by tuesday, later on tuesday could be pretty wet and windy. things turning milder and more unsettled through the course of next week but for the weekend, most of us looking dry, somewhat chilly. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. plans to give nhs staff in england a1% pay rise are dismissed by unions as a "kick in the teeth" — but ministers defend the proposal. our priority�*s had to be protecting people�*s jobs and livelihoods. because without those jobs and without those businesses continuing and people�*s employment continuing, we need that vibrant economy in order to fund the nhs. i think it is appalling, and this is not about affordability, because we know we are in an economic crisis. we have to grow our way out of the crisis. what do you think of the proposed 1% payrise for nhs staff?

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