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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 12, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... the taliban claims it has captured afghanistan's second city of kandahar. if confirmed, this would place two of the the country's three largest cities in insurgent hands, following the fall of the western centre of herat earlier the united states says it's sending troops to the afghan capital, kabul, to help evacuate some civilian staff from the american embassy. but the state department insisted the us embassy in kabul would remain open. the head of the world meteorological organisation has voiced concern about the effects of climate change in the mediterranean region, after italy registered what's thought to be a record temperature of 48.8 celsius. there's also been extreme weather in turkey. kastamonu, a city in the north of the country, has been hit by flash floods after heavy rainfall. 17 people have reportedly died, with more than 1,400 people evacuated from the areas affected. this is bbc news.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster henry bonsu, and lord jones, who is a former trade minster. just digby to us. just looking forward to what's on the front pages. let's start with the times — it leads with "multiple fatalities after plymouth mass shooting." the home secretary, priti patel, described the incident as "shocking". in the financial times, the us and uk are sending troops to afghanistan to help evacuate embassy staff from the capital, kabul. the metro says the move follows a wave of attacks from the taliban, as it seized 11 of afghanistan's 3a provincial capitals. the telegraph's sports page covers team gb�*s cj ujah, who may lose his silver medal in track and field after being suspended for an alleged doping breach. the guardian says gcse results this
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year have revealed a widening performance gap between pupils at selective schools and those from other state schools. and finally, the i has the title "britain faces biggest test for living with covid this weekend" as 1.7 million people are expected to attend theatres, sporting venues, and music festivals. let's begin with the situation in afghanistan. and while we've been on air, it's evolved a great deal, which just shows the very pace at which just shows the very pace at which the taliban are gaining territory in afghanistan as the allied troops have withdrawn, suggesting that kandahar may have fallen into their hands now. i remember kandaharwas on fallen into their hands now. i remember kandahar was on all our lips many years ago, where the brits democrat british army and the merit democrat british army and the merit democrat marines, the royal navy were all there, and we heard about
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kandahar all the time. now it looks like in the next 2a hours, it will fall to the taliban. for those of us who can remember the fall of the american backed south vietnamese government in saigon in 1975, this is so reminiscent of that. there is a momentum, a constant falling of the dominoes, if you like, towards the dominoes, if you like, towards the capital of the country. and then, the west in that case — it's america now, america and britain — going in and they say they'll get the paratroopers to go in and get 4000 brits out. 4000, that's a lot of people. that's a lot of helicopters. and they'll bring them all out, which is the greatest admission of defeat there can be. my concern, martin, and i labour the point in our earlier programme, i
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make no excuse for repeating this — if the allied presence did one thing, they did the first thing very quickly, which was getting rid of the taliban, they stopped them harbouring terrorists and al-qaeda up harbouring terrorists and al-qaeda up in the tora bora mountains — that was on very quickly after about three months. then they went on to this american—led nation exercise. and that's where they similarly failed with one exception, which as they did liberate women. they did give girls and women the chance of an education, the chance of a degree of equality and a life of existence, and a degree of being able to work and a degree of being able to work and take their proper place in society. and my greatest fear is that that will all be for naught, and that was a huge advance, and that terrifies me. but i tell you what i am very concerned about, is
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that if we do not as a country ensure that every single afghan who helped the british presence over 20 years, interpreters, people who worked with us and helped us, they must be living in sheer terror of what will happen to them if the taliban get there. and we have a duty, and international moral duty to get those people out and give them a home in the country that they helped. and if ever there was a time when we can actually show what true asylum means, it's that. and i really hope that will happen. yes. really hope that will happen. yes, let's look at _ really hope that will happen. yes, let's look at operation _ really hope that will happen. yes, let's look at operation cobble on the metro while we talk about that —— kabul. there is a vsat scheme being quickened up apparently, henry, to help these people out of afghanistan into and britain —— visa. but you might say it's a bit last minute. visa. but you might say it's a bit last minute-— visa. but you might say it's a bit last minute. absolutely, can you imaaine last minute. absolutely, can you imagine the _ last minute. absolutely, can you imagine the terror— last minute. absolutely, can you imagine the terror of— last minute. absolutely, can you
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imagine the terror of those - last minute. absolutely, can you l imagine the terror of those people last minute. absolutely, can you - imagine the terror of those people - imagine the terror of those people — interpreters — imagine the terror of those people — interpreters that have supported nato interpreters that have supported nate and — interpreters that have supported nato and western troops and all kinds _ nato and western troops and all kinds of— nato and western troops and all kinds of ways on the ground, and withoui— kinds of ways on the ground, and without whom soldiers could not function? — without whom soldiers could not function? why is it that it's taken so long. — function? why is it that it's taken so long, that we always have this default _ so long, that we always have this default position, especially when the home office is involved, of saying. — the home office is involved, of saying, "no, no," that's the default position— saying, "no, no," that's the default position even when people have lit democrat — position even when people have lit democrat risked life and limb to sunport— democrat risked life and limb to support troops from this country and other— support troops from this country and other countries. i've been reading some _ other countries. i've been reading some sociat— other countries. i've been reading some social media response to the pending _ some social media response to the pending a — some social media response to the pending a collapse of kandahar, and i pending a collapse of kandahar, and i know _ pending a collapse of kandahar, and i know torn — pending a collapse of kandahar, and i know tom too can hot, who did several— i know tom too can hot, who did several tours of duty in afghanistan, is absolutely foaming, positively _ afghanistan, is absolutely foaming, positively spitting, he is furious. hes— positively spitting, he is furious. he's written a 19 page twitter thread — he's written a 19 page twitter thread in— he's written a 19 page twitter thread in which he says, "this is appalling, — thread in which he says, "this is appalling, we have let these people down _ appalling, we have let these people down its— appalling, we have let these people down. it's the equivalent of training _ down. it's the equivalent of training a _ down. it's the equivalent of training a guy for a title bout then on the _ training a guy for a title bout then on the day— training a guy for a title bout then on the day he's due to go
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we've done to these afghan soldiers and troops. but we've done to these afghan soldiers and troo s. �* , ., _, and troops. but henry, what could the uk have _ and troops. but henry, what could the uk have done, _ and troops. but henry, what could the uk have done, just _ and troops. but henry, what could the uk have done, just briefly, - and troops. but henry, what could i the uk have done, just briefly, when the uk have done, just briefly, when the us said they were pulling out? once joe the us said they were pulling out? oncejoe biden said the americans were going, what more could britain have done? tram were going, what more could britain have done? ., , ., have done? two things - one, we think it's a _ have done? two things - one, we think it's a very _ have done? two things - one, we think it's a very serious _ have done? two things - one, we think it's a very serious mistake l have done? two things - one, we| think it's a very serious mistake at the most — think it's a very serious mistake at the most robust level, both military and civilian. — the most robust level, both military and civilian, and two, american is of a range — and civilian, and two, american is of a range of— and civilian, and two, american is of a range of partners in nato. how many— of a range of partners in nato. how many countries are in nato? 28, i think _ many countries are in nato? 28, i think there — many countries are in nato? 28, i think. there are still nato troops who contributed to this effort, they could _ who contributed to this effort, they could have — who contributed to this effort, they could have done this — maybe not easily— could have done this — maybe not easily without the states, but they coutd've _ easily without the states, but they could've done something to support those _ could've done something to support those troops, those africans who are now sitting _ those troops, those africans who are now sitting ducks. | those troops, those africans who are now sitting ducks.— now sitting ducks. i hope you know that i do now sitting ducks. i hope you know that i do hope _ now sitting ducks. i hope you know that i do hope that _ now sitting ducks. i hope you know that i do hope that the _ that i do hope that the international community understand something about afghanistan — it was the only country in that region of
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the only country in that region of the world that alexander the great failed to conquer. it was the only country that the roman empire didn't go near because of its reputation. the british empire twice was sent out of there with its tail between its legs. the soviet empire failed. the greatest military powers the world has ever seen called america has failed. and perhaps at last, someone will understand that afghanistan — you deal with them at your peril if you think you're going to conquer and occupy them. but diub , to conquer and occupy them. but digby. it's _ to conquer and occupy them. but digby, it's not about conquering, it's about — digby, it's not about conquering, it's about supporting... i�*m it's about supporting... i'm agreeing — it's about supporting... i'm agreeing with _ it's about supporting... i'm agreeing with you, - it's about supporting... i“n agreeing with you, henry, i'm agreeing with you, henry, i'm agreeing with you, henry, i'm agreeing with you. i'm just saying that's what were they would've said. what we will probably see is a civil war, because people must sit there and wait _ war, because people must sit there and wait for— war, because people must sit there and wait for the taliban is steam—roll through them and send them _ steam—roll through them and send them back— steam—roll through them and send them back to what happened in the 19905. _ them back to what happened in the 1990s, really awful, terrible regime _ 1990s, really awful, terrible regime. and people take advance ——
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take up— regime. and people take advance —— take up arms, they'll get them from within— take up arms, they'll get them from within and _ take up arms, they'll get them from within and without the country. i hope _ within and without the country. i hope i'm — within and without the country. i hope i'm wrong, we will see huge htood _ hope i'm wrong, we will see huge htood said — hope i'm wrong, we will see huge blood said. rememberwhen hope i'm wrong, we will see huge blood said. remember when we said let the _ blood said. remember when we said let the rwandans find it out? look what _ let the rwandans find it out? look what happened. will be really go back to _ what happened. will be really go back to that?— what happened. will be really go back to that? this is a sub'ect we could talk about t back to that? this is a sub'ect we could talk about for h back to that? this is a sub'ect we could talk about for the h back to that? this is a subject we could talk about for the whole . back to that? this is a subject we i could talk about for the whole paper review, it so complex and concerning, but we need to move on. on the front page of the times, we won't discuss it because it would be speculation, there's so little detail from the police, speculation, there's so little detailfrom the police, but speculation, there's so little detail from the police, but the headline is, "multiple fatalities after plymouth mass shooting." at 8:15pm tonight we got news that a very serious event was happening in plymouth, there was clearly some kind of gun incident, some shooting incident. it appears people have died and there have been people who have been wounded, as well. but apart from that, we know very little, people in the area were
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asked to remain indoors for their safety. i'm sure there'll be a lot more about that story in news tomorrow. let's look at the all you now, "britain faces because test living with covid this weekend." lots of people turning out for sport and music events. we'lljust see it, won't we, how people manage to socially distant still, whether they wear masks and how effective the vaccine is?— vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we _ vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we need _ vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we need to _ vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we need to to _ vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we need to to live - vaccine is? i've said for sometime now that we need to to live with l now that we need to to live with this. we've had a fabulous response to the vaccination programme, and the country — everybody should take a bow. it's interesting, the government is never as bad as people say they are, and there never as good as people say they are. there's always a grey in that bulimic. but i think the government can take a bow for the way the vaccination programme has been handled, so could
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the nhs, so could everybody in the country. this weekend, with the start of the premiership football season and loots of gigs and concerts in the theatres, festivals, we will see the test of this. and when you think that something like eight out of ten, 8.5 out of ten have got antibodies in their system whether through vaccination or having had it, it'll be the big test as to what happens 14 days after that. i actually do wish they would start a different way of reporting this, that they — who are they, the government i guess — would seize on the number of cases every day and move on to the hospitalisations and sadly the number of deaths —— would cease on the number of cases every day. that's the crux of the matter now because lots of people will test positive, they might�*ve been off—color, they aren't going anywhere in the hospital. janik off-color, they aren't going anywhere in the hospital. janik that could be anywhere in the hospital. janik that could he flew _ anywhere in the hospital. janik that could be flew or—
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anywhere in the hospital. janik that could be flew or incidents - anywhere in the hospital. janik that could be flew or incidents of - anywhere in the hospital. janik that could be flew or incidents of car - could be flew or incidents of car accidents — could be flew or incidents of car accidenta— could be flew or incidents of car accidents. �* , ., ,, ., , accidents. it's good to know who's been diagnosed _ accidents. it's good to know who's been diagnosed and _ accidents. it's good to know who's been diagnosed and recovers - accidents. it's good to know who'sj been diagnosed and recovers from accidents. it's good to know who's i been diagnosed and recovers from it, that sort of thing. i been diagnosed and recovers from it, that sort of thing.— that sort of thing. i think we are at the point _ that sort of thing. i think we are at the point where _ that sort of thing. i think we are at the point where if _ that sort of thing. i think we are at the point where if you - that sort of thing. i think we are at the point where if you have . that sort of thing. i think we are i at the point where if you have the very clumsy reporting ofjust cases, whereas you'll have a lot of people who get it but don't actually have symptoms, or indeed don't suffer badly, it's time to put this into context. that's important because if you want to go to a football match or concert, the person next to you may well be carrying it even if they're fine, and your only certainty to make sure that you don't get it badly will be a vaccination. and i'm encouraging everybody who says they don't have one to start persuading them to get one to start persuading them to get one stop if we could talk one to start persuading them to get one stop if we could tall— one stop if we could talk about the dailv telegraph. — one stop if we could talk about the daily telegraph, the _ one stop if we could talk about the daily telegraph, the world - one stop if we could talk about the daily telegraph, the world health | daily telegraph, the world health organization pointing the finger at chinese wuhan lab, saying that china needs to fess up? titer?
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chinese wuhan lab, saying that china needs to fess up?— needs to fess up? very quickly, were talkin: needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about — needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about a _ needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about a link _ needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about a link to _ needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about a link to the _ needs to fess up? very quickly, were talking about a link to the who, - talking about a link to the who, this doctor who says that it could be a _ this doctor who says that it could be a technician or a virologist who's— be a technician or a virologist who's gone out into the field collecting bat samples whose brought back a _ collecting bat samples whose brought back a virus, spread it, as opposed to a lab _ back a virus, spread it, as opposed to a lab leak — back a virus, spread it, as opposed to a lab leak. but the chinese need to a lab leak. but the chinese need to come _ to a lab leak. but the chinese need to come clean and allow them to do theiriob _ to come clean and allow them to do theirjob because it's in the interest— theirjob because it's in the interest of the whole community for people _ interest of the whole community for people to _ interest of the whole community for people to know exactly how this started — people to know exactly how this started. �* , ., ~ people to know exactly how this started. �*, ., ,, ., , ,, , started. let's talk about gcses, hen . started. let's talk about gcses, henry- firstly — started. let's talk about gcses, henry. firstly on _ started. let's talk about gcses, henry. firstly on the _ started. let's talk about gcses, henry. firstly on the guardian, | henry. firstly on the guardian, "gcses show widening gaps in attainment." again, there are so many ways of measuring that, it's notjust many ways of measuring that, it's not just about the kind many ways of measuring that, it's notjust about the kind of many ways of measuring that, it's not just about the kind of school you go to, but the part of the country you go to, the background you're from. country you go to, the background you're from-— country you go to, the background you're from. country you go to, the background
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ou'refrom. ~:::: 11:11: , , , you're from. about 600,000 pupils in encland you're from. about 600,000 pupils in england received _ you're from. about 600,000 pupils in england received the _ you're from. about 600,000 pupils in england received the gcses _ you're from. about 600,000 pupils in england received the gcses results, . england received the gcses results, it was— england received the gcses results, it was awarded by teacher assessment as opposed _ it was awarded by teacher assessment as opposed to formal exams. record numbers— as opposed to formal exams. record numbers of— as opposed to formal exams. record numbers of children got the highest possible _ numbers of children got the highest possible grades, you know, 30% of injuries— possible grades, you know, 30% of injuries saw— possible grades, you know, 30% of injuries saw grades of seven or above, _ injuries saw grades of seven or above. and _ injuries saw grades of seven or above, and lots of people are doing that well— above, and lots of people are doing that well at the same time saying that well at the same time saying that children have had it really difficult — that children have had it really difficult in the lead up to the gcses — difficult in the lead up to the gcses and a levels over the past couple _ gcses and a levels over the past couple years, so we may be need to be more _ couple years, so we may be need to be more tolerant of the so—called inflation — be more tolerant of the so—called inflation. the question is, what are emplovers — inflation. the question is, what are employers in the future to make of it? what— employers in the future to make of it? what will those colleges who will accept these gcses students as a level— will accept these gcses students as a level students make of it? when you look— a level students make of it? when you look at — a level students make of it? when you look at the variation in this rise across _ you look at the variation in this rise across the country in some parts _ rise across the country in some parts of— rise across the country in some parts of the country, it's pretty static. — parts of the country, it's pretty static. in — parts of the country, it's pretty static, in other parts it's shooting ahead, _ static, in other parts it's shooting
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ahead, and — static, in other parts it's shooting ahead, and the labour party leader, sir keir— ahead, and the labour party leader, sir keir starmer, was talking about the gap _ sir keir starmer, was talking about the gap between advantaged and disadvantaged pupils being unforgivable. let's a member that teachers _ unforgivable. let's a member that teachers are often accused of being very generous when it comes to teacher— very generous when it comes to teacher assessment —— let's remember. it would appear that independent private school teachers are being _ independent private school teachers are being more indulgent of their pupils— are being more indulgent of their pupils then teachers in the state schools — pupils then teachers in the state schools. so very difficult to distil the real — schools. so very difficult to distil the real trends here of what they will really — the real trends here of what they will really mean, we will have to wait and — will really mean, we will have to wait and see. but people are worried about— wait and see. but people are worried about this _ wait and see. but people are worried about this for several reasons. henry, — about this for several reasons. henry, can _ about this for several reasons. henry, can you sit there in all seriousness that an independent school assist tenneco teacher is more indulgent of pupils because they've done better?— more indulgent of pupils because they've done better? know, digby, ou're they've done better? know, digby, you're misinterpreting _ they've done better? know, digby, you're misinterpreting me. - they've done better? know, digby, you're misinterpreting me. digby, | you're misinterpreting me. digby, that him explain. _ you're misinterpreting me. digby, that him explain. it's _ you're misinterpreting me. digby, that him explain. it's a _ you're misinterpreting me. digby, that him explain. it's a conclusion| that him explain. it's a conclusion we are seeing _ that him explain. it's a conclusion we are seeing being _ that him explain. it's a conclusion we are seeing being reached - that him explain. it's a conclusion . we are seeing being reached not only by the _ we are seeing being reached not only by the guardian but other
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newspapers, as well, that there is a post grade — newspapers, as well, that there is a post grade inflation at schools, both _ post grade inflation at schools, both private and state schools, but the improvement due to this assessment, teacher assessment is even greater and more marked in independent and private schools then it is in— independent and private schools then it is in state _ independent and private schools then it is in state schools. so one could possibly— it is in state schools. so one could possibly conclude that teachers that independent schools — i should rephrase — independent schools — i should rephrase the term, indulgent — our being. _ rephrase the term, indulgent — our being. how— rephrase the term, indulgent — our being, how can i say, rewarding their— being, how can i say, rewarding their pupils to a greater extent more _ their pupils to a greater extent more than state schools are, hence the widening gap. more than state schools are, hence the widening gap-— the widening gap. henry, you could be actually wrong. _ the widening gap. henry, you could be actually wrong. and _ the widening gap. henry, you could be actually wrong. and it _ the widening gap. henry, you could be actually wrong. and it could - the widening gap. henry, you could be actually wrong. and it could be i be actually wrong. and it could be because the independent schools, because the independent schools, because of the way they are set up and the way they've been able to link in with parent teaching at home during the challenge of covid, it could be that they've actually got a better result out of this whereas many state school pupils didn't have the opportunity. now i understand
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why that is something that's deplorable and we need to work hard to stop that gap, but it might not be indulgent teachers, it might well be indulgent teachers, it might well be that they got a better result because their teaching was more productive — not better, but more productive — not better, but more productive during lockdown. i would just say this, that if we have got the problem of grade inflation, whatever you want to call it, because the challenge was so great during covid, i would've thought that grade inflation would've taken them to where it used to be — in other words, them to where it used to be — in otherwords, it them to where it used to be — in other words, it would be deficient because of the problem, and if there was great inflation, it took him straight past that and double. so i don't get, just because there was a big challenge and lots of hard work, that doesn't actually mean for an employer that they can trust the result. that's a worry.— employer that they can trust the result. that's a worry. again, this sub'ect result. that's a worry. again, this subject could _ result. that's a worry. again, this subject could exercise _ result. that's a worry. again, this subject could exercise us - result. that's a worry. again, this subject could exercise us all- subject could exercise us all night, couldn't it? there is so much to
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unpack and we haven't even talked about... pardon? it’s unpack and we haven't even talked about. .. pardon?— about... pardon? it's usually educational. _ about... pardon? it's usually educational. member- about... pardon? it's usually educational. member tony i about... pardon? it's usually. educational. member tony blair about... pardon? it's usually- educational. member tony blair all those _ educational. member tony blair all those years ago? all about education. mandela used to talk about— education. mandela used to talk about no— education. mandela used to talk about no matter what your background is, it is _ about no matter what your background is, it is the _ about no matter what your background is, it is the duty of the state and others _ is, it is the duty of the state and others to— is, it is the duty of the state and others to give you a good education. on that— others to give you a good education. on that i_ others to give you a good education. on that i completely agree, henry! thank you. it's so nice to get agreement, isn't it? eunice stubbs has died at the age of 84, there she is on the front of a lot of newspapers. i talked about margate us, the creator of the bbc�*s sherlock series, saying she was as delightful in person as you'd hope from how she appeared on screen —— mark gettys. a brief tribute from you both? i mark gettys. a brief tribute from ou both? . you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i
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you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i watched — you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i watched her _ you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i watched her all _ you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i watched her all the _ you both? i never met eunice stubbs, but i watched her all the way - but i watched her all the way through sherlock, even give us a clue with lionel blair. she through sherlock, even give us a clue with lionel blair.— through sherlock, even give us a clue with lionel blair. she was one ofthe clue with lionel blair. she was one of the captains. — clue with lionel blair. she was one of the captains, wasn't _ clue with lionel blair. she was one of the captains, wasn't she? - clue with lionel blair. she was one of the captains, wasn't she? she i clue with lionel blair. she was one i of the captains, wasn't she? she was wonderful. she _ of the captains, wasn't she? she was wonderful. she always _ of the captains, wasn't she? she was wonderful. she always looked - of the captains, wasn't she? she was wonderful. she always looked like i wonderful. she always looked like she was sort _ wonderful. she always looked like she was sort of— wonderful. she always looked like she was sort of floating, - wonderful. she always looked like she was sort of floating, she i wonderful. she always looked like she was sort of floating, she wasl wonderful. she always looked like | she was sort of floating, she was a trained dancer and she always looked so elegant as if she was floating, rather than walking like the rest of us. i rather than walking like the rest of us. ~' , rather than walking like the rest of us. ~ , ., , rather than walking like the rest of us. ~' , . , , rather than walking like the rest of us. i think she was very gracious in both body and _ us. i think she was very gracious in both body and mind. _ us. i think she was very gracious in both body and mind. i— us. i think she was very gracious in both body and mind. i regaled i us. i think she was very gracious in both body and mind. i regaled you| both body and mind. i regaled you all at 10:30pm _ both body and mind. i regaled you all at 10:30pm with _ both body and mind. i regaled you all at 10:30pm with my _ both body and mind. i regaled you all at 10:30pm with my version i both body and mind. i regaled you all at 10:30pm with my version of| all at 10:30pm with my version of summer holiday, i won't do that again in the interest of decency. but i would say that my memory of her goes back to 1964, i was eight, and she started with cliff richard in the shadows, and i followed and she started with cliff richard in the shadows, and ifollowed her ever since. and it's a sad day because she stood for decency, she stood for joyousness and cheerfulness in a very sad, nasty world in which you have to report
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daily and henry and i have the privilege of commenting. it's a nice occasion if we can say, well, god bless you, and at the end of the day, a life well lived, and huge respect for her own reflection, but also people like you and me. trier?r also people like you and me. very much so, also people like you and me. very much so. yes- _ also people like you and me. very much so. yes- a _ also people like you and me. very much so, yes. a sad _ also people like you and me. very much so, yes. a sad but - much so, yes. a sad but poignant note to end it on. henry, digby, always a challenge to have you on together. but we wouldn't miss it, with we? i don't think we would. that's it for the papers tonight, thanks to henry and digby for joining us. don't forget to buy a paper in the morning, will you? coming up next, it's probably the sport. night night. good evening, i'm adam wild with your latest sports news. the british olympic silver medallist
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cj ujah has been provisionally suspended for breaching anti—doping rules at the tokyo olympics. the 27—year—old returned an adverse test result during the games. he was part of the quartet that won the 100 metre relay silver for team gb. the ita, the international testing agency, has released the names of four track—and—field athletes whose a—samples, they say, committed anti—doping violations. on that list, team gb sprinter cj ujah. his sample, according to this report, contained traces of ostarine and s23. now typically it's a drug used by body—builders to enhance muscle growth. what's likely to happen now is that more testing might be carried out on blood or urine samples provided by the 27—year—old, and he may well get his chance to explain his side of the story to the international testing agency. elsewhere tonight, romelu lukaku says he is "happy to be back home" after the striker
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re—signed for chelsea. he moves to stamford bridge for a fee of £97.5 million from italian champions inter milan. the 28—year—old belgian returns to west london on a five—year deal, having left the club to join everton seven years ago. ahead of their premier league opener away to manchester united on saturday, leeds united have confirmed their head coach, marcelo bielsa, has signed a one—year deal at the club. after winning promotion to the top flight, bielsa lead the club to a ninth place finish last season. he'd been out of contract but, speaking through a translator this afteroon, he said he's committed himself to another season at elland road, and says the contract situation has been "resolved". celtic are into the europa league play—off round after a 7—2 aggregate win over czech sidejablonec. they will meet dutch side az alkmaar next. meanwhile, stjohnstone lost to turkish side galatasaray — meaning they drop into the conference league play—off. they lost 4—2 on the night,
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5—3 on aggregate. now, to the second test at lords, where a superb unbeaten century from kl rahul has put india firmly in charge on the opening day against england. our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. it was the sky that convinced england's captain — grey and friendly. and, what's more, he was fit. yes, james anderson was playing, so england chose to bowl. appealing... no, keep trying and trying. mark wood charged in, all his energy in every delivery, and... rohit sharma's batting could make a weaker bowler weep and any captain frown. regrets? he may have had a few. come on, jimmy, work some magic! rohit sharma out for 83, then anderson again, cheteshwar pujara caught and gone for nine. after two sessions of play, england had taken just two wickets. still, underfloodlights,
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they remained hopeful. but kl rahul stayed cool, and the sun returned to greet him. rock solid in the morning, expansive in the evening. bat all day, make 100 on this ground — now that is cricket perfection. it took virat kohli's late dismissal, ollie robinson's ball, and joe root�*s catch to remind us this is still a match. just keep smiling, captain. joe wilson, bbc news. rohit and kl started off really patiently, we bowled in good areas. they left well and the nicks didn't come today, you know, on a different day, they could've been 2—3 down early. so yeah, they played well. we just need early wickets in the morning. if we can get kl and rohit out early — they've got quite a long tail, so 5—6 down early and we're still in the game. to the hundred then, where the northern superchargers hammered the manchester originals at headingley. john simpson hit 71 offjust 28 balls as the superchargers capatalised on some poor bowling from the originals.
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and brandon carse added a boundary on the final ball to take his side to 200 — that's the higest total of the tournment so far. the originals were bowled out forjust 131, with the superchargers winning by 69, runs keeping their slim hopes of reaching the latter stages of the competiton alive. in the women's fixture, the originals put a severe dent in their rivals' hopes of progressing. lizelle lee with a dazzling display of batting. she made 68 from just 40 balls as the originals won by eight wickets. in super league tonight, there was a rare defeat for reigning champions st helens, as they went down 20—10 at home to castleford. greg eden here with the decisive try for the tigers that put the game beyond the reach of 12—man saints, who had tommy makinson sent off. eight—time paralympic equestrian champion sophie christiansen said she's "absolutely heartbroken" she will miss the tokyo games due to a "minor veterinary issue" with her horse.
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christiansen, who has cerebral palsy, won ten medals across the last four games, including three golds at both london and rio. she'll be replaced by 2019 european gold medallist georgia wilson, who'll make her games debut. christiansen is already looking ahead to the paralympics in paris. my friends and family will be able to come and watch me a lot easier. i think paris will be just as big as london, so how can i miss that? and british number one, jo konta, has withdrawn from the canadian open and her match against american teenager coco gauff with a knee injury. konta had been in good form — beating elina svitolina in three sets to reach the last 16 — and had been hoping to put a challenging few months behind her after missing wimbledon and the olympics. it's worrying news ahead of the us open which starts later this month. and that's all your sport for now.
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hello. there is no real heat in the uk forecast for the next few days. but across southern europe, it's a different story — it's been an exceptionally hot week, that heat now migrating westwards. the orange colours on this chart show places where temperatures will be well above the average. in parts of southern spain, we could be looking at temperatures as high as 47 celsius because high pressure is trapping the heat in place. but for us, low pressure is close by — that means some brisk winds, some rain at times but not all the time, and temperatures will struggle especially across northwestern parts of the uk. and here through friday, we will see some quite hefty showers working through — some heavy, some thundery, especially widespread across the far northwest of scotland. further south and east, many parts of england and wales will be dry with just the odd shower here. and while there will be big areas of cloud floating past, there will also be some good spells of sunshine.
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but it's breezy for all of us, especially windy up towards the northwest, and top temperatures in glasgow ofjust 17 celsius. could get to 22—23 across parts of eastern and southeastern england. now as we head through friday night, we will see some further showers especially across the northern half of scotland. further south, it turns predominantly dry, some clear spells at least for a time, and temperatures between 11—15 celsius as we start saturday morning. so, as we head into the start of the weekend, we've got one area of low pressure tending to push away north eastwards, but here comes another low drifting in from the west. a bit of uncertainty still at this range about the detail of saturday's forecast, but it's likely we will see cloud and rain spreading in most likely across some central parts of the uk. to the north, it's a mix of sunshine with just a few showers at this stage, and across the south of england, maybe south wales, it's likely to stay pretty much dry with some sunshine. those temperatures, for the most part, between 19—22 celsius.
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now, the messy picture continues on into sunday. this area of low pressure continues to drift in from the west. we see this frontal system dropping down from the north, so could well be a few different areas of rain on sunday, one pushing into northern scotland, some rain across northern england and wales, perhaps some further south, as well. but in between the areas of the wet weather, there will be some spells of sunshine. but by this stage turning really cool in northern scotland, maybe just 14 celsius.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. the taliban have made their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, and claim to have taken the country's second largest city, kandahar. as the security situation deteriorates thousands of us and british troops are being sent back to help evacuate american and uk nationals. the surging covid cases in parts of the united states — how religion, politics and science have clashed resulting in an epidemic of the unvaccinated. and — the father of britney spears agrees to step down as long—time conservator of her estate, seen a major victory for the singer.

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