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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 16, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today. the taliban take control of afghanistan — 20 years after they were forced from power, fighters enter the presidential palace in kabul. there were chaotic scenes at the airport, as thousands of people desperately tried to leave the country. british troops have arrived to help the uk's evacuation effort the prime minister has called for a co—ordinated international response to the crisis. nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a _
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nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a breeding ground for terror. new guidelines on gun licences are to be introduced in the wake of the mass shooting in plymouth. good morning. changes to the rules on self isolation. if you are pinged by the nhs app. it could meand an end to the pingdemic for hospitality friends like this one. and i've got an exclusive interview with olympic champion tom daley. he tells me why he's taking time out before deciding whether to continue diving and i even got to try on that olympic cardigan. good morning. this week is looking fairly quiet weather—wise. at times there will be a lot of cloud, some patchy light rain and drizzle. and there is no sign of the summer heat. details coming up. good morning. it's monday, 16th august. our top story. the taliban have seized control of afghanistan and declared
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that the war in the country is over, after their forces took the capital, kabul. president ashraf ghani has fled the country. there've been chaotic scenes at kabul airport, where hundreds of afghans have been trying to leave. britain, the united states and other western nations are continuing military operations to evacuate their citizens. our correspondent graham satchel has the latest. on board a plane due to leave kabul overnight. but at the last minute they're told the flight won't be going. passengers are forced to rejoin the chaos outside. there is panic and fear everywhere. for 20 years, afghanistan has had stability, democracy and relative safety. it has all ended in a matter of days. a lucky few have made it out. this is delhi airport and a mix
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of relief, anger and despair. i can't believe the world abandoned afghanistan. our friends are going to get killed. they're going to kill us. our women are not going to have any more rights. the taliban, forced from power by western troops two decades ago, are back. they claim to have taken over every government department, including this, the presidential palace in kabul. just hours earlier the former president, ashraf ghani, at the same desk. he's now fled to uzbekistan. in a statement, he said he has left to avoid bloodshed. kabul is a city on the move, residents desperate to escape. fear of what is to come has gripped every level of society, including former government ministers. deep down in my heart i keep telling myself i won't have to pay the price forjoining a government position. but now i might, i might
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face consequences that i never even dreamed of, and i guess that the price that we pay for trying to make this world a little better than when we came to it, particularly afghanistan. british troops have now arrived in kabul to evacuate uk nationals and afghans who worked with them. it's thought around 4000 in total are eligible to be airlifted out. criticism of the chaos now engulfing afghanistan is widespread. parliament will be recalled on wednesday to debate the crisis. a protest outside the white house in washington. america has long argued its troops couldn't stay in afghanistan forever, and public opinion supports troop withdrawal. but serious questions are now being asked. why was so much money spent, so many military lives lost, to simply allow the taliban to walk back into power?
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the air over kabul is full of helicopters as diplomats and embassy staff make their escape. on the ground the people wait with growing fear. it was not meant to end like this. graham satchell, bbc news. more the 60 countries including the us, uk, and australia, have issued a joint statement urging the taliban to allow people to leave afghanistan if they want to. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. morning to you. things have unfolded so quickly, haven't they? from a political point of view, what is going to happen?— political point of view, what is going to happen? yes, as you say, this is moving _ going to happen? yes, as you say, this is moving so _ going to happen? yes, as you say, this is moving so fast. _ going to happen? yes, as you say, this is moving so fast. the - going to happen? yes, as you say, | this is moving so fast. the absolute priority— this is moving so fast. the absolute priority of— this is moving so fast. the absolute priority of the government is getting — priority of the government is getting those british nationals, and eligible _ getting those british nationals, and eligible afghans come out of the country— eligible afghans come out of the country as quickly as possible. they think— country as quickly as possible. they think there — country as quickly as possible. they think there are about 4000 people. we were _ think there are about 4000 people. we were told yesterday the british ambassador in afghanistan was at kabut— ambassador in afghanistan was at kabul airport himself helping to process— kabul airport himself helping to process those applications. that is
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the absolute immediate priority for the absolute immediate priority for the government. but they are also having _ the government. but they are also having to _ the government. but they are also having to talk diplomatically to other _ having to talk diplomatically to other countries. borisjohnson having to talk diplomatically to other countries. boris johnson was saying _ other countries. boris johnson was saying yesterday that he was very aware _ saying yesterday that he was very aware he — saying yesterday that he was very aware he didn't want other like—minded countries to what he said prematurely recognise the taliban — said prematurely recognise the taliban. he said there would be a new regime but he didn't know what it would _ new regime but he didn't know what it would he — new regime but he didn't know what it would be. he said the uk would work— it would be. he said the uk would work with— it would be. he said the uk would work with the un security council to stop afghanistan lapsing back into terror~ _ stop afghanistan lapsing back into terror. ., , stop afghanistan lapsing back into terror. , . , stop afghanistan lapsing back into terror. , ., , ~ ., , ., terror. nobody wants afghanistan once aaain terror. nobody wants afghanistan once again to _ terror. nobody wants afghanistan once again to be _ terror. nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a _ terror. nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a breeding - terror. nobody wants afghanistan | once again to be a breeding ground for terror~ — once again to be a breeding ground for terror~ and _ once again to be a breeding ground for terror. and we _ once again to be a breeding ground for terror. and we don't _ once again to be a breeding ground for terror. and we don't think- once again to be a breeding ground for terror. and we don't think it's . for terror. and we don't think it's in the _ for terror. and we don't think it's in the interests _ for terror. and we don't think it's in the interests of _ for terror. and we don't think it's in the interests of the _ for terror. and we don't think it's in the interests of the people - for terror. and we don't think it's in the interests of the people of. in the interests of the people of afghanistan _ in the interests of the people of afghanistan that— in the interests of the people of afghanistan that it _ in the interests of the people of afghanistan that it should - in the interests of the people of afghanistan that it should lapse back afghanistan that it should lapse hack into — afghanistan that it should lapse back into that _ afghanistan that it should lapse back into that state, _ afghanistan that it should lapse back into that state, that - afghanistan that it should lapse i back into that state, that pre—2001 state _ back into that state, that pre—2001 state. into — back into that state, that pre-2001 state. ~ , . ., ., ., back into that state, that pre-2001 state. , . ., ., ., ., state. we expect to hear more of those concerns _ state. we expect to hear more of those concerns about _ state. we expect to hear more of those concerns about what - state. we expect to hear more of those concerns about what will i those concerns about what will happen — those concerns about what will happen to the future of afghanistan on wednesday, when, of course, pariiament— on wednesday, when, of course, parliament is being recalled from its summer break for a day so mps can discuss— its summer break for a day so mps can discuss the situation. there are
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also calls— can discuss the situation. there are also calls this morning for what happens — also calls this morning for what happens to those afghans who do not want to _ happens to those afghans who do not want to stay in afghanistan under the taliban, what routes, what possibility there is for them to leave — possibility there is for them to leave the _ possibility there is for them to leave the country. there is a joint statement — leave the country. there is a joint statement by more than 60 countries calling _ statement by more than 60 countries calling on— statement by more than 60 countries calling on senior people in afghanistan to allow them to leave. it afghanistan to allow them to leave. it says _ afghanistan to allow them to leave. it says those in positions of power and authority across afghanistan, their responsibility and accountability for the protection of human— accountability for the protection of human life, and the afghan people deserve _ human life, and the afghan people deserve to— human life, and the afghan people deserve to live in safety, security and dignity. here, the liberal democrats are calling on the government to help establish what they call— government to help establish what they call it a safe passage corridor, _ they call it a safe passage corridor, a secure route to allow an international— corridor, a secure route to allow an international border to allow afghans who want to leave to be able to do so _ afghans who want to leave to be able to do so safely and securely. so those _ to do so safely and securely. so those are — to do so safely and securely. so those are the immediate concerns. there _ those are the immediate concerns. there has— those are the immediate concerns. there has been some political criticism — there has been some political criticism of foreign secretary dominic— criticism of foreign secretary dominic raab after it emerges —— what _ dominic raab after it emerges —— what a _ dominic raab after it emerges —— what a marriage that he appears to have been— what a marriage that he appears to have been on holiday. he was due to return— have been on holiday. he was due to return yesterday. but labour have said he _
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return yesterday. but labour have said he has— return yesterday. but labour have said he has been a while. they say it is shameful.— said he has been a while. they say it is shameful. thank you very much for that. it is shameful. thank you very much for that- just _ it is shameful. thank you very much for that. just to _ it is shameful. thank you very much for that. just to let _ it is shameful. thank you very much for that. just to let you _ it is shameful. thank you very much for that. just to let you know - it is shameful. thank you very much for that. just to let you know as - for that. just to let you know as well, we will be talking to the defence secretary, ben wallace, at half past seven. police forces in england and wales are being asked by the home office to review the way they deal with firearms applications, following the mass shooting in plymouth. a minute's silence will also be observed today to remember the five victims. sarah ransome is in keyham for us this morning. sarah, there have been a lot of calls for tighter rules on who can own a firearm, and it announced that it will be a very difficult day for a lot of people with this moment of silence later this morning? yes. a lot of people with this moment of silence later this morning?- silence later this morning? yes, it absolutely is- _ silence later this morning? yes, it absolutely is. those _ silence later this morning? yes, it absolutely is. those calls - silence later this morning? yes, it absolutely is. those calls you - silence later this morning? yes, it absolutely is. those calls you talk| absolutely is. those calls you talk about, _ absolutely is. those calls you talk about, they are getting ever louder as questions intensify about just who can — as questions intensify about just who can have a firearm. particularly in the _ who can have a firearm. particularly in the light— who can have a firearm. particularly in the light of the fact that we know— in the light of the fact that we know now that jake davison, the
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gunmen— know now that jake davison, the gunmen who carried out this atrocity 'ust gunmen who carried out this atrocity just last _ gunmen who carried out this atrocity just last thursday, why he had a gun in the _ just last thursday, why he had a gun in the first— just last thursday, why he had a gun in the first place, and why, when his licence — in the first place, and why, when his licence was revoked following an allegation— his licence was revoked following an allegation of serious assault, why that license was returned to him 'ust that license was returned to him just a _ that license was returned to him just a few— that license was returned to him just a few weeks ago. now that decision— just a few weeks ago. now that decision is being investigated by the police watchdog, the independent office for— the police watchdog, the independent office for police conduct. and as you say, — office for police conduct. and as you say, the home office today is asking _ you say, the home office today is asking all— you say, the home office today is asking all police forces in england and wales to take a look again at the kind — and wales to take a look again at the kind of— and wales to take a look again at the kind of policies and procedures that they— the kind of policies and procedures that they go through when they issue a firearms _ that they go through when they issue a firearms licence. and they are also _ a firearms licence. and they are also talking about possibly introducing in the future guidance on social— introducing in the future guidance on social media checks from any applicants _ on social media checks from any applicants. you will also remember that jake _ applicants. you will also remember that jake davison, the 22—year—old who committed these crimes, he repeatedly posted a hate filled rants _ repeatedly posted a hate filled rants on — repeatedly posted a hate filled rants on his own social media outlets — rants on his own social media
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outlets. all of that, of course, little _ outlets. all of that, of course, little comfort to the people who live around here, who witnessed what went on _ live around here, who witnessed what went on on _ live around here, who witnessed what went on on that quiet summer's evening — went on on that quiet summer's evening. they will have been laying tributes _ evening. they will have been laying tributes here, floral tributes here, they have — tributes here, floral tributes here, they have been taking part in vigils over the _ they have been taking part in vigils over the weekend. they will be another— over the weekend. they will be another chance for that to happen today— another chance for that to happen today when the city is invited to fall silent — today when the city is invited to fall silent to remember those who died here — fall silent to remember those who died here. and it's hoped that other people _ died here. and it's hoped that other people around the uk will also take a moment— people around the uk will also take a moment to grieve and take part in that sharing — a moment to grieve and take part in that sharing of collective grief. thank — that sharing of collective grief. thank you. the death toll from the earthquake that struck haiti on saturday, has risen to at least 1,300 people. hospitals are inundated and struggling to cope with the number of injured, which has almost doubled to around 6,000 people. rescuers are trying to locate those still trapped under the rubble. james clayton reports from haiti. it's been a devastating 48 hours for
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this already impoverished region in the south—west of the country. the earthquake hit in the morning, when many werejust waking earthquake hit in the morning, when many were just waking up. it hit hard. it rocked churches, hotels and homes. the shaking hours too much for structures that collapsed in on themselves, sometimes on top of people. houses that were supposed to be places of safety, transformed into death traps. haste be places of safety, transformed into death traps.— be places of safety, transformed into death tras. ~ . , . , into death traps. we have seen many atients into death traps. we have seen many patients that — into death traps. we have seen many patients that were _ into death traps. we have seen many patients that were trauma _ into death traps. we have seen many patients that were trauma patients. l patients that were trauma patients. orthopaedic patients. they had to be addressed urgently. some of them had to be transferred and moved from their locality to more specialised facilities in port—au—prince or elsewhere. am facilities in port-au-prince or elsewhere-— facilities in port-au-prince or elsewhere. . . ., ,, ., elsewhere. an earthquake hit haiti 12 ears elsewhere. an earthquake hit haiti 12 years ago- _ elsewhere. an earthquake hit haiti 12 years ago. these _ elsewhere. an earthquake hit haiti 12 years ago. these earthquake . elsewhere. an earthquake hit haiti i 12 years ago. these earthquake won't compete with this death toll but there are fears of thousands of deaths. there are several factors that make the aid mission here
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difficult. for one, there is a tropical storm just long enough. you might be able to see from the clouds behind me. but there is also political turmoil. the president was assassinated only last month. and many people here believe that the haitian government does not have the capacity to deal with the disaster like this. the route to the affected areas from the capital is a dangerous road controlled by gangs. many haitians are sceptical of international help after much of the money promised to rebuild the country after 2010 was squandered. with a state of emergency cold, the people of haiti are now waiting and watching to see what their government and the international community can do to help. james clayton, bbc news, port—au—prince. more children return to school in scotland this week, with many covid restrictions still in place, until at least the end of september. secondary school pupils must continue wearing masks in the classroom and socially distance from their teachers. but complete classes will no longer need to self isolate if one person
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tests positive for the virus. from today, everyone who is double jabbed in england and northern ireland, will no longer need to self—isolate if they are alerted by the nhs covid app. ben is at a bar and restaurant for us on the river thames to find out what it means for staff absences within the hospitality industry. morning to you. good morning. i have spent a year and a half in bars and restaurants at this time of the day. we are right by the river. a glorious start. you might be able to make out the sunrise just behind us and the river thames in battersea. it is an important day for all sorts of businesses, particularly hospitality firms that have struggled over the past few months with this so—called pingdemic, the number of people being told to self—isolate through the nhs app because they've come into contact with someone who has covid. for firms that have been trying to get staff to work in places like this,
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it has meant they have really struggled. they have had to cope with fewer staff, and service has also been affected in some cases. from today changes are coming into force. let me run you through those changes. from today, if you have been double jabbed and you do come into contact with someone who has covid, you will not be asked to solve ice on it. but that is on the proviso that you have had both vaccinations. instead, you will be asked to take a pcr test. you will get a free pcr test from the nhs. but crucially, you won't have to self—isolate until you get the results of that test, unless perhaps you have got symptoms or it is a positive test. and what they are advising is that you should maybe just wear a mask and limit the amount of contact you have with other people, rather than being forced to isolate for ten days. so forced to isolate for ten days. so for firms like this it marks an important change. let me introduce you to the
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co—founder of this place. good morning. talk to me about the pingdemic? we have heard from all sorts of businesses, particularly hospitality ones like yours, but how difficult it has been to get staff when they are all being pinged? absolutely. it has been really hard for us. it is harder because we have no notice. they get pinged, they inform us and we have to take them off shift straightaway. we are quite lucky in that we have quite a large bank of staff and we have been able to absorb it a little bit. but for smaller businesses it is devastating. it smaller businesses it is devastating.— smaller businesses it is devastating. smaller businesses it is devastatina. , . ., ., devastating. it is that idea that there is very — devastating. it is that idea that there is very little _ devastating. it is that idea that there is very little notice. - devastating. it is that idea that there is very little notice. you | devastating. it is that idea that i there is very little notice. you can get a call ten minutes before a shift is due to start.— get a call ten minutes before a shift is due to start. how do you lan? shift is due to start. how do you plan? the _ shift is due to start. how do you plan? the team _ shift is due to start. how do you plan? the team understand - shift is due to start. how do you plan? the team understand andj shift is due to start. how do you - plan? the team understand and we'll just have to pull together. sometimes itjust means stepping up if we are not able to bring in reinforcements, but other times it means that we can call on people and they are willing to come in on short
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notice. �* ., they are willing to come in on short notice. . . . , ., , , notice. and have customers been particularly _ notice. and have customers been particularly understanding? - notice. and have customers been particularly understanding? as i i particularly understanding? as i said, it is service that often suffers if you don't have the people. people desperate to get back out after so long. have your customers been understanding? i think we are quite fortunate in the customers we receive. so i think they have been great. they have been very patient with us. the whole process has been a wave. we have been rolling with it. and adjusting and adapting. and i think customers do understand. so we have been very lucky. do understand. so we have been very luc . �* ., , do understand. so we have been very luc . r . , do understand. so we have been very luc . . . , , do understand. so we have been very luc. , lucky. and as i said, these changes onl affect lucky. and as i said, these changes only affect people _ lucky. and as i said, these changes only affect people if— lucky. and as i said, these changes only affect people if you _ lucky. and as i said, these changes only affect people if you have - lucky. and as i said, these changes only affect people if you have had l only affect people if you have had both vaccinations, that you won't need to isolate for those ten days. with a lot of your staff being very young, younger people may be less likely to have had the vaccine, does that concern you? it might not apply to all of your staff even though the rules have changed. llrrul’ith to all of your staff even though the rules have changed.— rules have changed. with the new rules have changed. with the new rule changes _ rules have changed. with the new rule changes it _ rules have changed. with the new rule changes it is _ rules have changed. with the new rule changes it is great _ rules have changed. with the new rule changes it is great to - rules have changed. with the new rule changes it is great to get - rule changes it is great to get clarity. but we are always going to
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take it on a case—by—case basis in any case. but again, because we can ask staff to stay at home, and we have been doing so, we might continue to do so if we feel it is the right thing to do. so it does seem as if somebody is not double vaccinated it is probably the safest thing to do and it is what we will continue doing. find thing to do and it is what we will continue doing.— thing to do and it is what we will continue doing. and as we sort of a- roach continue doing. and as we sort of approach the _ continue doing. and as we sort of approach the end, _ continue doing. and as we sort of approach the end, what _ continue doing. and as we sort of approach the end, what we - continue doing. and as we sort of approach the end, what we hope| continue doing. and as we sort of. approach the end, what we hope is the end of this pandemic, how would you look back on these 18 months in terms of how you have coped? the hardest. terms of how you have coped? the hardest- lt — terms of how you have coped? the hardest. it has _ terms of how you have coped? tue: hardest. it has been the terms of how you have coped? ti9: hardest. it has been the most challenging time. when you start a business you think that is going to be the most challenging time but nothing compares. i think we'rejust fortunate and grateful to still be here. so i think that is what we focus on. : here. so i think that is what we focus on— here. so i think that is what we focus on. : ~ i. focus on. and the future. and you are still smiling, _ focus on. and the future. and you are still smiling, which _ focus on. and the future. and you are still smiling, which is - focus on. and the future. and you are still smiling, which is the - focus on. and the future. and you l are still smiling, which is the most important thing. good luck.- important thing. good luck. thank ou. important thing. good luck. thank you- there — important thing. good luck. thank you- there you — important thing. good luck. thank you. there you have _ important thing. good luck. thank you. there you have it _ important thing. good luck. thank you. there you have it from - important thing. good luck. thank you. there you have it from a - you. there you have it from a business _ you. there you have it from a business point _ you. there you have it from a business point of _ you. there you have it from a business point of view. - you. there you have it from a business point of view. so - you. there you have it from a - business point of view. so important that these rules are clarified today. it should give people a bit
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more information about what they need to do. and for businesses that are trying to make sure they have the staff they need, to fill the shifts, to serve the customers coming back, today marks a very important day. as the sun comes up here over battersea in london. step out of the shot for a moment _ battersea in london. step out of the shot for a moment just _ battersea in london. step out of the shot for a moment just so _ battersea in london. step out of the shot for a momentjust so we - battersea in london. step out of the shot for a momentjust so we can i shot for a momentjust so we can enjoy that. much better. there we go. beautiful morning in london. looks lovely. 18 minutes past six. time now for a look at today's newspapers. and the front pages are dominated by one story. 'the fall of kabul�* is the guardian headline, above a picture of some taliban fighters. the telegraph says the west flees as the taliban take kabul, with an image of the us embassy being evacuated. the mirror reports that paratroopers have been sent to protect kabul airport, while 6,000 brits try to leave the city. and the daily mail shows the funeral of one of the 457 british military personnel who lost their lives
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in the conflict. the paper asks, 'what did they all die for?�* we will be talking about that throughout the morning. events are moving really fast in afghanistan. we will be speaking to ben wallace later. :, , :, :, we will be speaking to ben wallace later. . , . ., , we will be speaking to ben wallace later. . ,. ., , later. that is at half past seven. there is a _ later. that is at half past seven. there is a lot _ later. that is at half past seven. there is a lot changing - later. that is at half past seven. there is a lot changing very i there is a lot changing very quickly. pictures coming in all the time. we will keep you up to date. abs, time. we will keep you up to date. a couple of interesting things you might find in the papers. this is from the times. this is about eating meat. it is a survey done by the british nutrition foundation. some information from them. they provide information from them. they provide information on healthy eating. they have looked at 29 scientific papers over the past decade that studied what impact different diets had on health and the environment in rich nations. what has come out of it is that it may not be necessary... the
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review found that is not essential to cut out meat and dairy entirely. i offer you a picture. here we are. if ijust show i offer you a picture. here we are. if i just show you the i offer you a picture. here we are. if ijust show you the picture first. can you get in close on that one? it first. can you get in close on that one? :, :, ~' , first. can you get in close on that one? ,, , �*, one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture. _ one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is _ one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is it? _ one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is it? it _ one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is it? it is - one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is it? it is a - one? it looks like it is under it's a sculpture, is it? it is a ratherl a sculpture, is it? it is a rather eerie underwater _ a sculpture, is it? it is a rather eerie underwater image. it i a sculpture, is it? it is a rather eerie underwater image. it is l a sculpture, is it? it is a ratherj eerie underwater image. it is a sculpture. it is in marble. we are off the coast of tuscany. basically what was happening there, in an effort to deter trawler fishermen from overfishing a certain bay in tuscany, they invited a sculptor to put these sculptures on giant rocks. it is quite a simplistic way of stopping the trawlers from trolling the bay. they are giant rocks. they put their nets in, they get snagged. it sounds very simplistic. lastly? put their nets in, they get snagged. it sounds very simplistic.— it sounds very simplistic. why have the sculpture _ it sounds very simplistic. why have the sculpture on _ it sounds very simplistic. why have
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the sculpture on it? _ it sounds very simplistic. why have the sculpture on it? to _ it sounds very simplistic. why have the sculpture on it? to make i it sounds very simplistic. why have the sculpture on it? to make it i it sounds very simplistic. why have i the sculpture on it? to make it more interestin: the sculpture on it? to make it more interesting and _ the sculpture on it? to make it more interesting and probably _ the sculpture on it? to make it more interesting and probably to - the sculpture on it? to make it more interesting and probably to draw i interesting and probably to draw attention to it. apparently in a very short space of time they plunk these enormous pieces, they are marble, actually, and very quickly the area around it has come back to life with someone in my face realising that they are safe. on top of which, if you are scuba—diving down there in 40 years time, 100 years, suddenly you will see this weird image under the sea. you will probably get really scared.— probably get really scared. that's uuite probably get really scared. that's quite good- _ probably get really scared. that's quite good. we've _ probably get really scared. that's quite good. we've talked - probably get really scared. that's quite good. we've talked so i probably get really scared. that's| quite good. we've talked so much about shortages of things in the shops. this is about a shortage of crisps, which is very worrying for me because that is about the only thing i can't leave. crunch time for crisp lovers, they say, supplies are dwindling. beer could be running low as well. we talked about it last week. written as a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers, according to the road haulage association. the
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trade magazine the grocer says it is scuppering crisp supplies. going trade magazine the grocer says it is scuppering crisp supplies.- scuppering crisp supplies. going to flavour of crisp? _ scuppering crisp supplies. going to flavour of crisp? it _ scuppering crisp supplies. going to flavour of crisp? it is _ scuppering crisp supplies. going to flavour of crisp? it is not _ scuppering crisp supplies. going to flavour of crisp? it is not a - flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour- — flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour. it _ flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour. it is _ flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour. it is a _ flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour. it is a mate. i flavour of crisp? it is not a flavour. it is a mate. -- i flavour of crisp? it is not a i flavour. it is a mate. -- make. flavour. it is a mate. —— make. cheesy puffs. lovely. an incredible night of music and entertainment took place at wembley last night, to welcome home the olympic stars of team gb. it was the first time the athletes have had a chance to celebrate together, as they flew home within two days of competing in tokyo. our reporter charlotte gallagher caught up with some of them during the event. 22 golds, 21 silvers and 22 bronzes. it's great to see so many of them here tonight. a star—studded celebration for team gb. we've got lauren price and the boxing team. the pandemic meant athletes couldn't mix with each other in tokyo, so this was the first time many had met.
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not all, of course. it's actually really nice to be home, because when you are out there you are in such a little bubble that you don't really know, like, what the atmosphere or the feeling is when you get back. so to come back, and obviouslyjust then we had a reception with all the team gb athletes, and yeah, it was such an incredible buzz. it was just a really nice place to be just then. at all the olympic games, you're always in a bubble. but like you say, normally you can sort of step out and see people and mill about a little bit. but this time it was really strict, wasn't it? so we were locked up. it did it felt like a long time away from everybody, especially our little boy, so it was really special to come home and be reunited. # we'll rise up out of the depths, we'll rise up~~~#_ team gb had an impressive games, finishing fourth in the medals table. some athletes, like emily campbell, the first british woman to win a medal in weightlifting, made history. yes, she can!
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what a lift! she is making history- herein women's weightlifting. and, of course, the instant fame can take a bit of getting used to. it's been a little bit bizarre, yeah. i went to do my shopping at morrisons the other day and someone screamed, "there's a celebrity walking into morrisons!" i was like, "i'm not a celebrity, i'm not!" but, you know, it'sjust lovely, it's just so nice that people actually like pay attention to weightlifting, people appreciate the hard work that i've put in. others are well used to the olympics and the attention the games bring. when i was preparing for london and for rio it was all i had. it was the most important thing in the world. and now i've got my family. helen had an extra challenge this time, juggling the intense training and raising three young children. i think within a day of being home, and being around the children again, i honestly thought, how did i do a year of that? it was a real kind of reality check
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of what i did, i think, has really made me realise when i was in it, it felt that it was just something i was getting through. and when i look back i think, i don't think i could do that for a day now, let alone for a year! cheering. for many of the athletes, not having their family with them was the biggest challenge of the games. it feels amazing to be back. and incredible, massively grateful that we can have an event like this welcoming everyone back, celebrating everyone's achievements, the whole of team gb. so, yeah, incredible. amazing to be back with my family, spend time with everyone. it's been a bit manic, but we're going away very soon, so i can get some chilled time, which will be really nice. with coronavirus delaying tokyo by 12 months, it's only three years until many of these olympic heroes will do it all again. charlotte gallagher, bbc news.
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just on that actually, sally has an exclusive interview with tom daley. lots of exciting things about that. you saw him needing that cardigan over those weeks of the olympics. yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to t yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets tot it yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on- — yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on. probably _ yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on. probably like _ yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on. probably like a - yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on. probably like a lot i yeah, a nice piece of work. she gets to try it on. probably like a lot of- to try it on. probably like a lot of --eole, to try it on. probably like a lot of people. you _ to try it on. probably like a lot of people. you feel— to try it on. probably like a lot of people, you feel like _ to try it on. probably like a lot of people, you feel like you've i to try it on. probably like a lot of. people, you feel like you've grown up people, you feel like you've grown up with him. he was so young when he first started. up with him. he was so young when he first started-— first started. when it's your first interview him? _ first started. when it's your first interview him? sally _ first started. when it's your first interview him? sally thought i first started. when it's your first i interview him? sally thought when he was 13 and he — interview him? sally thought when he was 13 and he said _ interview him? sally thought when he was 13 and he said here. _ interview him? sally thought when he was 13 and he said here. all— interview him? sally thought when he was 13 and he said here. all the i was 13 and he said here. all the time has passed. it's quite extraordinary. we sort of watched him grow up. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come... we arejoined by we are joined by frankie we arejoined by frankie bridge of the saturdays after nine.
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now it is time for the first look at the weather. carol is there. :, carol is there. good morning. good morninu. carol is there. good morning. good morning- last _ carol is there. good morning. good morning. last week— carol is there. good morning. good morning. last week we _ carol is there. good morning. good morning. last week we were i carol is there. good morning. good| morning. last week we were telling you by the middle of this week's high pressure would be building in, things would settle down and it would warm up. that high pressure is not materialising. so the forecast is a bit different. it will be cooler. we're going to have a north—westerly. it will be often quite cloudy. that cloud take off or light and drizzle. but a lot of the time it will be dry. what has been happening overnight, you can see this big curl of cloud across the uk. that is a weather front. that is attached to an area of low pressure. again, if you look at the isobars, they are quite close together. a breezy day. the source of that is the north—west. it is dragging in a lot of moisture from the atlantic and therefore a lot of cloud. here is the weather front are sinking slowly south and weakening. some early brightness in the midlands getting into the south—east. in
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fact, centraland getting into the south—east. in fact, central and eastern areas today seeing the lion's share of any sunshine. towards the west, parts of scotland, northern ireland, wales and the south—west, the cloud will be thick enough for light rain or drizzle. these are our average wind speeds. not particularly strong. you will notice the breeze. these are our temperatures. 14 to 20 degrees. yesterday we got to just over 26 degrees in cavendish in suffolk. we are not going to see that the day. we are not going to see that this week. so overnight, some clear skies to start with. another weather front coming in from the west will introduce some decent amounts of rain across scotland and northern ireland, sinking steadily southwards. behind it, some patchy light rain and some drizzle. there will also be some widespread mist and fog as well. as a result, it's not going to be a cold night. here is our clutch of fronts tomorrow sinking south. you can see the
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isobars a little bit wider. we still are looking at breezy conditions. and we still are looking at a lot of cloud. the north—westerly dragging in all that moisture from the atlantic. so tomorrow, we have got some cloud, some patchy light rain and drizzle. to the south and east of hills, for example, we could see brightness coming through and these are our temperatures. up to 19 or 20 degrees and still some murkiness and mist and fog around the coasts and hills. as we head into wednesday it remains fairly cloudy. to the east of the pennines, parts of dorset, east devon, for example, we could pick up a bit of brightness. but still we are looking at a fair bit of cloud. most temperatures 14 to 21 degrees. at this time of the year we would be looking widely in the north at 20 to about 24 as we sink further south. beyond that it becomes less breezy but the forecast still remains unsettled. more later.
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good morning, welcome back. the taliban have seized control of afghanistan after their forces took the capital, kabul. overnight, the american flag at the us embassy was taken down and staff have been evacuated to the afghan capital's airport. our north america editorjon sopel reports from washington. over many years, and at a cost of tens of billions of dollars, the us trained and equipped afghan forces to be ready to take back control of their country. but they collapsed like a house of cards, one of many miscalculations made by the biden administration over these dizzying few weeks. and today america's most senior diplomat was trying to put a brave face on events. what we're focused on now is making sure that we can get our people to a safe and secure place, that we can do right by the people
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who stood with us in afghanistan all these years including afghans who worked for the embassy, worked for our military. we have a massive effort under way to bring afghans at risk out of the country, if that's what they so desire. america's attempt to export liberal democracy to afghanistan is well and truly over. america's effort to build a civil society in kabul and beyond, also in tatters. and joe biden's prediction from five weeks ago that everything would be just fine has not worn well. first of all, the mission hasn't failed, yet. so the question now is, where do they go from here? that, the jury is still out. but the likelihood, there's going to be the taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. the taliban wants to make a deal. the withdrawal policy was framed during the trump administration, and embraced byjoe biden, who is at camp david and today
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was being briefed by his officials. he believes passionately that america can't stay in afghanistan indefinitely. but foreign policy hawks are rounding on both men. what we are watching right now in afghanistan is what happens when america withdraws from the world. so everybody who has been saying america needs to withdraw, america needs to retreat, we are getting a devastating, catastrophic real—time lesson in what that means. us helicopters flew from roof to roof... america's most scarring military defeat was summed up in the images of the last helicopter flying off the roof of the us embassy in saigon at the end of the vietnam war. today's scramble to get out of kabul may not be that, but it's not far short. jon sopel, bbc news, washington. thousands of people have been displaced by the fighting in afghanistan. these are the latest images from the airport
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in kabul this morning. you get a sense from the noise and the numbers of people, this is the international airport, military flights are flying now. the sheer number of people you can see they're trying to leave the country, there is a window of opportunity for some to get out. sheekeba nasimi is from the afghanistan and central asian association and joins us now. good morning to you. i know you have been keeping in contact with friends, colleagues and family in afghanistan, what is the picture emerging that you are hearing? goad emerging that you are hearing? good mornin: , emerging that you are hearing? good morning. thank— emerging that you are hearing? good morning, thank you _ emerging that you are hearing? (limp. morning, thank you for having me. yes, i have been in contact with people in afghanistan, and i'm constantly checking, i am up—to—date with social media, but i receive a lot of messages from afghans asking for help. although i do as much as i
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can for them, it hurts knowing that my health can always be so limited. every day i read —— my help is so limited. every day i receive e—mails and messages about possible routes, leaving the country, we are doing all we can to directly support people through all the settlement schemes. i woke up this morning on social media watching people in cobble apple trying to leave, i don't know where they are going but theyjust don't know where they are going but they just want to leave —— don't know where they are going but theyjust want to leave —— kabul airport. someone i recently spoke to expressed extreme discomfort about the entry of the taliban into kabul, thinking that that would never happen. she says she doesn't want to move from kabul, she has three years of university left. it all happened so fast that people have not been able to process it yet. it's just
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one example, there are so many people so confused about what to do what is next to come. what what is next to come. what information _ what is next to come. what information are _ what is next to come. what information are you - what is next to come. whatj information are you hearing what is next to come. what i information are you hearing so far about the situation for those who are not trying to leave, who wants to remain, and the very genuinely fears people have about what the taliban would do immediately? what restrictions would be placed on regular lives? l restrictions would be placed on regular lives?— regular lives? i think at the moment. — regular lives? i think at the moment, the _ regular lives? i think at the moment, the most - regular lives? i think at the moment, the most people | regular lives? i think at the i moment, the most people are regular lives? i think at the - moment, the most people are fearful are women and girls, and how that will effect them, mostly. whether they will be able to go to school and have an education, and whether they will be able to go to work, allowed to leave their house without allowed to leave their house without a male, so it's the majority of women and girls and what the future holds for them.— holds for them. that's completely understandable. _ holds for them. that's completely understandable. what _ holds for them. that's completely understandable. what we - holds for them. that's completely . understandable. what we understand from the teledyne spokespeople who have been asked questions about that
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is —— tell a band spokespeople is that they are saying that there will be freedoms, women and girls will be allowed to continue their education, those restrictions will be eased this time round. [30 those restrictions will be eased this time round.— those restrictions will be eased this time round. do you have any evidence that _ this time round. do you have any evidence that supports _ this time round. do you have any evidence that supports that? - this time round. do you have any evidence that supports that? not yet, no, idon�*t evidence that supports that? not yet, no, i don't think anyone has. there is so much chaos and uncertainty, everyone is very confused and there hasn't been evidence or rules set out that what they are saying will actually happen. it's because of the last time they came into power, and how it was governed, it was scary for people, it didn't allow women to work or study, they were imprisoned in their own homes. people are imagining this will happen once again. because for the past week they have not been able to, because of the provinces being taken over by teledyne so —— by taliban so
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quickly, it is hard for people to understand what will happen. {flare quickly, it is hard for people to understand what will happen. give us our own understand what will happen. give us your own perspective _ understand what will happen. give us your own perspective as _ understand what will happen. give us your own perspective as a _ understand what will happen. give us your own perspective as a british - your own perspective as a british afghan activist. how should governments around the world react to this victory by the taliban in afghanistan? should they be treating the taliban leadership there as a government, orwhat? how should the taliban leadership there as a government, or what? how should they respond to the fact that the taliban are now in charge? i respond to the fact that the taliban are now in charge?— are now in charge? i believe that afghanistan _ are now in charge? i believe that afghanistan has _ are now in charge? i believe that afghanistan has needed - are now in charge? i believe that afghanistan has needed an - afghanistan has needed an international presence and an international presence and an international commitment to bringing freedom, democracy and getting more girls into education. over the past 20 years we have had media and government, sports, music and arts, thatis government, sports, music and arts, that is what the international community was able to do and i'm
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very thankfulfor that community was able to do and i'm very thankful for that because i believe that this has all been wasted. so much has been invested in afghanistan and all of that to be destroyed, it's heartbreaking that the rights and freedoms of girls will be taken. however i believe that we should all continue to work and make sure that this is not the case and unfortunately, the world has decided to leave afghanistan and abandon it. i want to make sure that we see humanitarian assistance, and the world to put pressure on the taliban so they don't return to their old ways of governing where women and girls are imprisoned and don't get an education. and of course, i will continue to fight for it because these types of atrocities have no place in this world.- have no place in this world. thank ou ve have no place in this world. thank you very much _ have no place in this world. thank you very much for _ have no place in this world. thank you very much for your— have no place in this world. thank you very much for your time - have no place in this world. thank you very much for your time this | you very much for your time this morning, sheekeba. we will be talking about this throughout the programme, lots of guests to talk
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to. let's talk to the sport. a cracking start to the premier league. a brilliant weekend of football and lots of the games didn't quite go the way they expected. despite missing harry kane, who's strongly linked with a transfer to manchester city, spurs began their premier league season with a i—0 win over the defending champions at the tottenham hotspur stadium. son heung min scored the only goal of the game early in the second half, so it's a winning start for new spurs boss nuno esprito santo. west ham picked up where they left off last season, coming from behind twice to beat newcastle li—2 in an exciting game at stjames' park. michail antonio scored the final goal. celtic are through to the quarterfinals of the scottish league cup after they beat hearts 3—2. japanese forward kyugo furuhashi continued his impressive start to life at parkhead, scoring celtic�*s third against the team that beat them on the opening day of the premiership season. they'll play raith rovers in the last eight. the full draw is on
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the bbc sport website. the second test could be set for a great final day after england took some late wickets against india at lord's. india will resume on 181 for six after losing three wickets for 20 runs. moeen ali got the last two and india have a lead ofjust 151i going into the final day. roger federer has announced that he'll be out of action for "many months" as he prepares to have further knee surgery. the ao—year—old had double knee surgery last year and says he's decided to have the latest surgery to, in his words, "give myself a glimmer of hope to return to the tour in some shape or form". but he also admits he's realistic about his future. there were so many stand—out moments for team gb this year in tokyo, but it's hard to top those wonderful scenes at the pool when tom daley
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finally won gold, alongside diving partner matty lee. well, tom's now back in the uk with the rest of the british athletes and i was lucky enough to catch up with him. tom, i would like to know what's in that bag of magical stuff that you've brought today. well, i've got the knitjumper that i made, this is it. my team gbjumper. a couple of medals in here in as well. i just want to say, though, that gold medal for you... yeah, honestly, it was... winning an olympic gold medal has been my dream since i was a little kid. and to actually have that medal be put round my neck, by matty, it was just, it was a total dream come true. so who is behind that medal? oh, so many people. i mean, obviously my coach and matty helped me get there but my dad for taking me to my first training sessions, travelling around the world, watching me.
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my mum, who helps me all the time. all of my friends, but obviously most importantly, lance, my husband, my son who have inspired me every day to keep going. do you want to put it on? oh, i'd love to, am i allowed? yeah. are you sure? yeah! the inside looks ugly because that's where the colour work is. that's ok. oh, gosh, it's an honour. honestly, go for it. oh, i like it. when i say i'm obsessed with knitting, i was knitting on the bus to the pool, on the bus home from the pool, in the stands whenever i had a spare moment, while the other boys in our apartment were playing video games, i would just sit and knit. how do you manage the tougher sides of fame? oh, good question. i mean, you know, i've learned, as i've gotten older, to not care so much about what other people think. it's also a lesson that my dad taught me. i used to find him so embarrassing, and he used to do things where i would be like, what are you doing?
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you know, bursting in on press conferences, doing all these things and i wasjust like, i thought it was extremely embarrassing. i'm tom's dad. tom, can i give you a cuddle? please? come on, please? now, being a parent and being slightly older, i realise he just didn't care what other people thought. if he wanted to go and see his son and give him a hug after winning a world championships, he was going to go and do that and he didn't care what anyone else thought about it. what would he say to you now, sitting here with a gold medal in front of you, at last? i mean, the crazy thing is, and when i look back, he never, ever got to be see me win any of my olympic medals. he got to see me compete in beijing, so he got to see me go to the olympic games, but he wasn't around for london 2012, rio or tokyo. so i think he would be extremely proud to think that i have not only got four olympic medals but one of them is a gold one. i would be really excited to have got the opportunity to speak to him after that event. and i know he would have done something crazy, he would have gotten down off
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the balcony, he probably would havejumped in the pool, he would have been the streaker of the olympics! ijust know he would have done something silly. yeah, itjust makes me extremely proud to think of all the hard work and all the sacrifice that he put into my diving career, i'd say it's worth it. proud is a word i want to pick up on, because i remember watching you saying how proud you were to stand there with your medal in this competition at the olympic games as a gay man, proud of who you are. you know, ifeel incredibly lucky to be from great britain, being able to stand on that diving board and not feel afraid of any ramifications or even fearfor my life. there are still ten countries at those olympic games where being gay is punishable by death in their countries. so ijust hope that winning an olympic gold medal, winning any olympic medal, or going to the olympics as a gay person, a member of the lgbt community, that any young kids out there that feel like they're never going to achieve anything just
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because of who they are, they know that with hard work, you can achieve anything, no matter who you are, where you come from, you can be the best in the world. it's only three years till paris. yes! i know, it's not very long to paris and i remember always saying, the thing is, i always said i'm going to keep going as long as, as long as my body will let me or until i win an olympic gold medal. now i've got my olympic gold medal, i'm like, that felt kind of good. i don't know, maybe i'll try it again. but honestly, but for now, i'm taking a bit of a break, going to spend some time with my family, see where, you know, life lands me, and we'll make decisions about moving forward about diving soon, well, hopefully the next few months, i guess. just been such a pleasure to talk to you. tom daley, thank you so much. thank you for having me. isn't that a great message? no matter where you are from, whatever your background is, whoever you are, your background is, whoever you are, you can achieve great things. i your background is, whoever you are, you can achieve great things. ! lease you can achieve great things. i love
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the way he — you can achieve great things. i love the way he talks — you can achieve great things. i love the way he talks about _ you can achieve great things. i love the way he talks about his - you can achieve great things. i love the way he talks about his dad - you can achieve great things. i love the way he talks about his dad as i the way he talks about his dad as well. �* , ,., , the way he talks about his dad as well. , , , ., ., the way he talks about his dad as well. �* ,,., , , ., ., ., well. absolutely brilliant and how now he's a _ well. absolutely brilliant and how now he's a father, _ well. absolutely brilliant and how now he's a father, he _ well. absolutely brilliant and how| now he's a father, he understands why his dad didn't care about what anyone thought about him breaking into press conferences, he was mortified and embarrassed but now he is like bring it on. i like mortified and embarrassed but now he is like bring it on.— is like bring it on. i like at the beginning. — is like bring it on. i like at the beginning. he _ is like bring it on. i like at the beginning, he was _ is like bring it on. i like at the beginning, he was like, - is like bring it on. i like at the beginning, he was like, i- is like bring it on. i like at the | beginning, he was like, i have medals— beginning, he was like, i have medals at— beginning, he was like, i have medals at the bottom of this bag somewhere. it medals at the bottom of this bag somewhere-— medals at the bottom of this bag somewhere. it was the cardigan it was beautiful. _ somewhere. it was the cardigan it was beautiful. and _ somewhere. it was the cardigan it was beautiful. and he _ somewhere. it was the cardigan it was beautiful. and he makes - somewhere. it was the cardigan it was beautiful. and he makes the | was beautiful. and he makes the attern was beautiful. and he makes the pattern himself? _ was beautiful. and he makes the pattern himself? he _ was beautiful. and he makes the pattern himself? he said - was beautiful. and he makes the pattern himself? he said he - was beautiful. and he makes the pattern himself? he said he did. was beautiful. and he makes the | pattern himself? he said he did it on a spreadsheet, _ pattern himself? he said he did it on a spreadsheet, counted - pattern himself? he said he did it on a spreadsheet, counted all- pattern himself? he said he did it on a spreadsheet, counted all the blocks, and while he was knitting, counted the stitches so he knew where to change colours. very clever! changes to self—isolation rules in england and northern ireland come into effect today meaning that far fewer people will have to quarantine if they have been in contact with someone with covid. people in england and northern ireland who are fully
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vaccinated will no longer have to automatically self—isolate. similar rules are already in place in scotland and wales. for more on this, let's speak to our regular gp, dr nighat arif. good morning, lovely to speak to you as ever. these are quite big changes, aren't they?- as ever. these are quite big changes, aren't they? yes, in encland changes, aren't they? yes, in england today _ changes, aren't they? yes, in england today from _ changes, aren't they? yes, in england today from the - changes, aren't they? yes, in england today from the 16th i changes, aren't they? yes, in| england today from the 16th of august, it comes into effect that if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for covid—19 and you are double vaccinated, then you don't have to self—isolate for ten days which will mean fantastic news for lots of businesses and if i'm completely honest, a lot of my patients were getting frustrated, they would say, i have been double vaccinated, and i am asymptomatic, why myself isolating? —— why am i myself isolating? —— why am i myself isolating? the rule was inevitable. the same is if you are 18 or below, if you are in contact with someone who has tested positive, you do not need to self—isolate. the rule is, you still need to have a pcr test as
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soon as possible, and you don't need to self—isolate if you are asymptomatic if you are waiting for results. the question is whether people will get a pcr test, and getting hesitancy from my patients who just don't have a pcr test even when they are symptomatic which is causing a bit of a practising general causing a bit of a practising uenera ., , ., ., , general -- a bit of a problem in aeneral general -- a bit of a problem in general practice. _ general -- a bit of a problem in general practice. can _ general -- a bit of a problem in general practice. can you - general -- a bit of a problem in general practice. can you give l general -- a bit of a problem in l general practice. can you give us general -- a bit of a problem in - general practice. can you give us an example of why? i general practice. can you give us an example of why?— general practice. can you give us an example of why? i had 90 telephone calls last week _ example of why? i had 90 telephone calls last week as _ example of why? i had 90 telephone calls last week as duty _ example of why? i had 90 telephone calls last week as duty doctor, - example of why? i had 90 telephone calls last week as duty doctor, and i calls last week as duty doctor, and i have got sneezing, cough, that has come on, a new temperature, and i would say, have you had a pcr test? they would say, i have done a lateral flow tester that was negative so i haven't got covid. the lateral flow tests at home are notoriously, you get false negative is for that and they should only be
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usedif is for that and they should only be used if you are not symptomatic twice weekly. the pcr test is the one that you go through the booking system, if you are symptomatic. patients are saying, i don't want to self—isolate or lose work, this is tiring, the whole system, i have been double vaccinated, why should i go get a pcr test? and patients say, the cost is not a covid car. i would say, how do you know? i know it's not, i don't feel unwell —— my cough is not a covid cough. people are frustrated by the rules and regulations and want to get on with their lives and the vaccination programme, we have always said, will allow you to get on with your life. so people are just saying, i would rather do that than have a test that is positive and then i will be isolating again.— is positive and then i will be isolating again. let's talk about the vaccinating _ isolating again. let's talk about the vaccinating programme, . isolating again. let's talk about| the vaccinating programme, are isolating again. let's talk about - the vaccinating programme, are you 0k? , , the vaccinating programme, are you 0k? , y i , the vaccinating programme, are you 0k? , , . , ., the vaccinating programme, are you 0k? , y . , ., i, the vaccinating programme, are you 0k? ,_ i, i, .,
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0k? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my — ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cun — ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cun of— ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cup of tea! _ ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cup of tea! we _ ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cup of tea! we know - ok? only my cup of tea, hang on! -- i need my cup of tea! we know the i i need my cup of tea! we know the 'ab is i need my cup of tea! we know the iab is being — i need my cup of tea! we know the jab is being offered _ i need my cup of tea! we know the jab is being offered to _ i need my cup of tea! we know the jab is being offered to 16 _ i need my cup of tea! we know the jab is being offered to 16 and - jab is being offered to 16 and 17—year—olds, what do expect the uptake to be? i 17-year-olds, what do expect the uptake to be?— 17-year-olds, what do expect the uptake to be? i have 'ust had great news on that. _ uptake to be? i have 'ust had great news on that. i _ uptake to be? i have 'ust had great news on that. i was _ uptake to be? i have just had great news on that. i was talking - uptake to be? i have just had great news on that. i was talking to - news on that. i was talking to a—level and gcse students last week and they were all for it. we have had uptake phenomenally through the roof in buckinghamshire and i know thatis roof in buckinghamshire and i know that is the case across the country because i have seen tweets about it, it's really lovely. i was talking to a 16—year—old girl who is getting her gcse results and i said, brilliant that he wants to get the vaccine, what is the reason? she said, i want to protect myself and my loved ones, because i have relatives who are clinically vulnerable, and i want to get on with my life and go and do my a—levels. the school closed, not being able to go to university, get on with your daily lives, the freedoms, they have all been hindered. and she said something interesting, we have lots of other
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vaccines at school already because of the —— like the hpv and tb vaccine, we are healthy adults we want to protect ourselves and those around us. there is lots of misinformation on social media so the worry was that younger people would say, i don't need it. they are quite positive so far and from what i'm hearing, taking up the vaccine which is great news. this i'm hearing, taking up the vaccine which is great news.— which is great news. as far as we understand. _ which is great news. as far as we understand, they _ which is great news. as far as we understand, they are _ which is great news. as far as we understand, they are only - which is great news. as far as we understand, they are only beingl understand, they are only being offered one vaccine at this point? yes, just one, we have also got the flu vaccination programme which will be rolled out from the 31st of august so a bigger group. year seven is to year 11 are being vaccinated, and then if you are in clinically vulnerable group, he will be offered the flu vaccination programme. the
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hope is, 75% of the adult population have been vaccinated in this country. there is a small but significant amount who have not been vaccinated but if we keep going the way we are, hopefully we should be able to get control of the virus and not have any future restrictions or lockdown playback, that is nighat arif, lovely to speak to you. israel was the first country in the world to offer a vaccine to every resident and now a third dose is being offered to everyone over the age of 50. it comes as health experts warn that hospitals could reach capacity within weeks. jenny hill reports from tel aviv. in the oblivion of intensive care, the brutal reality of what this virus can do. how old is this lady? she's 59. , , ., , .,
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she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv. she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv- staff _ she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv. staff tell _ she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv. staff tell us _ she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv. staff tell us they _ she's 59. this is a hospital in tel aviv. staff tell us they are - she's 59. this is a hospital in tel. aviv. staff tell us they are already battling a fourth wave, and it's going to get worse. they are doing what they can, expanding the number of beds in the unit, but the number of beds in the unit, but the number of hospitalisations, people falling seriously ill, is rising fast. it's the same across the country. and suddenly, the immediacy of the problem becomes clear. even as we film, the doctor in charge gets a call. , ., film, the doctor in charge gets a call. , . call. there is a patient, three vaccinations, _ call. there is a patient, three vaccinations, covid _ call. there is a patient, three vaccinations, covid positive, | call. there is a patient, three - vaccinations, covid positive, with acute respiratory failure. the second patient _ acute respiratory failure. the second patient in _ acute respiratory failure. the second patient in the hospital today who now need intensive care. but there is only one bed free. i’m there is only one bed free. i'm afraid the _ there is only one bed free. in afraid the numbers will go up. and i know that i will have to take hard decisions, who can get into intensive care and who will not. i
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was afraid of it, all the three waves that we had, i took those decisions. ,, ., waves that we had, i took those decisions-— waves that we had, i took those decisions. . ., , ., ., decisions. so, what has gone wrong for israel? this, _ decisions. so, what has gone wrong for israel? this, after— decisions. so, what has gone wrong for israel? this, after all, _ decisions. so, what has gone wrong for israel? this, after all, with - for israel? this, after all, with the first country in the world to offer a vaccine to every resident. but cases are rising, the government is a restrictions, even considering a lockdown. is a restrictions, even considering a lockdown-— a lockdown. one thing that went wron: is a lockdown. one thing that went wrong is just _ a lockdown. one thing that went wrong is just biology _ a lockdown. one thing that went wrong is just biology which - a lockdown. one thing that went wrong is just biology which is - a lockdown. one thing that went| wrong is just biology which is the delta variant. but the other thing that which went wrong is the slight euphoria that we had thinking that this is over, not going after vaccinating those who are not vaccinated.— vaccinating those who are not vaccinated. , ., ~ ., vaccinated. israel is now banking on the third dose _ vaccinated. israel is now banking on the third dose of— vaccinated. israel is now banking on the third dose of vaccine, _ vaccinated. israel is now banking on the third dose of vaccine, opening l the third dose of vaccine, opening up the third dose of vaccine, opening up centres is likely to roll it out fast. ~ ., ., , ., fast. we are not sure how well we are doing- — fast. we are not sure how well we are doing. this _ fast. we are not sure how well we are doing. this will _ fast. we are not sure how well we are doing. this will take _ fast. we are not sure how well we are doing. this will take another. are doing. this will take another week— are doing. this will take another week or— are doing. this will take another week or two to get the figures, those _ week or two to get the figures, those who— week or two to get the figures, those who have had the third jab.
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the question is, is this a third jab able _ the question is, is this a third jab able to— the question is, is this a third jab able to protect the people from getting — able to protect the people from getting infected and to have symptomatic disease? we are still out on _ symptomatic disease? we are still out on that. no symptomatic disease? we are still out on that-— out on that. no guarantees, little 0 timism out on that. no guarantees, little optimism on _ out on that. no guarantees, little optimism on these _ out on that. no guarantees, little optimism on these wards. - out on that. no guarantees, little optimism on these wards. for - out on that. no guarantees, little - optimism on these wards. for israel, this isn't so much about the rising case numbers, it's about what's happening in units like this all over the country. this is what will determine what israel does next. jenny hill, bbc news, tel aviv. just coming up to 7am, it is a rather lovely day out and about. we saw a rather lovely day out and about. - saw a beautiful sunrise over the thames earlier on.— thames earlier on. this is from battersea. _ thames earlier on. this is from battersea, looking _ thames earlier on. this is from battersea, looking lovely - thames earlier on. this is from battersea, looking lovely and l thames earlier on. this is from - battersea, looking lovely and come there this morning. —— it is very calm. there this morning. -- it is very calm. , ,., there this morning. -- it is very calm. , ., calm. there is something remarkable about big cities _ calm. there is something remarkable about big cities early _ calm. there is something remarkable about big cities early in _ calm. there is something remarkable about big cities early in the _ about big cities early in the morning. what is the picture across
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the uk? fairly cloudy across many parts of the uk, and through this week, the forecast. there will be a lot of cloud around, we are in cloud from the atlantic, temperatures will be around about average or below. ads, lat around about average or below. a lot ofthe around about average or below. a lot of the time — around about average or below. a lot of the time it — around about average or below. a lot of the time it will _ around about average or below. a lot of the time it will be _ around about average or below. a lot of the time it will be dry, patchy light rain or drizzle in the forecast. having said that. we have a hook of light rain slipping southwards, and that will weaken. if you look at the isobars, coming in from the atlantic in a north—westerly direction, it will be a breezy day. later on another weather front coming in across the west. this morning there is some early brightness in london and the midlands, across parts of scotland. the weather front will sink south and behind it, we will hang on to the sunshine. in the west, a
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different story. here across western scotland and northern ireland, in the three the south—west of england, the three the south—west of england, the cloud will be thick enough for some patchy light rain or drizzle. central and eastern areas are seeing something drier and brighter more cloud at times through the south—east. temperatures 13 to 18 degrees. yesterday it was just over 26 degrees in suffolk. we will not see that today or this week. this evening and overnight, we start off with clear skies in the east, a weather front coming into the west will bring a decent amount of rain across scotland and northern ireland sinking southwards and weakening. behind that, patchy light rain and drizzle a lot of cloud. widespread mist and fog is particularly over the hills and the coasts. tomorrow, weather front pushing towards the south—east, it will be a cloudy day and that will be thick enough for some drizzle here and there. one or two brighter breaks to the south and
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east of any and mountains, and temperatures, 1a to 19 degrees. it should be 20 to 2a north to south at this time of year. wednesday starts with a bit of brightness that there will be cloud around once again. the best breaks to the east of the pennines, some around dorset as well. and also the east of devon. the cloud is thick enough for some drizzle, occasionally, and these are the temperatures, 13 to 20 degrees. even as we head towards the end of the week, the forecast is still fairly cloudy with one or two exceptions. thursday will have some rain coming across south—west england and wales, pushing eastwards across the day and weakening. by the time it arrives in the south—east it will be fairly light. a fair bit of cloud around, thick enough for some drizzle, 13 to 20 degrees. the outlook beyond that, into friday,
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saturday and sunday, it looks like it is going to remain unsettled, there will be rain at times. below par temperatures once again, 18, 19 and 20, but it will not be wet all the time. stay with us, the headlines are coming up next.
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wall good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today. the taliban take control of afghanistan — 20 years after they were forced from power, fighters enter the presidential palace in kabul. there were chaotic scenes at the airport as thousands of people desperately tried to leave the country. british troops have arrived to help the uk's evacuation effort — the prime minister has called for a co—ordinated international response to the crisis. nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a breeding ground for terror.
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new guidelines on gun licences are to be introduced in the wake of the mass shooting in plymouth. no kane? well, that's no problem. spurs stun premier league champions manchester city, with son the main man. good morning. it's monday, 16th august. our top story. the taliban have seized control of afghanistan and declared that the war in the country is over, after their forces took the capital, kabul. president ashraf ghani has fled the country. there've been chaotic scenes at kabul airport where hundreds of afghans have been trying to leave. britain, the united states and other western nations are continuing military operations to evacuate their citizens. our correspondent graham satchel has the latest. on board a plane due to leave kabul overnight.
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but at the last minute they're told the flight won't be going. passengers are forced to rejoin the chaos outside. there is panic and fear everywhere. for 20 years, afghanistan has had stability, democracy and relative safety. it has all ended in a matter of days. a lucky few have made it out. this is delhi airport and a mix of relief, anger and despair. i can't believe the world abandoned afghanistan. our friends are going to get killed. they're going to kill us. our women are not going to have any more rights. the taliban, forced from power by western troops two decades ago, are back. they claim to have taken over every government department, including this, the presidential palace in kabul. just hours earlier the former president, ashraf ghani, at the same desk. he's now fled to uzbekistan. in a statement, he said he has
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left to avoid bloodshed. kabul is a city on the move, residents desperate to escape. fear of what is to come has gripped every level of society, including former government ministers. deep down in my heart i keep telling myself i won't have to pay the price forjoining a government position. but now i might, i might face consequences that i never even dreamed of, and i guess that the price that we pay for trying to make this world a little better than when we came to it, particularly afghanistan. british troops have now arrived in kabul to evacuate uk nationals and afghans who worked with them. it's thought around 4000 in total are eligible to be airlifted out. criticism of the chaos now engulfing afghanistan is widespread. parliament will be recalled on wednesday to debate the crisis.
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a protest outside the white house in washington. america has long argued its troops couldn't stay in afghanistan forever, and public opinion supports troop withdrawal. but serious questions are now being asked. why was so much money spent, so many military lives lost, to simply allow the taliban to walk back into power? the air over kabul is full of helicopters as diplomats and embassy staff make their escape. on the ground the people wait with growing fear. it was not meant to end like this. graham satchell, bbc news. more the 60 countries including the us, uk, and australia, have issued a joint statement urging the taliban to allow people to leave afghanistan if they want to. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. morning to you. we are seeing some
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ofthe morning to you. we are seeing some of the images _ morning to you. we are seeing some of the imagesjust _ morning to you. we are seeing some of the images just this _ morning to you. we are seeing some of the images just this morning. - morning to you. we are seeing some of the images just this morning. it i of the imagesjust this morning. it is mid—morning in afghanistan now. we have seen some of those chaotic scenes at the airport where people are trying to get out. what is the uk government are saying about what is happening there now command what they are doing? the is happening there now command what they are doing?— they are doing? the absolute riori they are doing? the absolute priority for— they are doing? the absolute priority for the _ they are doing? the absolute priority for the government l they are doing? the absolute | priority for the government is they are doing? the absolute - priority for the government is the evacuation — priority for the government is the evacuation process, getting bracing -- british— evacuation process, getting bracing —— british nationals and eligible afghans — —— british nationals and eligible afghans out of the country as quickly— afghans out of the country as quickly as possible. it is no small feat _ quickly as possible. it is no small feat there — quickly as possible. it is no small feat. there are about 4000 people in those _ feat. there are about 4000 people in those categories. and authorities getting _ those categories. and authorities getting them out as quickly as possible. as well as that though, there _ possible. as well as that though, there a _ possible. as well as that though, there a diplomatic priority for the government in terms of talking to other— government in terms of talking to other countries, to try to make sure, _ other countries, to try to make sure. as — other countries, to try to make sure, as borisjohnson put it yesterday, like—minded countries don't _ yesterday, like—minded countries don't prematurely recognise a taliban— don't prematurely recognise a taliban government. he said it was likely— taliban government. he said it was likely there would be a new regime but they— likely there would be a new regime but they didn't know what that would be yet _ but they didn't know what that would be yet he _ but they didn't know what that would be yet. he also said that the uk would _ be yet. he also said that the uk would work with the un security council — would work with the un security council and other nato countries to
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stop afghanistan lapsing back into terror~ _ nobody wants afghanistan once again to be a breeding ground for terror. i and we don't think it's - in the interests of the people of afghanistan that it should lapse back into that state, that - pre—2001 state. there are also huge concerns this morning — there are also huge concerns this morning about what will happen to other— morning about what will happen to other afghan citizens, as we have been _ other afghan citizens, as we have been hearing. as you said, the uk is among _ been hearing. as you said, the uk is among more — been hearing. as you said, the uk is among more than 60 countries who have signed a joint statement which says that _ have signed a joint statement which says that afghan or grand international citizens who wish to depart— international citizens who wish to depart the country must be allowed to do— depart the country must be allowed to do so _ depart the country must be allowed to do so. roads and border crossings must _ to do so. roads and border crossings must remain— to do so. roads and border crossings must remain open and calm must be maintained — must remain open and calm must be maintained. the liberal democrats are saying — maintained. the liberal democrats are saying the government should be trying _ are saying the government should be trying to— are saying the government should be trying to set up safe passage corridors— trying to set up safe passage corridors for people who wish to leave _ corridors for people who wish to leave afghanistan, a secure route that would — leave afghanistan, a secure route that would go from the country to an international border, so people can live safely — international border, so people can live safely. there are also
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questions being asked about what will happen to refugees from afghanistan, where they will go, which _ afghanistan, where they will go, which countries will take them. this is something we will hear more about in the _ is something we will hear more about in the coming days, particularly on wednesday when parliament is being recalled _ wednesday when parliament is being recalled from its summer break to discuss _ recalled from its summer break to discuss the — recalled from its summer break to discuss the situation in afghanistan. all of these concerns we are _ afghanistan. all of these concerns we are likely to hear a lot about. particularly— we are likely to hear a lot about. particularly about the potential impact — particularly about the potential impact on women and children in afghanistan. also, separately in westminster, there is also criticism of the _ westminster, there is also criticism of the foreign secretary, dominic raab, _ of the foreign secretary, dominic raab, after it emerged he had been on holiday— raab, after it emerged he had been on holiday for the past week. the foreign— on holiday for the past week. the foreign and commonwealth office said he was _ foreign and commonwealth office said he was coming back yesterday and he had been _ he was coming back yesterday and he had been personally coordinated a response. — had been personally coordinated a response, but labour has accused him of going _ response, but labour has accused him of going awol and say it is same —— shameful — and we'll be talking to the defence secretary ben wallace at half past seven. police forces in england and wales have asked by the home office to review the way they deal with firearm applications following the mass shooting in plymouth. a minute's silence will be observed in the city today to remember the five victims.
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police will be issued with statutory guidance which will include social media checks for anyone applying for a licence. the death toll from the earthquake that struck haiti on saturday has risen to at least 1,300 people. hospitals are inundated and struggling to cope with the number of injured — which has almost doubled to around 6,000 people. rescuers are trying to locate those still trapped under the rubble, while aid workers provide food, water and shelter ahead of an imminent tropical storm. from today, people in england and northern ireland who've received two doses of coronavirus vaccine will no longer have to automatically self—isolate if they come into contact with someone who has covid—19. instead they'll be advised to get a free pcr test. those who do test positive though will be legally obliged to self isolate for 10 days. scotland and wales have already made similar changes.
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let's return to our main story now. the taliban have seized control of afghanistan and declared that the war in the country is over, after their forces took the capital, kabul. we're joined now by freelance journalist charlie faulkner. morning. tell us the latest situation? what can you see, what has been going on?— has been going on? yeah, at the moment the _ has been going on? yeah, at the moment the situation _ has been going on? yeah, at the moment the situation is - has been going on? yeah, at the moment the situation is really i moment the situation is really unclear~ — moment the situation is really unclear~ i_ moment the situation is really unclear. i think people are still unclear. ! think people are still very— unclear. ! think people are still very much— unclear. i think people are still very much afraid. certainly there are people — very much afraid. certainly there are people who feel that they will be targeted by the taliban. they are very much— be targeted by the taliban. they are very much hiding out in different places— very much hiding out in different places around the city. i think there — places around the city. i think there was— places around the city. i think there was an expectation that when taliban— there was an expectation that when taliban fighters would enter kabul, there _ taliban fighters would enter kabul, there would be conflict. the fact that hasn't happened in the way it was expected, i think that has also
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added _ was expected, i think that has also added to— was expected, i think that has also added to the climate of fear. and certainly— added to the climate of fear. and certainly people really are terrified. the scenes we have been witnessing — terrified. the scenes we have been witnessing overnight at the airport, and it— witnessing overnight at the airport, and it is— witnessing overnight at the airport, and it is still continuing currently, in terms of thousands of people _ currently, in terms of thousands of people trying to get into the airport. _ people trying to get into the airport, trying to get onto the tarmac — airport, trying to get onto the tarmac it— airport, trying to get onto the tarmac. it hasjust been utter chaos because _ tarmac. it hasjust been utter chaos because people are just so desperate to get— because people are just so desperate to get out _ because people are just so desperate to get out. the taliban have control of afghanistan's land borders. the only way— of afghanistan's land borders. the only way to exit the country is through— only way to exit the country is through kabul airport. we only way to exit the country is through kabul airport. we have been lookin: at through kabul airport. we have been looking at some _ through kabul airport. we have been looking at some pictures _ through kabul airport. we have been looking at some pictures coming - through kabul airport. we have been looking at some pictures coming out| looking at some pictures coming out of the airport this morning. it is mid—morning where you are. you talk about that fear. what about from your own point of view as well? i your own point of view as well? i mean, as a foreigner i'm in a much more— mean, as a foreigner i'm in a much more privileged position than any
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afghan— more privileged position than any afghan here. that is something that i'm afghan here. that is something that l'm very— afghan here. that is something that i'm very much aware of. we have been given— i'm very much aware of. we have been given assurances by the taliban that foreign _ given assurances by the taliban that foreignjournalists given assurances by the taliban that foreign journalists will not be targeted. which is reassuring. but obviously — targeted. which is reassuring. but obviously, we don't quite know what to expect _ obviously, we don't quite know what to expect on a more individual basis — to expect on a more individual basis and _ to expect on a more individual basis. and at the moment, there was looting _ basis. and at the moment, there was looting last _ basis. and at the moment, there was looting last night around the city. it is not _ looting last night around the city. it is notjust the taliban looting last night around the city. it is not just the taliban that could — it is not just the taliban that could pose a threat. taliban fighters _ could pose a threat. taliban fighters. we are also looking at the serious _ fighters. we are also looking at the serious criminals and of that kind of thing _ serious criminals and of that kind of thing as— serious criminals and of that kind of thing as well. they sort of prosper— of thing as well. they sort of prosper in— of thing as well. they sort of prosper in this interim stage when a change _ prosper in this interim stage when a change of— prosper in this interim stage when a change of power is occurring. can ou also change of power is occurring. can you also talk _ change of power is occurring. can you also talk to me a little bit about how quickly this happened as well? are people in afghanistan surprised by the speed at which this has changed?—
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has changed? yes. i mean, i think everybody — has changed? yes. i mean, i think everybody is _ has changed? yes. i mean, i think everybody is shocked _ has changed? yes. i mean, i think everybody is shocked about - has changed? yes. i mean, i think everybody is shocked about how. everybody is shocked about how quickly — everybody is shocked about how quickly gains were made by the taliban, — quickly gains were made by the taliban, and certainly how quickly kabul— taliban, and certainly how quickly kabul has — taliban, and certainly how quickly kabul has fallen. nobody expected this. when president biden first announced the withdrawal would be completed, the withdrawal of us troops _ completed, the withdrawal of us troops would be completed by september the 11th, certainly in those _ september the 11th, certainly in those initial weeks we saw territory being _ those initial weeks we saw territory being gained by the taliban, but a lot of— being gained by the taliban, but a lot of it _ being gained by the taliban, but a lot of it was symbolic because the district _ lot of it was symbolic because the district centres that they were taking — district centres that they were taking had been surrounded by taliban— taking had been surrounded by taliban anyway. so initially, they knew _ taliban anyway. so initially, they knew taliban were in that area anyway — knew taliban were in that area anyway. we saw that significantly progress — anyway. we saw that significantly progress. i think with the fall of herat. — progress. i think with the fall of herat, kandaharand lashkar gah, herat, kandahar and lashkar gah, everybody— herat, kandaharand lashkar gah, everybody knew it was just a matter of time _ everybody knew it was just a matter of time before kabul went. but i think— of time before kabul went. but i think the — of time before kabul went. but i
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think the taliban were seriously underestimated. and, yeah, ithink at the _ underestimated. and, yeah, ithink at the moment, in terms of the safety— at the moment, in terms of the safety of— at the moment, in terms of the safety of afghans, certainly it is much _ safety of afghans, certainly it is much better that the war didn't hit the centre — much better that the war didn't hit the centre of kabul. but it has done in so _ the centre of kabul. but it has done in so many— the centre of kabul. but it has done in so many other places around the country _ in so many other places around the count . g , in so many other places around the count ., , , , in so many other places around the count ., ,, , country. just briefly as well, we know that _ country. just briefly as well, we know that six _ country. just briefly as well, we know that six different - country. just briefly as well, we| know that six different countries are asking... if people want to leave afghanistan, they are allowed to do that. what is your assessment of whether that will be likely to happen? i of whether that will be likely to ha - en? ., of whether that will be likely to ha . en? ., ., of whether that will be likely to ha - en? ., . ., of whether that will be likely to ha . en? ., ., ., , happen? i mean, there are no flights at the moment. _ happen? i mean, there are no flights at the moment, so _ happen? i mean, there are no flights at the moment, so it's _ happen? i mean, there are no flights at the moment, so it's impossible i at the moment, so it's impossible for anybody to leave. and the reason why there _ for anybody to leave. and the reason why there are no flights is because the evacuation process of internationals is taking priority on the runway. getting afghans out, getting _ the runway. getting afghans out, getting international is out, the evacuation plans, all completely in chaos _ evacuation plans, all completely in chaos the — evacuation plans, all completely in chaos. the us administration has come _ chaos. the us administration has come under criticism for not
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initiating _ come under criticism for not initiating the evacuation plan sooner~ _ initiating the evacuation plan sooner. as we can see, it has been in complete — sooner. as we can see, it has been in complete disarray.— in complete disarray. chardy, take care of yourself. _ in complete disarray. chardy, take care of yourself. thank _ in complete disarray. chardy, take care of yourself. thank you - in complete disarray. chardy, take care of yourself. thank you very i care of yourself. thank you very much. thank you so much for talking to us on bbc breakfast. we will be speaking to the defence secretary and about 20 minutes.— speaking to the defence secretary and about 20 minutes. hopefully, our next guest. — and about 20 minutes. hopefully, our next guest, labour _ and about 20 minutes. hopefully, our next guest, labour mp _ and about 20 minutes. hopefully, our next guest, labour mp dan _ and about 20 minutes. hopefully, our next guest, labour mp dan jarvis, i next guest, labour mp danjarvis, was able to get that. good morning. just so people understand this is a country you know well. when you were in the military you served two terms in afghanistan. ijust wonder military you served two terms in afghanistan. i just wonder what your reflections are as you see some of those images this morning, as afghanistan wakes up to being under taliban control? it is afghanistan wakes up to being under taliban control?— taliban control? it is heartbreaking to see what — taliban control? it is heartbreaking to see what is _ taliban control? it is heartbreaking to see what is happening _ taliban control? it is heartbreaking to see what is happening in - to see what is happening in afghanistan. i've spoken to lots of veterans _ afghanistan. i've spoken to lots of veterans of— afghanistan. i've spoken to lots of veterans of the afghanistan campaign over the _ veterans of the afghanistan campaign over the course of the weekend. and we are _ over the course of the weekend. and we are all— over the course of the weekend. and we are all desperately angry and deeply— we are all desperately angry and deeply worried about the situation in the _ deeply worried about the situation in the country that we invested in
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such— in the country that we invested in such a _ in the country that we invested in such a lot, — in the country that we invested in such a lot, so much sacrifice, so much _ such a lot, so much sacrifice, so much resource poured into afghanistan over the last 20 years, and lots _ afghanistan over the last 20 years, and lots of— afghanistan over the last 20 years, and lots of people who served there in the _ and lots of people who served there in the british armed forces are now, understandably, asking if it was all worth— understandably, asking if it was all worth it _ understandably, asking if it was all worth it. ~ ., ., ., worth it. what now, given what you know that country, _ worth it. what now, given what you know that country, and _ worth it. what now, given what you know that country, and frankly, i worth it. what now, given what you know that country, and frankly, we| know that country, and frankly, we are where we are. it is an awful phrase, but i think in a way president biden has reflected that, borisjohnson to a degree as well, given where we are in this situation as we look at the chaos they are and be real worries from those people who live there who will not be able to leave, what would be good international politics relative to the new taliban leadership now? well, we have to accept there is a new normal— well, we have to accept there is a new normal now in afghanistan. although — new normal now in afghanistan. although it is a bitter pill to have to swallow, we are going to have to engage _ to swallow, we are going to have to engage with the new administration in kabul _ engage with the new administration in kabul it— engage with the new administration in kabul. it is in our national interest— in kabul. it is in our national interest to _ in kabul. it is in our national interest to do that. the first priority— interest to do that. the first priority is— interest to do that. the first
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priority is of course to complete the ongoing military evacuation, which _ the ongoing military evacuation, which hundreds of british soldiers, including _ which hundreds of british soldiers, including from my own old regiment, are in— including from my own old regiment, are in kabul— including from my own old regiment, are in kabulare including from my own old regiment, are in kabul are doing everything they possibly can to recover british passport— they possibly can to recover british passport holders and other entitled personnel. that is the immediate priority — personnel. that is the immediate priority. but very quickly thereafter, the diplomatic purpose has to _ thereafter, the diplomatic purpose has to be _ thereafter, the diplomatic purpose has to be about averting a diplomat -- where _ has to be about averting a diplomat —— where humanitarian disaster. afghanistan is a strategically placed — afghanistan is a strategically placed country. there is a very real prospect _ placed country. there is a very real prospect that hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people, will seek to leave _ if not millions of people, will seek to leave the country. there is a real— to leave the country. there is a real possibility of a refugee crisis which _ real possibility of a refugee crisis which could be very destabilising for region. so the uk government, working _ for region. so the uk government, working with international partners, has to— working with international partners, has to have — working with international partners, has to have an ongoing dialogue with the taliban, with the new regime, to try to _ the taliban, with the new regime, to try to avert _ the taliban, with the new regime, to try to avert a — the taliban, with the new regime, to try to avert a humanitarian disaster. _ try to avert a humanitarian disaster, and try, somehow, to try to minimise — disaster, and try, somehow, to try to minimise the impact the situation will have _ to minimise the impact the situation will have on— to minimise the impact the situation will have on the population of afghanistan, not least all those
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women — afghanistan, not least all those women and girls that we have invested — women and girls that we have invested so much effort over the years _ invested so much effort over the years and — invested so much effort over the years and trying to protect. helping with the timeline. _ years and trying to protect. helping with the timeline. i'm _ years and trying to protect. helping with the timeline. i'm looking i years and trying to protect. helping with the timeline. i'm looking at i with the timeline. i'm looking at the prime minister's words in relation to that. he has said, talking to the international community, he has said, don't prematurely recognise the taliban government. now given the crisis, and it is immediate, in relation to the logistics and the real concerns for safety there, do you think that is the wrong approach? you think it would better to very quickly officially recognise this government, albeit that nobody wants to do that? would that be pragmatic? i think the pragmatic thing to do is to immediately enter dialogue, whether— to immediately enter dialogue, whether that requires official recognition is a moot point. the most _ recognition is a moot point. the most important thing is that there is an— most important thing is that there is an incredibly risky situation in afghanistan. forthose is an incredibly risky situation in afghanistan. for those people who have previously spoken out about the taliban, _ have previously spoken out about the taliban, there are hundreds if not thousands— taliban, there are hundreds if not thousands of afghans who have
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previously supported coalition forces, — previously supported coalition forces, who find themselves in the most _ forces, who find themselves in the most perilous situation this morning _ most perilous situation this morning. we have to do everything we can to _ morning. we have to do everything we can to support them. they will of course _ can to support them. they will of course be — can to support them. they will of course be time to reflect on what has been — course be time to reflect on what has been a — course be time to reflect on what has been a catastrophic failure of foreign _ has been a catastrophic failure of foreign policy. this is the biggest foreign _ foreign policy. this is the biggest foreign policy. this is the biggest foreign policy crisis for generations. but the immediate priority— generations. but the immediate priority has to be trying to unite the international community to leveraged what influence we still have, _ leveraged what influence we still have, in — leveraged what influence we still have, in order to benefit the afghan population — have, in order to benefit the afghan population. i think that needs to be the priority— population. i think that needs to be the priority over the coming hours and days — the priority over the coming hours and days in— the priority over the coming hours and da s. , ., ., and days. in terms of the immediate lo . istics, and days. in terms of the immediate logistics. there _ and days. in terms of the immediate logistics, there are _ and days. in terms of the immediate logistics, there are questions - and days. in terms of the immediate logistics, there are questions about| logistics, there are questions about how diplomats, for example, i'm not quite sure what the situation is this morning. it's not clear in relation to british diplomats still there, british citizens still there. literally the logistics of getting them from where they are to the airport. we have seen it is very chaotic there. that in itself presents potential problems, doesn't
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it? the british military will clearly be closely involved in trying to get people safely out. indeed, my understanding is that the british— indeed, my understanding is that the british diplomatic mission in kabul have been— british diplomatic mission in kabul have been doing an amazing job trying _ have been doing an amazing job trying to— have been doing an amazing job trying to support and processes many british— trying to support and processes many british passport holders and entitled personnel. they have obviously been doing that under the most challenging circumstances. i think— most challenging circumstances. i think they— most challenging circumstances. i think they have now relocated to kabul _ think they have now relocated to kabul airport. clearly there is usually— kabul airport. clearly there is usually important role for for our armed _ usually important role for for our armed forces who were there at the airport— armed forces who were there at the airport trying to provide some degree — airport trying to provide some degree of security, so those people can't be _ degree of security, so those people can't be evacuated as quickly as possible — can't be evacuated as quickly as possible. the situation is moving very quickly. and that is why we need _ very quickly. and that is why we need to— very quickly. and that is why we need to see some leadership, some energy— need to see some leadership, some energy and — need to see some leadership, some energy and some real pragmatic foreign — energy and some real pragmatic foreign policy action from the british— foreign policy action from the british government, working with our international allies, british government, working with our internationalallies, but british government, working with our international allies, but also partners _ international allies, but also partners in the region. a hugely significant — partners in the region. a hugely significant role for pakistan to be playing — significant role for pakistan to be playing. the british government has a leading _ playing. the british government has a leading role to play. and i would expect _ a leading role to play. and i would
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expect them to step up, to do everything they possibly can to engage — everything they possibly can to engage with our partners, and actually— engage with our partners, and actually look at whether some semblance of order can be established on the ground. but clearly— established on the ground. but clearly that will require some sort of negotiation and dialogue with the new administration in kabul. dan jarvis, new administration in kabul. dan jarvis. thank— new administration in kabul. dan jarvis, thank you _ new administration in kabul. lian jarvis, thank you for your time this morning. labour mp and former soldier in the british army. lode morning. labour mp and former soldier in the british army. we are auoin to soldier in the british army. we are going to continue _ soldier in the british army. we are going to continue talking _ soldier in the british army. we are going to continue talking about i soldier in the british army. we are | going to continue talking about that right now. for 20 years, many women in afghanistan have had the freedom to go to school and work — things they were banned from doing under the previous taliban regime. there is growing concern about what life could be like now the militants have regained control of the country. we're joined now by pashtana durrani, from the education charity learn afghanistan. things being what they are, she is in afghanistan, and we havejust lost that line. let's show you the pictures coming into us this morning. this is the scene at kabul airport. it has been like this over
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the past few hours. people desperately trying to get on board planes. many hundreds at the airport trying to get on board planes. to give you a sense of the timeline. there are around two and a half hours ahead in kabul. this is mid—morning. and during the morning more and more people have been arriving at the airport. this is one of the stills you can see. you immediately get a sense of the sheer numbers of people who have gone to the airport to try and get on those flights. no commercial aircraft flying. so these are the flights that have been organised by various governments. that process, as you can see, has led to many, many thousands of people simply arriving at the airport and trying to get on the aircraft. at the airport and trying to get on the aircraft-— the aircraft. let's speak to our ruest the aircraft. let's speak to our guest from — the aircraft. let's speak to our guest from the _ the aircraft. let's speak to our guest from the education i the aircraft. let's speak to our. guest from the education charity learn afghanistan. thank you for joining us. it is a very difficult situation. we can see what is unfolding. tell us what the situation is like for you? thanks
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for -- thank _ situation is like for you? thanks for -- thank you _ situation is like for you? thanks for -- thank you for— situation is like for you? thanks for -- thank you for having i situation is like for you? thanks for -- thank you for having me. | for —— thank you for having me. people — for —— thank you for having me. people and _ for —— thank you for having me. people and more and more afraid by the fact— people and more and more afraid by the fact they are going to lose everything. which is in a sense a faster— everything. which is in a sense a faster process. panic is not the solution — faster process. panic is not the solution. this is now the political situation — solution. this is now the political situation and we have to try to come up situation and we have to try to come up with— situation and we have to try to come up with solutions. people right now are very— up with solutions. people right now are very panicked. afraid. they are fleeing, _ are very panicked. afraid. they are fleeing, they are doing anything and everything. people are literally in a zone _ everything. people are literally in a zone. you had to get to ten checks until that _ a zone. you had to get to ten checks until that place. as a zone. you had to get to ten checks until that place.— until that place. as far as you can see, until that place. as far as you can see. what — until that place. as far as you can see, what about _ until that place. as far as you can see, what about the _ until that place. as far as you can see, what about the immediate l until that place. as far as you can i see, what about the immediate future under taliban control? the see, what about the immediate future under taliban control?— under taliban control? the immediate future, the under taliban control? the immediate future. they are _ under taliban control? the immediate future, they are being _ under taliban control? the immediate future, they are being very _ under taliban control? the immediate future, they are being very weird i future, they are being very weird about— future, they are being very weird about it. — future, they are being very weird about it. to— future, they are being very weird about it, to be honest. in some places— about it, to be honest. in some places they are very nice to people. and there _ places they are very nice to people. and there are places where they have been slitting throats. i do not want
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to been slitting throats. ! do not want to trust— been slitting throats. i do not want to trust them. i am not trusting them _ to trust them. i am not trusting them for— to trust them. i am not trusting them for their words. the first thing — them for their words. the first thing they— them for their words. the first thing they did yesterday, they brought— thing they did yesterday, they brought down the flag. the second thing _ brought down the flag. the second thing they— brought down the flag. the second thing they did, they are in the process— thing they did, they are in the process of— thing they did, they are in the process of changing the name of afghanistan. at the same time we are being _ afghanistan. at the same time we are being stripped of are political rights, — being stripped of are political rights, our mobility, our social rights — rights, our mobility, our social rights this _ rights, our mobility, our social rights. this is in the process of happening. i rights. this is in the process of happening-— happening. i know that you're passionate — happening. i know that you're passionate about _ happening. i know that you're passionate about education, i happening. i know that you're i passionate about education, women being educated. the taliban have said they will allow girls education. how do you respond to that? , ., ,_ education. how do you respond to that? , ., ., that? they were willing to say that uirls can that? they were willing to say that girls can go _ that? they were willing to say that girls can go to _ that? they were willing to say that girls can go to work. _ that? they were willing to say that girls can go to work. but _ that? they were willing to say that girls can go to work. but what i that? they were willing to say that girls can go to work. but what do | girls can go to work. but what do they actually mean? inaudible.
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these are some things that you have to accept _ these are some things that you have to accept. they are being weird about— to accept. they are being weird about it — to accept. they are being weird about it. they are not accepting the general— about it. they are not accepting the general education or the general working — general education or the general working of women in professional fields _ working of women in professional fields. these are some things you have _ fields. these are some things you have to _ fields. these are some things you have to understand they are trying to dodge _ have to understand they are trying to dodge the bullet. | have to understand they are trying to dodge the bullet. i am have to understand they are trying to dodge the bullet.— to dodge the bullet. i am going to ask ou to dodge the bullet. i am going to ask you another _ to dodge the bullet. i am going to ask you another question, - to dodge the bullet. i am going to i ask you another question, sometimes we are losing the words, but that is not your problem. tell me about western governments? how do you feel about how this has been handled by western governments? flat about how this has been handled by western governments? plat 64 about how this has been handled by western governments?— western governments? not a very dinnified western governments? not a very dignified exit. _ western governments? not a very dignified exit. they _ western governments? not a very dignified exit. they label- western governments? not a very dignified exit. they label us i western governments? not a very dignified exit. they label us with l dignified exit. they label us with all these — dignified exit. they label us with all these different times. not a very dignified withdrawal, right? leaving — very dignified withdrawal, right? leaving the country in chaos, pulling — leaving the country in chaos, pulling people out of their way to leave _ pulling people out of their way to leave their planes. where is the humanity— leave their planes. where is the humanity in that? do leave their planes. where is the humanity in that?— leave their planes. where is the humanity in that? do you feel let down? how _ humanity in that? do you feel let down? how do _ humanity in that? do you feel let down? how do you _ humanity in that? do you feel let down? how do you assess - humanity in that? do you feel let down? how do you assess what i humanity in that? do you feel let i down? how do you assess what has happened? flat down? how do you assess what has ha ened? ., _ down? how do you assess what has ha--ened? . ,, . , down? how do you assess what has hauened? ., _ . , , happened? not by the western people but b the
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happened? not by the western people but by the afghan _ happened? not by the western people but by the afghan president. _ happened? not by the western people but by the afghan president. we i but by the afghan president. we voted _ but by the afghan president. we voted for— but by the afghan president. we voted for him and he abandoned us. all of— voted for him and he abandoned us. all of these — voted for him and he abandoned us. all of these sacrifices for what? just to — all of these sacrifices for what? just to the future as well, are you expecting changes to come in very quickly? expecting changes to come in very cuickl ? , , , ., quickly? yes, yes. one thing that we know about — quickly? yes, yes. one thing that we know about the _ quickly? yes, yes. one thing that we know about the taliban, _ quickly? yes, yes. one thing that we know about the taliban, they - quickly? yes, yes. one thing that we know about the taliban, they love i know about the taliban, they love policing _ know about the taliban, they love policing people. as fast as possible. the girls were escorted out of _ possible. the girls were escorted out of the — possible. the girls were escorted out of the bank and into their houses — houses. they love policing hos — they love policing people. houses. the love oholicin --eole. , they love policing people. listen, i a- reciate they love policing people. listen, i appreciate your _ they love policing people. listen, i appreciate your time. _ they love policing people. listen, i appreciate your time. thank - they love policing people. listen, i appreciate your time. thank you i they love policing people. listen, i. appreciate your time. thank you very much for talking to us. clearly a difficult situation. thank you. hate difficult situation. thank you. we are going to move onto other topics now. at half past seven speaking to ben the defence secretary. it's been a weekend of grief and heartache for the people of plymouth, who are trying to come to terms with thursday's deadly shooting. a one minute silence will be held
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across the city later this morning, to remember the five people who were killed in the attack. we're joined now by nick kelly, the leader of plymouth city council. good morning to you. it's an important morning this morning. a moment when people there can stop and think at 11am?— and think at 11am? morning. that is correct. it and think at 11am? morning. that is correct- it is — and think at 11am? morning. that is correct. it is the _ and think at 11am? morning. that is correct. it is the first _ and think at 11am? morning. that is correct. it is the first formal - correct. it is the first formal occasion— correct. it is the first formal occasion the city can come together and pay— occasion the city can come together and pay their respects to those who sadly— and pay their respects to those who sadly lost _ and pay their respects to those who sadly lost their lives in such horrific— sadly lost their lives in such horrific circumstances last week. tell us _ horrific circumstances last week. tell us a — horrific circumstances last week. tell us a little more about the efforts being made locally to help people either directly caught up in events or who have been affected by it? , ., , events or who have been affected by it? , ., it? yes, over the past few days since these _ it? yes, over the past few days since these horrific _ it? yes, over the past few days since these horrific murders, i it? yes, over the past few days | since these horrific murders, we have _ since these horrific murders, we have worked incredibly hard with all agencies, _ have worked incredibly hard with all agencies, including the government, police _ agencies, including the government, police and _ agencies, including the government, police and support workers, to really — police and support workers, to really reach out to the community and the _ really reach out to the community and the support they are wanting in their time _ and the support they are wanting in their time of need. we set up local community— their time of need. we set up local
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community hubs. we have leafleted. we have _ community hubs. we have leafleted. we have set up books of condolences across _ we have set up books of condolences across the _ we have set up books of condolences across the city. and you have seen on the _ across the city. and you have seen on the news — across the city. and you have seen on the news the outpouring of emotion— on the news the outpouring of emotion in terms of floral tributes as well— emotion in terms of floral tributes as well as — emotion in terms of floral tributes as well as church services. so in our hour— as well as church services. so in our hour of— as well as church services. so in our hour of need we are delighted the local— our hour of need we are delighted the local community has come together— the local community has come together in these tragic circumstances.- together in these tragic circumstances. �* ., , ., circumstances. i'm not sure what you can say about — circumstances. i'm not sure what you can say about the _ circumstances. i'm not sure what you can say about the other— circumstances. i'm not sure what you can say about the other questions i can say about the other questions people have. one isjust about people's emotional welfare. you will be well aware there are many questions being asked of the police and local authorities, of the nhs, of those people involved in decision—making, but this man's mental health and why he was allowed to have a gun licence, for example. what kind of involvement does the
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local council have now, looking at what could be learned from what has happened? i what could be learned from what has ha-oened? ~ what could be learned from what has hauened? ., v what could be learned from what has hauened? ~ �*, . . happened? i think it's the cliche that lessons _ happened? i think it's the cliche that lessons will _ happened? i think it's the cliche that lessons will be _ happened? i think it's the cliche that lessons will be learned. i happened? i think it's the cliche j that lessons will be learned. we happened? i think it's the cliche i that lessons will be learned. we had a very— that lessons will be learned. we had a very productive meeting with the home _ a very productive meeting with the home secretary when she visited plymouth. i'm glad to see today that she has— plymouth. i'm glad to see today that she has asked for all gun licence application forms to be reviewed. the local— application forms to be reviewed. the local authority will review their— the local authority will review their records to see if there is any further— their records to see if there is any further assistance we can give them. 0bviously— further assistance we can give them. obviously this was an individual with a _ obviously this was an individual with a very disturbed mind. that nationally— with a very disturbed mind. that nationally is something we need to address— nationally is something we need to address to — nationally is something we need to address to prevent occurrences like this. address to prevent occurrences like this i_ address to prevent occurrences like this ithink— address to prevent occurrences like this. i think for now plymouth is a city in _ this. i think for now plymouth is a city in mourning. what we really want _ city in mourning. what we really want to — city in mourning. what we really want to focus on is today's one minute's — want to focus on is today's one minute's silence. we hope the nation willioin _ minute's silence. we hope the nation willioin us _ minute's silence. we hope the nation willjoin us. we have been inundated with condolences nationwide and
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internationally. a dark time in plymouth. we want to respect the wishes _ plymouth. we want to respect the wishes of— plymouth. we want to respect the wishes of the families. and concentrate on respecting the lives that have _ concentrate on respecting the lives that have been lost. there will be enquiries — that have been lost. there will be enquiries that will obviously take place _ enquiries that will obviously take place and — enquiries that will obviously take place and are extremely important. the immediate action now is to pay our respects. the immediate action now is to pay our respects-— the immediate action now is to pay our respects. thank you very much. that is the — our respects. thank you very much. that is the plymouth _ our respects. thank you very much. that is the plymouth council- our respects. thank you very much. | that is the plymouth council leader, nick kelly. that minute's silence taking place at 11am. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come, the saturdays singer frankie bridge shares her own experience of depression and panic attacks in a new book, which she hopes will provide support for other mums struggling with their mental health. frankie will be here just after 9. we'll also bring you the latest news and weather. the time is 7:29am. it is a lovely dawn in london. i'm not sure it is going to be like that for everyone. good morning. good morning. we do have some sunshine in places. but we
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also have quite a bit of cloud. this is one of our weather watchers pictures taken in norfolk. some of us will see some sunshine today, others will have a cloudy day. not particularly cold across the board. double figures. except for braemar and balmoral where temperatures are hovering at eight and 9 degrees. as we go through this new week you will find it is going to be fairly cool. we will see temperatures are fairly average. it is going to be fairly cloudy. we are pulling in a north—westerly wind, dragging in that moisture from the atlantic. that is producing some light rain and drizzle. a weak weather front sinking south right now. and behind it, some brighter skies. the brighter skies today are going to be in central and eastern areas. in the south there will be quite a bit of cloud times, as there will be across wales, northern ireland and western scotland. east of that we are back into some sunny skies. that cloud will be thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle or some light and
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patchy rain. temperatures today getting up to about 20 degrees at best. yesterday, we got 26.4 in cavendish in suffolk. we are not going to see a temperature like that through the rest of this working week. this evening and overnight some clear skies to start with. then a new weather front comes in bringing rain across scotland and northern ireland and continuing to progress southwards and eastwards. the cloud building ahead of it. behind it it will be quite cloudy as well. again, some patchy light rain and drizzle. quite a bit of mist and fog around. especially so on the coasts and hills. as a result it is not going to be a cold night. we are staying in double figures. tomorrow we pick up this cloud and rain posing steadily southwards and eastwards. a lot of cloud around tomorrow. again, thick enough for patchy light rain or drizzle. we will also hang onto some mist and fog, especially on the coasts and
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hills. it will be quite murky. we could see some breaks in that cloud to the south and east of the hills and mountains. temperatures 14 to 20 degrees. even into wednesday, although some of us will start off on a bright note, we will see the cloud through the course of the day. the best chance of seeing breaks will be through the east of the pennines, parts of dorset and east devon. once again that cloud likely to be thick enough for some drizzle here and there. temperatures 14 to about 20 degrees. as we head towards the end of the week, thursday, we have got rain coming across parts of wales and the south—west of england. that will move eastwards across southern counties. to the north of that a fair bit of cloud. once again, some patchy light rain and drizzle. more later. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. the taliban has claimed victory in afghanistan after seizing control of the capital,
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kabul. the prime minister borisjohnson says the country cannot be allowed to become a "breeding ground for terror" under the new regime. we're joined now by the defence secretary, ben wallace. thank you forjoining us. i'm sure you have seen the pictures we have seen here on bbc breakfast at kabul airport, people desperately trying to escape, what do you make of the situation right now? the to escape, what do you make of the situation right now?— to escape, what do you make of the situation right now? the footage you have seen is — situation right now? the footage you have seen is the _ situation right now? the footage you have seen is the south _ situation right now? the footage you have seen is the south side - situation right now? the footage you have seen is the south side of- situation right now? the footage you have seen is the south side of the i have seen is the south side of the airport, the civilian side. it is no comfort for those people who are clearly trying to leave the country, on flights which aren't going, they are suspended at the moment. on the military side of the effort, we are seeing the military aircraft coming in and out, it is still open and secure and that's why have we put in
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over 600 forces yesterday, today, over 600 forces yesterday, today, over the weekend to make sure that we can keep a secure part of the airport functioning and at the same time, to effectively process and manage and escort people onto our flights to get them out of afghanistan.— flights to get them out of afhhanistan. ., ., , , ., afghanistan. how many people have ou afghanistan. how many people have you managed _ afghanistan. how many people have you managed to _ afghanistan. how many people have you managed to get _ afghanistan. how many people have you managed to get out _ afghanistan. how many people have you managed to get out so - afghanistan. how many people have you managed to get out so far? i you managed to get out so far? yesterday we got out 300, they were a british passport holders, and other members of the british government, they were taking those out. we flew in members of the parachute regiment and the logisticians so we can process those people. we have 700 further people to take over the next 36 hours, and on top of that, another 800 within the same time scale or a few more hours later. on top of that, myself and the home secretary have been working very hard to remove any
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other bureaucratic barriers that did stand in the way such as the requirement to have an afghan passport to make sure that if our people have passed our tests and our screening, those afghans can come in. we are working to remove them as we speak, i will be speaking to the home secretary later today to make sure that we can speed that up. we all recognise time is of the essence, every hour counts. our flights are coming in and out. if we managed to keep it in the way we are planning to come we should have capacity for over 1000 people per day to exit to the uk, currently this is not about capacity on planes, devout processing speed so we are trying to fix that. == planes, devout processing speed so we are trying to fix that.— we are trying to fix that. -- it's about processing _ we are trying to fix that. -- it's about processing speed. i we are trying to fix that. -- it's about processing speed. so i we are trying to fix that. -- it's i about processing speed. so when hoping everyone will be out? i will! hoping everyone will be out? i will be huite hoping everyone will be out? i will be quite honest, _ hoping everyone will be out? i will be quite honest, i— hoping everyone will be out? i will be quite honest, i don't— hoping everyone will be out? ihh ll be quite honest, i don't think every single person, our timescale we had originally planned was august 31,
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will be out. we will try very hard to get everyone out, that is one of the biggest regrets of the speed of the biggest regrets of the speed of the collapse of the afghan government, those timetables will no doubt have to be shortened and we are moving extra assets to do that, whether that is air assets or people, and moving forward even more military personnel in case we need them. if we can manage to keep the airport running in the way we are putting in place our people to deliver, i'm confident that by the end of the month, we could get everyone out and hopefully sooner. there will be some people are left behind, we have made that clear in the last few weeks. i'm not going to raise expectations. that's why the home secretary has agreed to allow accelerated processing in third countries, so that some people who have already left the country but are not in the uk find themselves in refugee camps in greece for example, when we brought back a family from, they can be processed and we can
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continue to do so. the overall message is our british team is open—ended, there is a time limit on that. some other international countries have the time limits. no matter —— there is no time limit on ours. the taliban have made grand statements, we need to see whether they deliver them. there will be a time, free—flowing trade is incredibly important to afghanistan, and there will be a time when some of those people are able to get out. we are focused on every thing we can right now, that's why we are in afghanistan, that's what people should understand. our military are 4-1 should understand. our military are 4—1 tasks, processing afghans who we have an obligation to, processing uk passport holders. we will continue to do that until the last minute. i to do that until the last minute. i think you said there will be some people left behind, and these people are in a dangerous and vulnerable situation. to are in a dangerous and vulnerable situation. ., , . ., , ,
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are in a dangerous and vulnerable situation. . ., , , ., situation. to be clear, this is not new, situation. to be clear, this is not new. people _ situation. to be clear, this is not new. people who _ situation. to be clear, this is not new, people who are _ situation. to be clear, this is not new, people who are not - situation. to be clear, this is not new, people who are not in i situation. to be clear, this is not| new, people who are not in kabul situation. to be clear, this is not i new, people who are not in kabul or not able to get to kabul, people who have already left the country and find themselves in pakistan or india or neighbouring states, those people, they will not be able to get to our processing centre and they will not be able to get through. there are people throughout the country who will find it hard. with the us, the removal of the framework nation and the military might, and the speed of the afghan government collapse, it's simply not possible for us to send small bands of troops miles into afghanistan to find people if they are not able to be found. it is a deep regret that we have got to a position where we have, i haven't hidden that over the last few weeks, i was on your programme last week to say that i felt that the deal created, the donald trump deal created a situation that ended where we are today. we are doing everything, putting in british men and women of our armed forces to do everything we
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can to get those people out and we will continue to do that. can! can to get those people out and we will continue to do that.— will continue to do that. can i pick u . will continue to do that. can i pick u- on a will continue to do that. can i pick up on a point. _ will continue to do that. can i pick up on a point, translators, - will continue to do that. can i pick up on a point, translators, peoplej up on a point, translators, people who have obviously helped to citizens while in afghanistan, they are among the people who are eligible to come to the uk, are they? eligible to come to the uk, are the ? , , ., eligible to come to the uk, are the ? , , ., , ., they? yes, they are. i can give you a list come — they? yes, they are. i can give you a list come the _ they? yes, they are. i can give you a list come the people _ they? yes, they are. i can give you a list come the people eligible i they? yes, they are. i can give you a list come the people eligible are | a list come the people eligible are people who have worked for us in public facing roles, both essential and nonessential duties, people who worked, some of them were people who have worked for us but not in public facing roles, but is still incredibly important and known by the taliban, they're coming out. contractors and third parties, we have not said if you work as an interpreter for us but you have not said if you work as an interpreterfor us but you didn't directly work for us, we have also changed the rules a few weeks ago to make sure they can be processed. and indeed any other special cases reprocessed through. and doing it notjust in afghanistan, through third countries as well. since those changes, we have already processed
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and brought back to the country 2300 people with their families, they are now back in the uk. they are afghan families, they have come to the country, we have around 700 waiting to go, and another 700 literally in parallel. so another 14 or 1500 on top of that. and there are more that we are still processing. some of those, we know that if the timeframe by the end of august is the timeframe that definitely means it closes, if we don't get to operate after that, then those people may not be processed in time. some of the processes are logical, basically security checks. we have to make sure that some of the people we are bringing back are not affiliated to a terrorist organisation or the taliban, a very small number have been. they might not have worked for us for ten or 12 or 15 years. these are people who work from for us at some stage, not working for us right
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now. some of them stopped working for us 15 years ago. we have to see that they are right. we would not like to import people into the country, who have the wrong links. that means we are doing our very best to make sure we don't discriminate against those people who legitimately can come here. this is very much — who legitimately can come here. this is very much an _ who legitimately can come here. this is very much an unfolding situation, borisjohnson says he doesn't want to prematurely recognise the taliban. there could be an unfolding humanitarian crisis, do you need a dialogue with the taliban government and are you talking to them? yesterday i went to a middle eastern country to seek reassurances from the taliban leadership to make sure that they kept their word and allowed our people to leave from the airport, i was given an assurance that was the case. the prime minister is saying, their actions have to match the rhetoric. we have
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seen some significant statements from them about wanting the country to continue to function and be an international country, and i think that's really important that we judge them by those actions. 50 that's really important that we judge them by those actions. so no direct talks — judge them by those actions. so no direct talks at _ judge them by those actions. so no direct talks at this _ judge them by those actions. so no direct talks at this point? _ judge them by those actions. so no direct talks at this point? we i judge them by those actions. so no direct talks at this point? we have | direct talks at this point? we have our ambassador— direct talks at this point? we have our ambassador in _ direct talks at this point? we have our ambassador in the _ direct talks at this point? we have our ambassador in the country, i direct talks at this point? we have i our ambassador in the country, that is one of the jobs of our ambassador, to reach out to whatever the government is. we have an ambassador in north korea, we had an ambassador in north korea, we had an ambassador in north korea, we had an ambassador in many parts of the world where we find it difficult to accept the values or the regime. we need aid. what we know is that failed states lead to terrorism and poverty so we have to make sure we have pathways for aid and pathways to security. we will always invest in that, that's what we have to do. if that means, once the taliban prove that the words match the rhetoric, any responsible government would recognise that in confined,
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tightly defined engagement, that is something that could be necessary. i something that could be necessary. i know you served in the arm yourself, we have spoken to veterans here on the programme saying they are heartbroken and angry, they are worried, a huge amount of sacrifice was made. how much of this is a failure by the us and government? == failure by the us and government? -- uk government? if it is a failure, it is a failure of the international community to not realise that you don't fix things overnight. when you deal with a country like afghanistan which has 1000 years of history of civil war, you manage its problems and you might have to manage it for hundreds of years. you cannotjust rock in and rock out and expect something to be fixed. but also its a failure to recognise that military might on its own time and time again, we have seen this, it might do what it did, and half of the mission was entirely successful, the
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removal in 2001 of the taliban and al-qaeda, the dispersal of al-qaeda which ultimately ended in the tax ceasing on the streets of britain and the death of a summer bin laden. —— that ended the attacks on the streets and it was the death of a summer bin laden. we educated millions of women, and despite the taliban, you cannot un—educate someone, there are women in afghanistan with the better out luke who will be able to use that education, hopefully. —— with a better outlook. it wasn't for nothing, but i totally feel, every soldier has their own conflict. i was in northern ireland as a soldier, some of our soldiers were killed on those deals, that was my conflict. we all deeply care for
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those we go to protect, we deeply care about the outcomes of those countries, and ifully understand what i hear from veterans and serving personnel and none of us wanted to be in this position. and that's why i'm doing my very best in government as the secretary of state for defence to stand by as many people as we can. but all of us know that afghanistan is not finished, it's an unfinished problem for the world. and the world needs to help it. �* . ., .,. world. and the world needs to help it. �* . ., , . world. and the world needs to help it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank ou it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for— it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your _ it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your time _ it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your time here i it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your time here on - it. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your time here on the i thank you for your time here on the busy breakfast. —— bbc breakfast. let's get the sport now with sally. it looks like manchester city might need someone to score some goals for them with the giant squad. manchester city look like they need a striker after failing to score again. they lost 1—0 at tottenham. harry kane, who's linked with a move to pep guardiola's side, wasn't even on the bench for spurs. son heung min scored the only goal of the game to give new spurs boss,
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nuno esprito santo, a winning start. harry, like brian, kristian romero, theyjoin us later. so harry worked this morning, he is preparing himself, and when he's ready, he willjoin the group and help the team. west ham came from behind twice to beat newcastle li—2 at st james�* park. michail antonio scored the final goal. we gave newcastle a bit of a leg up with the goaljust before half—time. i don't think we really deserved to go 2—1 down. but we did, so we had to come out and find a way of doing it again and we did do it, we kept at it, didn't change too much. and the players who performed really well last season have started well this season. celtic will play raith rovers in the last eight of the scottish league cup after beating hearts 3—2. japanese forward kyugo furu—hashi scored the winner at parkhead. the full draw for the quarterfinals is on the bbc sport website.
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there could be an exciting final day for england against india. the tourists lead by 154 with four wickets left. they lost three wickets for just 20 runs late on at lord's. moeen ali got the last two to leave the second test finely poised. it's test cricket, and that's what it is. and the challenge is, i thought they played fantastically well. but i thought the way we hung in there was fantastic and that really puts us in a position where we can fight to win tomorrow. the score never really got away from us which was great. so it's going to be a great day tomorrow, hopefully. kevin kisner won the pga tour's first six—way play—off to claim the wyndham championship. all six parred the first play—off hole before kisner put himself closest on the next with his second shot into a long parfour. everyone else missed their birdie chance before he putted in to take his tenth pro title and put himself in contention for a ryder cup place.
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he might have noticed that tom daley has been speaking to us exclusively here on breakfast. and tom daley has been telling me why he's taking a break from diving. you can hear all about that in an hour's time, how he's yet to decide whether to go to another olympics and how this one was so special. in 2016 when it didn't go anywhere near the way that i wanted it to, actually lance said to me, maybe you weren't meant to win a gold medal this time, maybe your son needs to see you become an olympic champion. and although i always dreamed that it would happen, i was fully ready after these olympic games to try and begin to accept the fact that i may never, ever be olympic champion. and the fact that i can now say that i am an olympic champion is... it still doesn't feel real. it's, yeah, overwhelming.
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in around an hour's time, we will be revealing what tom's career ambition is. �* ., ., “ revealing what tom's career ambition is. ok, i'm looking forward to it. it's something _ is. ok, i'm looking forward to it. it's something very _ is. ok, i'm looking forward to it. it's something very big. - it's something very big. thank you very much. next month marks 20 years since september 11th, when nearly 3,000 people were killed in the deadliest terror attack in history on us soil. a new documentary tells the story of the young people whose fathers were killed in the attack, either before they were born or before they had a chance to meet them. let's hear from some of them. maile rachel hale. diane hale—mckinzy. richard b hall. stanley r hall. you have so many eyes on you being one of the youngest kids. and my father, sebastien gorki, who i never met because i was in my mum's belly. for a nine—year—old, _ you can't really comprehend it, but being able to be a part— of that was something extraordinary.
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we scribbled over his name. my mum wanted us to put this over our beds. these are his sunglasses, i know that. when we sent over the home videos, and i heard my dad speak, on one of the videos, that was the first time i ever heard his voice. it's an extraordinary documentary. we're joined by the two people featured there. nick gorki is in new york, and claudia szurkowski joins us from naples in florida. good morning to both of you. can i start with you, claudia, could you explain four people, the story? you never met your father, but clearly, you have an absolute association with him, and you had to learn who he was and learn about him? yes. he was and learn about him? yes, definitely- — he was and learn about him? yes, definitely. it's _ he was and learn about him? yes,
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definitely. it's very _ he was and learn about him? yes, definitely. it's very difficult - he was and learn about him? 1a: definitely. it's very difficult to understand and comprehend it for myself, even today, being 19 years old, i know that my mum and i have always had a very strong connection and she has always been so open to me to tell me anything and everything that i have wanted to know since i was little. i have always known about the separation that i will have for my whole life. so it's always been very difficult growing up in things like that, seeing other girls of their dads and staff. but my —— with their dads. but my mum has or has been very open with me, with any question i had or anything i wanted to know. it’s anything i wanted to know. it's robabl anything i wanted to know. it's probably worth explaining, if you wouldn't mind, how it was that your father was in the north tower when it happened? 50. father was in the north tower when it happened?—
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it happened? so, my father worked for a contracting _ it happened? so, my father worked for a contracting union _ it happened? so, my father worked for a contracting union where - it happened? so, my father worked for a contracting union where he . for a contracting union where he would paint and put up wallpaper and things like that. so each day he was given a different site to work at. and i know that monday the tenth, he was in jersey and and i know that monday the tenth, he was injersey and somebody else was in the towers doing a job. and ultimately some way along the line on that monday a mistake was made, so he was assigned to go in from 7am until 9am, just for two hours on the 11th, to fix a mistake and ultimately never came home. i’m 11th, to fix a mistake and ultimately never came home. i'm so sor . i ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry- i will — ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. i will come _ ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. iwill come back— ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. i will come back to _ ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. i will come back to you - ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. i will come back to you in - ultimately never came home. i'm so sorry. i will come back to you in a i sorry. i will come back to you in a minute, claudia. let's speak to you, nick, your dad was there as well, why was he there? he nick, your dad was there as well, why was he there?— nick, your dad was there as well, why was he there? he was there for a meetin: , why was he there? he was there for a meeting. he — why was he there? he was there for a meeting. he had _ why was he there? he was there for a meeting, he had volunteered - why was he there? he was there for a meeting, he had volunteered for- why was he there? he was there for a meeting, he had volunteered for the l meeting, he had volunteered for the meeting _ meeting, he had volunteered for the meeting in_ meeting, he had volunteered for the meeting in the morning. it typically worked _ meeting in the morning. it typically worked in _ meeting in the morning. it typically worked in midtown which is another part of— worked in midtown which is another part of new york city, but someone had not _ part of new york city, but someone had not been able to attend the meeting — had not been able to attend the meeting he was out and he had
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volunteered that morning. i think he was on _ volunteered that morning. i think he was on the _ volunteered that morning. i think he was on the 94th floor of the south tower— was on the 94th floor of the south tower at— was on the 94th floor of the south tower at the time and my mother was supposed _ tower at the time and my mother was sopposed to— tower at the time and my mother was supposed to be in the south tower as well. supposed to be in the south tower as welt but— supposed to be in the south tower as well. but luckily, she was morning six, well. but luckily, she was morning six. due _ well. but luckily, she was morning six. due to — well. but luckily, she was morning six, due to being pregnant with me. -- she _ six, due to being pregnant with me. -- she had — six, due to being pregnant with me. —— she had morning sickness. so that avoided _ —— she had morning sickness. so that avoided a _ —— she had morning sickness. so that avoided a disaster. | -- she had morning sickness. so that avoided a disaster.— avoided a disaster. i think we saw ou avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading _ avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading there. _ avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading there. this _ avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading there. this has - avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading there. this has had . avoided a disaster. i think we saw you reading there. this has had a| you reading there. this has had a huge impact on you and the rest of yourfamily, that goes huge impact on you and the rest of your family, that goes without saying. your family, that goes without sa inc. ~ , your family, that goes without saying. absolutely, especially my mother and _ saying. absolutely, especially my mother and my — saying. absolutely, especially my mother and my grandparents. - saying. absolutely, especially my mother and my grandparents. to | saying. absolutely, especially my - mother and my grandparents. to lose someone _ mother and my grandparents. to lose someone so _ mother and my grandparents. to lose someone so close to you, to lose the father— someone so close to you, to lose the father of— someone so close to you, to lose the father of your child, to lose your son. _ father of your child, to lose your son, i_ father of your child, to lose your son, i can — father of your child, to lose your son, i can never even fully imagine what _ son, i can never even fully imagine what that— son, i can never even fully imagine what that must be like for them. and also to— what that must be like for them. and also to he, _ what that must be like for them. and also to he, i— what that must be like for them. and also to be, i do have another sister, — also to be, i do have another sister, but _ also to be, i do have another sister, but she is not a descendant of my— sister, but she is not a descendant of my father. so it definitely creates _ of my father. so it definitely creates an interesting dynamic in the entire — creates an interesting dynamic in the entire family.— creates an interesting dynamic in the entire family. claudia, tell me a little bit about _
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the entire family. claudia, tell me a little bit about the _ the entire family. claudia, tell me a little bit about the grieving - a little bit about the grieving process for you. almost everyone goes through some kind of grieving process, but yours is so unusual. i just wonder how that works out in practice, what have been the moments in your life which have been may be the hardest, and how you overcome things? 50 the hardest, and how you overcome thins? ., ,, ., , things? so for me, i know my irievini things? so for me, i know my grieving process _ things? so for me, i know my grieving process is _ things? so for me, i know my grieving process is very - things? so for me, i know my - grieving process is very completed. i know at this point in time are more angry at the fact that he shouldn't have been there, if that makes sense. it's very difficult for me to understand why it makes me so upset, because i never met him and i never got the chance to tell people, i have a dad, i have a second parent. so it's very complicated and i'm very torn between being upset and being angry. but one thing that i would always do to try and ease myself is talk to my older sister
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who was thrown off when he passed, or talk to my mum, just to fill a void, i guess you can say, of happy memories and things they remember about him. or, i mean, i catch myself talking to him all the time as well, which comforts me in a way to maybe think that he is listening and watching me grow up. it’s to maybe think that he is listening and watching me grow up. it's very movini and watching me grow up. it's very moving hearing — and watching me grow up. it's very moving hearing you _ and watching me grow up. it's very moving hearing you talk— and watching me grow up. it's very moving hearing you talk like - and watching me grow up. it's very moving hearing you talk like that l moving hearing you talk like that and lots of people would completely understand those sentiments. you have video footage of him, obviously not with you, but does that give you comfort to see those images? it does now, but comfort to see those images? it does now. but the — comfort to see those images? it does now, but the first _ comfort to see those images? it does now, but the first time _ comfort to see those images? it does now, but the first time that _ comfort to see those images? it does now, but the first time that i - comfort to see those images? it does now, but the first time that i ever - now, but the first time that i ever saw the video footage of him, there was a point in time where he wasn't on the camera but he was speaking, and when i heard his voice, i didn't know it was him, which really upset me because i didn't know what he sounded like. he could have been walking down the street and spoken
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and i wouldn't have known. so that upset me. a lot. but watching it over, now i get to a point where if i hear his voice somewhere and don't see him i will know it's him so i feel now good that i know what he sounded like and i know how he talked. ., ., r' sounded like and i know how he talked. . ., i. sounded like and i know how he talked. ., . ,, x' sounded like and i know how he talked. ., ., �*, talked. can i ask you, nick, it's comini talked. can i ask you, nick, it's coming on _ talked. can i ask you, nick, it's coming on to — talked. can i ask you, nick, it's coming on to 20 _ talked. can i ask you, nick, it's coming up to 20 years - talked. can i ask you, nick, it's coming up to 20 years next - talked. can i ask you, nick, it's. coming up to 20 years next month since 9/11. here on the programme, and i'm sure you are of course aware of what is going on in afghanistan at the moment, how does that impact on you and your thoughts?— on you and your thoughts? honestly, because the — on you and your thoughts? honestly, because the war _ on you and your thoughts? honestly, because the war was _ on you and your thoughts? honestly, because the war was something - on you and your thoughts? honestly, | because the war was something which was something i had always grown up knowing _ was something i had always grown up knowing in _ was something i had always grown up knowing in the background, learning in history— knowing in the background, learning in history classes, i have never really— in history classes, i have never really been _ in history classes, i have never really been able to attribute the two of _ really been able to attribute the two of them. because 9/11 was something that happened, something something that happened, something so personal, i have had many stories from _ so personal, i have had many stories from my— so personal, i have had many stories from my mum and grandparents. but
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the war— from my mum and grandparents. but the war in— from my mum and grandparents. but the war in afghanistan, especially, it was— the war in afghanistan, especially, it was only— the war in afghanistan, especially, it was only ever something which i had occasionally when we watched the news which _ had occasionally when we watched the news which was very rare. we don't exactly— news which was very rare. we don't exactly watch the news every day at home _ exactly watch the news every day at home nor — exactly watch the news every day at home. nor did we talk much about it. so i don't _ home. nor did we talk much about it. so i don't think i was able to form many— so i don't think i was able to form many informed opinions about anything — many informed opinions about anything going on over there. ijust feel anything going on over there. ijust feet for— anything going on over there. ijust feel for everyone, anything going on over there. ijust feelfor everyone, my anything going on over there. ijust feel for everyone, my heart goes out to those _ feel for everyone, my heart goes out to those in— feel for everyone, my heart goes out to those in afghanistan who are going _ to those in afghanistan who are going through everything that's happening right now, i can barely imagine _ happening right now, i can barely imagine what it must be like. but having _ imagine what it must be like. but having this — imagine what it must be like. but having this personal connection, i still don't — having this personal connection, i still don't necessarily feel that i am informed enough to make a very strong _ am informed enough to make a very strong opinion over it. | am informed enough to make a very strong opinion over it.— strong opinion over it. i really appreciate — strong opinion over it. i really appreciate you _ strong opinion over it. i really appreciate you both _ strong opinion over it. i really appreciate you both talking i strong opinion over it. i really appreciate you both talking to strong opinion over it. i really - appreciate you both talking to us, you are both in the documentary. thank you so much, both of you, this coming to speak to us. —— for coming to speak to us. 'children of 9/11: our story�*, is on tonight at 9pm on channel 4. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. i think it is mixed, isn't it? yes, a iood i think it is mixed, isn't it? yes, a good description, _ i think it is mixed, isn't it? yes, a good description, good - i think it is mixed, isn't it? yes, a good description, good morning, everyone. we were telling you last week that we thought that temperatures would rise from the middle of this week but that is when we thought high pressure would build in and now it looks like it is not. so this week is going to be fairly cool so this week is going to be fairly cool, temperature is around orjust below average, cloudy at times, often try. i say that because there is also some drizzle and some patchy light rain in the forecast. we have that today. overnight the curl of cloud here is a weather front which has been producing some rain, it will sink southwards is a weak feature today but still some spots of rain on it. if you look at the direction of those isobars, they are coming in from the north—west, the atlantic, so they are dragging in all that the moisture in the form of cloud. that cloud is thick enough for the patchy light rain and drizzle. the brighter skies will be
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across central and eastern areas, we should see some sunshine. one thing you will notice is the breeze. it will not be particularly strong but compared to recent days, you will notice it. these are the wind speed that you can expect. temperatures today, below par, 14 to 20 when it should be 20 to 2a north to south. this evening we start off with clear skies but knew where the front introducing rain in scotland and northern ireland, getting into england and wales. the cloud building ahead of it. behind it, cloudy with patchy light rain edges. —— and drizzle. patchy fog around the hills and coasts. into tomorrow, the hills and coasts. into tomorrow, the weather front descends south and east, still some isobars but a bit looser so it will be a breezy day.
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the rain is pushing into the near continent leaving us with a lot of cloud. there will be coastal mist and murk with hill fog, and we will have some of the cloud thick enough for some patchy light rain or drizzle but there will be some brighter breaks in the shelter of the hills and mountains. 14 to 20 degrees. into wednesday, some of us will start on a bright note but it will start on a bright note but it will be essentially a fairly cloudy day once again. the best breaks to the east of the pennines, dorset and east devon, the breeze a bit lighter on wednesday. our temperature range, 14 in the north to 21 in london, 70 in fahrenheit. as we head on into thursday, we have a little front coming in across south—west england and south wales, that is going to scoot across southern areas, weakening all the time so by the time it gets into the south—east, there will not be much rain left on it. forthe there will not be much rain left on it. for the rest of us on thursday it. for the rest of us on thursday it will be cloudy, thick enough or
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patchy light rain and drizzle. into friday, a new weatherfront patchy light rain and drizzle. into friday, a new weather front coming in from the atlantic will introduce some rain. the headlines are coming up some rain. the headlines are coming up next. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today. the taliban take control of afghanistan — 20 years after they were forced from power, fighters enter the presidential palace in kabul. there were chaotic scenes at the airport, as thousands of people desperately tried to leave the country. british troops have arrived in afghanistan —
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the defence secretary ben wallace has told breakfast that they've already helped evacuate hundreds of people, but admitted they can't help everyone. and i'm confident but by the end of the month— and i'm confident but by the end of the month we could get everybody out and hopefully sooner. there will be some _ and hopefully sooner. there will be some people left behind. we made that clear — new guidelines on gun licences are to be introduced in the wake of the mass shooting in plymouth. good morning. changes to the rules if you are pinged by the nhs up. it could mean that you don't have to self—isolate and it could mean good news for hospitality businesses like this one. i love the details. —— i will have the details. and i've got an exclusive interview with olympic champion tom daley. he tells me why he's taking time out before deciding whether to continue diving — and i even got to try on that olympic cardigan.
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good morning. it's monday, 16th august. our top story. the taliban have seized control of afghanistan and declared that the war in the country is over, after their forces took the capital, kabul. defence secretary ben wallace told us british military operations have already evacuated 300 people, while1500 more are waiting to depart in the next few days. but he admitted they can't help everyone. there've been chaotic scenes at kabul airport, where hundreds of afghans have also been trying to leave. our correspondent graham satchel has the latest. on board a plane due to leave kabul overnight. but at the last minute they're told the flight won't be going. passengers are forced to rejoin the chaos outside. there is panic and fear everywhere. for 20 years, afghanistan has had stability, democracy and relative safety.
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it has all ended in a matter of days. a lucky few have made it out. this is delhi airport and a mix of relief, anger and despair. i can't believe the world abandoned afghanistan. our friends are going to get killed. they're going to kill us. our women are not going to have any more rights. the taliban, forced from power by western troops two decades ago, are back. they claim to have taken over every government department, including this, the presidential palace in kabul. just hours earlier the former president, ashraf ghani, at the same desk. he's now fled to uzbekistan. in a statement, he said he has left to avoid bloodshed. kabul is a city on the move, residents desperate to escape. fear of what is to come has gripped every level of society, including former government ministers. deep down in my heart i keep telling myself i won't have to pay the price
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forjoining a government position. but now i might, i might face consequences that i never even dreamed of, and i guess that the price that we pay for trying to make this world a little better than when we came to it, particularly afghanistan. british troops have now arrived in kabul to evacuate uk nationals and afghans who worked with them. it's thought around 4000 in total are eligible to be airlifted out. criticism of the chaos now engulfing afghanistan is widespread. parliament will be recalled on wednesday to debate the crisis. a protest outside the white house in washington. america has long argued its troops couldn't stay in afghanistan forever, and public opinion supports troop withdrawal. but serious questions are now being asked. why was so much money spent, so many military lives lost,
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to simply allow the taliban to walk back into power? the air over kabul is full of helicopters as diplomats and embassy staff make their escape. on the ground the people wait with growing fear. it was not meant to end like this. graham satchell, bbc news. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. we have been speaking to ben wallace on the programme and you get a sense of the urgency behind trying to get people out of kabul particularly? yes, that is the main priority of the government, getting out british nationals— the government, getting out british nationals and eligible afghans, and those _ nationals and eligible afghans, and those are _ nationals and eligible afghans, and those are people who have worked with british forces in the past. that— with british forces in the past. that could be as much as ten to 15 years— that could be as much as ten to 15 years ago— that could be as much as ten to 15 years ago in— that could be as much as ten to 15 years ago in public facing roles. the taliban would know they had worked _ the taliban would know they had worked with british forces in the past _ worked with british forces in the past. those are the people they are
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trying _ past. those are the people they are trying to— past. those are the people they are trying to get out very, very quickly. — trying to get out very, very quickly. ben wallace did say the military— quickly. ben wallace did say the military part of kabul airport is still functioning. that is why they have _ still functioning. that is why they have sent — still functioning. that is why they have sent 602%, to make sure that those _ have sent 602%, to make sure that those applications can be processed. he said _ those applications can be processed. he said he _ those applications can be processed. he said he is going to be working with the — he said he is going to be working with the home office and the home secretary— with the home office and the home secretary to review some of the rules _ secretary to review some of the rules around bureaucracy. ben wallace — rules around bureaucracy. ben wallace said they took 300 people out yesterday. they are hoping to -et out yesterday. they are hoping to get another 700 out in the next 24 to 36— get another 700 out in the next 24 to 36 hours — to 36 hours. here is what he had to say. to 36 hours. here is what he had to sa . ~ to 36 hours. here is what he had to sa . . ., here is what he had to say. we all recognise. — here is what he had to say. we all recognise. we _ here is what he had to say. we all recognise, we all— here is what he had to say. we all recognise, we all see _ here is what he had to say. we all recognise, we all see what - here is what he had to say. we all recognise, we all see what we - here is what he had to say. we all recognise, we all see what we are| recognise, we all see what we are seeing _ recognise, we all see what we are seeing on — recognise, we all see what we are seeing on telly, _ recognise, we all see what we are seeing on telly, time _ recognise, we all see what we are seeing on telly, time is _ recognise, we all see what we are seeing on telly, time is of- recognise, we all see what we are seeing on telly, time is of the - seeing on telly, time is of the essence _ seeing on telly, time is of the essence we _ seeing on telly, time is of the essence. we have _ seeing on telly, time is of the essence. we have —— - seeing on telly, time is of the essence. we have —— every. seeing on telly, time is of the . essence. we have —— every hour counts — essence. we have —— every hour counts 0ur— essence. we have —— every hour counts. our flights _ essence. we have —— every hour counts. our flights are - essence. we have —— every hour counts. our flights are coming l essence. we have —— every hour| counts. our flights are coming in and out — counts. our flights are coming in and out soon, _ counts. our flights are coming in and out. soon, if— counts. our flights are coming in and out. soon, if we _ counts. our flights are coming in and out. soon, if we managed i counts. our flights are coming inj and out. soon, if we managed to counts. our flights are coming in- and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the _ and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way— and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way we — and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way we are _ and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way we are planning - and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way we are planning to, - and out. soon, if we managed to keep it in the way we are planning to, we i it in the way we are planning to, we should _ it in the way we are planning to, we should have — it in the way we are planning to, we should have capacity— it in the way we are planning to, we should have capacity for— it in the way we are planning to, we should have capacity for over- it in the way we are planning to, we should have capacity for over a i should have capacity for over a thousand — should have capacity for over a thousand people _ should have capacity for over a thousand people a _ should have capacity for over a thousand people a day- should have capacity for over a thousand people a day to i should have capacity for over a thousand people a day to exitl should have capacity for over a i thousand people a day to exit to the united _ thousand people a day to exit to the united kingdom _ thousand people a day to exit to the united kingdom. currently, - thousand people a day to exit to the united kingdom. currently, this- thousand people a day to exit to the united kingdom. currently, this is. united kingdom. currently, this is not a _ united kingdom. currently, this is not a had — united kingdom. currently, this is not a bad capacity— united kingdom. currently, this is not a bad capacity on _ united kingdom. currently, this is not a bad capacity on planes, i united kingdom. currently, this is not a bad capacity on planes, it i united kingdom. currently, this is not a bad capacity on planes, it is| not a bad capacity on planes, it is about— not a bad capacity on planes, it is about processing _ not a bad capacity on planes, it is about processing —— _ not a bad capacity on planes, it is about processing —— processing i about processing —— processing speed — about processing —— processing speed he— about processing -- processing seed. , about processing -- processing sieed. ., �* , speed. he did say it wouldn't be iossible speed. he did say it wouldn't be possible to _ speed. he did say it wouldn't be possible to get _
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speed. he did say it wouldn't be possible to get everything i speed. he did say it wouldn't be possible to get everything a i speed. he did say it wouldn't be i possible to get everything a person out. possible to get everything a person out for— possible to get everything a person out. for example, people who are unable _ out. for example, people who are unable to— out. for example, people who are unable to get to kabul. he said it would _ unable to get to kabul. he said it would be — unable to get to kabul. he said it would be the case they would be sending — would be the case they would be sending soldiers into the country, further— sending soldiers into the country, further into the country, to try to find people. he has acknowledged while _ find people. he has acknowledged while they will try their hardest, it is likety— while they will try their hardest, it is likely that not everybody will be got _ it is likely that not everybody will be got out. that does remain the immediate — be got out. that does remain the immediate priority for the government. behind the scene is there _ government. behind the scene is there are — government. behind the scene is there are diplomatic efforts going on, talking to other countries about how to _ on, talking to other countries about how to deal— on, talking to other countries about how to deal with this. so yesterday, boris _ how to deal with this. so yesterday, borisjohnson said he didn't want like—minded countries to prematurely recognise _ like—minded countries to prematurely recognise the taliban. i think there is a sense — recognise the taliban. i think there is a sense, we heard from ben wallace — is a sense, we heard from ben wallace, that ministers want to see what the _ wallace, that ministers want to see what the taliban are going to do. there _ what the taliban are going to do. there is— what the taliban are going to do. there is certainly a sense i don't want _ there is certainly a sense i don't want them — there is certainly a sense i don't want them to be prematurely recognised by other countries. a statement has been put out by more than 60 _ statement has been put out by more than 60 countries saying that afghan citizens _ than 60 countries saying that afghan citizens who want to leave the country — citizens who want to leave the country should be allowed to do so. country should be allowed to do 50. that roads — country should be allowed to do 50. that roads need to be kept open, the airport— that roads need to be kept open, the airport needs to be kept open and they should be allowed to leave if they should be allowed to leave if they wish — they should be allowed to leave if they wish. there is certainly a lot of international pressure, a lot of
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international focus on this. they will be _ international focus on this. they will be questions asked in the coming — will be questions asked in the coming days about what the uk does about— coming days about what the uk does about taking refugees from afghanistan. they're supposed to be a very— afghanistan. they're supposed to be a very large number of refugees. where _ a very large number of refugees. where do — a very large number of refugees. where do they go? how does the international community respond? a hu-e international community respond? a huge amount of questions. we will hear more — huge amount of questions. we will hear more in the coming days. parliament is being recalled for a day from — parliament is being recalled for a day from its summer break on wednesday, to debate all of these issues _ wednesday, to debate all of these issues. ., ~' , ., , much for that. nine minutes past eight. police forces in england and wales are being asked by the home office to review the way they deal with firearms applications, following the mass shooting in plymouth. a minute's silence will also be observed today, to remember the five victims. our reporter sarah ransome is in keyham for us this morning. morning to you. we can see the sign just in front of you. today will be a moment to reflect on those who have been affected have those who have been affected have those who have lost their lives, but also wider questions about who is allowed
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to own a firearm?— to own a firearm? yes, that's right. that is a question _ to own a firearm? yes, that's right. that is a question that _ to own a firearm? yes, that's right. that is a question that has - to own a firearm? yes, that's right. that is a question that has troubled j that is a question that has troubled many— that is a question that has troubled many people who have come here to lay toys _ many people who have come here to lay toys and — many people who have come here to lay toys and tributes to those who lost their — lay toys and tributes to those who lost their lives last week. to maxine _ lost their lives last week. to maxine davison, the mother ofjake davison, _ maxine davison, the mother ofjake davison, the gunman, who also shot himself _ davison, the gunman, who also shot himself the — davison, the gunman, who also shot himself. the three—year—old sophie martyn— himself. the three—year—old sophie martyn and — himself. the three—year—old sophie martyn and her dad lee come out for a walk _ martyn and her dad lee come out for a walk to— martyn and her dad lee come out for a walk. to kate sheppard and steven washington. in that central question about— washington. in that central question about why— washington. in that central question about whyjake davison had a gun licence _ about whyjake davison had a gun licence at — about whyjake davison had a gun licence at all is key to their thought _ licence at all is key to their thought. they want to know why he had that _ thought. they want to know why he had that. why, when he had that licence _ had that. why, when he had that licence revoked because of an allegation of serious assault was made. _ allegation of serious assault was made. it— allegation of serious assault was made, it was then later returned to him _ made, it was then later returned to him why— made, it was then later returned to him. why did that happen? that decision— him. why did that happen? that decision is— him. why did that happen? that decision is being investigated by the police watchdog. the home office has asked _ the police watchdog. the home office has asked police forces throughout england _ has asked police forces throughout england and wales to take another look at _
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england and wales to take another look at why, or how, they process those _ look at why, or how, they process those firearms licence applications. and they— those firearms licence applications. and they also say, the home office, that they— and they also say, the home office, that they are going to issue guidance on the need for social media — guidance on the need for social media checks on those people who apply— media checks on those people who apply for— media checks on those people who apply for the licences. for people like that— apply for the licences. for people like that that come here though, that is— like that that come here though, that is little comfort. they will have _ that is little comfort. they will have a — that is little comfort. they will have a chance today to pose again and reflect — have a chance today to pose again and reflect on what happened last week _ and reflect on what happened last week. there is a 's silence in plymouth _ week. there is a 's silence in plymouth later today for people to remember and commemorate those who lost their— remember and commemorate those who lost their lives. —— a minute's silence — lost their lives. -- a minute's silence. ., ., lost their lives. -- a minute's silence-— lost their lives. -- a minute's silence. ., ., �*, , . silence. that one minute's silence takini silence. that one minute's silence taking place _ silence. that one minute's silence taking place at — silence. that one minute's silence taking place at 11am. _ the death toll from the earthquake that struck haiti on saturday, has risen to at least 1,300 people. hospitals are inundated and struggling to cope with the number of injured, which has almost doubled to around 6,000 people. rescuers are trying to locate those still trapped under the rubble. james clayton reports from haiti. it's been a devastating 48 hours for this already impoverished region
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in the south—west of the country. the earthquake hit in the morning, when many werejust waking up, and it hit hard. it rocked churches, hotels and homes. the shaking earth too much for structures that collapsed in on themselves, sometimes on top of people. houses that were supposed to be places of safety, transformed into death traps. we have seen many patients that were trauma patients. orthopaedic patients and surgical trauma patients. they had to be addressed urgently. some of them had to be transferred and moved from their locality to more specialised facilities in port—au—prince or elsewhere. the earthquake was bigger than the one that hit 11 years ago, which killed up to 300,000 people. this earthquake won't compete with this death toll, but there are fears of thousands of deaths. there are several factors that make
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the aid mission here difficult. for one, there is a tropical storm just blowing in now. you might be able to see from the clouds behind me. but there is also political turmoil. the president was assassinated only last month, and many people here believe that the haitian government does not have the capacity to deal with a disaster like this. the route to the affected areas from the capital is a dangerous road controlled by gangs. many haitians are sceptical of international help after much of the money promised to rebuild the country after 2010 was squandered. with a state of emergency called, the people of haiti are now waiting and watching to see what their government and the international community can do to help. james clayton, bbc news, port—au—prince. let's go back to our main story. as we've been hearing this morning, the taliban has taken control of the afghan capital kabul, claiming the war is now over. it follows more than 20 years of conflict. let's take a look at how quickly
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the situation escalated. on the 2nd ofjuly, the us military left bagram airfield — its key base — effectively ending its military campaign there. five days later, president biden gave a press conference, where he reassured people that the taliban would not take over afghanistan. if the taliban takeover of afghanistan now inevitable? no, it is not. because _ afghanistan now inevitable? no, it is not. because you _ afghanistan now inevitable? no, it is not. because you have - afghanistan now inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the i afghanistan now inevitable? no, it is not. because you have the afghan troops, _ is not. because you have the afghan troops, you — is not. because you have the afghan troops. you have _ is not. because you have the afghan troops, you have 300,000 - is not. because you have the afghan troops, you have 300,000 well- troops, you have 300,000 well eguippedi — troops, you have 300,000 well eguipped. as— troops, you have 300,000 well equipped, as well—equipped i troops, you have 300,000 well equipped, as well—equipped asl troops, you have 300,000 well. equipped, as well—equipped as any army— equipped, as well—equipped as any army in— equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the — equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the world, _ equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the world, and _ equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the world, and an- equipped, as well—equipped as any army in the world, and an air- equipped, as well—equipped as any| army in the world, and an air force, against— army in the world, and an air force, against something _ army in the world, and an air force, against something like _ army in the world, and an air force, against something like 75,000 i against something like 75,000 taliban — against something like 75,000 taliban it _ against something like 75,000 taliban it is— against something like 75,000 taliban. it is not _ against something like 75,000 taliban. it is not inevitable. i over the next month, taliban insurgents gained more and more ground. on 6th august, the city of zaranj became the first provincial capital to be captured by militants in more than 20 years. last week, things started to escalate. on friday, four provincial capitals
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fell — including kandahar, the country's second city. on saturday, the taliban took the major northern city of mazar—i—sharif with little resistance. hours later, the key eastern city jalalabad also fell. it meant the taliban was effectively surrounding kabul. and yesterday, insurgents entered the capital, claiming victory. let's speak now to sir nicholas kay, the former british ambassador to afghanistan. and you were the ambassador there between 2017 and 2018. so this is relatively recently. can ijust ask first of all your reflections on some of the images you have seen and what is happening right now? yeah. what is happening right now? yeah, thank ou what is happening right now? yeah, thank you very _ what is happening right now? yeah, thank you very much. _ what is happening right now? yeah, thank you very much. and _ what is happening right now? yeah, thank you very much. and after i what is happening right now? yeah, thank you very much. and after being uk ambassador i was the nato senior civilian— uk ambassador i was the nato senior civilian representative there until more _ civilian representative there until more or— civilian representative there until more or less this time last year. so my relatively recent. but it
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predates the president biden decision to commit himself to this percipient— decision to commit himself to this percipient and premature withdrawal. well, what _ percipient and premature withdrawal. well, what has happened has taken a lot of people by surprise and needs to be _ lot of people by surprise and needs to be studied and looked at and understood. but for now, the priority— understood. but for now, the priority really is this new reality, this new— priority really is this new reality, this new day that has broken in kabul. — this new day that has broken in kabul, and dealing with the immediate issues there. and the immediate issues there. and the immediate issues there. and the immediate issue is, certainly from the uk _ immediate issue is, certainly from the uk point of view, helping afghan who work— the uk point of view, helping afghan who work for us and afghans associated with us, to have safe passage — associated with us, to have safe passage out of the country. that is a great _ passage out of the country. that is a great effort of the team out there is doing _ a great effort of the team out there is doing. the ambassador is their stamping — is doing. the ambassador is their stamping passports himself at the airport _ stamping passports himself at the airport. and i do urge them to keep that up— airport. and i do urge them to keep that up and — airport. and i do urge them to keep that up and extended and be as flexible — that up and extended and be as flexible as possible. there are so many _ flexible as possible. there are so many afghans who are feeling in danger—
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many afghans who are feeling in danger and who have had close association with those over the years — association with those over the years. they have been close friends, close _ years. they have been close friends, close partners, and they deserve to have a _ close partners, and they deserve to have a safe — close partners, and they deserve to have a safe passage out of the country — have a safe passage out of the count . ~ , , ., ,, have a safe passage out of the count . . , , ., ,, ., have a safe passage out of the count . . , , ., «i ., �* country. we were speaking to ben wallace, the _ country. we were speaking to ben wallace, the defence _ country. we were speaking to ben wallace, the defence secretary, l country. we were speaking to ben wallace, the defence secretary, aj wallace, the defence secretary, a short time ago and he was talking about the sheer numbers. they have taken out 300 people already. they are expecting some 1500 more in the next 24 to 36 hours. but then hoping to get 1000 people a day leaving until the 31st of august. you talked about the ambassador stamping passports. there will be a lot of people who will be hoping it is the british who will help them leave. how will they determine who are the right people to be offered that help? right people to be offered that heli ? ., �* right people to be offered that heli ? . �* ., right people to be offered that heli? . �* ., ., , help? yeah, i'm not a serving british diplomat _ help? yeah, i'm not a serving british diplomat now. - help? yeah, i'm not a serving british diplomat now. i'm i help? yeah, i'm not a serving british diplomat now. i'm not| help? yeah, i'm not a serving i british diplomat now. i'm not close to the _ british diplomat now. i'm not close to the detail of this. but i hope that the — to the detail of this. but i hope that the spirit of this will be as flexible — that the spirit of this will be as flexible and as generous as possible. we need to be remembered now for— possible. we need to be remembered now for the _ possible. we need to be remembered now for the manner in which we stood
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firm and _ now for the manner in which we stood firm and repaid a debt of honour to those _ firm and repaid a debt of honour to those who— firm and repaid a debt of honour to those who have helped and worked with us, _ those who have helped and worked with us, and those whose lives are now at _ with us, and those whose lives are now at risk — with us, and those whose lives are now at risk. there are judges. for example. — now at risk. there are judges. for example. a — now at risk. there are judges. for example, a womanjudge is in contact with me _ example, a womanjudge is in contact with me almost hourly, desperate, desperate — with me almost hourly, desperate, desperate to get out of the country. she is— desperate to get out of the country. she is a _ desperate to get out of the country. she is a very— desperate to get out of the country. she is a very young and very successfuljudge and she fears for her life _ successfuljudge and she fears for her life. she never was employed by the uk _ her life. she never was employed by the uk but _ her life. she never was employed by the uk but she was working on uk funded _ the uk but she was working on uk funded projects. so anyway, let's be generous _ funded projects. so anyway, let's be generous. let's be remembered for that spirit— generous. let's be remembered for that spirit of generosity and our ability— that spirit of generosity and our ability to— that spirit of generosity and our ability to be adept at dealing with this. ability to be adept at dealing with this but — ability to be adept at dealing with this. but beyond getting our own people _ this. but beyond getting our own people out, there is a real need now for a concerted international effort on the _ for a concerted international effort on the humanitarian side. afghanistan is a mountainous country. _ afghanistan is a mountainous country, as you know. winter comes early _ country, as you know. winter comes early the _ country, as you know. winter comes early. the internally displaced people — early. the internally displaced people there are very vulnerable, even _ people there are very vulnerable, even before the taliban offensive started _ even before the taliban offensive started the one reported that 5000
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-- 55— started the one reported that 5000 —— 5.5 million afghans were food insecure — —— 5.5 million afghans were food insecure. that is somewhat short of famine _ insecure. that is somewhat short of famine but — insecure. that is somewhat short of famine but very severe. it's the population— famine but very severe. it's the population of scotland. that was before _ population of scotland. that was before this. so there is a massive humanitarian need. and agencies, the un included, but governments as welli _ un included, but governments as well, will— un included, but governments as well, will have to get together and put in _ well, will have to get together and put in a _ well, will have to get together and put in a really big plan to help that — put in a really big plan to help that. ., ., put in a really big plan to help that. . ., i. ., put in a really big plan to help that. . ., ., ., that. can i ask you about some of the diplomacy _ that. can i ask you about some of the diplomacy from _ that. can i ask you about some of the diplomacy from now - that. can i ask you about some of the diplomacy from now on? i that. can i ask you about some of the diplomacy from now on? so l that. can i ask you about some of- the diplomacy from now on? so many things are different about this. the speed of the fall of afghanistan has clearly ta ken speed of the fall of afghanistan has clearly taken everybody by surprise. so does that mean that you rip up the normal diplomacy rule book and straightaway borisjohnson has asked for a pause before governments officially recognise the taliban government... is there a necessity to start dealing with these people, regardless of what you might think, more quickly than you might in other circumstances?— circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal— circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal with _ circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal with them _ circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal with them in _ circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal with them in terms i circumstances? there is an absolute need to deal with them in terms of i circumstances? there is an absolute| need to deal with them in terms of a humanitarian response. that is to
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help people of afghanistan. but i think— help people of afghanistan. but i think it _ help people of afghanistan. but i think it is — help people of afghanistan. but i think it is quite right that we should — think it is quite right that we should collectively, as an international community, and a huge numbers— international community, and a huge numbers of— international community, and a huge numbers of countries have signed up, proceed _ numbers of countries have signed up, proceed carefully. the taliban, you know _ proceed carefully. the taliban, you know, haven't got the benefit of the dead _ know, haven't got the benefit of the dead we _ know, haven't got the benefit of the dead. we have seen them before. they now need _ dead. we have seen them before. they now need to _ dead. we have seen them before. they now need to demonstrate, if they say they have _ now need to demonstrate, if they say they have changed, they need to demonstrate it and they need to be iudged _ demonstrate it and they need to be iudged by— demonstrate it and they need to be judged by their actions and not their— judged by their actions and not their words. judged by their actions and not theirwords. it is judged by their actions and not their words. it is going to take some — their words. it is going to take some time to see those actions we need _ some time to see those actions we need to— some time to see those actions we need to see. will they respect human rights? _ need to see. will they respect human rights? will— need to see. will they respect human rights? will they respect freedoms? will they— rights? will they respect freedoms? will they respect an inclusive government that all afghans feel represented in due and crucially, they really— represented in due and crucially, they really cut their ties to international terrorism, to al-qaeda? so there is an awful lot of actions — al-qaeda? so there is an awful lot of actions i — al-qaeda? so there is an awful lot of actions i think we really do need to see _ of actions i think we really do need to see the — of actions i think we really do need to see the taliban taking. but deal
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with them — to see the taliban taking. but deal with them to have the people of afghanistan?— with them to have the people of afihanistan? ~ , , ., «i i. afghanistan? absolutely. thank you ve much afghanistan? absolutely. thank you very much for— afghanistan? absolutely. thank you very much for your _ afghanistan? absolutely. thank you very much for your time. _ afghanistan? absolutely. thank you very much for your time. let's i very much for your time. let's continue _ very much for your time. let's continue talking _ very much for your time. let's continue talking about - very much for your time. let's continue talking about that i very much for your time. let's continue talking about that right now. the crisis has led to questions over the safety of people in afghanistan, and the effectiveness of 20 years of military involvement from countries, including the us and the uk. i'm joined now by gulwali passarla, who fled afghanistan when he was a child, as well as veteran andrew fox. thank you. i can see you both listening in a very intense way to all of that. gulwali, you were 13 when you left afghanistan. presumably you still have friends and family. what are they telling you about the situation?- you about the situation? yeah, i left when i _ you about the situation? yeah, i left when i was _ you about the situation? yeah, i left when i was 12 _ you about the situation? yeah, i left when i was 12 and _ you about the situation? yeah, i left when i was 12 and arrived i you about the situation? yeah, i l left when i was 12 and arrived here when _ left when i was 12 and arrived here when t _ left when i was 12 and arrived here when t was — left when i was 12 and arrived here when i was 13. i had hoped to return one day _ when i was 13. i had hoped to return one day. recently i became a british citizen _ one day. recently i became a british citizen and _ one day. recently i became a british citizen and i— one day. recently i became a british citizen and i was looking forward to going _ citizen and i was looking forward to going to _ citizen and i was looking forward to going to see my family. my mother is there _ going to see my family. my mother is there they— going to see my family. my mother is there. they are physically somewhat safe but— there. they are physically somewhat safe but mentally they are distorted and people are traumatised. you can living _ and people are traumatised. you can living in—
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and people are traumatised. you can living in fear— and people are traumatised. you can living in fear as to what is going to happen _ living in fear as to what is going to happen. there's much uncertainty. and it's _ to happen. there's much uncertainty. and it's absolutely heartbreaking this has— and it's absolutely heartbreaking this has happened.— and it's absolutely heartbreaking this has happened. yeah. and from our ioint this has happened. yeah. and from your point of— this has happened. yeah. and from your point of view _ this has happened. yeah. and from your point of view there _ this has happened. yeah. and from your point of view there will - this has happened. yeah. and from your point of view there will be i this has happened. yeah. and from your point of view there will be so i your point of view there will be so many veterans, i think you did three tours, when you see this happening and the speed at which it has happened, what do you think? it is the sieed happened, what do you think? it is the speed that is so heartbreaking. by the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making — the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making a — the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making a deal— the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making a deal with _ the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making a deal with the - the speed that is so heartbreaking. by making a deal with the taliban i by making a deal with the taliban last year. — by making a deal with the taliban last year. and _ by making a deal with the taliban last year, and saying _ by making a deal with the taliban last year, and saying we - by making a deal with the taliban last year, and saying we are i by making a deal with the talibanl last year, and saying we are going to withdraw— last year, and saying we are going to withdraw so _ last year, and saying we are going to withdraw so fast, _ last year, and saying we are going to withdraw so fast, we _ last year, and saying we are going to withdraw so fast, we have i to withdraw so fast, we have effectively _ to withdraw so fast, we have effectively pulled _ to withdraw so fast, we have effectively pulled the - to withdraw so fast, we have effectively pulled the rug i to withdraw so fast, we have| effectively pulled the rug out to withdraw so fast, we have - effectively pulled the rug out from underneath — effectively pulled the rug out from underneath our— effectively pulled the rug out from underneath our afghan _ effectively pulled the rug out from underneath our afghan allies, i effectively pulled the rug out from | underneath our afghan allies, open the door— underneath our afghan allies, open the door to — underneath our afghan allies, open the door to the _ underneath our afghan allies, open the door to the taliban _ underneath our afghan allies, open the door to the taliban and - underneath our afghan allies, open the door to the taliban and said, i the door to the taliban and said, there _ the door to the taliban and said, there you — the door to the taliban and said, there you go. _ the door to the taliban and said, there you go, the _ the door to the taliban and said, there you go, the country- the door to the taliban and said, there you go, the country is i the door to the taliban and said, . there you go, the country is yours, fill your— there you go, the country is yours, fill your boots _ there you go, the country is yours, fill your boots. it _ there you go, the country is yours, fill your boots. it is _ there you go, the country is yours, fill your boots. it is the _ there you go, the country is yours, fill your boots. it is the moral- fill your boots. it is the moral injustice _ fill your boots. it is the moral injustice of— fill your boots. it is the moral injustice of doing _ fill your boots. it is the moral injustice of doing it _ fill your boots. it is the moral injustice of doing it so- fill your boots. it is the moral injustice of doing it so fast, . fill your boots. it is the morall injustice of doing it so fast, so didn't— injustice of doing it so fast, so didn't have _ injustice of doing it so fast, so didn't have a _ injustice of doing it so fast, so didn't have a chance _ injustice of doing it so fast, so didn't have a chance to - injustice of doing it so fast, so. didn't have a chance to succeed, that is— didn't have a chance to succeed, that is what— didn't have a chance to succeed, that is what causes _ didn't have a chance to succeed, that is what causes so _ didn't have a chance to succeed, that is what causes so much i didn't have a chance to succeed, i that is what causes so much anguish within_ that is what causes so much anguish within the _ that is what causes so much anguish within the military _ that is what causes so much anguish within the military community. - that is what causes so much anguish within the military community. youl within the military community. you will have within the military community. will have worked with people from the afghan army. so what happened with them? figs the afghan army. so what happened with them? �* . . the afghan army. so what happened with them? �* , . . , the afghan army. so what happened with them? �* , . ~ ., . with them? as far as i know. i have seen whatsapp _ with them? as far as i know. i have seen whatsapp clips _ with them? as far as i know. i have seen whatsapp clips that _ with them? as far as i know. i have seen whatsapp clips that have - with them? as far as i know. i have | seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to _ seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be — seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be it— seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be it is_ seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be. it is not— seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be. it is not a _ seen whatsapp clips that have been sent to be. it is not a particularly. sent to be. it is not a particularly happy— sent to be. it is not a particularly happy ending _ sent to be. it is not a particularly happyendinq i_ sent to be. it is not a particularly happy ending. i have _ sent to be. it is not a particularly happy ending. i have seen - sent to be. it is not a particularly- happy ending. i have seen companies of people _ happy ending. i have seen companies of people i_ happy ending. i have seen companies of people i have — happy ending. i have seen companies of people i have worked _ happy ending. i have seen companies of people i have worked with - happy ending. i have seen companies of people i have worked with stoch i of people i have worked with stoch in kandahar— of people i have worked with stoch in kandaharairfield. _
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of people i have worked with stoch in kandahar airfield. they- of people i have worked with stoch in kandahar airfield. they were - in kandahar airfield. they were waiting — in kandahar airfield. they were waiting for— in kandahar airfield. they were waiting for a _ in kandahar airfield. they were waiting for a helicopter- in kandahar airfield. they were - waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is— waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the — waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the last _ waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the last i _ waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the last i have _ waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the last i have heard. - waiting for a helicopter extraction. that is the last i have heard. those same -- so — that is the last i have heard. those same -- so they — that is the last i have heard. those same -- so they were _ that is the last i have heard. those same -- so they were standing - that is the last i have heard. those same -- so they were standing up| same —— so they were standing up against them in some instances? yes. against them in some instances? yes, this was the — against them in some instances? yes, this was the cream _ against them in some instances? yes, this was the cream of _ against them in some instances? yes, this was the cream of the _ against them in some instances? yes, this was the cream of the crop the afghan— this was the cream of the crop the afghan army— this was the cream of the crop the afghan army and _ this was the cream of the crop the afghan army and they— this was the cream of the crop the afghan army and they would - this was the cream of the crop the afghan army and they would fight| this was the cream of the crop the . afghan army and they would fight to the tast— afghan army and they would fight to the last because _ afghan army and they would fight to the last because surrender- afghan army and they would fight to the last because surrender is - afghan army and they would fight to the last because surrender is not - afghan army and they would fight to the last because surrender is not an| the last because surrender is not an option _ the last because surrender is not an option. they— the last because surrender is not an option. they knew— the last because surrender is not an option. they knew part _ the last because surrender is not an option. they knew part of— the last because surrender is not an option. they knew part of the - the last because surrender is not an option. they knew part of the army| option. they knew part of the army would _ option. they knew part of the army would face — option. they knew part of the army would face execution _ option. they knew part of the army would face execution if— option. they knew part of the army would face execution if captured. . option. they knew part of the armyl would face execution if captured. so to see _ would face execution if captured. so to see those — would face execution if captured. so to see those videos _ would face execution if captured. so to see those videos from _ would face execution if captured. so to see those videos from kandahar. would face execution if captured. sol to see those videos from kandahar is 'ust, to see those videos from kandahar is just. i_ to see those videos from kandahar is just. itook— to see those videos from kandahar is just. i took my— to see those videos from kandahar is just, i took my breath _ to see those videos from kandahar is just, i took my breath away, - to see those videos from kandahar is just, i took my breath away, quite i just, i took my breath away, quite honestly — just, i took my breath away, quite honestl . . . just, i took my breath away, quite honestl . . , ., honestly. that is the whole thing. you made the _ honestly. that is the whole thing. you made the point _ honestly. that is the whole thing. you made the point you _ honestly. that is the whole thing. you made the point you said - honestly. that is the whole thing. you made the point you said herej honestly. that is the whole thing. i you made the point you said here on what is the speed at which this has happened and the impact it will have. how fearful are you for your family? i have. how fearful are you for your famil ? . �* ., have. how fearful are you for your famil ? . �* . ., ,., family? i haven't had a sleep for the whole _ family? i haven't had a sleep for the whole week. _ family? i haven't had a sleep for the whole week. it _ family? i haven't had a sleep for the whole week. it has - family? i haven't had a sleep for the whole week. it has been - family? i haven't had a sleep forj the whole week. it has been one family? i haven't had a sleep for i the whole week. it has been one of the whole week. it has been one of the longest weeks of my life. everybody is sad about what has happened. it is notjust about my family _ happened. it is notjust about my family the — happened. it is notjust about my family. the safety of afghans. there are more _ family. the safety of afghans. there are more than 5 million displaced. people _ are more than 5 million displaced. people need help. people who are already— people need help. people who are already struggling before and with the basic— already struggling before and with the basic necessities. this was avoidable, _ the basic necessities. this was avoidable, this was preventable. because — avoidable, this was preventable. because of the us and the
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international community, they have let afghanistan. our four —— forces for let afghanistan. 0ur four —— forces for bravery— let afghanistan. our four —— forces for bravery in — let afghanistan. our four —— forces for bravery in some cases and in other— for bravery in some cases and in other cases _ for bravery in some cases and in other cases had to tactically restrict— other cases had to tactically restrict so as not to cause death. the afghans have tasted freedom. then 20 _ the afghans have tasted freedom. then 20 years later, everything has been _ then 20 years later, everything has been taken — then 20 years later, everything has been taken away from them. ijust hope _ been taken away from them. ijust hope the _ been taken away from them. ijust hope the taliban are true to their words _ hope the taliban are true to their words. they will allow people some freedom _ words. they will allow people some freedom and be true to their words not to— freedom and be true to their words not to execute people. we will see. if not to execute people. we will see. if they _ not to execute people. we will see. if they want international legitimacy and recognition, they need _ legitimacy and recognition, they need to— legitimacy and recognition, they need to act responsibly is a government and prefers —— preserve our institutions, the national anthenr, _ our institutions, the national anthem, the afghan flag, things that are very— anthem, the afghan flag, things that are very dearto anthem, the afghan flag, things that are very dear to us. i am sure the listeners — are very dear to us. i am sure the listeners will _ are very dear to us. i am sure the listeners will understand the importance of the british like to people — importance of the british like to people and the national anthem. to see the _ people and the national anthem. to see the afghan flags, down, i mean, there _ see the afghan flags, down, i mean, there was— see the afghan flags, down, i mean, there was a — see the afghan flags, down, i mean, there was a transfer —— for if there was a _ there was a transfer —— for if there was a transfer of power through an election. _ was a transfer of power through an election, we would have no issue. this was— election, we would have no issue. this was a — election, we would have no issue. this was a military coup. it was done _ this was a military coup. it was done with— this was a military coup. it was done with the us, effectively. the
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afghan— done with the us, effectively. the afghan government has failed its people — afghan government has failed its people. this is where we are. canl people. this is where we are. can i 'ust ick people. this is where we are. can i just pick pp — people. this is where we are. can i just pick up on _ people. this is where we are. can i just pick up on a — people. this is where we are. can i just pick up on a couple _ people. this is where we are. can i just pick up on a couple of- people. this is where we are. (cami just pick up on a couple of thoughts with you? we were speaking to the defence secretary, ben wallace, who said those associated with helping british troops, they are making efforts to get them out of the country as well. you will have worked very closely with them people. what do you think of that? i people. what do you think of that? i think it's a shame it has taken effectively _ think it's a shame it has taken effectively the _ think it's a shame it has taken effectively the collapse - think it's a shame it has taken effectively the collapse of - think it's a shame it has taken effectively the collapse of the | effectively the collapse of the country — effectively the collapse of the country before _ effectively the collapse of the country before we _ effectively the collapse of the country before we start - effectively the collapse of the - country before we start extracting everybody — country before we start extracting everybody. there _ country before we start extracting everybody. there have _ country before we start extracting everybody. there have been- country before we start extracting i everybody. there have been efforts to get— everybody. there have been efforts to get them — everybody. there have been efforts to get them out _ everybody. there have been efforts to get them out. a— everybody. there have been efforts to get them out. a few _ everybody. there have been efforts to get them out. a few of _ everybody. there have been efforts to get them out. a few of them - everybody. there have been effortsl to get them out. a few of them have already— to get them out. a few of them have already come — to get them out. a few of them have already come over. _ to get them out. a few of them have already come over. a _ to get them out. a few of them have already come over. a good - to get them out. a few of them have already come over. a good 2000. ii already come over. a good 2000. i don't _ already come over. a good 2000. i don't think— already come over. a good 2000. i don't think it — already come over. a good 2000. i don't think it was _ already come over. a good 2000. i don't think it was enough _ already come over. a good 2000. i don't think it was enough soon - don't think it was enough soon enough — don't think it was enough soon enough if— don't think it was enough soon enough if we _ don't think it was enough soon enough. if we knew— don't think it was enough soon enough. if we knew this - don't think it was enough soon enough. if we knew this was . don't think it was enough soon - enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision— enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision to — enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision to withdraw— enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision to withdraw was - enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision to withdraw was made . enough. if we knew this was coming, the decision to withdraw was made a| the decision to withdraw was made a year ago. _ the decision to withdraw was made a year ago. it— the decision to withdraw was made a yearago. it is— the decision to withdraw was made a year ago, it is something _ the decision to withdraw was made a year ago, it is something we - the decision to withdraw was made a year ago, it is something we shouldi year ago, it is something we should have been— year ago, it is something we should have been dealing _ year ago, it is something we should have been dealing with _ year ago, it is something we should have been dealing with from - year ago, it is something we should have been dealing with from day. year ago, it is something we should l have been dealing with from day one. it is have been dealing with from day one. it is a _ have been dealing with from day one. it is a real— have been dealing with from day one. it is a real shame _ have been dealing with from day one. it is a real shame that— have been dealing with from day one. it is a real shame that we _ have been dealing with from day one. it is a real shame that we are - have been dealing with from day one. it is a real shame that we are now- it is a real shame that we are now seeing _ it is a real shame that we are now seeing british— it is a real shame that we are now seeing british troops _ it is a real shame that we are now seeing british troops posting - it is a real shame that we are now seeing british troops posting to l seeing british troops posting to kabul— seeing british troops posting to kabul airport~ _ seeing british troops posting to kabul airport. they— seeing british troops posting to kabul airport. they will- seeing british troops posting to kabul airport. they will be - seeing british troops posting tol kabul airport. they will be doing the best— kabul airport. they will be doing the bestjob~ _ kabul airport. they will be doing the bestjob. the _ kabul airport. they will be doing the bestjob. the fact _ kabul airport. they will be doing the bestjob. the fact it- kabul airport. they will be doing the bestjob. the fact it has- kabul airport. they will be doing i the bestjob. the fact it has come this far. _ the bestjob. the fact it has come this far. it— the bestjob. the fact it has come this far. it is— the bestjob. the fact it has come this far, it is a _ the bestjob. the fact it has come this far, it is a shame, _ the bestjob. the fact it has come this far, it is a shame, it- the bestjob. the fact it has come this far, it is a shame, it is- the bestjob. the fact it has come this far, it is a shame, it is a - this far, it is a shame, it is a national— this far, it is a shame, it is a national shame. _
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this far, it is a shame, it is a national shame.— this far, it is a shame, it is a national shame. we are watching those pictures — national shame. we are watching those pictures of— national shame. we are watching those pictures of them _ national shame. we are watching those pictures of them arriving. l national shame. we are watching i those pictures of them arriving. ben wallace making the point that the military part of the airport is open. from a military point of view, how difficult is that to do? you have not how difficult is that to do? you have rrot only _ how difficult is that to do? you have not only got _ how difficult is that to do? you have not only got paratroopers there. — have not only got paratroopers there. you _ have not only got paratroopers there. you got _ have not only got paratroopers there, you got the _ have not only got paratroopers there, you got the 82nd - have not only got paratroopers l there, you got the 82nd airborne division — there, you got the 82nd airborne division from _ there, you got the 82nd airborne division from the _ there, you got the 82nd airborne division from the united - there, you got the 82nd airborne division from the united states. i division from the united states. there _ division from the united states. there are — division from the united states. there are a _ division from the united states. there are a lot _ division from the united states. there are a lot of— division from the united states. there are a lot of soldiers. i there are a lot of soldiers. noncombatants _ there are a lot of soldiers. j noncombatants evacuation there are a lot of soldiers. _ noncombatants evacuation operations are trained _ noncombatants evacuation operations are trained for — noncombatants evacuation operations are trained for. this— noncombatants evacuation operations are trained for. this is— noncombatants evacuation operations are trained for. this is bread - noncombatants evacuation operations are trained for. this is bread and i are trained for. this is bread and butter— are trained for. this is bread and butter stuff — are trained for. this is bread and butter stuff for— are trained for. this is bread and butter stuff for our— are trained for. this is bread and butter stuff for our men - are trained for. this is bread and butter stuff for our men and i are trained for. this is bread and i butter stuff for our men and women. but it— butter stuff for our men and women. but it is— butter stuff for our men and women. but it is in— butter stuff for our men and women. but it is in a — butter stuff for our men and women. but it is in a very— butter stuff for our men and women. but it is in a very contested - butter stuff for our men and women. but it is in a very contested area. i but it is in a very contested area. i'm but it is in a very contested area. i'm not— but it is in a very contested area. i'm not going _ but it is in a very contested area. i'm not going to— but it is in a very contested area. i'm not going to speculative i but it is in a very contested area. i'm not going to speculative out i i'm not going to speculative out what _ i'm not going to speculative out what is — i'm not going to speculative out what is going _ i'm not going to speculative out what is going on— i'm not going to speculative out what is going on on— i'm not going to speculative out what is going on on the - i'm not going to speculative out what is going on on the ground. i'm not going to speculative out i what is going on on the ground. but we have _ what is going on on the ground. but we have got— what is going on on the ground. but we have got the _ what is going on on the ground. but we have got the best _ what is going on on the ground. but we have got the best troops - what is going on on the ground. butl we have got the best troops possible to be doing _ we have got the best troops possible to be doing that— we have got the best troops possible to be doing thatjob. _ we have got the best troops possible to be doing thatjob. it's— we have got the best troops possible to be doing thatjob. it's not- we have got the best troops possible to be doing thatjob. it's not a - to be doing thatjob. it's not a huge — to be doing thatjob. it's not a huge airfield. _ to be doing thatjob. it's not a huge airfield. it _ to be doing thatjob. it's not a huge airfield. it should - to be doing thatjob. it's not a huge airfield. it should be i huge airfield. it should be something _ huge airfield. it should be something that _ huge airfield. it should be something that we - huge airfield. it should be something that we can i huge airfield. it should be i something that we can achieve relatively— something that we can achieve relatively smoothly. _ something that we can achieve relatively smoothly. in - something that we can achieve relatively smoothly.— relatively smoothly. in the circumstances. _ relatively smoothly. in the circumstances. what - relatively smoothly. in the | circumstances. what about relatively smoothly. in the - circumstances. what about looking relatively smoothly. in the _ circumstances. what about looking to the future of the dogma? there is lots of discussion about whether the british government should be talking directly to the taliban. what are your thoughts about the future and what needs to happen? irate
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your thoughts about the future and what needs to happen?— your thoughts about the future and what needs to happen? we should not isolate afghans _ what needs to happen? we should not isolate afghans in _ what needs to happen? we should not isolate afghans in afghanistan. - isolate afghans in afghanistan. there _ isolate afghans in afghanistan. there needs to be more sanctions on pakistan, _ there needs to be more sanctions on pakistan, because the taliban would not have _ pakistan, because the taliban would not have what i have without the support — not have what i have without the support of— not have what i have without the support of pakistan. this is an open secret~ _ support of pakistan. this is an open secret~ we — support of pakistan. this is an open secret. we need to be talking to the taliban— secret. we need to be talking to the taliban and — secret. we need to be talking to the taliban and saying, if you want international legitimacy, to preserve the gains of the last 20 years. _ preserve the gains of the last 20 years. we — preserve the gains of the last 20 years, we have to see how they go about _ years, we have to see how they go about it _ years, we have to see how they go about it. they say they have changed and are _ about it. they say they have changed and are going to be more careful. i hope _ and are going to be more careful. i hope there — and are going to be more careful. i hope there will be an increase in security — hope there will be an increase in security. what has happened should not have _ security. what has happened should not have happened. there will be resistance~ — not have happened. there will be resistance. in the end afghans want their freedom. they want accountability. the system is imperfect but we had a parliament, we had _ imperfect but we had a parliament, we had a _ imperfect but we had a parliament, we had a representative democracy. right _ we had a representative democracy. right now— we had a representative democracy. right now we have nothing. these leaders _ right now we have nothing. these leaders have been imposed upon us. this is— leaders have been imposed upon us. this is basically a military coup led by— this is basically a military coup led by the _ this is basically a military coup led by the us and by their representatives on the ground. given what we know _ representatives on the ground. given what we know so _ representatives on the ground. given what we know so far... _ representatives on the ground. given what we know so far... i'm _ representatives on the ground. (1: ar what we know so far... i'm getting information about what is going on at the airport. going forward, it is clearly a dangerous situation at the
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moment. the fact that the forces in some ways, as far as we understand, have fallen away, does that in any way help at all? i have fallen away, does that in any way help at all?— way help at all? i don't think so. the only way _ way help at all? i don't think so. the only way we _ way help at all? i don't think so. the only way we will— way help at all? i don't think so. the only way we will see - way help at all? i don't think so. the only way we will see real- the only way we will see real military— the only way we will see real military intervention - the only way we will see real military intervention in - the only way we will see real- military intervention in afghanistan again— military intervention in afghanistan again as _ military intervention in afghanistan again as if— military intervention in afghanistan again as if we — military intervention in afghanistan again as if we go _ military intervention in afghanistan again as if we go for _ military intervention in afghanistan again as if we go for a _ military intervention in afghanistan again as if we go for a full—scale i again as if we go for a full—scale invasion~ — again as if we go for a full—scale invasion. that's— again as if we go for a full—scale invasion. that's simply- again as if we go for a full—scale invasion. that's simply not i again as if we go for a full—scalei invasion. that's simply not going again as if we go for a full—scale i invasion. that's simply not going to happen _ invasion. that's simply not going to happen. you — invasion. that's simply not going to happen. you might— invasion. that's simply not going to happen. you might see _ invasion. that's simply not going to happen. you might see some - invasion. that's simply not going to . happen. you might see some military action— happen. you might see some military action if— happen. you might see some military action if the _ happen. you might see some military action if the taliban _ happen. you might see some military action if the taliban start _ action if the taliban start harbouring _ action if the taliban start harbouring terrorists i action if the taliban start i harbouring terrorists again. action if the taliban start - harbouring terrorists again. but i don't _ harbouring terrorists again. but i don't think— harbouring terrorists again. but i don't think they _ harbouring terrorists again. but i don't think they will _ harbouring terrorists again. but i don't think they will necessarily. don't think they will necessarily because — don't think they will necessarily because that _ don't think they will necessarily because that is _ don't think they will necessarily because that is the _ don't think they will necessarily because that is the one - don't think they will necessarily because that is the one thing i don't think they will necessarily. because that is the one thing that would _ because that is the one thing that would provoke _ because that is the one thing that would provoke a _ because that is the one thing that would provoke a reaction- because that is the one thing that would provoke a reaction from i because that is the one thing that i would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip— would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side — would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side of— would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side of that _ would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side of that is _ would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side of that is i _ would provoke a reaction from nato. the flip side of that is i think- the flip side of that is i think this— the flip side of that is i think this will— the flip side of that is i think this will give _ the flip side of that is i think this will give fundamentalist| this will give fundamentalist terrorist _ this will give fundamentalist terrorist throughout- this will give fundamentalist terrorist throughout the i this will give fundamentalist i terrorist throughout the world a real shot — terrorist throughout the world a real shot in _ terrorist throughout the world a real shot in the _ terrorist throughout the world a real shot in the arm. _ terrorist throughout the world a real shot in the arm. it- terrorist throughout the world a real shot in the arm. it will- terrorist throughout the world a real shot in the arm. it will be l real shot in the arm. it will be huge — real shot in the arm. it will be huge encouragement - real shot in the arm. it will be huge encouragement for- real shot in the arm. it will be| huge encouragement for them real shot in the arm. it will be i huge encouragement for them to real shot in the arm. it will be - huge encouragement for them to see the taliban— huge encouragement for them to see the taliban defeat _ huge encouragement for them to see the taliban defeat of— huge encouragement for them to see the taliban defeat of the _ huge encouragement for them to see the taliban defeat of the west, - huge encouragement for them to see the taliban defeat of the west, as i the taliban defeat of the west, as they will— the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have _ the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have spun _ the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have spun it. _ the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have spun it. there i the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have spun it. there is- the taliban defeat of the west, as they will have spun it. there is a i they will have spun it. there is a real danger— they will have spun it. there is a real danger that _ they will have spun it. there is a real danger that whole - they will have spun it. there is a real danger that whole world i they will have spun it. there is a real danger that whole world byl they will have spun it. there is al real danger that whole world by a movement— real danger that whole world by a movement is— real danger that whole world by a movement is going _ real danger that whole world by a movement is going to— real danger that whole world by a movement is going to be - real danger that whole world by a l movement is going to be energised because _ movement is going to be energised because of— movement is going to be energised because of the _ movement is going to be energised because of the way— movement is going to be energised because of the way afghanistan i movement is going to be energisedi because of the way afghanistan has fallen _ because of the way afghanistan has fallen if— because of the way afghanistan has fallen. , a a, , because of the way afghanistan has fallen. , . ., , ., ., fallen. it is clearly an unfolding situation- _ fallen. it is clearly an unfolding situation. thank _ fallen. it is clearly an unfolding situation. thank you _ fallen. it is clearly an unfolding situation. thank you for - fallen. it is clearly an unfolding situation. thank you for your i fallen. it is clearly an unfolding - situation. thank you for your time. i'm going to read the latest. this is from reuters. at least five
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people have been killed at the airport as hundreds of people try to force their way onto planes leaving the afghan capital. as we say, very much an ongoing, unfolding situation. thank you both for your time. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come... following his return from tokyo, olympic diver tom daley talks to us about his love of knitting, why fatherhood is better than winning gold, and what his late dad would have made of his success. we'll have that shortly and bring you the latest news and weather. some rain. the headlines are coming up next. let's get the weather now. for many of us this morning a cloudy start, for some, we have some sunshine but you can see from the weather watchers picture taken in north yorkshire, there is a fair bit of cloud around. notjust cloud, we
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have patchy rain. this week forecast is going to be fairly cool, temperatures around about average or below, the high pressure we expected is not going to happen, looks like that will now be next week. mostly cloudy, producing some light rain or drizzle but most of us will miss that and stay dry. we have had some rain this morning coming in, courtesy of our weather front, there is a heck of it coming here moving southwards. another band of rain is coming in across north—west england. it will be a breezy day, and the breeze is coming in from the north—west, dragging in lots of moisture from the atlantic, hence all of this cloud in the west and part of the south. the brightest skies are likely to be across central and eastern areas where we will hang on some sunshine. western scotland has some cloudy day, thick enough for some odd spots of rain or
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drizzle. to move towards the midlands and head eastwards, we are looking at brighter skies with sunny spells and temperatures nothing to write home about. 13 in lerwick to about 19 in hull. yesterday we reached 26.4 degrees in parts of suffolk, we will not see that level of temperature this week. as we had on through the evening and overnight, we start with the clear skies, cloud will build ahead of a new weather front coming in introducing rain across scotland and northern ireland, getting into northern england and wales through the night with cloud building ahead of it, thick enough find it for some patchy light rain and drizzle. there will be some widespread mist and fog tonight, particularly in the coasts and the hills. with all of this going on, hardly surprising it will not be a cold night. tomorrow we start with the dregs of the rain
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moving from the south—east. tomorrow there will be cloud around with some brighter breaks in the shelter of the hills in the mountains, the cloud still thick enough for some drizzle. we will hang on to the coastal mist some hill fog, temperatures 1a to 20 degrees. some will start with brightness and sunshine tomorrow but essentially it will be a cloudy days. the wind will be lighter as well, and the temperature range on wednesday, 13 to 20. more weather later on in the programme. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. police forces in england and wales are being asked by the home office to review the way they deal with firearms applications following the mass shooting in plymouth.
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questions have been raised over how the killer was given back his gun permitjust weeks before he carried out the attack. let's look at the rules around gun licensing in the uk. in order to buy or own a gun in the uk, a request for a licence must be sent to the police. the applicant must prove that they pose no danger to public safety or peace. there must also be a good reason for owning a gun, such as for someone�*s job, for pest control or sport. officers will check the national database for a criminal record. some people with serious convictions are banned for life from owning a gun. under 185 can be granted a licence, but only for certain types of gun. we're joined now by former chief constable of northumbria police, sue sim. good morning. iwant good morning. i want to first of all, as you are hearing this debate now, prompted by the awful events in plymouth, what are your thoughts
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given that previously you were involved in another incident many years ago, real moats, people will remember, who shot a number of people in northumbria —— raoul moat people in northumbria —— raoul moat people will remember who shot a number of people in northumbria. i think the thing that your viewers really need to understand is that there are two different types of licenses that you can apply for. the things that you have described there are those art for a section one firearm. mr davison, i believe, had a shotgun certificate, you do not need to fulfil all of those requirements in order to obtain a shotgun certificate. children as young as 1a can have a shotgun certificate. these are things which need to be looked at. when the
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derrick bird shooting took place in cumbria in 2010, the home office affairs select committee produced a firearms control paper and the government response to it in 2011 was for them to refuse the recommendation which would have meant that people who were applying for a shotgun certificate would have had to do exactly the same things as those wanted section one firearm. the issue now is that we need to not just look at these individual cases, but we need to look at the application process around shop fronts. it needs to be brought in line —— around shotguns. can fronts. it needs to be brought in line -- around shotguns.- fronts. it needs to be brought in line -- around shotguns. can i ask ou as a line -- around shotguns. can i ask
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you as a former— line -- around shotguns. can i ask you as a former police _ line -- around shotguns. can i ask you as a former police chief, - line -- around shotguns. can i ask you as a former police chief, is - line -- around shotguns. can i ask you as a former police chief, is it i you as a former police chief, is it too much of the public to expect their police force to know more about people who live in the area who have gun licences? as we know, the vast majority of these people are not a risk. but what we're learning now in this particular case in plymouth, there were some alarms, alarm bells rang, over a period of time, and people might be hoping that the local police would be more tuned in, maybe pay more attention to that, building up a picture of the people who make the eight risk. the striker who may be a risk. certainly if you have revoked a shotgun licence which appears to be the case in this case, i do believe that nowadays, with a vast array of social media that is around, i do believe that social media checks should be made as well as with doctors and as well as the normal police checks in relation to criminal activity.
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police checks in relation to criminalactivity. i police checks in relation to criminal activity. i think nowadays police officers, police chiefs need to be much more savvy with social media aspects. i'm not sure that is a requirement at the moment, i believe it should be. to a requirement at the moment, i believe it should be.— a requirement at the moment, i believe it should be. to be clear on that, so believe it should be. to be clear on that. so peeple _ believe it should be. to be clear on that, so people understand, - believe it should be. to be clear on that, so people understand, if- believe it should be. to be clear on that, so people understand, if you| that, so people understand, if you were running a police force now, and somebody had had a shotgun licence revoked and it would be handed back, are you allowed unilaterally as a police force to do extra checks to check out people 's social media presences? are you allowed to do that, are there restrictions around that? ., ., that, are there restrictions around that? c, c, i, , that, are there restrictions around that? a, a, a, that? you can do anything you want in relation to _ that? you can do anything you want in relation to doing _ that? you can do anything you want in relation to doing checks - that? you can do anything you want in relation to doing checks as - that? you can do anything you want in relation to doing checks as a - in relation to doing checks as a chief constable. that's why the individual forces have responsibility for giving out shotgun certificates, and that's what we're talking about in this instance, and firearms licences. an individual chief constable can make whatever checks they deem
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appropriate. that's what it says on the legislation, that's what it says in the home office guidance. it's down to individual chief constables to make sure that such checks are undertaken as they deem appropriate. it easy to be wise after the event in the circumstances, but when people hear you say that and given your experience, what you knew, how is it possible that isn't happening on a routine basis? fits is it possible that isn't happening on a routine basis? $5 i is it possible that isn't happening on a routine basis?— on a routine basis? as i say, i think the _ on a routine basis? as i say, i think the issue, _ on a routine basis? as i say, i think the issue, you _ on a routine basis? as i say, i think the issue, you need - on a routine basis? as i say, i think the issue, you need to l on a routine basis? as i say, i. think the issue, you need to look much more closely at the fact that to obtain a shotgun certificate, and to obtain a shotgun certificate, and to retain it, is far easier than a section one firearm. and i believe unfortunately that there appears to be some complacency around shotgun certificates, and that's why i am appealing for the government, and for all police chiefs and everybody who is involved, to do a root and
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branch review of how you obtain a short —— shot gun certificate. we do not want to see any more family is devastated in this way. as a matter of fact, last year, there were 677 notifiable offences committed with a shotgun. 53% of those involved a being discharged. it's no longer the case of saying, these are only used in farms, for shooting or in sport. we need to look much more closely at how you obtain and retain a shotgun certificate. we don't want any more tragedies like this. sue certificate. we don't want any more tragedies like this.— tragedies like this. sue sim, thank ou so tragedies like this. sue sim, thank you so much _ tragedies like this. sue sim, thank you so much for— tragedies like this. sue sim, thank you so much for your _ tragedies like this. sue sim, thank you so much for your time - tragedies like this. sue sim, thank you so much for your time this - you so much for your time this morning, former chief constable of northumbria police. sally has been having lots of chats with amazing sports personalities, gold—medal winning olympians and you
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have had another one, i love this one. , , ., ., have had another one, i love this one. ., ., one. this is another special one which we recorded _ one. this is another special one which we recorded with - one. this is another special one which we recorded with tom - one. this is another special one - which we recorded with tom daley, and we have been following him since he was very young. me and we have been following him since he was very young-— he was very young. we were trying to reminisce early _ he was very young. we were trying to reminisce early on, _ he was very young. we were trying to reminisce early on, i'm _ he was very young. we were trying to reminisce early on, i'm thinking - he was very young. we were trying to reminisce early on, i'm thinking he i reminisce early on, i'm thinking he was 13 when he first sat with us on the sofa. you kinda feel like you have watched him up. fin the sofa. you kinda feel like you have watched him up.— the sofa. you kinda feel like you have watched him up. on tv, that's wh he is have watched him up. on tv, that's why he is such _ have watched him up. on tv, that's why he is such a _ have watched him up. on tv, that's why he is such a great _ have watched him up. on tv, that's why he is such a great chatter. - have watched him up. on tv, that's why he is such a great chatter. it. why he is such a great chatter. it was one of the best chats we've had so far. there were so many stand—out moments for team gb this year in tokyo but it's hard to top those wonderful scenes at the pool when tom daley finally won gold, alongside diving partner matty lee. well, tom's now back in the uk with the rest of the british athletes and i was lucky enough to catch up with him. tom, i would like to know what's in that bag of magical stuff that you've brought today. well, i've got the knitjumper that i made, this is it. my team gbjumper.
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a couple of medals in here as well. i just want to say, though, that gold medal for you... yeah, honestly, it was. winning an olympic gold medal has been my dream since i was a little kid. and to actually have that medal be put round my neck, by matty, it was just, it was a total dream come true. so who is behind that medal? oh, so many people. i mean, obviously my coach and matty helped me get the but my dad for taking me to my first training sessions, travelling around the world, watching me. my mum, who helps me all the time. all of my friends, but obviously most importantly, lance, my husband, my son who have inspired me every day to keep going. do you want to put it on? oh, i'd love too, am i allowed? yeah. are you sure? yeah! the inside looks ugly because that's where the colour work is. that's ok.
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oh, gosh, it's an honour. honestly, go for it. oh, i like it. do you know what? i love a cardigan. do you? yeah, look at that. my knitting has become quite a lot of my mindfulness. i actually started it originally as, i'm terrible at sitting still. it was actually lance who suggested that some people on movie sets will sit there and knit squares just the time, you know. i was like, ok, i'll try that. then i started trying it, fell in love with it and here i am. because that's way beyond knitting squares. yeah, when i say i'm obsessed with knitting, i was knitting on the bus to the pool, on the bus home from the pool, in the stands whenever i had a spare moment, while the other boys in our apartment were playing video games, i would just sit and knit. how do you manage the tougher sides of fame? oh, good question. i mean, you know, i've learned, as i've gotten older, to not care so much about what other people think. it's also a lesson that my dad taught me.
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i used to find him so embarrassing, and he used to do things where i would be like, what are you doing? you know, bursting in on press conferences, doing all these things and i wasjust like, i thought it was extremely embarrassing. i'm tom's dad. tom, can i give you a cuddle? please? come on, please? now, being a parent and being slightly older, i realise he just didn't care what other people thought. if he wanted to go and see his son and give him a hug after winning a world championships, he was going to do that and he didn't care what anyone else thought about it. what would he say to you now, sitting here with a gold medal in front of you, at last? i mean, the crazy thing is, and when i look back, he never, ever got to be see me win any of my olympic medals. he got to see me compete in beijing, so he got to see me go to the olympic games, but he wasn't around for london 2012, rio or tokyo. so i think he would be extremely proud to think that i have not only got four olympic medals but one of them is a gold one. i would be really excited to have got the opportunity to speak
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to him after that event. and i know he would have done something crazy, he would have gotten down off the balcony, he probably would havejumped in the pool, he would have been the streaker of the olympics! ijust know he would have done something silly. yeah, itjust makes me extremely proud to think of all the hard work and all the sacrifice that he put into my diving career, i'd say it's worth it. proud is a word i want to pick up on, because i remember watching you saying how proud you were to stand there with your medal in this competition at the olympic games as a gay man, proud of who you are. you know, ifeel incredibly lucky to be from great britain, being able to stand on that diving board and not feel afraid of any ramifications or even fearfor my life. there are still ten countries at those olympic games where being gay is punishable by death in their countries. so ijust hope that winning an olympic gold medal, winning any olympic medal, or going to the olympics as a gay person, a member
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of the lgbt community, that any young kids out there that feel like they're never going to achieve anything just because of who they are, they know that with hard work, you can achieve anything, no matter who you are, where you come from, you can be the best in the world. there is one particular moment i want to talk to you about, bear with me. i've brought something extra special with me for you. oh, dear. we had these made, and this is it. look at that. i know. that was me looking at the, the unionjack being raised for the national anthem. and ijust, i mean, i literally was, i was trying to sing the national anthem and ijust couldn't. yeah, i mean, iwas a mess. 3.7 degrees of difficulty, the world's hardest diving for the world's most coveted prize. it was so tense, though. wasn't it? it was so tense waiting to see what would happen with the scores. in the last round,
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when we were going to dive for dive with the chinese divers, and it was getting really close, and going into that last, we did that last dive and we knew that we had done the best that we possibly could to lay down the gauntlet and have it, you know, the chinese divers had everything to do afterwards. and i remember we hit the water, and i remember making a face and thinking, that's going to be close, that was good. and i wasjust, the waiting, the waiting and waiting when they were showing all the replays, and you're standing there waiting and waiting, and i was like, this is torture, what are you doing to us? and jane said to me, what do we need to look for, where are we looking? and i said, don't look at the big scoreboard, look at that little on there because that little board always comes up about half a second before so you'll be able to see. we just have to make sure that number two comes up in the corner, and if it comes up number two, it means we're number one and we're going to be olympic champions. and i remember the moment when the scoreboard clicked and ijust turned to matty. he picked me up, jane was there, and the funny thing was, whenjane came in to give me
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a cuddle, she cut my face. so then i go up on the podium and i've got this, i was like bleeding on my chin. they were like, what's happening to your face? i was like, i don't know, somebody scratched me but i don't care. yeah, it was such a... yeah, that moment i will rememberforever. look at what it means to matty lee, look at what it means to jane figueiredo! look at what it means to great britain! do you know what, the crazy thing is, that was his first olympic games, he's done six dives at the olympics and he's olympic champion. that's insane! i was like, this is my fourth attempt, i've been doing it for... he's done six dives at the olympics. honestly, i am incredibly proud of him in the way that he was able to go into his first olympic games under such extreme pressure, knowing how much, i mean, this whole year, every single competition we have gone into, he has delivered. we are unbeaten this year so far. in world cups, europeans, olympics and i think that is something that i am incredibly proud of him for being
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able to hold that together. because that's a lot of pressure. when you arrived home, the reception was of course incredible, wasn't it? it was so surreal to see people outside of team gb for the first time in a few weeks and coming out into the arrivals hall, all my friends were there, and they had brought union jack flags. i could hear them a mile off to start with. but they were all screaming and shouting, lots of hugs. i mean, of course, iwould have loved for lance and robbie to be there as well, but i'm counting down the days, i'm going to be leaving this week to go to canada to see them. he must be so excited to know that you are nearly home. yeah, i mean, literally, when i called him and asked him, i said to him, papa won another medal. and hejust said, ok, papa, but when do you come to see me? i wasjust like, and it has put everything into perspective. i know i love these medals and i'm so grateful for that, but, you know, robbie will forever
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be my everything, and being a parent is better than any olympic medal. in a way, do you think you look at that gold there and think it came at the right time? because of robbie? yeah, absolutely. in 2016 when it didn't go anywhere near the way that i wanted it to, actually lance said to me, maybe you weren't meant to win a gold medal this time, maybe your son needs to see you become an olympic champion. and although i always dreamed that it would happen, i was fully ready after these olympic games to try and begin to accept the fact that i may never, ever be olympic champion. and the fact that i can now say that i am an olympic champion is... it still doesn't feel real. it's, yeah, overwhelming. tell me what it was like when you saw the pictures back of your mum and lance and kind of the emotion that they felt watching you?
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being able to stand on that podium and see their way, how much it meant to them and see their reactions, i mean, lance really screamed. i watched it and i was like, oh, my goodness! to be fair, i have heard him do that before, whenever we get on a roller—coaster, that is the noise that he makes all the way round. because of the delay to tokyo, it's only three years till paris. yes! i know, it's not very long to paris and i remember always saying, the thing is, i always said i'm going to keep going as long as, as long as my body will let me or until i win an olympic gold medal. now i've got my olympic gold medal, i'm like, that felt kind of good. i don't know, maybe i'll try it again. but honestly, but for now, i'm taking a bit of a break, going to spend some time with my family, see where, you know, life lands me, and we'll make decisions about moving forward about diving soon, well, hopefully the next few months, i guess. what's the dream then, away from diving, what comes next after that?
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once i've finished with diving, i'd love to be, you know, olympic grandstand presenter, like, clare balding'sjob. where she is hosting the whole thing. it's yours! i know, clare has to retire at some point. so i'll be there, ready to stand in whenever she needs. just been such a pleasure to talk to you. tom daley, thank you so much. thank you for having me. i tell you what. clare balding, watch out! — i tell you what. clare balding, watch out! he's _ i tell you what. clare balding, watch out! he's brilliant, - i tell you what. clare balding, watch out! he's brilliant, we i i tell you what. clare balding, - watch out! he's brilliant, we have 'ust come watch out! he's brilliant, we have just come up _ watch out! he's brilliant, we have just come up with _ watch out! he's brilliant, we have just come up with a _ watch out! he's brilliant, we have just come up with a fantastic - watch out! he's brilliant, we have| just come up with a fantastic idea, i will say it here, tom daley, like, a daily show. surely that will happen! a daily show. surely that will ha en! ., , a daily show. surely that will happen!_ he a daily show. surely that will- happen!_ he will a daily show. surely that will- happen!_ he will do a daily show. surely that will hat-en! ., , he willdoa happen! that sounds ok. he will do a cell out of a — happen! that sounds ok. he will do a cell out of a job! _ cell out of a job! —— do us all out of a job! thank you very much. from today everyone who is double jabbed in england and northern ireland, will no longer need to self—isolate if they are alerted by the nhs covid app. ben is at a bar and restaurant for us on the river thames to find out what it means for staff absences
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within the hospitality industry. good morning to you both. let me tell you, if you were with us earlier, it was all very smooth, the tide has come in, it's lifted us up and it is now very rocky on the barge, bearwith and it is now very rocky on the barge, bear with us if you are feeling seasick, i am! a very important day for hospitality firms like this particular reach have struggled over the last few months with the pingdemic, the number of people who have been told to self—isolate. many firms have not had the staff who had turn up for work because they have been isolating from home. today marks an important change to the rules. if you have had both doses of the vaccine, and you are contacted by the nhs app, you will not have the self—isolate at home for ten days. provided you have had of the doses. they say instead that you should take a pcr test. what is crucially different, you don't have to isolate
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while you wait for the results of that test. but he will be encouraged to wear a mask and cut contact with other people until you find out. if you are positive, then you should isolate. it's hoped that this the rules will allow folks to get back to some sort of reality and make sure they are not susceptible to the problems of the endemic which meant a whole swathes of the workforce were not able to turn up for work. —— the pingdemic. the general manager is here with us, it has been so difficult running somewhere like this with so many tables when a lot of your staff were being pinged, including yourself?— of your staff were being pinged, including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate _ including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate that _ including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate that we _ including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate that we have - including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate that we have a - including yourself? absolutely, we are fortunate that we have a big i are fortunate that we have a big amount of staff and we can share staff between our sister boat down the way. but it is a very difficult situation. �* , , .,
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situation. but it is the short notice, people _ situation. but it is the short notice, people saying, - situation. but it is the short notice, people saying, i- situation. but it is the short i notice, people saying, i cannot situation. but it is the short - notice, people saying, i cannot come to work, maybe an hour before their shift. so you're left in the lurch. how have customers dealt with it? most people have been really understanding, everybody is realising people are still finding their feet, realising people are still finding theirfeet, especially realising people are still finding their feet, especially given the circumstances. obviously it isn't a great situation.— circumstances. obviously it isn't a great situation. things are looking u n great situation. things are looking u- now, great situation. things are looking up now. you _ great situation. things are looking up now. you are — great situation. things are looking up now, you are getting _ great situation. things are looking up now, you are getting back- great situation. things are looking up now, you are getting back to i up now, you are getting back to normality, how confident are you about the weeks and months to come? very confident. the team is great, we have really come together and we are there to support each other to fill in where needed, and i hope to drive it forward and just looking forward. drive it forward and 'ust looking forward. ,., ., drive it forward and 'ust looking forward. , , forward. good luck, still smiling, that's the most _ forward. good luck, still smiling, that's the most important - forward. good luck, still smiling, that's the most important thing. | that's the most important thing. thank you so much, nice to see you. with this —— bear with us as we try to get to the end of the boat, it is very rocky! siobhan is from the british chambers of commerce.
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hearing from karen, the challenge of the pingdemic has meant that businesses have not had enough staff? it businesses have not had enough staff? ., , , businesses have not had enough staff? , . businesses have not had enough staff? . , , ., , , businesses have not had enough staff? , ., ,, ., .,, staff? it has been an issue for lots of businesses. _ staff? it has been an issue for lots of businesses. last _ staff? it has been an issue for lots of businesses. last month, - staff? it has been an issue for lots of businesses. last month, 5096 i staff? it has been an issue for lots| of businesses. last month, 5096 of of businesses. last month, 50% of businesses — of businesses. last month, 50% of businesses we had talked to said they have — businesses we had talked to said they have significant issues with staffing — they have significant issues with staffing off either ill also fascinating. so we welcome the changes— fascinating. so we welcome the changes today. i think there will be some _ changes today. i think there will be some -- _ changes today. i think there will be some -- or— changes today. i think there will be some —— or self isolating. ithink there _ some —— or self isolating. ithink there will— some —— or self isolating. ithink there will still be some issues in businesses with a younger workforce who do— businesses with a younger workforce who do not— businesses with a younger workforce who do not have two jabs. this businesses with a younger workforce who do not have two jabs.— who do not have two 'abs. this only a- lies if who do not have two 'abs. this only applies if you _ who do not have two 'abs. this only applies if you have — who do not have two jabs. this only applies if you have got _ who do not have two jabs. this only applies if you have got both - who do not have two jabs. this only applies if you have got both doses l applies if you have got both doses of the vaccine, so for some younger people, they will still have to stay home for ten days?— people, they will still have to stay home for ten days? that's right but vaccination — home for ten days? that's right but vaccination levels _ home for ten days? that's right but vaccination levels continue - home for ten days? that's right but vaccination levels continue to - home for ten days? that's right but vaccination levels continue to rise l vaccination levels continue to rise so hopefully that problem will not
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be with us for too long and businesses can think about what is next. .. businesses can think about what is next. ~ ., , ., businesses can think about what is next. ~ ., ,., ., �* , next. thinking about what's next, it feels that in — next. thinking about what's next, it feels that in some _ next. thinking about what's next, it feels that in some respects, - next. thinking about what's next, it feels that in some respects, we're i feels that in some respects, we're getting to the end of the day—to—day problems for businesses that have coped for so long, but we are told that autumn and winter could be different again. what does business need to hear as far as planning for the autumn and winter? haste need to hear as far as planning for the autumn and winter?— the autumn and winter? we are heafina the autumn and winter? we are hearing that. — the autumn and winter? we are hearing that, what _ the autumn and winter? we are hearing that, what we - the autumn and winter? we are hearing that, what we really - the autumn and winter? we are | hearing that, what we really like the autumn and winter? we are i hearing that, what we really like to see is _ hearing that, what we really like to see is a _ hearing that, what we really like to see is a contingency plan in place. let's _ see is a contingency plan in place. let's look— see is a contingency plan in place. let's look to — see is a contingency plan in place. let's look to the next three to six months _ let's look to the next three to six months and — let's look to the next three to six months and think about if things change — months and think about if things change again, which we hope they won't, _ change again, which we hope they won't, what can we put in place? that _ won't, what can we put in place? that might — won't, what can we put in place? that might be thinking about a trooster— that might be thinking about a boosterjab programme, or if we get another— boosterjab programme, or if we get another variant where we see the case _ another variant where we see the case rates — another variant where we see the case rates going up again, what things— case rates going up again, what things can — case rates going up again, what things can be put in place in terms of business — things can be put in place in terms of business support, like possibly starting _ of business support, like possibly starting the furlough scheme again or grants _ starting the furlough scheme again or grants that worked really well last time — or grants that worked really well last time round. is it or grants that worked really well last time round.— or grants that worked really well
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last time round. is it reasonable to exect last time round. is it reasonable to exoect that — last time round. is it reasonable to exoect that they — last time round. is it reasonable to expect that they would _ last time round. is it reasonable to expect that they would be - expect that they would be contingency plans? we just don't know what's going to happen. business has been resilient and flexible over the past 18 months, but we just don't know what is around the corner. haste but we just don't know what is around the corner.— but we just don't know what is around the corner. we don't, that's wh the around the corner. we don't, that's why the contingency _ around the corner. we don't, that's why the contingency plans - around the corner. we don't, that's why the contingency plans are - around the corner. we don't, that's why the contingency plans are so i why the contingency plans are so important — why the contingency plans are so important. so at least we have that in place _ important. so at least we have that in place. that gives business clarity — in place. that gives business clarity and certainty and then they can concentrate on doing what they do best— can concentrate on doing what they do best which is powering the economic— do best which is powering the economic recovery, investing in jobs _ economic recovery, investing in jobs we — economic recovery, investing in jobs. we really want to see business and government thinking about the longer— and government thinking about the longer term. and government thinking about the longerterm. it is and government thinking about the longer term. it is important to get through— longer term. it is important to get through where we are now, but thinking — through where we are now, but thinking about longer term investment in skills, in global trade, — investment in skills, in global trade, in _ investment in skills, in global trade, in the levelling up agenda. because — trade, in the levelling up agenda. because we have spent all of this time _ because we have spent all of this time getting to this point, and we want _ time getting to this point, and we want businesses to be able to move on from _ want businesses to be able to move on from just— want businesses to be able to move on from just surviving to going back to growing — on from just surviving to going back to growing and thriving. it is on from just surviving to going back to growing and thriving.— to growing and thriving. it is so important- _ to growing and thriving. it is so important. lovely _ to growing and thriving. it is so important. lovely to _ to growing and thriving. it is so important. lovely to see - to growing and thriving. it is so important. lovely to see you, i to growing and thriving. it is so - important. lovely to see you, thank you very much. important. lovely to see you, thank you very much-— important. lovely to see you, thank
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you very much. thank you very much. so the thought _ you very much. thank you very much. so the thought of— you very much. thank you very much. so the thought of business _ you very much. thank you very much. so the thought of business as - you very much. thank you very much. so the thought of business as far- you very much. thank you very much. so the thought of business as far as l so the thought of business as far as another milestone in that recovery, it has been a tough 18 months for everybody but we know businesses have found it particularly difficult to adapt to some of the changes, lots of rules they are being asked to put in place, changes they have been made to their business. today is an important milestone but not applicable to everyone so remember to check the rules. and it's worth looking at what might happen in the autumn and winter. the sun was out earlier but it is now looking more into it and it is definitely more rocky on the boat. haste into it and it is definitely more rocky on the boat.— into it and it is definitely more rocky on the boat. we were a little worried that _ rocky on the boat. we were a little worried that the _ rocky on the boat. we were a little worried that the floating _ rocky on the boat. we were a little worried that the floating bar - rocky on the boat. we were a little worried that the floating bar had i worried that the floating bar had been detached from the store because we had some creaking noises but you are secure, everything ok? haste we had some creaking noises but you are secure, everything ok?— are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to — are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to the _ are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to the side, _ are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to the side, but _ are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to the side, but i'm - are secure, everything ok? we are tethered to the side, but i'm told, | tethered to the side, but i'm told, i'm reliably informed, there are two hours of the day when the tide and the thames that lifts the boat off
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of its grounded, its beached essentially most of the time, so we are now at the whim of the tide for are now at the whim of the tide for a couple of hours. itjust happens that it a couple of hours. itjust happens thatitis a couple of hours. itjust happens that it is a couple of hours that we are here. . ., ., . are here. hence the dramatic creaking! _ are here. hence the dramatic creaking! thank _ are here. hence the dramatic creaking! thank you - are here. hence the dramatic creaking! thank you very - are here. hence the dramatic i creaking! thank you very much, are here. hence the dramatic - creaking! thank you very much, ben. it's not me, it's the boat. you're watching breakfast. the time is 8:59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. chaos at kabul airport as hundreds try to leave afghanistan — following the taliban takeover of the capital i can't believe the world abandoned afghanistan. our friends are going to get killed, they're going to kill us. our women are not going to have any more rights. british troops continue to evacuate people from the country — including uk citizens and members of the british government. yesterday we got out 300, they were british passport holders and other members of the british government. police in england and wales are asked to review how they approve gun licenses — in the wake of the plymouth shooting. in haiti, the search for survivors
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in collapsed buildings as the death toll from a huge earthquake

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