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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  June 23, 2021 6:00pm-6:25pm BST

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at six: a close encounter between russia and the royal navy in the black sea off crimea. russia says it's fired shots and dropped bombs in the path of hms defender — a claim the ministry of defence has denied — but our correspondent on—board says the situation is tense. this russian coast guard vessel has come up right close to this british warship and is trying now to force it to change course. if you don't change the course, i will fire — if you don't change the course, i will fire. , , l, if you don't change the course, i will fire. ,, t, , if you don't change the course, i will fire. ,, a, , if you don't change the course, i willfire. ,, a, , a, , , will fire. russia says the warship was violating _ will fire. russia says the warship was violating its _ will fire. russia says the warship was violating its waters, - will fire. russia says the warship was violating its waters, britain | was violating its waters, britain says they were sailing in international seas. we will be asking why this happened and how serious this encounter could be.
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also tonight. former premier league footballer dalian atkinson was killed five years ago — he was tasered and kicked twice in the head. pc benjamin monk of west mercia police was convicted of manslaughter, but cleared of murder. it's mainly relief, we'rejust relieved that it's finally over. it's been a really long journey. one of thousands of women in scotland hoping for a formal apology, after they were forced to give up their babies for adoption half a century ago. and coming up on the bbc news channel: who will be crowned cricket world champions? new zealand chase the title, as india slump to 170 all—out at the hampshire bowl.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. russia says its patrol ships and fighterjets have fired warning shots and dropped bombs in the path of a royal navy destroyer sailing in the black sea near crimea this afternoon. the russian defence ministry said that hms defender had violated its territorial waters. but the ministry of defence has flatly denied that claim, saying the russians were carrying out exercises. the mod says the royal navy destroyer was sailing in an internationally recognised shipping lane within the i2—mile limit of crimea's territorial waters. our defence correspondent jonathan beale is the only broadcaster on—board hms defender. he has just sent this report. action stations... this is not a drill — action stations... this is not a drill take _ action stations... this is not a drill take a _ action stations... this is not a drill. take a seat straightaway! a
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british drill. take a seat straightaway! british warship in the black sea. about to make a point to russia. irate about to make a point to russia. we are about to make a point to russia. - are straight into it, go into action stations now, just —— just get to a high state of residence. hms defender has _ high state of residence. hms defender has just _ high state of residence. hms defender has just left - high state of residence. hms defender has just left the - high state of residence. hms defender has just left the port of odessa. as you can see, just over there, we are already being shadow by a russian warship. they are soon checking russian military aircraft. and they are also tracking them. it and they are also tracking them. it is a slightly more increased threat because _ is a slightly more increased threat because we are operating outside of our normal— because we are operating outside of our normal areas. you because we are operating outside of our normal areas.— our normal areas. you are being watched by _ our normal areas. you are being watched by the _ our normal areas. you are being watched by the russians? - our normal areas. you are being watched by the russians? they| our normal areas. you are being i watched by the russians? they can see us, watched by the russians? they can see us. we — watched by the russians? they can see us. we can _ watched by the russians? they can see us, we can see _ watched by the russians? they can see us, we can see them. - watched by the russians? they can see us, we can see them. as - watched by the russians? they can see us, we can see them. as we i watched by the russians? they canl see us, we can see them. as we get close to crimea. — see us, we can see them. as we get close to crimea, the _ see us, we can see them. as we get close to crimea, the tension - see us, we can see them. as we get close to crimea, the tension rises. l close to crimea, the tension rises. hms defender is going to sail within what russia now claims is its territorial waters. they are following a legally recognised shipping lane. is there a flashpoint potentially in
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terms of how the russians could behave? , ., _, ., , behave? there is a contentious oint, behave? there is a contentious point. their— behave? there is a contentious point, their posture _ behave? there is a contentious point, their posture will - behave? there is a contentious point, their posture will likely l behave? there is a contentious. point, their posture will likely be more _ point, their posture will likely be more belligerent— point, their posture will likely be more belligerent because - point, their posture will likely be more belligerent because of- point, their posture will likely be more belligerent because of our| more belligerent because of our proximity— more belligerent because of our proximity to _ more belligerent because of our proximity to what _ more belligerent because of our proximity to what they- more belligerent because of our| proximity to what they recognise more belligerent because of our. proximity to what they recognise as their waters — proximity to what they recognise as their watere— their waters. they will view you as belligerent — their waters. they will view you as belligerent going _ their waters. they will view you as belligerent going so _ their waters. they will view you as belligerent going so close - their waters. they will view you as belligerent going so close to - belligerent going so close to crimea. , ., ,, ., crimea. they might take that view. as hms defender— crimea. they might take that view. as hms defender comes _ crimea. they might take that view. as hms defender comes within - crimea. they might take that view. as hms defender comes within 12 i as hms defender comes within 12 miles of the coast, the russian coast guard make a dangerous move. this russian coast guard vessel has come up right close to this british warship and is trying now to force it to change course. nothing on the bridge. if you cross the line, i will— nothing on the bridge. if you cross the line, i will fire, _ nothing on the bridge. if you cross the line, iwill fire, if— nothing on the bridge. if you cross the line, i will fire, if you - nothing on the bridge. if you cross the line, i will fire, if you don't - the line, i will fire, if you don't change — the line, i will fire, if you don't change the _ the line, i will fire, if you don't change the course, _ the line, i will fire, if you don't change the course, i— the line, i will fire, if you don't change the course, i will- the line, i will fire, if you don't change the course, i will fire. i change the course, i will fire. 0ver~ — change the course, i will fire. over the _ change the course, i will fire. over. the crew— change the course, i will fire. over. the crew wear- change the course, i will fire. i over. the crew wear protective clothing in case that threat is followed through. shots are fired,
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but out of reach. i followed through. shots are fired, but out of reach.— followed through. shots are fired, but out of reach. i have got visual, trackin: but out of reach. i have got visual, tracking right. _ but out of reach. i have got visual, tracking right, altitude _ but out of reach. i have got visual, tracking right, altitude low. - tracking right, altitude low. throughout the transit, hms defender detects at least 20 russian military aircraft nearby. some, far too close for comfort. aircraft nearby. some, far too close for comfort-— for comfort. the uk and the royal navy deployment _ for comfort. the uk and the royal navy deployment is _ for comfort. the uk and the royal navy deployment is here - for comfort. the uk and the royal navy deployment is here to - for comfort. the uk and the royal. navy deployment is here to maintain international order and uphold that for the global peace and security, and the royal navy and the uk will always call out states that do not follow international order, that is our mission. follow international order, that is our mission-— follow international order, that is our mission. last year, russian -- russia claims _ our mission. last year, russian -- russia claims to _ our mission. last year, russian -- russia claims to have _ our mission. last year, russian -- russia claims to have chased - our mission. last year, russian -- i russia claims to have chased another navy warship out of the black sea, but clearly, britain has not been deterred. this is evidence that the uk is willing to challenge russia to
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uphold international law. but it is a high—risk strategy. james landale —— jonathan beale, a high—risk strategy. james landale ——jonathan beale, bbc news, on board hms defender. our diplomatic correspondent james landalejoins me now. dramatic scenes, what is behind this and what does this mean for relations with russia?- and what does this mean for relations with russia? both sides were clearly _ relations with russia? both sides were clearly ready _ relations with russia? both sides were clearly ready for _ relations with russia? both sides were clearly ready for this, - relations with russia? both sides were clearly ready for this, hmsl were clearly ready for this, hms defender were in action stations and russia had lots of aircraft in the region and it was a deliberate decision by hms defender to go that close to crimea, it could have taken a longer route outside but it chose not due to a set is freedom of navigation and what britain seizes international waters. one source said, defenderwas international waters. one source said, defender was not there to pick a fight, but to make a point. confrontations like this are not unprecedented, but this is more acute than usual. the uk has tested russia's resolve and shown its support for ukraine. in return, russia has responded robustly by defending what it sees as its sovereignty and it has accused the
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uk of plating —— blatant provocation and summons the british ambassador, so relations between the uk and moscow are cooler as a result of this incident, but both sides will have felt they have made their point. have felt they have made their oint. , . , have felt they have made their oint. �* ., , ., ., have felt they have made their oint. g ., , ., ., ., ~ have felt they have made their oint. �* ., , ., ., ., ~' i., for the first time in britain for more than 30 years, a police officer has been convicted of manslaughter during the course of their duties. pc benjamin monk was found guilty of killing the former aston villa striker dalian atkinson, who died after a stand—off with west mercia police officers in telford in 2016. a trial at birmingham crown court heard how pc monk tasered mr atkinson for 33 seconds and kicked him twice in the head. the 43 year old had denied any wrongdoing, and said he believed there was a danger to life for him and his colleague. our correspondent sian lloyd reports. pc benjamin monk had fired his taser three times when dalian atkinson fell to the ground.
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while he lay in the street, the police officer kicked him twice in the head. the 48—year—old former footballer never recovered and died in hospital. dalian atkinson's behaviour had been described as "erratic and disturbed" when he visited his father's home in telford in the early hours of the morning. a neighbour called 999. 43—year—old pc benjamin monk — an officer with ia years' experience — responded to the call. today, he was found guilty of killing the former striker. dalian atkinson's family have followed the seven—week trial. they described the five years it's taken to get the case to court as "unacceptable", but welcome the jury's verdict.
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hello, police! ..the suspect becomes more compliant. daniel sandford, bbc news. the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, has urged the population to take up the covid jab, particularly the second dose, in the fight against the growing delta variant of the virus. it comes as 60% of uk adults
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are now fully vaccinated. however, uptake is not equal across the country and although vaccine confidence is growing, particularly in ethnic minority communities, vaccine hesitancy is some areas is still preventing people coming forward, as our community affairs correspondent adina campbell explains. a walk—in vaccination centre in east london. this mosque is one of many local efforts to help drive up take—up rates and harder to reach communities. take-up rates and harder to reach communities.— take-up rates and harder to reach communities. obviously, anything auainst a communities. obviously, anything against a disease, _ communities. obviously, anything against a disease, you _ communities. obviously, anything against a disease, you should - communities. obviously, anything. against a disease, you should take. but there are still worries not enough people from ethnic minority groups, who are some of the most at risk of getting coronavirus and becoming seriously ill, have had a covid vaccine. even though vaccine take rates have improved within all ethnic minority communities over the
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last few months, there are still worries about areas like new and in east london, one of the most diverse, youngest and poorest parts of the country. only 50% of adults here have had theirfirst of the country. only 50% of adults here have had their first dose of the country. only 50% of adults here have had theirfirst dose —— in newham. far lowerthan here have had theirfirst dose —— in newham. far lower than the national average of 81%. latest nhs figures in england show take—up rates are lowest in black communities across all ages. just 68% of black people aged over 50 have been vaccinated, compared with 94% of white people and 85% of south asian people. i am and 85% of south asian people. i am very cautious — and 85% of south asian people. i am very cautious about _ and 85% of south asian people. i am very cautious about what is going on i’ili'it very cautious about what is going on right now. _ very cautious about what is going on right now. i— very cautious about what is going on right now, i don't know if it is safe — right now, i don't know if it is safe and _ right now, i don't know if it is safe and if— right now, i don't know if it is safe and if it will affect me in the lon- safe and if it will affect me in the long term — safe and if it will affect me in the long term. | safe and if it will affect me in the long term-— long term. i feel better is especially _ long term. i feel better is especially a _ long term. i feel better is especially a sense - long term. i feel better is especially a sense of- long term. i feel better is . especially a sense of distrust long term. i feel better is - especially a sense of distrust that has been — especially a sense of distrust that has been fostered _ especially a sense of distrust that has been fostered between - especially a sense of distrust that| has been fostered between ethnic minorities— has been fostered between ethnic minorities and _ has been fostered between ethnic minorities and the _ has been fostered between ethnic minorities and the government. l has been fostered between ethnic minorities and the government. [l has been fostered between ethnic i minorities and the government. i am“ minorities and the government. i am not takin: minorities and the government. i am not taking the _ minorities and the government. i am not taking the vaccine _ minorities and the government. not taking the vaccine until i am certain it is safe to be inside my body. certain it is safe to be inside my bod . , . ., , , certain it is safe to be inside my bod. ,. ., , , body. public health experts say they are doinu body. public health experts say they are doing all — body. public health experts say they are doing all they _ body. public health experts say they are doing all they can _ body. public health experts say they are doing all they can to _ body. public health experts say they are doing all they can to make - body. public health experts say they are doing all they can to make surel are doing all they can to make sure people are aware of misinformation.
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we trained a large workforce to be able to— we trained a large workforce to be able to have supportive conversations, able to answer people's— conversations, able to answer people's question so they feel reassured about getting a vaccine. and ministers say more work is being done to target those who are reluctant about having a covid vaccine. latest data shows you are less likely to have had a vaccine if you are black, is it time to take a new approach?— you are black, is it time to take a new approach? this past week, we launched the _ new approach? this past week, we launched the toolkit, _ new approach? this past week, we launched the toolkit, a _ new approach? this past week, we launched the toolkit, a really - launched the toolkit, a really short, sharp, very concise toolkit of how to make sure we take the best learnings of how people have reached out to black, afro—caribbean communities and got people that confidence. communities and got people that confidence-— confidence. every time i am in a surue , confidence. every time i am in a surgery. l _ confidence. every time i am in a surgery. l have _ confidence. every time i am in a surgery. l have a _ confidence. every time i am in a surgery, i have a conversation l confidence. every time i am in a - surgery, i have a conversation where somebody— surgery, i have a conversation where somebody tips from say no to maybe or maybe _ somebody tips from say no to maybe or maybe ts — somebody tips from say no to maybe or maybe ts and that is what makes a difference _ or maybe ts and that is what makes a difference. ~ , ., ~', difference. with 'ust a few weeks until it is difference. with just a few weeks until it is expected _ difference. with just a few weeks until it is expected until - difference. with just a few weeks until it is expected until all - until it is expected until all lockdown measures will be lifted in england, vaccinating as many people as possible from all backgrounds will be a top priority.
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adina campbell, bbc news. the latest government figures show that in the past 2a hours, 19 deaths were reported and 16,135 new infections were recorded. that means an average of 11,354 new cases per day in the last week. just under 300,000 people received a first dose of the vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. a first dose of the vaccine nearly 43.5 million people have now had theirfirstjab, that's around 83% of uk adults. a quarter—of—a—million people have had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. it means 31.7 million people have now had both doses, that's just over 60% of uk adults. scotla nd scotland has recorded its highest ever daily figure today, almost 3000 new cases of coronavirus. our correspondent alexandra mackenzie is in glasgow, do we know what is
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behind this sudden rise?- behind this sudden rise? well, sohie, behind this sudden rise? well, sophie. in _ behind this sudden rise? well, sophie, in recent— behind this sudden rise? well, sophie, in recent days, - behind this sudden rise? well, sophie, in recent days, two . behind this sudden rise? -ii sophie, in recent days, two thirds of new cases have been male, and these males have been aged between 15 and 1m. so, they are less likely at the beginning of the year. alexandra, thank you. the time is coming up to 20 past six, our top story... russia says it has five shots and dropped bombs in the path of hms defender, a claim denied by the ministry of defence, but our
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correspondent on board says the situation is tense. coming up — after winning their group, england will find out tonight who they will take on in the knockout stage of the euros. coming up in sportsday, france, portugal, germany, who will it be next for england at the euros? hungary can also qualify. last month, we brought you the story of the thousands of unmarried women in england who were forced to give up their babies for adoption in the 19505, �*60s and �*705. tens of thousands of women in scotland also went through the same trauma. now they want a formal apology from the government, and tomorrow, some will meet the scottish children's minister. duncan kennedy has been speaking to two women with harrowing tales of what they went through as young women, and the lost decades
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without their children. this is a story from a different era. a time when unmarried women faced shame for getting pregnant. i was 16. it was 1962. elsbeth ross lived in glasgow when she became pregnant. she was sent, in secret, to a mother and baby home. six weeks after giving birth, the matron made it clear elsbeth was to leave without her baby. she said to me, "just go to your dormitory and pack your bags and go." and i did. and my life just continued from there as if that had never happened. did you give up your baby? no, it was taken. it was actually taken from my arms without telling me what was happening. elsbeth showed us that home where her baby was taken from her for adoption 59 years ago.
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this is the first time she's been back inside. it's a little strange walking in here after all these years. it's now flats, but she goes straight to the room where she last saw her baby. this is the last place i saw my son. it's a moment she yearns for the past. just turn the clock back... when you see this room, what does it mean to you? oh, it's horrible. it's just horrible. it's like i've saved this up for years. this was the last place you saw your baby. in that room. elsbeth wouldn't see her son again for 35 years. 50 years ago, the pressure on unmarried women to give up their babies for adoption came from church run homes, families,
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nhs staff and social workers. it was 1978 when i found out i was pregnant. janno farmer remembers the day she gave birth. and found herself begging the doctor for pain relief. can you stop, please, i'm not anaesthetised, you're not... you're stitching and i can feel everything you're doing. he didn't say a word to me. he didn't say a word. and he just went on to the next stitch. and i thought, this is terrible, this is... this must be what it feels like to be tortured. nurses didn't even let her see her baby. so i didn't see him at all.
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not even a little bit. and when was the first time you got to hold your own baby? the first time i got to hold my own baby was 31 years later when he was about six foot one. so i never held my baby, i never saw him. last month, birthmothers in england wrote to borisjohnson asking him for a government apology for historical forced adoptions. i feel deep sadness that in the past women were forced to give their children up for adoption... now, nicola sturgeon says she will consider one. with birthmothers beating the scottish children's minister tomorrow. do you think it's time someone, the government, should say sorry? yes, i do. i do. ijust never really had a life, to be honest. i just went through the motions. with a big hole in it. a great big hole in it. m,—hm. sorry would be a great thing. losing your child is an immense failure whether or not you actively
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participated or not, and that leaves a scar. it's a very scarring thing. two mothers sharing their stories of forced adoption, with duncan kennedy. it's exactly five years today since britain voted to leave the european union. in that time, european union citizens have been able to apply to continue to live and work in the uk, post—transition. that scheme, which closes in a week, has seen 5.5 million applications, far more than original estimates. here's our deputy political editor, vicki young. ending the uncertainty. the eu settlement scheme has been one of the great successes of our brexit negotiations. the great successes of our brexit negotiations-— the great successes of our brexit negotiations. the great successes of our brexit ne . otiations. ~ ., ., ., negotiations. more than 5 million eu citizens have — negotiations. more than 5 million eu citizens have officially _ negotiations. more than 5 million eu citizens have officially secured - citizens have officially secured their right to live and work in the uk and time is running out for others who want to apply. i uk and time is running out for others who want to apply. i would encourage — others who want to apply. i would encourage anyone _ others who want to apply. i would encourage anyone who _ others who want to apply. i would encourage anyone who may - others who want to apply. i would encourage anyone who may still. others who want to apply. i would l encourage anyone who may still be eligible to apply ahead of the deadline next week musa stan, who is belgian, applied when the skin
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openedin belgian, applied when the skin opened in 2019. the belgian, applied when the skin opened in 2019.— belgian, applied when the skin opened in 2019. the process was relatively straightforward, - opened in 2019. the process was relatively straightforward, very l relatively straightforward, very easy, _ relatively straightforward, very easy, i— relatively straightforward, very easy, i think i got my answer within a week— easy, i think i got my answer within a week or— easy, i think i got my answer within a week or so, — easy, i think i got my answer within a week or so, so i was quite happy with that, — a week or so, so i was quite happy with that, obviously. my partner, she had _ with that, obviously. my partner, she had to — with that, obviously. my partner, she had to apply for a similar scheme, _ she had to apply for a similar scheme, she did it back in february and she _ scheme, she did it back in february and she is— scheme, she did it back in february and she is still waiting to hear back— and she is still waiting to hear back from _ and she is still waiting to hear back from the home office on what happens _ back from the home office on what happens to have rights and whether she will— happens to have rights and whether she will be — happens to have rights and whether she will be allowed to stay, in fact most _ she will be allowed to stay, in fact most of— she will be allowed to stay, in fact most of the home office says the number— most of the home office says the number of— most of the home office says the number of people applying for this scheme _ number of people applying for this scheme is — number of people applying for this scheme is far higher—than—expected. it scheme is far higher—than—expected. it suggests— scheme is far higher—than—expected. it suggests that around 2 million more _ it suggests that around 2 million more eu — it suggests that around 2 million more eu citizens had been living here _ more eu citizens had been living here than— more eu citizens had been living here than officials thought. but what _ here than officials thought. but what about those who want to come here in _ what about those who want to come here in future? the hospitality industry— here in future? the hospitality industry says it is desperate for a new generation of workers. in new generation of workers. henley, new generation of workers. in henley, olivier has plenty of customers in his restaurant but not enough staff. he is being forced to close one day a week. he says the furlough scheme is partly to blame, plus the reliance on eu workers who have now left. the plus the reliance on eu workers who have now left-— have now left. the main and only difficul , have now left. the main and only difficulty. it _ have now left. the main and only difficulty. it is — have now left. the main and only difficulty, it is the _
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have now left. the main and only difficulty, it is the staff _ have now left. the main and only difficulty, it is the staff issue. - difficulty, it is the staff issue. everybody is struggling, from the fish and chip shop, to the big michelin star trek, it is not only one type of employee or skilled employee we can't find, it is the whole range of the industry. hospitality experts are worried about the new immigration scheme, which was designed to reduce the number of unskilled workers coming to the uk. n number of unskilled workers coming to the uk. , ., to the uk. i believe the government is auoin to to the uk. i believe the government is going to have _ to the uk. i believe the government is going to have to _ to the uk. i believe the government is going to have to introduce - to the uk. i believe the government is going to have to introduce some i is going to have to introduce some sort of— is going to have to introduce some sort of return scheme for eu workers. _ sort of return scheme for eu workers. i— sort of return scheme for eu workers, i think the whole concept of skilled — workers, i think the whole concept of skilled and unskilled workers is now essentially archaic, what has happened — now essentially archaic, what has happened with the pandemic has highlighted that the definition of skilled _ highlighted that the definition of skilled and unskilled does not go far enough, and to now turn around and say— far enough, and to now turn around and say hospitality workers are unskilled — and say hospitality workers are unskilled and can't necessarily hit that minimum salary to get visas to come _ that minimum salary to get visas to come back— that minimum salary to get visas to come back to the uk, it isjust not a solution — come back to the uk, it isjust not a solution anymore, it is not going to work _ a solution anymore, it is not going to work. �* , , , , a solution anymore, it is not going towork. �* , , , , ., to work. but ministers insist that art of to work. but ministers insist that part of the _ to work. but ministers insist that part of the point _ to work. but ministers insist that part of the point of— to work. but ministers insist that part of the point of brexit - to work. but ministers insist that part of the point of brexit is - to work. but ministers insist that part of the point of brexit is to i part of the point of brexit is to encourage employers to recruit and train workers already in the
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country. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. football now, and england will find out this evening who they will face in the last 16 of the euros after they finished top of their group. it could be france, germany, portugal or hungary. here's our sports editor, dan roan. commentator: lovely little ball, it is put into the back of the net by raheem sterling. two wins, and england have got off to a solid if not spectacular start at the euros. manager gareth southgate has not been afraid to make changes in the group stage, and one of those to take advantage is by karius a. the 19—year—old arsenal player was man of the match in their win against the czech republic, having been handed a surprise start. this the czech republic, having been handed a surprise start. this was my first time playing _ handed a surprise start. this was my first time playing in _ handed a surprise start. this was my first time playing in a _ handed a surprise start. this was my first time playing in a major - first time playing in a major tournament and sometimes people can be nervous but for me i was just excited, i had the confidence from the coach and the players are so i really enjoyed it. just the coach and the players are so i really enjoyed it.— really en'oyed it. just three years a . o really enjoyed it. just three years ago bukayo _ really enjoyed it. just three years ago bukayo saka _ really enjoyed it. just three years ago bukayo saka was _ really enjoyed it. just three years ago bukayo saka was a _ really enjoyed it. just three years ago bukayo saka was a pupil- really enjoyed it. just three years| ago bukayo saka was a pupil here really enjoyed it. just three years i ago bukayo saka was a pupil here at
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greenford high in west london. his achievement has been a source of pride, the school thrilled by his performance just a few miles away at wembley. performance 'ust a few miles away at wemble . �* ., ., , .,, wembley. before i went to bed last niuht 'ust wembley. before i went to bed last night just dropped _ wembley. before i went to bed last nightjust dropped him _ wembley. before i went to bed last nightjust dropped him a _ wembley. before i went to bed last nightjust dropped him a quick i nightjust dropped him a quick message — nightjust dropped him a quick message to say congratulations, man of the _ message to say congratulations, man of the match performance in my eyes, and it _ of the match performance in my eyes, and it was _ of the match performance in my eyes, and it was nice because i woke up this morning to the radio on in the background — this morning to the radio on in the background talking about one of my ex—students and i roll over to check the alarm _ ex—students and i roll over to check the alarm and there was a message from bakayo saying thanks, sir, and a little _ from bakayo saying thanks, sir, and a little message showing he still cares _ a little message showing he still cares about us as a school, which is lovely _ cares about us as a school, which is lovel . ., ., .., , . lovely. for the fourth consecutive match, lovely. for the fourth consecutive match. england _ lovely. for the fourth consecutive match, england will— lovely. for the fourth consecutive match, england will play - lovely. for the fourth consecutive match, england will play here i lovely. for the fourth consecutive match, england will play here at. match, england will play here at wembley next tuesday, this time in front of a5,000 fans, the biggest crowd at a british sports event since the start of the pandemic. but there is also a sense that they will need to raise their game if they are to beat what are likely to be daunting opponents. england will play whoever finishes runner—up daunting opponents. england will play whoeverfinishes runner—up in group f tonight, either world champions france, cristiano ronaldo—
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inspired european champion sport or a resurgent germany or a dangerous looking hungary. brute a resurgent germany or a dangerous looking hungary-— looking hungary. we can't sit back and be too — looking hungary. we can't sit back and be too conservative. - looking hungary. we can't sit back and be too conservative. we i looking hungary. we can't sit back and be too conservative. we just l and be too conservative. we just have to let off the leash slightly. young players haven't really experienced defeat, so they don't know, they are playing with freedom, and gareth will give them that freedom, at the right time. having been outclassed _ freedom, at the right time. having been outclassed by _ freedom, at the right time. having been outclassed by croatia, i been outclassed by croatia, scotland's journey at the tournament is over, once again failing to progress to the knockout stages. but for wales, who trained earlier in rome, the dream is very much alive, preparing to play denmark in amsterdam on saturday with a place in the quarterfinals at stake. dan roan, bbc news. and finally, the queen has held herfirst in—person weekly audience with the prime minister at buckingham palace since the first lockdown began last year. have you been talking to your secretary of state for health, poor man, he came to the privy council...? man, he came to the privy council. . . ?_ man, he came to the privy i
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council. . . ?- indeed. the council...? oh, yes. indeed. the queen and _ council...? oh, yes. indeed. the queen and boris _ council...? oh, yes. indeed. the queen and boris johnson, i council...? oh, yes. indeed. the queen and boris johnson, who i council...? oh, yes. indeed. the i queen and boris johnson, who were queen and borisjohnson, who were together at the g7 summit earlier this month, have been conducting their audiences by telephone ever since the pandemic began. time for a look at the weather, here's darren bett. it felt a bit more like summer today across south—eastern parts, with lighter wins and more sunshine, but that was not the case for many other parts of the uk, stuck underneath cloud, with damp and drizzly weather. you can see the contrast. the wetter weather will be clipping the south—west of england in the next few hours and gradually, overnight, very slowly, this cloud pushes further into the midlands, towards lincolnshire, and there will be bits of rain and drizzle. i think across east anglia and the south—east it is going to be dry and clear and quite cool first thing tomorrow morning. elsewhere, a warmer night underneath the blanket of cloud. and there is some warmer, more humid air across some parts of the country tomorrow in between the
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two weather fronts. there will be some wetter weather coming

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