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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 21, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday, live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. at least 25 people are dead in the central chinese province of henan after the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. some forced their way out of trains on the subway. translation: we broke half. of a window so air could get in, otherwise we would have choked. the threat of climate change is all too real for many countries, above all low—lying ones. i'll be discussing this with david panuelo — president of the federated states of micronesia. as shock defeat for the us women's football team as action gets under way in tokyo —
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ahead of friday's official opening ceremony. unearthing archaeological treasure, such as discovery on extraordinary fossils from more than 150 million years ago. my my from our studio in singapore. this is bbc news. it's newsday. welcome to newsday — broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. it's six in the morning here in singapore and henan in central china where the heaviest rains since records began have caused devastation in the province and affected dozens of other cities. more than 200,000 people have been displaced and at least 25 people have died. the worst flooding is in the city
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of zhengzhou which has a population of 12 million and sits on the banks of the yellow river. the military have warned that a major dam �*could collapse at any time' — and soldiers have been mobilised to try to divert rivers which have burst their banks. chinese scientists say global warming has made china's annual flood season much more dangerous. 0ur china correspondent robin brant sent this report. passengers on an underground train trying to escape the approaching floodwater. instead, though, they found themselves standing still, silent, holding on as the levels rose around them. translation: the water was at shoulder level. . a child and i both nearly gave up. we were worn out. but i used my arm to hang on, and that's why i am bruised. others in the carriage said air was the problem. translation: we broke half. of a window so air could get in, otherwise we would have choked.
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at least a dozen people lost their lives as the water overran the tunnels and then the trains. above ground, others faced a terrifying torrent. the muddy, brown waters of the yellow river trying to sweep them away. this was just one example of an impromptu rescue effort that succeeded. the impact of the floods has been widespread, the city of zhengzhou was the worst hit, at one point it had almost a year public with the rain fall in just three days. the city of zhengzhou was the worst hit, at one point it had almost over a million people have been affected. in the last few days, hundreds of thousands of people were evacuated from in or around this city and millions more warned about the impending floods, but the most troubling question that remains amidst the stench of dirty water here is how was it that a station on this line, on an underground metro system that's less than ten years old,
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came to be overwhelmed by rainwater and passengers left to die on the platform? china has mobilised its army, but not its leader. in a brief statement, president xijinping called for improvements to the system for early warnings. measures that are likely to be needed more as chinese scientists admit these once in a millennia rains could become more frequent as global warming makes for more dangerous weather. robin brandt, bbc news, zhengzhou in eastern china. i'm joined now by isabel hilton, the founder of china dialogue, an organisation that looks at the country's environmental challenges. *the highest rainfall in 60 years. i know there are many factors — but what has contributed to this huge amount of rain?*the chinese communist party has actaully scientist have been telling us for 20 years that climate change, which of course results in warmer air and
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warmer seas, of course results in warmer air and warmerseas, produces of course results in warmer air and warmer seas, produces heavier rainfall. and therefore more extreme weather events. particularly in places like this which is vulnerable to the typhoon season, and the yellow river which is no as the sorrow because it floods every year. the intensity of these events is what matters because nothing that we have built, nothing that in our cities, in our transfer systems is built to withstand this level of climate emergency.— built to withstand this level of climate emergency. built to withstand this level of climate emeruen . , climate emergency. under the chinese covernment climate emergency. under the chinese government has _ climate emergency. under the chinese government has made _ climate emergency. under the chinese government has made lots _ climate emergency. under the chinese government has made lots of- climate emergency. under the chinese government has made lots of efforts i government has made lots of efforts during the five—year plans to shift towards a more environmentally friendly policy, how much might these floods floods speed that process up? i these floods floods speed that process up?— these floods floods speed that process op?— process up? i think the first concern of _ process up? i think the first concern of the _ process up? i think the first concern of the governmentl process up? i think the first i concern of the government will process up? i think the first - concern of the government will to be seen to be rescuing people and the party is very keen to show that the
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government cares for people's well—being. when a disaster like this happens we will get a lot of exposure of the fact that the pla has been sent, the lived experience of people is altogether more terrifying. to be in one of those floods, whatever your circumstances is pretty terrifying. i think it will bring home to people that the climate change is truly terrifying prospect in that we are really not prepared. and that global action on climate change has fallen well behind the promises made in paris, so although china has moved... so sorry to interrupt you, but the us, and boy has processed china are not doing enough, how much do you agree with that? ., ,, , doing enough, how much do you agree with that? . ,, , ., , , ., with that? frankly nobody is doing
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enou:h. with that? frankly nobody is doing enough- even _ with that? frankly nobody is doing enough. even when _ with that? frankly nobody is doing enough. even when distinguishedl with that? frankly nobody is doing l enough. even when distinguished as john kerry, is that for four years of the trump administration the united states was out of the climate talks altogether. everyone is very glad the united states is back but finger—pointing is not helpful at this point. what we need is a greater collaboration and greater commitment from everybody. china is acting on climate change, its a very big country and committed to cold, it's needing to roll back that early commitment to fossil fuels but in the respect is doing a great deal. it's the primary supplier of renewable energy technologies to the entire world. ., ~ renewable energy technologies to the entire world. ., ,, , ., renewable energy technologies to the entire world-— entire world. thank you so much. isabel hilton _ entire world. thank you so much. isabel hilton for _ entire world. thank you so much. isabel hilton for your _ entire world. thank you so much. isabel hilton for your thoughts. i still to come a bit later in the programme. we get a view from one of the world's most vulnerable
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regions on the impacts of global warming — the federated states of micronesia — a group of some 600 small islands in the western pacific ocean. but first. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines in the uk. britain will give france around $75 million more — in funding to stem the rising number of migrants crossing the english channel. the two countries have agreed to deploy more police and invest in detection technology on the french coast, to try to stop boats carrying illegal migrants from reaching british shores. the eu has rejected demands by the uk government to redraw the post—brexit trading arrangements it agreed for northern ireland. british ministers say border checks on goods being sent from other parts of the uk to northern ireland — which were agreed in the brexit divorce deal — have proved unsustainable. police in spain have arrested a 22—year—old uk citizen in connection with the hacking of 130 high—profile twitter accounts, including those of elon musk, barack 0bama and kanye
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west. the hacked accounts tweeted followers, encouraging them to join a bitcoin scam, injuly last year. joseph 0'connor is charged with conspiracy to intentionally access a computer without authorisation and obtaining information from a protected computer. to the olympics now — where we've seen the start of the competition injapan ahead of the opening ceremony on friday. it began with women's softball — japan taking on australia in the opening event — and women's football — where there has already been an upset. the games are of course being held with heavy restrictions because of coronavirus. 0rganisers say there are now more than 80 confirmed covid cases related to the games and two competitors have been ruled out — after testing positive.
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we can go live now to our team in tokyo. sarah mulkerirns is overlooking the harbour in tokyo. and mariko 0i is in the ginza district of downtown tokyo. great to see the both of you out and about — sarah, let me start with you — the softball under way with the japanese team scoring a victory. what's the reaction been? yes, welcome along to tokyo. i think finally we were talking about the sport at last and when you have a sporting shock that certainly takes over the headlines. we know that we have been leading with the overnight on the bbc sport website because it is a significant result when you consider that the us women's national team, a world cup winners. they had not been beaten since january 2019. however sweet it are
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one of their old photos because if you go all the way back to the olympics in rio in 2016 it was sweet and who knocked the usa out in a penalty shoot—out then. so they know each other well and sweet and played some brilliant football. it was a 3-0 some brilliant football. it was a 3—0 when against the us women's national team. with two of the goals on the evening, so a really good results from sweden but i will tell you that back in 2008 when the usa went on to win the gold medal they lost their opening game, and if anything the us women's national team, they like a challenge. they like to be under pressure. they like to have the doubters against them so i would not put it past them using this as significant motivation to potentially go on to win. i will also tell you that there was an opening win forjapan in the soft ball, they are the defending
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champions from 2008 to the last time softball was at the olympics. the host was off to a winning start as well. mariko i know you've been gathering sentiment from people in tokyo — one day till the event and still talk that it could be cancelled. what are you hearing? it's interesting _ what are you hearing? it's interesting you _ what are you hearing? it's interesting you ask about cancellation because i know a couple of for _ cancellation because i know a couple of for media including the bbc have reported _ of for media including the bbc have reported about the comments made by the chief— reported about the comments made by the chief of— reported about the comments made by the chief of tokyo 2028 saying that cancellation has not been ruled out but its— cancellation has not been ruled out but it's hot— cancellation has not been ruled out but it's not being talked about at all by— but it's not being talked about at all byjapanese media and when i was talking _ all byjapanese media and when i was talking to _ all byjapanese media and when i was talking to a _ all byjapanese media and when i was talking to a japanese cameraman and colleagues _ talking to a japanese cameraman and colleagues about it almost feels like he — colleagues about it almost feels like he said itjust so he and japan does _ like he said itjust so he and japan does not — like he said itjust so he and japan does not get accused of forging ahead _ does not get accused of forging ahead with the games despite the risk of— ahead with the games despite the risk of this becoming a super spreader— risk of this becoming a super spreader event. and they have been quite _ spreader event. and they have been quite a _ spreader event. and they have been quite a lot— spreader event. and they have been quite a lot of criticism injapan that— quite a lot of criticism injapan that those officials and politicians say one _ that those officials and politicians say one thing to foreign immediate
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and its— say one thing to foreign immediate and it's a _ say one thing to foreign immediate and it's a big flood in different to japanese — and it's a big flood in different to japanese media and the public because — japanese media and the public because they seem to think what foreiqn _ because they seem to think what foreign media want to hear it different— foreign media want to hear it different to what the japanese public — different to what the japanese public want to hear but i think it's fair to— public want to hear but i think it's fair to say— public want to hear but i think it's fair to say that the japanese public have now — fair to say that the japanese public have now reluctantly accepted that the games would go ahead regardless of the _ the games would go ahead regardless of the strong public opposition, especially after we found out the contract — especially after we found out the contract that they signed did not exactly— contract that they signed did not exactly give japan the right to cancel — exactly give japan the right to cancel the event without possibly facinq _ cancel the event without possibly facing future lawsuits and as a result — facing future lawsuits and as a result the _ facing future lawsuits and as a result the ioc is not exactly well—liked. it's boss is meeting the emperor— well—liked. it's boss is meeting the emperor today, well—liked. it's boss is meeting the emperortoday, but well—liked. it's boss is meeting the emperor today, but there's been quite _ emperor today, but there's been quite a _ emperor today, but there's been quite a lot— emperor today, but there's been quite a lot of criticism that apparently he reportedly demanded that this _ apparently he reportedly demanded that this meeting with the emperor even know— that this meeting with the emperor even know he has only received a first shot — even know he has only received a first shot of — even know he has only received a first shot of covid vaccine and the emperor— first shot of covid vaccine and the emperor will be declaring the opening — emperor will be declaring the opening of the tokyo games in person tomorrow— opening of the tokyo games in person tomorrow nightjust like his grandfather did for the 1964 games
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and there's a lot of concerns about him being — and there's a lot of concerns about him being there in person as well. would _ him being there in person as well. would he — him being there in person as well. would he complicate a backdrop to be preparing as athletes. sarah you have been talking to some athletes with no spectators in the quarantine, what have you found? it is so different. 0ver quarantine, what have you found? it is so different. over the course of the last 18 months and support we've been talking to a wide range of athletes, all around the world who have had to try to come up with different ways of training and who have not had the same training facilities that they usually would have. also the fact these games are now happening a year later, that's good for some athletes who needed recovery from injuries potentially and maybe worse for others who were hanging on at the end of their career. so much preparation that usually goes into it and i've been looking at some of the really inventive ways that athletes all around the world have been coping with training in the pandemic. bathtubs, balconies and kitchens. here is how some olympic athletes have trained for tokyo during
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lockdowns around the world. no treadmill was no problem for the 5000 metre runner paul chelimo. the us athlete took this jokey approach to indoor training. anouk verge—depre made use of her sister and nearby balcony to keep her beach volleyball skills sharp. at least the swiss player won't have to worry about trees in tokyo. the philippines' hidilyn diaz swept the gym for the kitchen allowing her to a live stream her weightlifting sessions. she also helped raise money forfood parcels for hundreds of families. boxer ginny fuchs made her own gym outside — breaking rocks on a hillside with her us training team. while up on the roof, cuban wrestler daniel gregoric worked
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out with a little help from his coach. he went to his coach's home to train and it was just enough for the indian ten metre shooter to practice in. and ray also trained inside heading to a parking garage but packing a shotgun rather than an air rifle meant the lebanese athlete did not pull the trigger. thank you so much forjoining us on the programme. i know you have lots of stuff to get under way as the olympics gets ready for tomorrow. under way as the olympics gets ready fortomorrow. i'm under way as the olympics gets ready for tomorrow. i'm going to let you get back to it. thank you for joining us. if you want to get in touch with me i'm on twitter — @bbckarishma you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme... the remote pacific islands of micronesia are some
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of the most vulnerable places on the planet to the effects of climate change. i'll be talking live to the federation's president about what the world can do to help. coming down the ladder now. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash in the 30 year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred to that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now a decade later, it has been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in| sperm quantity, and an increase in malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. _ thousands of households across
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the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. this is newsday on the bbc. in singapore. 0ur headlines. 25 dead but also dramatic rescues in the central chinese province after the central chinese province after the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. now as we've been reporting china has had record rains and flooding — last weeks floods in europe killed over 200 people — we've seen recent record heatwaves and wildfires in the us. these just some of the latest examples of the immense atmospheric
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challenges the world is facing. one of the most vulnerable places to the impacts of global warming — are the federated states of micronesia — a group of some 600 small islands in the western pacific 0cean. joining me now from honolulu is the president of the federated states of micronesia — david panuelo. the images coming out of china today — devastating scenes there. you yourself have painted a dire picture fo what the future holds — if more global action isn t taken to combat climate change. tell us how urgent the situation is in micronesia right now? thank you for having me on your bbc programme. it is urgent indeed. i have received an invitation from the prime minister of the uk and we are ready for that. also engaged the
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president of the cop26 and we are ready to combat this very urgent topic. the situation that is happening around the world, we saw germany, belgium and other european countries severely affected by storms and heavy rains, flooding. we saw what happened in china and two citizens of these countries. the threat of climate change is already here. we have been saying that it's notjust in the future, it's artie happening today. even our dead are not safe from this existential threat. rising sea waters are washing graveyards into the rising ocean and the storms that knock over banana trees. ads,
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ocean and the storms that knock over banana trees-— banana trees. a real challenge. i 'ust want banana trees. a real challenge. i just want to _ banana trees. a real challenge. i just want to jump _ banana trees. a real challenge. i just want to jump in _ banana trees. a real challenge. i just want to jump in here - banana trees. a real challenge. i just want to jump in here and - just want to jump in here and ask you, the united states has been saying that countries are not doing enough, it has pointed the finger at china saying that it could do much more. how much do you agree with that? we more. how much do you agree with that? ~ ., more. how much do you agree with that? . ., ., , , that? we have said it many times over that we _ that? we have said it many times over that we are _ that? we have said it many times over that we are calling _ that? we have said it many times over that we are calling on - that? we have said it many times over that we are calling on the i over that we are calling on the bigger countries to do this. china, india, the european union, the bigger countries that are the big emissions contributing to the carbon footprint. we need to take action now and in fact they need to champion the movement and reversing climate change. because the impacts on small island countries and pacific island countries are threatened by climate change. and so cop26 is something we need so we can come there and say what we have been
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saying over the years. this is very, very urgent and very important for our populations in the small pacific island countries.— island countries. what role do smaller nations _ island countries. what role do smaller nations like _ island countries. what role do smaller nations like yours - island countries. what role do| smaller nations like yours play island countries. what role do i smaller nations like yours play in all of this?— all of this? well, we are the countries — all of this? well, we are the countries without _ all of this? well, we are the countries without any - all of this? well, we are the . countries without any footprint, all of this? well, we are the - countries without any footprint, and he carbon footprint. we don't have any emissions but you see that we have been championing these efforts. we are talking about here. solutions that really exist can go towards cutting the short—lived super pollutant emissions from hf seeds. 0ur pollutant emissions from hf seeds. our country urges all countries to ratify the agreement through the montreal protocol. 0ur ratify the agreement through the montreal protocol. our country helps to champion this movement we are calling on the bigger countries to
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ratify the amendment. and we are taking this matter to the cop26 and be able to work with those countries so that we can understand that this is a matter that requires emergency and action today right now. but even with our and action today right now. but even with your own _ and action today right now. but even with your own backyard _ and action today right now. but even with your own backyard there's - and action today right now. but even with your own backyard there's a - and action today right now. but even with your own backyard there's a lot | with your own backyard there's a lot of political infighting that is holding up progress on climate change. what responsibility do countries like yours have in this particular battle? latte countries like yours have in this particular battle?— particular battle? we are not divided at — particular battle? we are not divided at all— particular battle? we are not divided at all on _ particular battle? we are not divided at all on the - particular battle? we are not divided at all on the front - particular battle? we are not divided at all on the front in l particular battle? we are not - divided at all on the front in terms of climate change. we are super united on it. at the last pacific islands forum we passed the communique that speaks to this existential threat in our livelihood and our countries are together on this one. we took it to united
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nations and cop 26th around the corner. the united states, recently at president biden's special envoy on climate change, john kerry, and he's talking to the countries to be together and be united in this decade of action this must be done. this existential threat is not something that affects only pacific island countries. look around to the recent news, canada is reporting the highest temperatures, united states is hurting, livestock and food security is also a threat in the united states. look around the rest of the world, the things we are doing everywhere will be impacted by climate change. it's a win—win situation if we come together and i sat at the united nations is probably going to take a greater
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challenge than the global community in the second world war because this means extinction of the life—support system that we have on the planet both on land and at sea. for our country. both on land and at sea. for our count . ., ~ both on land and at sea. for our count . ., ,, i. both on land and at sea. for our count . ., ,, , , ., country. thank you, president of the federated states _ country. thank you, president of the federated states of _ country. thank you, president of the federated states of micronesia. - country. thank you, president of the federated states of micronesia. i . federated states of micronesia. i know there's a lot more that we could talk about, but that's all that we have time for on the programme today i'm afraid. ahe a he was special from the natural history museum is working at a quarry at a secret location in the cotswolds. they have unearthed evidence of tens of thousands of rare marine fossils such as feather stars from hundred 67 million years ago when a shallow tropical sea covered much of southern england.
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that's it for newsday. thank you so much forjoining us, stay with bbc world news. good evening. it's been another hot day across most parts of the uk, and in northern ireland, it looks like records have been broken once again. 31.3 degrees recorded at castlederg in county tyrone this afternoon. that is a new provisional all—time record for northern ireland. the previous record, well, that was only set last saturday. things are set to change over the coming days because to this swirl of cloud here, an area of low pressure out in the atlantic. that'll be moving in our direction in time for the weekend, but in the shorter—term, it's just going to nudge up against this area of high pressure, strengthening the easterly wind. it is that that is pushing the heat westwards, so these areas still covered by a met office amber extreme heat warning — the south west of england, parts of the midlands, the southern half of wales
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and also northern ireland. high temperatures by day, but also those temperatures staying pretty high at night. those temperatures not dropping quickly at all through the evening. any daytime thunderstorms should tend to fade, but have a look at the temperatures at 11pm. we're looking at values around 22—23 degrees in places, and those temperatures won't fall an awful lot further as we head through the rest of the night. we're also going to see more of this low cloud, mist and murk pushing in towards northern and eastern scotland, parts of eastern england. so, quite a grey, misty start to the day here. a lot of that low cloud and fog and mist will tend to burn back towards the coast, so it should brighten up inland. and for most, tomorrow is another hot and mostly sunny day with just a scattering of isolated afternoon thunderstorms. but there is evidence of the easterly wind, not a particularly strong wind, but enough to push the heat westwards. so, in northern ireland tomorrow, we could be looking at a high of 32 degrees. it is possible we could break that record once again. will be cooler across eastern parts of the uk. and here on friday, again, we'll see some mist and murk and low cloud.
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also down to the south west, notice this heavy, thundery rain drifting into the picture. this is the first sign of our change for the weekend. temperatures also a little bit lower on friday, but as we head into the weekend, this area of low pressure is going to slide across the uk, particularly england and wales, giving some heavy, thundery downpours, possibly enough rain to cause some disruption. across northern ireland and scotland, it should stay mostly dry, but temperatures much lower than they have been.
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this is bbc news, the headlines.
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china has seen some of the worst flooding in years — with twelve months' worth of rain — in just three days in some cities. at least 25 people have died in hunaan province. smoke from wildfires raging across the western us is causing harmful air pollution as far away as new york. thousands of people have been evacuated in oregon, where the largest active wildfire has burned 1500 square kilometres. the eu has rejected demands by the uk government to redraw the post—brexit trading arrangements it agreed for northern ireland. ministers say border checks on goods from great britain it signed up to in the brexit divorce deal have proved unsustainable. at the tokyo 0lympics at the tokyo olympics the us women's have suffered a shock to sweden.

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