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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2021 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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hello, good evening. this is bbc news. our headlines... new guidance for people for double jabs from the 16th as they continue to relax restrictions in england. step—by—step we are replacing the temporary protection of what the long—term protection of the vaccine. yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now. _ yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now. fix— yes, let's have freedom keep masks for now, fix six pay and let's unlock— for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in_ for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in a _ for now, fix six pay and let's unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six _ unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six paw — unlock in a safe and sustainable way -- six pay-— -- six pay. the end of term will mean the _ -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end _ -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end of— -- six pay. the end of term will mean the end of school- -- six pay. the end of term will| mean the end of school bubbles -- six pay. the end of term will. mean the end of school bubbles for england. you both only help isolate if they test positive. amanda spent guilty of murdering sisters who were
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stabbed after a birthday celebration in london of last year. they paid tribute to them outside of court. today, we remember our goal is as we remember that wonderful strong linen they were, and we hope that some good will come out of this horrible story. good will come out of this horrible sto . ., �* , , ., good will come out of this horrible sto . ., �*, story. voxel uk's plant looks safe after the company _ story. voxel uk's plant looks safe after the company unveils - story. voxel uk's plant looks safe after the company unveils plans l story. voxel uk's plant looks safe | after the company unveils plans to build an all electric band there from 2022. this is the scene live right now of wembley where there is excitement as italy take on spain in the first of the euro 2020 semi finals and that match has just kicked off in the last few seconds.
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hello, good evening. welcome to bbc news. the government signalled a further evening of coronavirus restrictions in england after admitting that daily covid cases could reach 100,000 at some point this summer. the health secretary said that from the 16th of august, people who are fully vaccinated well no longer have to self—isolate if they come into close contact with a person who has tested positive. that policy will also apply to anybody under the age of 18 from the same dates. but labour has questioned what the lifting of restrictions amid rising cases will mean for the most vulnerable. here is our health editor, hugh penn. getting pinged, the nhs covid app alerting people they've been in contact with someone who tested positive and telling them to self—isolate for up to ten days. that will come to an end in england in mid august for those
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who are double jabbed, whether allotted by the app or test and trace officials, they will be simply asked to get tested. people we spoke to in slough said they had bad memories of self—isolation. the office is only round the corner from the house and they wanted me to be in the office and stuff, and as a result i couldn't be, and it was a really bad time. i had the experience of isolating so it is very difficult. i would encourage everyone tojust have the vaccine, to be honest. i work on a contract, _ helping people back to work that i have lost theirjobs through covid,| and the absolute devastation that it has caused i think you shouldn't have to self—isolate any more. i from mid—august, no one under 18 in england will have to self—isolate if they are in contact with an infected person, though they will be urged to take a test. secretary of state. the health secretary told mps it was part of the move towards more normal everyday lives. step—by—step, jab byjab, we are replacing the temporary protection of restrictions with the long—term protection of the vaccine. so we can restore the freedoms which
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we cherish, and the experiences which mean so much to us all. labour questioned the government because my overall strategy. so let's have a u—turn on mask wearing, yes, let's have freedom but not a high risk free for all. keep masks for now, fixed sick pay, and let's unlock in a safe and sustainable way. the latest numbers show nearly 29,000 daily reported cases, and more than 400 patients admitted to hospital in one day. the government predicts 50,000 cases a day by the 19th ofjuly, then 100,000 a day possibly in august. one key member of a government advisory committee says predicting future hospital numbers is difficult, but he is not concerned at this stage. there are risks to the opening injuly, undoubtedly, and that has been highlighted, and certainly we can expect high numbers of cases, but i would say i moderate ridley optimistic that we can
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keep hospitalisations ——but i would say i moderately optimistic that we can keep hospitalisations and deaths at manageable, relatively low levels, but there are risks. with covid patient number set to rise further, there are fears that hospitals will come under renewed pressure and again have to postpone nonurgent operations. 0ur concern about even small increases in covid activity is that it will impact the efforts of trusts to tackle the backlog of care, manage the rising demand for mental health services, constrained by the decreased capacity due to social distancing and infection control. the government tos in wales and northern ireland have yet to unveil their plans. scottish ministers say they are on track to lift remaining restrictions next month. hugh pym, bbc news. so we have been hearing the latest official figures stating that in the
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last 2a hours 37 deaths were reported in 28,773 new infections were recorded across the united kingdom. 0n were recorded across the united kingdom. on average, they have been 26,632 new cases a day in the uk in the last week, more than 76,000 people received first dose of the vaccine in the latest 2a hour period. that's almost 45 and a half million who have now had their first vaccination will stop 86.2% of uk adults. nearly 148,000 have had their second dose, which means that nearly 33.9 million people are now fully vaccinated, so that is 64.3% of uk adults. covid roles are also to be relaxed in england's schools with the present system of sending whole bubbles home after a positive case is said to be scrapped after the end of term. after that, children will only have to isolate if they test positive. new figures show that people absences in england
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because of covid are at a new high since all students return to school in march of this year. figures show that more than 640,000 pupils in england are not in school due to covid last week, under 10% of those, 62,000, have confirmed or suspected covid. 0ur education correspondent has this report. this is west horton high school in bolton, an area which has had some of the highest rates of covid in the country. over the past few months, the school has been part of a clinical trial. instead of bubbles being sent home to isolate, children are sent here for daily tests. during the october to christmas period, we sent home masses of students, some students six or seven times in isolation within that period of time. we are keen to avoid that situation again, so when the clinical trial came along to allow us to keep the students in school with the daily contact testing, we volunteered. so, with that, we've managed to keep well over 500 students in the building that would have been sent home. today, the government has announced that many restrictions,
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such as staggered starts and social distancing in schools, will be lifted, and bubbles will be scrapped. we recognise that the system of the bubbles and isolation is causing disruption to many children's education. that is why we will be ending bubbles and transferring contact tracing to the nhs test and trace system for early years settings, schools and colleges. you didn't get it. see if you can hear that now. there are also plans to move back to the exam system next year, but these pupils say the disruption caused has put them at a disadvantage. we've missed months of education, in places like bolton where it's heavily populated. you see that we are isolating more often, so we are missing out on much more education. i think that all schools should have the daily testing, because it has a really large impact on what students are learning in school rather than being at home, stop just looking at a screen. lost time in school has had
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a major impact on learning and on children's well—being. labour said it's glad the chaotic bubble system is ending, but says there is a risk that today's announcement will drive up infections in schools. at this primary school, there are safety concerns from teachers, parents and pupils. i think it's a complicated issue. in terms of missed learning and health, i thoroughly welcome it. the children will still be in school. but then when it comes to the anxieties of parents and teachers, of potentially having a child in school with the virus that's dormant, and the impact on their health, that's going to be very, very challenging to manage that. the government hopes in september schools in england will return changes in scottish and welsh schools and wellston announced their changes soon. students will still be offered to lateral flow tests a week. the government hopes in september schools in england will return to normality as we learn to live with covid. but the dilemma of keeping schools safe while minimising disruption means there are no easy answers. ——in northern ireland, pupils will continue to be offered two lateral flow tests a week.
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let's talk now to this shadow schools minister representing the labour party. thank you very much for being with us. the government said they made the right decision on ending school bubbles and this idea of isolating because somebody in your bible tests positive. the? of isolating because somebody in your bible tests positive. they have made the right _ your bible tests positive. they have made the right decision _ your bible tests positive. they have made the right decision at - your bible tests positive. they have made the right decision at the - your bible tests positive. they have l made the right decision at the wrong time, and they are making it at the moment. == time, and they are making it at the moment. �* , , , time, and they are making it at the moment-_ the - moment. -- bible tests. the replacements _ moment. -- bible tests. the replacements coming - moment. -- bible tests. the replacements coming in - moment. -- bible tests. the replacements coming in for l moment. -- bible tests. the - replacements coming in for almost a month now, but the government haven't been listening to me and they waited, as usual, until we were in a complete crisis weigh 670,000 students weren't at school before acting to man but they have done is just thrown everything out. we do need to reform the bubble system, we need to reform the bubble system, we need to reform the bubble system, we need to realise that some schools will be in school after the 19 stale, and there can be a lot of confusion around that. the removal of testing, tracing and tracking away from schools into the nationwide system is a mystery to me
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because schools are coping very well with us. they understand the school population very well, they understand certain families need more encouragement than others, but the test and tray system nationwide is underperforming very, very profoundly, and yet, there is no plan over the summer to use school facilities, there is no plan at all to make sure school that connect students in isolation are getting fed if they are on free school meals, and there is no plan in place after when thejc bia declares that the vaccine is safe for secondary students to make sure that it is offered, not forest, but offered to parents to consider for their children before schools return for the autumn term, because that is the only way we can introduce stability into our school system going forward. ~ ., , ., ., forward. where do you stand on the idea of vaccinating _ forward. where do you stand on the idea of vaccinating children? - forward. where do you stand on the idea of vaccinating children? where | idea of vaccinating children? where does the labour party stand on that? we are very clear on this, and we had been saying it for some time now, if thejc bia stays at the vaccine is safe for children 12
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plus, than it should be offered to parents and children over the summer months before they return to school in september. again, this needs to be accompanied with all the information that parents need to make an informed choice, but let's be really clear, nobody is talking about forcing this on anybody. parents need to be in control, and they need to make the decision, but it has to be done that every child, if it's declared safe, it needs to be offered it over the summer so that when schools return that there is a stability in school and a lot of children who have been vaccinated will be safe going forward and can avoid the uncertainties that have such high levels of contagion in schools is causing. and those people who think it's fine that students and young people and children won't end up in hospital, you have to understand, and any school environments, whether it's teachers are children, there will be some clinically vulnerable people there. some young people with quite severe
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challenges are in mainstream education, and they should be. so we can't have a two—tier education system going forward, and the way that gavin williamson is running the system at the moment is leading to a two—tiered system. finally, the 1st of september, we need to know the plan for the next academic year so that teachers are teaching to the exam framework with certainty and students are learning for the exams they are going to have to sit next spring. they need to know that now if we are going to have any hope of getting our education system back on track. ~ ., getting our education system back on track. a, , , ., track. more broadly, the government have announced _ track. more broadly, the government have announced a _ track. more broadly, the government have announced a whole _ track. more broadly, the government have announced a whole series - track. more broadly, the government have announced a whole series of. have announced a whole series of measures aimed at easing, lifting restrictions in england. do you welcome that? industry leaders, business leaders have welcomed that, hospitality leaders, it is freedom day on the way, and what do you say about that?— about that? labour isn't calling for the bubble system _ about that? labour isn't calling for the bubble system to _ about that? labour isn't calling for the bubble system to be _ about that? labour isn't calling for the bubble system to be reformed| about that? labour isn't calling for. the bubble system to be reformed for weeks and weeks now. —— has been calling for the bubble system to be
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reformed. it's good news that every student is unnecessarily at home often means the parents aren't at work. the government haven't made them think that the education of today in the economy of tomorrow, but also when it comes to self isolating, the economy of today, we have been really, really firm on this. also, they are making mistakes already. for example, it is very difficult to understand why, but the scientific basis of scrapping the need for facemasks in schools at the moment, because when the introduced facemasks earlier this year, the contagion, the levels of covid and our society was at a third then it is now, but now it is three times higher and growing. we know that cases are likely to go from 20,000 today as it is today to 100,000 over the summer, and yet, government are removing masks, not introducing them, bearing in mind that a country
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that that is similar to us in our vaccination rates, israel, israel currently has 200 cases a day, and they have just introduced to marie introducing the need to wear facemasks enclosed areas and on public transport. we have got ten times that amount and we are scrapping it. the government aren't releasing —— releasing scientific data behind it. while we are asking is show us the scientific advice that you are making decisions on. we think it should be a conscious uplifting, but absolutely firm they, it the bubble system and anything that prevents students from being in school when they need to learn and preventing people from going about their business and academic and economic activity going forward, we need to break down those barriers and we do need to make sure that as we go forward our economy, our education system is stabilised, but it won't be if government keeps lurching from side to side and fails to really get covid under control. albright, peter, labour npn shadow schools minister, thank you very much your time.— schools minister, thank you very much your time._ we | schools minister, thank you very . much your time._ we will much your time. thank you. we will be findin: much your time. thank you. we will be finding out _ much your time. thank you. we will be finding out about _ much your time. thank you. we will be finding out about other— much your time. thank you. we will be finding out about other strays . much your time. thank you. we will be finding out about other strays of| be finding out about other strays of the day being covered in tomorrow's
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from pages at 1030 and 11:30pm tonight in the papers. —— 10:30pm. tonight in the papers. ——10:30pm. 0ur tonight in the papers. ——10:30pm. our guests are alena roche, a columnist for the article websites. a look at our latest headlines... new guidance for people who have been double vaccinated from the 16th of august as the government continues to relax covid restrictions in england. the end of term well mean the end of school bubbles and england. pupils will only self—isolate if they test positive. i mean is found guilty of murdering sisters who were stabbed after a birthday celebration in london last year. right, let's get all the latest sports news for you. mark has got that. spain, italy, how's it going? mark has got that. spain, italy, hows it going?— how's it going? well, we are, a stake in the _ how's it going? well, we are, a stake in the right _ how's it going? well, we are, a stake in the right at _ how's it going? well, we are, a stake in the right at the - how's it going? well, we are, a. stake in the right at the business end of year at 2020, and that spirit
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—— first semifinal is under way. that when it's at wembley. there are 60,000 fans in the stadium this evening. roberto mancini's team looking to reach the final by tonight's opponents. they are on and on weekend street, and it's expected to bea to be a lot closer than that tonight. it's as close as can be afterjust over 15 minutes. it is still 0—0. italyjust got themselves a free cake hitting the post, although, it did turn out to be outside while spain leapt to dominate over the last few minutes. still, a knife edge, 0—0 there. gareth southgate says his england side are "excited" by the prospect of playing their first european championship semi—final for 25 years tomorrow against denmark. the squad arrived at their hotel in london after all 26 players trained at st george's park this morning
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with southgate looking to go one better than the semi—finals he reached at both the world cup in russia in 2018 and the nations league in 2019. we are very excited about the game, that is— we are very excited about the game, that is for— we are very excited about the game, that is for sure. and we know that we are _ that is for sure. and we know that we are going to have tremendous support— we are going to have tremendous support throughout the country, so that is— support throughout the country, so that is a _ support throughout the country, so that is a great feeling for us. i think— that is a great feeling for us. i think we — that is a great feeling for us. i think we are ready for the game. i think— think we are ready for the game. i think the — think we are ready for the game. i think the players are ready. they've -ot think the players are ready. they've got tremendous experience now themselves having been in this situation — themselves having been in this situation before. so i think preparation has been calm. it's going _ preparation has been calm. it's going to — preparation has been calm. it's going to be a really, really tight again. _ going to be a really, really tight again. i— going to be a really, really tight again, ithink, and i think going to be a really, really tight again, i think, and i think an exciting _ again, i think, and i think an exciting game for everybody. emma raducanu says the whole experience of her remarkable run at wimbledon caught up with her, after having to withdraw midway through her match last night.the 18 year old brit was trailing 4—6, 0—3 to ajla tomljanovic when she became unwell and had to leave the court. she says she's still unsure what happened. no, i don't know what caused it. i think that it was a combination of everything that has gone on behind the scenes in the last week and
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accumulation of the excitements, i think it's a great learning experience for me going forward, it's a great step forward, now next time, hopefully i will be better prepared. raducanu's opponent last night ajla tomljanovic was back in action today but her wimbledon is also over — beaten by fellow australian ashleigh barty in straight sets. it means world number one barty has reached her first wimbledon semi—final with a 6—1, 6—3 win and she'll now face angelique kerber in the last four, after the 2018 wimbledon champion beat karolina muchova in straight sets. both aryna sabalenka and karolina pliskova are also into their first wimbledon semi—finals. sabalenka beat tunisia's 0ns jabeur, who'd become the first arab woman to reach the last eight at the all england club. her adventure is over though so sabalenka will now face pliskova who overcame viktorija golubic. another win for mark cavendish who sprinted to his 33rd stage victory at the tour de france taking stage ten in valence. afterfour hours riding his der—kerr—nick quickstep team mates guided him perfectly to the finish.
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he's nowjust one stage win from equalling eddy merckx's record of 34 victories and could reach that milestone on thursday. taday pogacia retains the overall lead. the british and irish lions�* tour match against the vodacom bulls on saturday has been postponed because of covid—19 cases in the hosts' camp. four bulls players and one member of the management team returned positive covid tests. 0rganisers say they are looking to reschedule the game or provide another opponent. meanwhile, south africa's second test against georgia on friday is also being reviewed, after a number of players from both camps returned positive tests. england have been forced to select a completely new team ahead of their one day series against pakistan after a coronavirus outbreak forced the entire squad into isolation. three players and four management staff tested positive, so 18 replacements have been called up to replace them. ben stokes returns to captain the side. chris silverwood is back as head coach.
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the first one day match is set to take place on thursday in cardiff. after 20 minutes and wimbley between italy and spain, ban, it is still 0-0. i italy and spain, ban, it is still 0—0. iam italy and spain, ban, it is still 0—0. i am sure there will be singles very soon. thank you much indeed. iman i man has been found guilty of murdering two sisters and in north london park injune of last year. the sisters were killed in wembley after celebrating a birthday. the jury after celebrating a birthday. the jury at the old bailey heard that 19—year—old danielle stabbed them at random after planning to sacrifice women in the belief that he would win the lottery. duke kelly reports. on a summer evening with friends, they were celebrating bibaa's birthday in the park. 0na summer on a summer evening with friends —— but as she gave a sign of peace,
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there was a sinister presence close by. danyal hussein was lying in wait, watching them. he was armed with a knife because, in his words, his intention was to sacrifice women. he is believed to have attacked bibaa first. he stabbed her eight times. nicole saw what he had done to her sister and put up a fight. she was stabbed 28 times. today, their mother and all their close family were in court to see the killer convicted. this is an unbelievable day for us. today, we remember our girls as the wonderful, strong women they were. and we hope that some good will come out of this horrible story. thank you. you are under arrest, come out. keep walking towards me. after danyal hussein was arrested, police discovered a satanic plan
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in a note in his bedroom. it was a deal with a demon from hell. and it was signed in his own blood. he wrote that he was prepared to "perform a minimum of six sacrifices" every six months and "sacrifice only women." and he was clear what he wanted in return — a lottery win. under the heading, "for me," he wrote, "win the mega millions superjackpot." 24 hours after he killed the sisters, he began buying lottery tickets. i want to pay tribute to the family of nicole and bibaa. they have acted with the utmost dignity throughout this investigation and trial. this investigation has touched all of us so deeply and we are glad that the jury saw through danyal hussein's ridiculous denials. today, the family were full of praise for the detectives who
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brought danyal hussein to justice. as a result of this case, two police officers who are not part of the investigation team are facing criminal charges. they are accused of taking photographs of the murder scene and sharing them with colleagues on social media. in life, bibaa henry and nicole smallman shared that special sister's bond. their family and all those who loved them are now forced to live their lives contemplating everything that has been lost. june kelly, bbc news, at the old bailey. draught legislation intended to tackle what minister is described as a broken asylum system has been introduced into parliament. the home office as the bill will help prevent people who have passed through a safe country claiming asylum in the
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uk. at campaigners warned that thousands of people who are currently given asylum will be turned away in the future. our home editor mark easton has been explaining the political context to this proposed legislation. this i think it's a _ this proposed legislation. this i think it's a response _ this proposed legislation. this i think it's a response to - this proposed legislation. this i think it's a response to some i this proposed legislation. t�*i " i think it's a response to some deep political frustration in the think it's a response to some deep politicalfrustration in the home office. eddie patel, of course, has 0ffice. eddie patel, of course, has committed herself to taking back control of britain's borderers after breck set. it almost daily, we are seeing those thingies put up into tad haven in dover, and each day, each migrant that walks up the ramp is in a sense of political humiliation for the home secretary, and there is rb real determination to do something to take on the people smugglers who are bringing over there desperate human cargo. the nationality and borderers bail, really, perhaps the most standup parts of that are designed to try and put those traffickers out of
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business. there is a plan to perhaps depart more easily asylum—seekers who arrive here, particularly if they have come in from an illegal, by an illegal route to. there will be a new criminal offence of arriving in the uk without permission. they will also want to try and send people back, as you say, to a safe country, the asylum seeker may have come through or perhaps depart then to another country if it is deemed that they don't have the right to come to the uk. also, there are plans to, particularly with migrant boats to turn those boats around and in foreign waters and push them back into foreign waters, potentially to foreign ports. now, the problem with all of this, and it really has been the problem since the beginning of
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the problem since the beginning of the year, is that you need to essentially an agreement from another country to make most of that to happen. at the moment, the home office has not got those agreements. there's lots of negotiations going on behind the scenes. there are lots of hopes we might be able to do some kind of deals, but when it comes to deporting asylum—seekers, when it comes to off shoring, as they call it can actually setting up asylum systems. we have heard stories of putting them on a central island and so on. in the end, all of those require cooperation, and it is perhaps the paradox of breck sit in a way that actually taking control of the borderers is going to require greater international cooperation, not less. mike easton, our home editor. some news coming into us concerning lord bethel, the minister at the department of health and social care. we are hearing that the information watchdog has launched an official investigation and into the
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use of private e—mail accounts at the department of health, information commissioner saying her office has served notices on the department to preserve evidence relevant to her inquiry. that all follows reports that the former health secretary, matt hancock, and the current health minister, lord bethel. they routinely used private e—mail accounts to discuss government business. all of this also comes as the lords commissioner for standards announced they are investigating lord bethel over a complaint that he sponsored a parliamentary pass for the aid that matt hancock was caught kissing on leaked ct —— cctv footage. so, more on that as it comes into us. the owner of vauxhall has confirmed plans to build electric vans at its ellesmere port plant in cheshire. stellantis has received financial support from the government
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towards its one hundred million pound investment. the future of the plant had been in doubt after the company scrapped plans to build its new astra model there — and the decision will safeguard more than a thousand factoryjobs. our business correspondent colletta smith reports. the car industry has been straddling old and new technologies for years. no matter how small the business. the mechanics you can fix electric and hybrid as well as diesel and petrol. down the road in the vauxhall plant, they are making the same shift, stopping production of the astra and moving to electric van production. van sales have been skyrocketing over the last year with so many more delivery vehicles on the road. they will all have to be electric in the next nine years, and vauxhall are hoping to mop up the market. we will have a fully electric line—up of electric vehicles in the next two months, so that's three models in the heartland of the van market with full electrification,
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so we are confident that we will grow. last week it was a big government investment for nissan in sunderland and today it is money for vauxhall, but they won't say how much. the batteries themselves will be made in france and germany but the vans will be constructed here. the government need announcements like this to keep jobs and make sure we hit those emissions targets. it is a transition from the kinds of vehicles that were made historically over 60 years here, and now we have got electric vehicles, we have got what people call a green industrial revolution and i think this is a new chapter. john's company are already supplying electric fleet of vans but his options have been limited because there's not many electric models on the market. the uptake has been really strong, especially in the last couple of years with the government saying that we need to take away the emission vehicles. a lot of people are buying into it because of the cost saving as well as the environment saving, you know? investment decisions by big car manufacturers have basically been
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paused for the last couple of years because of brexit, so the hope now is that here in the uk we can put our foot on the accelerator quick enough to catch up with our european neighbours. a couple of years ago we went to amsterdam and you saw all of the charging points on the lamp post and you could charge your car basically anywhere. the facilities were there and that is what it needs in the uk. it needs the government to get behind it and build more infrastructure for the electric cars. places like this will see the real impact of today's announcement in the years ahead. reassuring customers and repairing and testing the vehicles of the future, but they are already geared up for the changes. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. i think the weather is going to be a little bit better tomorrow. certainly quite a few showers around today and earlier on some of the
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quite heavy rain with strong winds and southern areas of the uk. tomorrow, we will see more blue skies. at the moment, we are still in the wake of the slow pressure which swept across the country earlier on and you could big dip in thejet stream here earlier on and you could big dip in the jet stream here and within the step, you've got the shower whether thatis step, you've got the shower whether that is in place for the rest of us and so through the course of this evening, and overnight still scattered showers across the country because of the low pressure centre just to the east of scotland. for a time, some areas, there will be in the way of rain but plenty of clear spells in places but temperatures of around 14 in liverpool will match that in cardiff and it's not a quote night. tomorrow, the low pressure slow—moving and that means it is not taking weather with it. there is high pressure trying to build here from the south but we are still really under the influence of that and closer to norway that is to us, it is still overall trend the weather pattern across the uk. scattered showers but blue skies and
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between two and the winds are going to be later and all of the combined means that temperatures will be around 21 in london, 21 in glasgow and it will feel a little bit warmer. stilla and it will feel a little bit warmer. still a shower chance i think immobile dent and the same goes for the football the following day will actually be a little bit drier. 0n day will actually be a little bit drier. on thursday right across the country, it is looking better and we still expecting showers started around almost anywhere but i think plenty of sunny spells as well. the winds be relatively light and so temperatures getting into the low 20s across many southern and central areas of the uk. through the weekend, friday into saturday, we will see a little weather front moving across the south of the country and we are expecting perhaps a few spots of rain but before that happens, we will see showers building across some parts of the uk on friday but again, plenty of sunny spells in between and temperatures in the sunshine getting to around 20 or 23 celsius. here is the outlook
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for the next few days. a little bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go, maybe around 17 in aberdeen in the south and a high of 22. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the government announces that from next month, people in england 12 two jabs of the coated vaccine will not need to isolate of the coated vaccine will not need to isolate if they come into contact with someone who tests positive. the government also says the end of term will mean the end of school bubbles in england. pupils self—isolate of the tests positive. a man is found guilty murdering sisters who were stabbed after birthday celebrations in london last year. at the port, it
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looks safe after the company unveils plans to build an all electric band there from 2022. and sport. first of there from 2022. and sport. first of the euro 2020 semifinals is under way in italy are playing spain in front of 60,000 cloud at wembley and it is 0-0. back now to one of main stories tonight — the news that the education secretary, gavin williamson, has said the system of "bubbles" for containing coronavirus outbreaks in schools in england is to end. it has led to large numbers of pupils being sent home if a single child in their group tests positive. let's discuss today's announcement in more detail with sammie mcfarlan, founder of the campaign group long covid kids. i'm alsojoined by glyn potts — headmaster of newman rc college in 0ldham and, we can also speak to geoff barton, general secretary of the association
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of school and college leaders. is this a sensible move to end the school bubbles that have caused so much disruption in our schools? i think there are two dimensions to this and the data is telling us that something like six straight 5000 children were off school last week in si because that covid—19 is because they may or may not have come into contact and that is simply unsustainable and representing school and college leaders, we have said on educational grounds, that has to end. that said, i think what a lot of people will see that we are certainly moving to something quite different where lets the restrictions have disappeared, give us the rush to make reassurance —— the reassurance and we will be wanting more detail about that but the educational terms, we had to end
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the educational terms, we had to end the bubble system. bearing in mind we're not talking about the ending of this week or next week, it's not until the 19th, of this week or next week, it's not untilthe19th, really of this week or next week, it's not until the 19th, really important that people recognise that. should we ever have _ that people recognise that. should we ever have had _ that people recognise that. should we ever have had that _ that people recognise that. should we ever have had that system, - that people recognise that. should l we ever have had that system, that school bubbles system? taste we ever have had that system, that school bubbles system?— school bubbles system? we had to have then because _ school bubbles system? we had to have then because will— school bubbles system? we had to have then because will be - school bubbles system? we had to have then because will be had - school bubbles system? we had to have then because will be had to i have then because will be had to minimise young people meeting with other young people to keep your groups or classes together, but as time has gone and we had the announcement today. founder of the cam aiun announcement today. founder of the campaign grouo. _ announcement today. founder of the campaign group, what _ announcement today. founder of the campaign group, what are _ announcement today. founder of the campaign group, what are your - campaign group, what are your concerns about this? 50. campaign group, what are your concerns about this?— campaign group, what are your concerns about this? so, i mean removing _ concerns about this? so, i mean removing the — concerns about this? so, i mean removing the bubbles _ concerns about this? so, i mean removing the bubbles is - concerns about this? so, i mean removing the bubbles is a - concerns about this? so, i mean removing the bubbles is a huge | removing the bubbles is a huge concern — removing the bubbles is a huge concern for us and the bubbles have always— concern for us and the bubbles have always been too big, smaller bubbles would _ always been too big, smaller bubbles would been helpful but to remove them _ would been helpful but to remove them completely leaves the children completely at risk. it's russian roulette. — completely at risk. it's russian roulette, we do not know who's going to get— roulette, we do not know who's going to get covid—19 and loan covid—19. the alternative is, as we seen in the last few days, we have had hundreds of thousands of children self isolating and not at school and
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thatis self isolating and not at school and that is just a lost generation of children. it's not sustainable, is it? �* , to make absolutely and we are wondering whether or not funding wondering whether or not funding wondering how we can improve ventilation and schools to keep them in schools _ ventilation and schools to keep them in schools and keep them educated and also _ in schools and keep them educated and also keep them safe and healthy. those _ and also keep them safe and healthy. those are _ and also keep them safe and healthy. those are the measures that could be an adequate replacement for the bubble system was blue that we have to make sure they can be in school _ we have to make sure they can be in school but _ we have to make sure they can be in school but they can also be protected from the virus which is a novel— protected from the virus which is a novel virus — protected from the virus which is a novel virus. we do not know the long-term — novel virus. we do not know the long—term lasting effects but we do know that _ long—term lasting effects but we do know that a percent of the older age groups— know that a percent of the older age groups and — know that a percent of the older age groups and the younger age group who -et groups and the younger age group who get covid—19 to get long covid—19. and we _ get covid—19 to get long covid—19. and we do— get covid—19 to get long covid—19. and we do not know how long it will last for~ _ and we do not know how long it will last for~ you — and we do not know how long it will last for. you know the 9000 children still have _ last for. you know the 9000 children still have symptoms at 12 months plus, _ still have symptoms at 12 months plus, according to our data. . we
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need to plus, according to our data. . need to get plus, according to our data. . - need to get this in perspective because the risk of children becoming our risk of the virus is very small, isn't it? is becoming our risk of the virus is very small, isn't it?— becoming our risk of the virus is very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not sure that— very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not sure that the _ very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not sure that the parents _ very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not sure that the parents of - very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not sure that the parents of my - very small, isn't it? is it? i'm not| sure that the parents of my group would _ sure that the parents of my group would say — sure that the parents of my group would say that. the data has a brilliant — would say that. the data has a brilliant recording service and we are very— brilliant recording service and we are very grateful for it, but the use 21— are very grateful for it, but the use 21 symptoms to record how many children— use 21 symptoms to record how many children are _ use 21 symptoms to record how many children are affected by covid—19 and have — children are affected by covid—19 and have long covid symptoms. but actually, _ and have long covid symptoms. but actually, parents or reporting of 200 symptoms and so any of the children— 200 symptoms and so any of the children that are reporting symptoms, they are not being reported — symptoms, they are not being reported and continued with ongoing symptoms and i'm sure the truth is that it's _ symptoms and i'm sure the truth is that it's much higher than the ones we are _ that it's much higher than the ones we are currently facing.— we are currently facing. professor russell, president _ we are currently facing. professor russell, president of _ we are currently facing. professor russell, president of the - we are currently facing. professor russell, president of the royal. russell, president of the royal couege russell, president of the royal college and an expert in his field, he says cases in the community are rising and there will be a small increase in the number of children we see with covid—19, but the overwhelming majority of children and young people have no symptoms or
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very mild illness only. what is your response to that? that very mild illness only. what is your response to that?— response to that? that is 'ust not what we fl response to that? that is 'ust not what we are seeing. _ response to that? that is 'ust not what we are seeing. we _ response to that? that isjust not what we are seeing. we have - what we are seeing. we have thousands of children in the group there _ thousands of children in the group there were — thousands of children in the group there were ill in the first and second — there were ill in the first and second wave and none of them are getting _ second wave and none of them are getting better. some of them have made _ getting better. some of them have made improvements but they have not returned _ made improvements but they have not returned to _ made improvements but they have not returned to the previous level of health _ returned to the previous level of health and i think we need to be much _ health and i think we need to be much more curious with the lasting effects— much more curious with the lasting effects of— much more curious with the lasting effects of covid—19 on children. that's— effects of covid—19 on children. that's got— effects of covid—19 on children. that's got to the headmaster of the newman college, what has been your experience in this bubbles and are you glad to see the back of it? i am crateful to you glad to see the back of it? i am grateful to it _ you glad to see the back of it? i am grateful to it and _ you glad to see the back of it? i am grateful to it and i _ you glad to see the back of it? i am gratefulto it and i think— you glad to see the back of it? i am grateful to it and i think they were a necessary— grateful to it and i think they were a necessary evil— grateful to it and i think they were a necessary evil at _ grateful to it and i think they were a necessary evil at the _ grateful to it and i think they were a necessary evil at the time - grateful to it and i think they were a necessary evil at the time the i a necessary evil at the time the virus _ a necessary evil at the time the virus is — a necessary evil at the time the virus is rife _ a necessary evil at the time the virus is rife in— a necessary evil at the time the virus is rife in the _ a necessary evil at the time the virus is rife in the community. a necessary evil at the time thel virus is rife in the community we are limiting _ virus is rife in the community we are limiting information- virus is rife in the community we are limiting information in- virus is rife in the community we are limiting information in the i are limiting information in the virus — are limiting information in the virus is — are limiting information in the virus is not _ are limiting information in the virus is not at _ are limiting information in the virus is not at such _ are limiting information in the virus is not at such a - are limiting information in the virus is not at such a high- are limiting information in the i virus is not at such a high level. i think. _ virus is not at such a high level. i think. i_ virus is not at such a high level. i think, i disagree _ virus is not at such a high level. i think, i disagree with _ virus is not at such a high level. i
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think, i disagree with the - think, i disagree with the competence _ think, i disagree with the competence about- think, i disagree with the competence about long l think, i disagree with the - competence about long covid and think, i disagree with the _ competence about long covid and we have many— competence about long covid and we have many more _ competence about long covid and we have many more risks _ competence about long covid and we have many more risks associated - competence about long covid and we have many more risks associated to. have many more risks associated to children. _ have many more risks associated to children. not— have many more risks associated to children, notjust _ have many more risks associated to children, notjust in _ have many more risks associated to children, notjust in covid—19.- have many more risks associated to children, notjust in covid—19.they| children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing — children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing those _ children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing those risks— children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing those risks on - children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing those risks on a - children, notjust in covid—19. they are balancing those risks on a daily basis _ are balancing those risks on a daily basis for— are balancing those risks on a daily basis for the — are balancing those risks on a daily basis for the last _ are balancing those risks on a daily basis for the last four _ are balancing those risks on a daily basis for the last four weeks, - are balancing those risks on a daily basis for the last four weeks, i've i basis for the last four weeks, i've had nearly— basis for the last four weeks, i've had nearly 600 _ basis for the last four weeks, i've had nearly 600 children - basis for the last four weeks, i've had nearly 600 children out - basis for the last four weeks, i've had nearly 600 children out at i basis for the last four weeks, i've. had nearly 600 children out at one point. _ had nearly 600 children out at one point. 40%— had nearly 600 children out at one point. 40% of— had nearly 600 children out at one point. 40% of my— had nearly 600 children out at one point, 40% of my teaching - had nearly 600 children out at one point, 40% of my teaching staff. . point, 40% of my teaching staff. that would — point, 40% of my teaching staff. that would that _ point, 40% of my teaching staff. that would that be _ point, 40% of my teaching staff. that would that be considered . that would that be considered acceptable? _ that would that be considered acceptable? it _ that would that be considered acceptable? it presents - that would that be considered acceptable? it presents for. that would that be considered i acceptable? it presents for more difficulties— acceptable? it presents for more difficulties for— acceptable? it presents for more difficulties for us— acceptable? it presents for more difficulties for us to _ acceptable? it presents for more difficulties for us to manage - acceptable? it presents for more difficulties for us to manage a i difficulties for us to manage a former— difficulties for us to manage a former challenges— difficulties for us to manage a former challenges for- difficulties for us to manage a former challenges for young i difficulties for us to manage a - former challenges for young people. that is— former challenges for young people. that is not— former challenges for young people. that is not acceptable and _ former challenges for young people. that is not acceptable and we - former challenges for young people. that is not acceptable and we need i that is not acceptable and we need to trust— that is not acceptable and we need to trust school— that is not acceptable and we need to trust school leaders _ that is not acceptable and we need to trust school leaders to - that is not acceptable and we need to trust school leaders to make - that is not acceptable and we needj to trust school leaders to make the ti l ht to trust school leaders to make the right decisions _ to trust school leaders to make the right decisions whether _ to trust school leaders to make the. right decisions whether communities and by— right decisions whether communities and by the _ right decisions whether communities and by the people _ right decisions whether communities and by the people. it’s _ right decisions whether communities and by the people-— and by the people. it's been chaos, frankl , and by the people. it's been chaos, frankly. for— and by the people. it's been chaos, frankly, for the _ and by the people. it's been chaos, frankly, for the last _ and by the people. it's been chaos, frankly, for the last few _ and by the people. it's been chaos, frankly, for the last few weeks? - and by the people. it's been chaos, | frankly, for the last few weeks? i'm blessed to have the hardest working team education— blessed to have the hardest working team education to _ blessed to have the hardest working team education to make _ blessed to have the hardest working team education to make it - blessed to have the hardest working team education to make it a - blessed to have the hardest working team education to make it a joy- blessed to have the hardest working team education to make it a joy forl team education to make it a joy for me and _ team education to make it a joy for me and my— team education to make it a joy for me and my young— team education to make it a joy for me and my young people - team education to make it a joy for me and my young people are - team education to make it a joy forj me and my young people are really mature _ me and my young people are really mature in _ me and my young people are really mature in their— me and my young people are really mature in their concerns _ me and my young people are really mature in their concerns and - me and my young people are really mature in their concerns and quite i mature in their concerns and quite rightly— mature in their concerns and quite rightly they — mature in their concerns and quite rightly they want _ mature in their concerns and quite rightly they want to _ mature in their concerns and quite rightly they want to know - mature in their concerns and quite rightly they want to know that - rightly they want to know that they're — rightly they want to know that they're going _ rightly they want to know that they're going to _ rightly they want to know that they're going to be _ rightly they want to know that they're going to be protected. rightly they want to know that - they're going to be protected. but they're going to be protected. but the parents — they're going to be protected. but the parents need _ they're going to be protected. but the parents need great _ they're going to be protected. butl the parents need great information in the _ the parents need great information in the schools _ the parents need great information in the schools need _ the parents need great information in the schools need more - the parents need great informationl in the schools need more autonomy the parents need great information. in the schools need more autonomy to make _ in the schools need more autonomy to make local— in the schools need more autonomy to make local decisions. _ in the schools need more autonomy to make local decisions. with _ in the schools need more autonomy to make local decisions. with their- make local decisions. with their councils— make local decisions. with their councils with _ make local decisions. with their councils with the _ make local decisions. with their councils with the regional- councils with the regional governments, _ councils with the regional governments, to- councils with the regional governments, to make . councils with the regional. governments, to make sure councils with the regional- governments, to make sure we can councils with the regional— governments, to make sure we can do our best— governments, to make sure we can do our best by— governments, to make sure we can do our best by the — governments, to make sure we can do
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our best by the children. _ governments, to make sure we can do our best by the children. simply- our best by the children. simply sending — our best by the children. simply sending children _ our best by the children. simply sending children home - our best by the children. simply sending children home in- our best by the children. simply sending children home in largel sending children home in large numbers— sending children home in large numbers of— sending children home in large numbers of you _ sending children home in large numbers of you have _ sending children home in large numbers of you have done - sending children home in large numbers of you have done forl sending children home in large . numbers of you have done for the past five — numbers of you have done for the past five weeks, _ numbers of you have done for the past five weeks, puts _ numbers of you have done for the past five weeks, puts children - numbers of you have done for the past five weeks, puts children ati past five weeks, puts children at risk _ past five weeks, puts children at risk we — past five weeks, puts children at risk we need _ past five weeks, puts children at risk. we need a _ past five weeks, puts children at risk. we need a different - past five weeks, puts children at i risk. we need a different measure that accepts — risk. we need a different measure that accepts the _ risk. we need a different measure that accepts the risk _ risk. we need a different measure that accepts the risk of _ risk. we need a different measure that accepts the risk of covid—19 . that accepts the risk of covid—19 but mitigates— that accepts the risk of covid—19 but mitigates other— that accepts the risk of covid—19 but mitigates other risks - that accepts the risk of covid—19 but mitigates other risks as - that accepts the risk of covid—19l but mitigates other risks as well. give us _ but mitigates other risks as well. give us some _ but mitigates other risks as well. give us some ideas— but mitigates other risks as well. give us some ideas of— but mitigates other risks as well. give us some ideas of what - but mitigates other risks as well. give us some ideas of what you i but mitigates other risks as well. - give us some ideas of what you would like to put into practice in your school. we are not going to have the system or bubble, but mitigating systems which you like there to help deal with covid—19 in the future? we've got eight or nine weeks until september tare we've got eight or nine weeks until se tembe ., ., ., september we need to have a significant _ september we need to have a significant effort _ september we need to have a significant effort in _ september we need to have a | significant effort in supporting schools — significant effort in supporting schools of— significant effort in supporting schools of testing _ significant effort in supporting schools of testing on - significant effort in supporting schools of testing on our - significant effort in supporting i schools of testing on our return significant effort in supporting - schools of testing on our return in the same — schools of testing on our return in the same way— schools of testing on our return in the same way they— schools of testing on our return in the same way they have - schools of testing on our return in the same way they have to - schools of testing on our return in the same way they have to get. the same way they have to get sporting — the same way they have to get sporting events— the same way they have to get sporting events off _ the same way they have to get sporting events off the - the same way they have to get| sporting events off the ground. the same way they have to get l sporting events off the ground. i think— sporting events off the ground. i think will— sporting events off the ground. i think will be _ sporting events off the ground. i think will be important _ sporting events off the ground. i think will be important and - sporting events off the ground. i think will be important and vitall think will be important and vital that we — think will be important and vital that we talk— think will be important and vital that we talk about _ think will be important and vital that we talk about ventilation . think will be important and vital. that we talk about ventilation and there _ that we talk about ventilation and there are — that we talk about ventilation and there are some _ that we talk about ventilation and there are some countries- that we talk about ventilation and there are some countries in- that we talk about ventilation and i there are some countries in europe beverly— there are some countries in europe beverly done — there are some countries in europe beverly done this _ there are some countries in europe beverly done this and. _ there are some countries in europe beverly done this and.— there are some countries in europe beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, beverly done this and. when you save ventilation. a — beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, a lot _ beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, a lot of _ beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, a lot of people _ beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, a lot of people do - beverly done this and. when you save ventilation, a lot of people do not - ventilation, a lot of people do not know what you mean by that. i know that ventilation is a key factor, but how do you improve the
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ventilation in the school? simply o enin: ventilation in the school? simply oenin: a ventilation in the school? simply opening a window— ventilation in the school? simply opening a window is _ ventilation in the school? simply opening a window is not - ventilation in the school? simply opening a window is not an - ventilation in the school? simplyl opening a window is not an option ventilation in the school? simply . opening a window is not an option in some _ opening a window is not an option in some schools — opening a window is not an option in some schools and _ opening a window is not an option in some schools and opening _ opening a window is not an option in some schools and opening a - opening a window is not an option in some schools and opening a windowj opening a window is not an option in. some schools and opening a window on a busy— some schools and opening a window on a busy road _ some schools and opening a window on a busy road does — some schools and opening a window on a busy road does not _ some schools and opening a window on a busy road does not do _ some schools and opening a window on a busy road does not do it. _ some schools and opening a window on a busy road does not do it. but - some schools and opening a window on a busy road does not do it. but then. a busy road does not do it. but then you need _ a busy road does not do it. but then you need to — a busy road does not do it. but then you need to talk about _ a busy road does not do it. but then you need to talk about whether - a busy road does not do it. but then you need to talk about whether or. you need to talk about whether or not we _ you need to talk about whether or not we should _ you need to talk about whether or not we should be _ you need to talk about whether or not we should be investing - you need to talk about whether or not we should be investing in- you need to talk about whether or. not we should be investing in proper ventilation— not we should be investing in proper ventilation in— not we should be investing in proper ventilation in schools _ not we should be investing in proper ventilation in schools to _ not we should be investing in proper ventilation in schools to make - not we should be investing in proper ventilation in schools to make sure i ventilation in schools to make sure that the _ ventilation in schools to make sure that the air— ventilation in schools to make sure that the air going _ ventilation in schools to make sure that the air going into _ ventilation in schools to make sure that the air going into a _ ventilation in schools to make sure that the air going into a school- ventilation in schools to make sure that the air going into a school is l that the air going into a school is appropriate — that the air going into a school is appropriate for _ that the air going into a school is appropriate for young _ that the air going into a school is appropriate for young people - that the air going into a school is| appropriate for young people and that the air going into a school is i appropriate for young people and i think we _ appropriate for young people and i think we need _ appropriate for young people and i think we need to _ appropriate for young people and i think we need to ask— appropriate for young people and i think we need to ask and - appropriate for young people and i think we need to ask and start - appropriate for young people and i think we need to ask and start the | think we need to ask and start the debate _ think we need to ask and start the debate on — think we need to ask and start the debate on vaccinating _ think we need to ask and start the debate on vaccinating children. . debate on vaccinating children. voluntarily. _ debate on vaccinating children. voluntarily, but _ debate on vaccinating children. voluntarily, but clearly, - debate on vaccinating children. voluntarily, but clearly, for. debate on vaccinating children. i voluntarily, but clearly, for have sustainability— voluntarily, but clearly, for have sustainability of— voluntarily, but clearly, for have sustainability of education - voluntarily, but clearly, for have sustainability of education and l voluntarily, but clearly, for havel sustainability of education and we need _ sustainability of education and we need to— sustainability of education and we need to start _ sustainability of education and we need to start having _ sustainability of education and we need to start having these - need to start having these discussions. _ need to start having these discussions. simply- need to start having thesel discussions. simply waiting need to start having these - discussions. simply waiting until the last— discussions. simply waiting until the last minute _ discussions. simply waiting until the last minute and _ discussions. simply waiting until the last minute and forcing - discussions. simply waiting until the last minute and forcing it. discussions. simply waiting until the last minute and forcing it on| the last minute and forcing it on school _ the last minute and forcing it on school leaders _ the last minute and forcing it on school leaders and _ the last minute and forcing it on school leaders and asking - the last minute and forcing it on school leaders and asking them | the last minute and forcing it on. school leaders and asking them to react— school leaders and asking them to react is— school leaders and asking them to react is not— school leaders and asking them to react is not a _ school leaders and asking them to react is not a plan— school leaders and asking them to react is not a plan i— school leaders and asking them to react is not a plan i think- school leaders and asking them to react is not a plan i think trust - react is not a plan i think trust between — react is not a plan i think trust between government- react is not a plan i think trust between government and - react is not a plan i think trust . between government and school leaders — between government and school leaders have _ between government and school leaders have eroded _ between government and school leaders have eroded and - between government and school leaders have eroded and now. between government and schoolj leaders have eroded and now we between government and school- leaders have eroded and now we need to start _ leaders have eroded and now we need to start the _ leaders have eroded and now we need to start the talk _ leaders have eroded and now we need to start the talk about _ leaders have eroded and now we need to start the talk about what _ leaders have eroded and now we need to start the talk about what we - leaders have eroded and now we need to start the talk about what we need l to start the talk about what we need to start the talk about what we need to do _ to start the talk about what we need to do. �* . to start the talk about what we need to do. �* , ., to start the talk about what we need todo.�* to do. buds of the debate about vaccinating _ to do. buds of the debate about vaccinating children _ to do. buds of the debate about vaccinating children because . to do. buds of the debate about vaccinating children because it | to do. buds of the debate about| vaccinating children because it is to do. buds of the debate about i vaccinating children because it is a good point. what is your view on that? it good point. what is your view on that? , , �* ., that? it might be, but i'm education is and ultimately _ that? it might be, but i'm education is and ultimately we _ that? it might be, but i'm education is and ultimately we will _ that? it might be, but i'm education is and ultimately we will look - that? it might be, but i'm education is and ultimately we will look to - is and ultimately we will look to the medical profession i think
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there's a frustration on the how long the seriousness of this debate is going to be to come to terms with some sort of solution and it may be some sort of solution and it may be some issue about side effects but there may not be a good look at the very least and elicit the adults, the people that are 21 that been vaccinated and are going about business as usual while in our schools, we start to see young people suffering with all of this, it might be the case that it happens but, we had, we have to have a plan for it. and i think that would be one way of getting reassurance to people that the government is doing more thanjust giving people that the government is doing more than just giving us rhetoric and actually saying that we have a specific plan to protect those young people. specific plan to protect those young eo - le. ~ , ~. specific plan to protect those young --eole. ~ , ., ., specific plan to protect those young neale, . , ., ., specific plan to protect those young --eole. ~ , . ., ., people. where you stand on this? you talk about your _ people. where you stand on this? you talk about your concerns _ people. where you stand on this? you talk about your concerns along - talk about your concerns along covid—19 and generally about covid—19 and generally about covid—19 and generally about covid—19 and children and where you stand on the issue of vaccinating children? i stand on the issue of vaccinating children? .. . stand on the issue of vaccinating children? ~ . , ., , children? i think children should be offered the vaccine, _ children? i think children should be offered the vaccine, definitely - offered the vaccine, definitely but i offered the vaccine, definitely but i don't _ offered the vaccine, definitely but i don't think it should be just for
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that but— i don't think it should be just for that but the rising infections and the younger age group, 28% of the admissions and children went up by 20% last _ admissions and children went up by 20% last week and we saw that rising much _ 20% last week and we saw that rising much faster— 20% last week and we saw that rising much faster in the second wave and so the _ much faster in the second wave and so the vaccinations are key and i think— so the vaccinations are key and i think it — so the vaccinations are key and i think it should be parental choice. and glenn— think it should be parental choice. and glenn was talking to us about some of the other things that can be donein some of the other things that can be done in schools and would you like to see more done in terms of ventilation and so on?- ventilation and so on? yes, absolutely. _ ventilation and so on? yes, absolutely. as _ ventilation and so on? yes, absolutely. as i _ ventilation and so on? yes, absolutely. as i said - ventilation and so on? yes, absolutely. as i said my . ventilation and so on? yes, - absolutely. as i said my opening comments, we need to ventilations and we _ comments, we need to ventilations and we need robust mitigation now and we need robust mitigation now and before — and we need robust mitigation now and before the ottoman children return _ and before the ottoman children return to — and before the ottoman children return to school and we been fundraising for this and we have a lon- fundraising for this and we have a long list— fundraising for this and we have a long list of— fundraising for this and we have a long list of head teachers who we need _ long list of head teachers who we need to _ long list of head teachers who we need to look at the government to supply— need to look at the government to supply that and that is really their 'ob, supply that and that is really their job. not— supply that and that is really their job, not ours. just supply that and that is really their job. rrot ours-— supply that and that is really their job, not ours. just talk to us about how much — job, not ours. just talk to us about how much damage _ job, not ours. just talk to us about how much damage you _ job, not ours. just talk to us about how much damage you think - job, not ours. just talk to us about how much damage you think it's i job, not ours. just talk to us about. how much damage you think it's been done to this generation of
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schoolchildren who have lost so much education, so much days, weeks of learning? i education, so much days, weeks of learnin: ? ., �* ., ., ., learning? i don't want to rule out the talent and _ learning? i don't want to rule out the talent and ability _ learning? i don't want to rule out the talent and ability that - learning? i don't want to rule out the talent and ability that is - learning? i don't want to rule out the talent and ability that is in . the talent and ability that is in this generation _ the talent and ability that is in this generation of _ the talent and ability that is in . this generation of young people. the talent and ability that is in - this generation of young people. or they do— this generation of young people. or they do need — this generation of young people. or they do need is— this generation of young people. or they do need is optimism _ this generation of young people. or they do need is optimism and - this generation of young people. or they do need is optimism and hope| they do need is optimism and hope and they— they do need is optimism and hope and they have _ they do need is optimism and hope and they have an _ they do need is optimism and hope and they have an abundance - they do need is optimism and hope and they have an abundance of- they do need is optimism and hope and they have an abundance of wel they do need is optimism and hope . and they have an abundance of we can present— and they have an abundance of we can present them — and they have an abundance of we can present them a — and they have an abundance of we can present them a plan _ and they have an abundance of we can present them a plan that _ and they have an abundance of we can present them a plan that they- and they have an abundance of we can present them a plan that they can - present them a plan that they can engage _ present them a plan that they can engage with — present them a plan that they can engage with and _ present them a plan that they can engage with and that _ present them a plan that they can engage with and that is _ present them a plan that they can engage with and that is the - engage with and that is the difficulty— engage with and that is the difficulty that _ engage with and that is the difficulty that we've - engage with and that is the difficulty that we've got - engage with and that is the i difficulty that we've got now. engage with and that is the - difficulty that we've got now. we're talking _ difficulty that we've got now. we're talking about — difficulty that we've got now. we're talking about recovery. _ difficulty that we've got now. we're talking about recovery. this - difficulty that we've got now. we're talking about recovery. this is- difficulty that we've got now. we're talking about recovery. this is not. talking about recovery. this is not 'ust talking about recovery. this is not just about — talking about recovery. this is not just about an— talking about recovery. this is not just about an air _ talking about recovery. this is not just about an air and _ talking about recovery. this is not just about an air and equality- talking about recovery. this is not just about an air and equality with the system. — just about an air and equality with the system, that— just about an air and equality with the system, that many— just about an air and equality with the system, that many of- just about an air and equality with the system, that many of the - just about an air and equality withj the system, that many of the new system _ the system, that many of the new system of — the system, that many of the new system of education. _ the system, that many of the new system of education. these - the system, that many of the newj system of education. these young people _ system of education. these young people are — system of education. these young people are resilient _ system of education. these young people are resilient and _ system of education. these youngj people are resilient and desperate to show— people are resilient and desperate to show their _ people are resilient and desperate to show their abilities. _ people are resilient and desperate to show their abilities. we - people are resilient and desperate to show their abilities. we need i people are resilient and desperatej to show their abilities. we need to stop down— to show their abilities. we need to stop down beating _ to show their abilities. we need to stop down beating them _ to show their abilities. we need to stop down beating them and - stop down beating them and suggesting _ stop down beating them and suggesting that _ stop down beating them and suggesting that somehow . stop down beating them and - suggesting that somehow they're going _ suggesting that somehow they're going to — suggesting that somehow they're going to be — suggesting that somehow they're going to be a _ suggesting that somehow they're going to be a lost _ suggesting that somehow they're going to be a lost generation- suggesting that somehow they're going to be a lost generation or. going to be a lost generation or generation— going to be a lost generation or generation that _ going to be a lost generation or generation that will— going to be a lost generation or generation that will amount - going to be a lost generation or generation that will amount to i generation that will amount to nothing — generation that will amount to nothing. nothing _ generation that will amount to nothing. nothing could - generation that will amount to nothing. nothing could be - generation that will amount to . nothing. nothing could be further from _ nothing. nothing could be further from the — nothing. nothing could be further from the truth. _ nothing. nothing could be further from the truth. come _ nothing. nothing could be further from the truth. come and - nothing. nothing could be further from the truth. come and see - nothing. nothing could be further from the truth. come and see myj from the truth. come and see my children— from the truth. come and see my children they _ from the truth. come and see my children they will— from the truth. come and see my children they will blow— from the truth. come and see my children they will blow you - from the truth. come and see my children they will blow you away. | children they will blow you away. but we _ children they will blow you away. but we need _ children they will blow you away. but we need is _ children they will blow you away. but we need is a _ children they will blow you away. but we need is a clear— children they will blow you away. but we need is a clear plan- children they will blow you away. but we need is a clear plan as . but we need is a clear plan as students _ but we need is a clear plan as students in _ but we need is a clear plan as students in opportunity - but we need is a clear plan as students in opportunity to - but we need is a clear plan as i students in opportunity to show but we need is a clear plan as - students in opportunity to show it and let— students in opportunity to show it and let them _ students in opportunity to show it and let them live _ students in opportunity to show it and let them live it. _ students in opportunity to show it and let them live it. i’m“— students in opportunity to show it and let them live it.— and let them live it. i'm sure they would blow _ and let them live it. i'm sure they would blow away _ and let them live it. i'm sure they would blow away anyone - and let them live it. i'm sure they would blow away anyone who - and let them live it. i'm sure they i would blow away anyone who comes and let them live it. i'm sure they - would blow away anyone who comes to see them in your school. thank you
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so much. thank you tojeff the secretary of association of school and college leaders. and mcfarland, founder of this. good to talk to all of you. thank you so much for your time. from next month, people in england who had two jabs of the covid—19 vaccine were to vaccinate if they come into contact with someone who tests positive. the end of term will be the end of school bubbles in england. pupils will itself isolate if the test positive. in other news, a man is found guilty of murdering sisters who were stabbed after birthday celebrations in london last year. last month, the government apologised to victims of rape
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for the record low conviction rate in england and wales. one of the problems in securing convictions is the way in which evidence is gathered from victims�* mobile phones. the policing bill currently making its way through parliament sets limits on the extent to which police can request personal information from victims. but the victims commissioner dame vera baird says it doesn't go far enough. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has this report. when sarahjenkin reported to police she had been rates, she received a request familiar to many people who make allegations. i had pieces of paper put in front of me saying, look, we need to get data from your phone and we need your medical records, can you sign this? saying that you agree to that. she felt prosecutors were focusing on her. they seemed, it certainly in my case, to be using this information as a way to try to discredit me, discredit my account, imply that i'm not a credible witness. this sort of thing led to a government review
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of rate investigations, and last month, this... the first thing i need to say i think is sorry. it's not good enough. we've got to do a lot better. new laws are being considered to limit the information police can obtain. it would have to be provided voluntarily and be necessary and proportionate to the investigation. but now the victims commissioner has told the bbc she is deeply worried. the apology is undermined completely by pursuing this legislation. _ she says it won't prevent whole phones being downloaded. it is definitely a backward step and it definitely clashes - with the apology from ministers l and with the intention in the rate review to focus on the defendant and less on the complainant. - she wants stronger safeguards and agreement to be provided explicitly and unambiguously in writing and it must be for police to investigate a specific, relevant line of enquiry.
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the home office insists that the new laws will be backed up by a police code of conduct. but sarah says it was not the police who were pushing for disclosure of her personal information. it was the prosecutors, the crown prosecution service, an organisation accused of trying to get rid of rape cases where there is not a clear chance of a conviction. the cps says her case was carefully reviewed bit did not meet the legal test for prosecution, a decision she struggles with. i feel very angry about what has happened, with the trauma that i have suffered directly from the treatment of particular aspects of the criminaljustice system. the artist damien hirst,
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famous for his bisected cow, shark in formaldehyde and diamond studded skull, has changed tack. his new exhibition is of oil paintings of cherry blossom. the show, in paris has been delayed twice because of covid, but has finally opened today, showcasing canvases painted during long periods working alone during lockdown. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson was given a preview. as shocking as a dead animal or a diamond studded skull in the eyes of the artist. as much about life and death. damien hirst has been painting cherry trees, dozens upon dozens of them, all the way through the pandemic. much of it alone, without his team of assistants, thanks to covid restrictions. itjust became a really solitary thing, making art, which i've never really got it to that point except when i was very young.
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so it was quite nice to do that, and then trying to find some positivity in all the negativity and all the anxiety that everybody is feeling. in the beginning i was really anxious, but it's funny that in that anxiety, i made these paintings that are really positive. the canvases got larger in lockdown, he says. leaves appeared and shifts in perspective gave more gravity to the trees. i rememberjohn lennon once said, somebody said to him, why did he cut his hair in the 70s? and he said, "well, what else would you do after you have grown it?" it kind of feels something like that, i always just try to keep reinventing myself. yeah. my mum used to say to me, "there's enough horror in the world, can't you just paint flowers?" maybe she got to me eventually. flowers that are in his words garish, messy, almost tacky. "someone who saw them the other day asked me if i was in love," hirst told me, "but i hope they're more psychotic than that". lucy williamson, bbc news, paris.
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a herd of elephants — born and raised in the uk — are set to embark on a 7—thousand mile trip to start a new life in the wilds of kenya. it's the first time an entire herd has been returned to the wild after living in captivity. the thirteen elephants have been cared for by the uk conservation charity, the aspinall foundation. i'm joined now by damian aspinall, the foundation's chairman. i suppose the question is why and how did all of this come about? well, the y is easy. because if you are an elephant lover, then why wouldn't we do this? it's come about for years looking at these elephants in captivity and just thinking that they don't belong in captivity. they don't belong in cages and as happy as they may be, we have a very
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successful breeding development and i think they belong in the wild and elephants have never done well in zoos. and i think you know, they deserve their shot of freedom. i suppose that in that case, if captivity is so bad, why are they in zoos in the first place and should be feel guilty? most people watching you now have seen and enjoyed looking at elephants in zoos in this country but are you saying unhappy when they are here? the country but are you saying unhappy when they are here?— when they are here? the truth is that elephants _ when they are here? the truth is that elephants don't _ when they are here? the truth is that elephants don't do - when they are here? the truth is that elephants don't do well- when they are here? the truth is that elephants don't do well in i when they are here? the truth is . that elephants don't do well in zoos and half elephants live half their natural age in zoos. they have problems about the few elephant caps that are born, a third of them died before the age of one. theyjust do not do well in zoos and they shouldn't be in captivity. in the
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truth is, robbing africa of elephants for many years, selling them to the vile circuses and zoos all over the world. i think it is about time that we did something about time that we did something about that and try to send some of these elephants back to their ancestral homelands and i think they deserve it. is a ancestral homelands and i think they deserve it. . . ancestral homelands and i think they deserve it. ., , deserve it. is a huge logistical exercise. _ deserve it. is a huge logistical exercise, getting _ deserve it. is a huge logistical exercise, getting these - deserve it. is a huge logistical. exercise, getting these elephants all the way to africa. it’s exercise, getting these elephants all the way to africa.— exercise, getting these elephants all the way to africa. it's the most difficult thing _ all the way to africa. it's the most difficult thing you've _ all the way to africa. it's the most difficult thing you've ever - all the way to africa. it's the most difficult thing you've ever tried . all the way to africa. it's the most difficult thing you've ever tried to | difficult thing you've ever tried to do but i think it's also the most worthwhile thing to do. but to get elephants into crates and lorries and get them onto a huge plane and then fly them to africa and get them wild and safe is a huge challenge, but it's a challenge that we are absolutely delighted to take on. stand absolutely delighted to take on. and for them, to suddenly be transported to africa, how much of a shock is that going to be? an entirely different climate and different
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conditions?— different climate and different conditions? ., , , , conditions? undoubtedly, it will be a shockin: conditions? undoubtedly, it will be a shocking will _ conditions? undoubtedly, it will be a shocking will do _ conditions? undoubtedly, it will be a shocking will do everything - conditions? undoubtedly, it will be a shocking will do everything we . conditions? undoubtedly, it will be| a shocking will do everything we can to make it as less stressful as possible. we have over 300 animals, we have learned over the years that the best way to make animals undomesticated. we will do it slowly and do everything we can to make it as stress—free as possible for those elephants. as stress-free as possible for those elehants. ., . ,, ., as stress-free as possible for those elehants. ., ., ,, ., , ., , elephants. you talk about elephants not bein: elephants. you talk about elephants rrot being happy _ elephants. you talk about elephants rrot being happy in — elephants. you talk about elephants not being happy in captivity, - elephants. you talk about elephants not being happy in captivity, does i not being happy in captivity, does that apply to other animals that we see in zoos? should they all be re—wild as you say? i see in zoos? should they all be re-wild as you say?— see in zoos? should they all be re-wild as you say? i don't think it's possible _ re-wild as you say? i don't think it's possible to _ re-wild as you say? i don't think it's possible to re-wild - re-wild as you say? i don't think it's possible to re-wild all - re-wild as you say? i don't think it's possible to re-wild all the . it's possible to re—wild all the animals in captivity, but i definitely think we need to rethink about zoos in the future of zoos. there too many animals that are not rare and endangers, there too many other animals that are inbred. and i think we have to have the courage to look at ourselves and think has this been working in do we need to change
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and i think we need to change. the time has come to change and i think we have to readdress the balance of these animals in captivity.— these animals in captivity. really interestin: these animals in captivity. really interesting thoughts _ these animals in captivity. really interesting thoughts that - these animals in captivity. really interesting thoughts that you - these animals in captivity. really . interesting thoughts that you raised there and really get to talk to you. thank you for being with us. now it's time for a look at the weather. well, i think the weather's going to be a little bit better tomorrow. certainly quite a few showers around today, and earlier on some really quite heavy rain with strong winds in southern areas of the uk. tomorrow, we'll see more blue sky. but at the moment, we're still in the wake of this low pressure which swept across the country earlier on. you can see a big dip in the jet stream here. and within this dip, we've got that showery weather so through the course of this evening and overnight, still scattered showers across the country. you can see the low pressure centred just to the east of scotland there, so for a time, in some areas here, there will be more persistent rain.
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but plenty of clear spells in places, too. temperatures of around 14 in liverpool. we'll match that in cardiff as well, so it's not a cold night. and then tomorrow, the low pressure's actually quite slow moving. that means that it's not taking its weather with it. there is high pressure trying to build here from the south, but we're still really under the influence of that low. i know it's quite far away, it's closer to norway than it is to us, but it's still overall driving the weather pattern across the uk. so scattered showers, but blue sky in between too. the winds are going to be lighter. all of that combined means that the temperatures will be around 21 in london, 21 in glasgow. it is going to feel a little bit warmer. still a shower chance, though, i think, in wimbledon, and the same goes for the football. the following day might actually be a little bit drier. in fact, thursday right across
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the country is looking better. we're still expecting showers dotted around almost anywhere, but i think plenty of sunny spells as well. the winds will be relatively light, so temperatures again getting into the low 20s across many southern and central areas of the uk. now, through the weekend, friday into saturday, we'll see i think a little weather front moving across the south of the country, so that means we are expecting perhaps a few spits and spots of rain. but before that happens, you can see showers building across some parts of the uk on friday. but again, plenty of sunny spells in between, temperatures in the sunshine getting to around 20 or 23 celsius. so here's the outlook for the next few days. a little bit disappointing as far as the temperatures go — maybe only around 17 in aberdeen, but in the south, no higher than 22. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with christian fraser. good news for people in england who are fully vaccinated — they won't have to self—isolate after a close covid contact. that there are concerns that anti—factors are putting that at risk. the rate of vaccination in the us has stalled. joe biden says we are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans are _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions of americans are still _ are at a vulnerable stage. millions| of americans are still unvaccinated and unprotected. because of that, that communities are best, their friends are at rest, the people they care about are at risk. we will speak to andy, the former white house covid adviser. it is getting more expensive to develop at
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the pump as oil prices hit

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