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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 17, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. kabul airport reopens following a day of desperation and chaos in which thousands tried to flee afghanistan after the taliban took control of the capital. the scenes at the airport have been highlighted by newly released satellite pictures showing people swarming onto the runway. us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan, saying the mission was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. i stand squarely behind my decisions. after 20 years, i've learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw. here in the uk, the foreign secretary says the government is looking at a bespoke resettlement
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scheme for vulnerable afghans we are working on that very carefully, we've always been a big hearted nation, you've got a home secretary and foreign secretary who know what that means from our own personal history. new zealand announces a snap lockdown after the country detected its first case of locally transmitted covid—19 since february. haiti suffers further. after the death toll in saturday's earthquake passes 1,400 — a tropical storm makes landfall on the island. bob dylan is being sued by a woman who says he sexually abused her in 1965 when she was 12 years old. he denies the allegations.
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the taliban has urged government officials in afghanistan to return to work. it has offered them a general amnesty and, in a statement, said it wanted people to start routine life with full confidence. at kabul�*s airport, military flights have resumed after yesterday's chaotic scenes, when hundreds of afghans tried to board aircraft. those scenes at the airport have been highlighted by newly released satellite pictures — showing just how many people were on the runway. overnight, evacuations by the military restarted — this footage shows the french air force preparing to fly its citizens out of kabul. president biden has said he stands squarely behind his decision to withdraw american troops from afghanistan, in a defiant speech a day after the taliban seized control of the country. joe biden acknowledged that the afghan government's collapse had happened a lot faster than expected, and placed the blame on the country's leaders
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and security forces. here, the foreign secretary says details of a new resettlement scheme for afghan refugees will be announced soon. the scheme will be aimed at helping those most in need, including women and girls. the home office says it will be guided by the capacity of local authorities when deciding how many afghan refugees will be allowed to settle in the uk. our first report is from our correspondentjohn mcmanus. breaking short his summer holiday, president biden flew into washington dc on monday to answer the charge that he had overseen a majorforeign policy disaster for afghanistan, and perhaps the world. he admitted that events over the past week had caught his government by surprise, but he was in no mood to apologise. we gave them every tool they could need. we paid their salaries, provided for the maintenance of their air force. we gave them every chance
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to determine their own future. mr biden said the buck stopped with him. but... i am left again to ask of those who argue that we should stay, how many more generations of america's daughters and sons would you have me send to fight afghanistan's civil war? as he spoke, thousands of miles away the taliban, armed and confident, had taken control of the streets of kabul, now able to walk in unopposed to government buildings. they are the government now. for many it's a nightmare. it's worse than what i thought, because they are searching to our addresses. and it's not only my life, but also my family life right now is in danger. we are facing more and more threats than before, because before our identity was not being clear to the taliban.
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now they know our name, ourface, ouraddress, our phone numbers, everything. fearing the future, many afghans are trying to leave in any way they can. their desperation evident in these scenes at kabul airport. the us says it has now secured the airport in order to evacuate americans and otherforeigners. yet some people are managing to get out. charities in the uk have urged the government to help refugees fleeing the taliban to settle in britain. ministers say that more than 3000 afghan interpreters and their families who worked with uk forces, have been resettled, and they're working to bring more to britain. but the situation for afghan women is particularly dangerous. the re orts is particularly dangerous. the reports we — is particularly dangerous. the reports we are _ is particularly dangerous. tue: reports we are seeing is particularly dangerous. tte: reports we are seeing are worrying because there are girls who are
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worried about their safety, many are not allowed to be in schools, this is what i'm hearing from the activists working on the ground. details of a new scheme to welcome afghan refugees to the uk is due to be announced in the coming days. we are obviously a bighearted nation. we've got the criteria for asylum set in law. we worked with the un on that. we are working very carefully at what kind of further commitment we might make. the prime minister borisjohnson says he wants the un security council to urgently meet to discuss the international community's next steps. —— says he wants the g7 group of world leaders to urgently meet. but china has already said it wants friendly relations with afghanistan's new recruits, while russia has said it believes the taliban will restore order. john mcmanus, bbc news. speaking this morning, the foreign secretary gave an update on the latest situation on the ground in kabul.
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at 6am this morning i was updated that the situation has come to, there has been an increase in us and uk forces, including crowd control, because we have seen ordinary afghans heading for the exits given the taliban takeover, it is crucial be stabilising to allow the airport to operate functionally, both for afghans and british afghans who wish to leave and also the afghan translators and many other workers who served us loyally. so the situation is calmer, allowing us to mmp situation is calmer, allowing us to ramp up a number of flights and people that can come out. we expect 350 british nationals and those afghan workers to be able to leave in the next 2a hours, i suspect if and as the situation stabilises, those numbers will increase significantly. let's talk to our political
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correspondent helen catt. dominic raab said if and when the situation stabilises, the number being moved out of kabul will stabilise, but we do not have a firm idea of the numbers and labour says there needs to be more urgent action from the government. government is talking about a bespoke arrangement, so when will be get more details and when we'll be hear definitely how many people are being moved out of afghanistan and one will happen? —— and when will we be hearing definitely?— and when will we be hearing definitely? british nationals, afu hans definitely? british nationals, afghans who _ definitely? british nationals, afghans who have _ definitely? british nationals, afghans who have worked i definitely? british nationals, l afghans who have worked with definitely? british nationals, - afghans who have worked with the british forces at some point in the last 20 years are being moved out currently, there is already a scheme for that and you heard dominus up talking about that, —— you heard dominic raab talking about that and his figures were relating to that. but there has been pressure, some people saying we will expect a big
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wave of afghan refugees and they need to come up with a way to facilitate and help that. the government is developing what it calls a bespoke programme which would run on top of normal asylum rules to help people fleeing afghanistan, that is what we are waiting to hear more details of. it is understood it would probably be similar to a scheme set up in 2014 for people fleeing syria, under which 20,000 people came to the uk to be resettled over about five years. but at the moment we do not know anything about the numbers the uk might be looking to accept, the home office says it will be guided by the capacity of local authorities but the key thing is we do not know what the numbers will be, although we are told it will focus on those afghans in greatest need, particularly women and children. this is what dominic raab said about that earlier.
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the details will be set out by the prime _ the details will be set out by the prime minister and home secretary in due course _ prime minister and home secretary in due course and shortly. but we will secure _ due course and shortly. but we will secure the — due course and shortly. but we will secure the evacuation of his many riches _ secure the evacuation of his many riches nationals, including dual nationals. _ riches nationals, including dual nationals, as we can. we saw 150 come _ nationals, as we can. we saw 150 come back— nationals, as we can. we saw 150 come back on flights on sunday, believe — come back on flights on sunday, believe it— come back on flights on sunday, believe it or not that is exactly what _ believe it or not that is exactly what i — believe it or not that is exactly what i was _ believe it or not that is exactly what i was working on with the foreign— what i was working on with the foreign office team in cobra, we have _ foreign office team in cobra, we have seen— foreign office team in cobra, we have seen 289 of those afghan nationals who served as comeback, we looking _ nationals who served as comeback, we looking to _ nationals who served as comeback, we looking to ramp up that on top of those _ looking to ramp up that on top of those two — looking to ramp up that on top of those two tracks, nationals and afghans — those two tracks, nationals and afghans who had served us, there will he _ afghans who had served us, there will he the — afghans who had served us, there will be the asylum route and as well as the _ will be the asylum route and as well as the ordinary asylum process we want _ as the ordinary asylum process we want to— as the ordinary asylum process we want to look at what we will do bespoke — want to look at what we will do bespoke for afghanistan. we have a modei— bespoke for afghanistan. we have a model for— bespoke for afghanistan. we have a model for that previously used in syria. _ model for that previously used in syria. iet — model for that previously used in syria, let us work the details property. _ syria, let us work the details --roerl. ., . , syria, let us work the details pronerly-_ syria, let us work the details --roerl. ., . , ., , syria, let us work the details n-roerl. ., . , ., , .,, properly. concerns have been raised about how particularly _ properly. concerns have been raised about how particularly women - properly. concerns have been raised about how particularly women and i about how particularly women and girls would be able to access any such scheme within the scale of the
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takeover of afghanistan by the taliban, how they would get out of the country or access that. others have questioned other aspects of that, like labour's stephen kinnock. our ability to deliver on promises like that— our ability to deliver on promises like that has been sorely lacking up to now. _ like that has been sorely lacking up to now. so — like that has been sorely lacking up to now, so it is crucial to british government does not build up expectations that cannot be delivered on, but we also see the british— delivered on, but we also see the british government being ready to do far more _ british government being ready to do far more to _ british government being ready to do far more to secure safe passage for those _ far more to secure safe passage for those people to whom we are to aegerter— those people to whom we are to aegerter of gratitude, and i'm afraid — aegerter of gratitude, and i'm afraid the chaotic and shambolic scenes— afraid the chaotic and shambolic scenes coming out of kabul, it is a very dark— scenes coming out of kabul, it is a very dark day for us. so scenes coming out of kabul, it is a very dark day for us.— very dark day for us. so there will be lots of attention _ very dark day for us. so there will be lots of attention focused - very dark day for us. so there will be lots of attention focused on i very dark day for us. so there will| be lots of attention focused on the scene said kabul airport again, we have been told it is much, and are hoping to resume military flights to extract british nationals and
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afghans who have worked with the british security forces. we do not know when we will get news on the scheme following settling afghan refugees. foreign secretary dominic raab said one of the key things they wanted to do was make sure the situation on the ground in afghanistan did not deteriorate in the hopes that that would mean that fewer people wanted to leave. thank ou, helen fewer people wanted to leave. thank you. helen catt- _ lord dannatt was was head of the british army between 2006 and 2009. hejoins me now. good morning, thank you for your time. i want your reaction festival to what president biden said last night, placing the blame for what has happened on the afghan government and forces, saying american troops should not be fighting a war afghan forces are not prepared to fight. what fighting a war afghan forces are not prepared to fight.— fighting a war afghan forces are not prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am — prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am afraid _ prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am afraid to _ prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am afraid to say _ prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am afraid to say i _ prepared to fight. what did you make of that? i am afraid to say i think - of that? i am afraid to say i think it is a better edge. the principal reason why afghan forces have collapsed was the decision by
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president biden to announce that american and therefore other international forces were believed by the 20th anniversary of 9/11 in 102 weeks. the sadness of that is that what we have done for the last years since major combat operations by international forces ended in 2014 is providing important technical assistance to the afghan national forces as we have continued to train them, and to support their morale and there will to fight. the decision to pull out the international trips very quickly has undermined the morale of the afghan government and particularly undermine the morale of the afghan national army, that has caused to give the rapid advance of —— the taliban has not been down to the brilliance of the taliban's fighting, it has been the collapse of morale in the afghan national security forces which i am afraid as a consequence ofjoe biden's
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decision and is much unfortunate. nevertheless, where you surprised at the pace of eight? in some provincial capitals the afghan army decided not to fight. they have fought, more than 40,000 members of the afghan army killed since 2014 alone, they have fought, but in these last weeks and days were you surprised at the speed at which the taliban were able to regain control? yes, i think everyone has been surprised to the point of being shocked, but even a quick analysis of what has happened has been the decision to withdraw international forces completely undermining the will of the afghan national forces. it is not the brilliance of the taliban as fighters but across these 34 provincial capitals and the national capital of kabul, local officials have been doing deals probably largely to save their own
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skins and it has effectively opened the door to the taliban who have swept through the country at an amazing speed. thinking back to sunday morning, we saw the president in his office talking to the nation, by sunday evening he had fled north. quite extraordinary, the speed of what has happened. but i am afraid i was unconvinced by what president biden said, the us have a lot to explain. in biden said, the us have a lot to exlain. ., , ., , biden said, the us have a lot to exlain. .,, ., , ., explain. in the last 24 hours also we have heard _ explain. in the last 24 hours also we have heard from _ explain. in the last 24 hours also we have heard from a _ explain. in the last 24 hours also we have heard from a number. explain. in the last 24 hours also we have heard from a number of| we have heard from a number of afghan veterans who have lost limbs, suffered at life changing injuries in their tours there, who had seen friends lose their lives, many of them asking whether their effort was all in vain. what is your message to those people? mr; all in vain. what is your message to those people?— all in vain. what is your message to those people? my message to those --eole is those people? my message to those people is that _ those people? my message to those people is that they _ those people? my message to those people is that they acted _ those people? my message to those people is that they acted with - those people? my message to those people is that they acted with great | people is that they acted with great professionalism and commitment and carried out their duty on behalf of our nation with great professionalism and skill and they should be proud of what they achieved. while they were doing
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that, containing the taliban, particularly in the south of afghanistan, it enabled a fair degree of development and enhancement to afghan civil society to the point where the government was better than in the past, their economy was picking up and by civil society had changed. the position of women in civil society transformed, girls are able to go to school, that process was due to the fact that, in security terms, afghanistan was relatively stable, so they should feel a degree of satisfaction for having achieved that. the disappointment is what we have been talking about, this operation has ended with disastrous consequences. i think the wider point is that since about 2014, 2015, the number of troops in afghanistan has been very small, just providing that technical support to the afghan
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national security forces and that moral support. that could have gone on for quite some time while afghan society continue to develop. i think there is an analogy, the big charities like unicef and save the children do not count in years the number of times they are in somewhere conducting an operation, they do what needs to be done, the military should have seen themselves the same. casualties have been mercifully low over the last few years but our effect was significant, both forafghanistan, significant, both for afghanistan, for stability significant, both forafghanistan, for stability in the region and stability or widely internationally. one final question if i may, dominic raab this morning talking about hopes that the uk might be able to exercise a positive and moderating influence in afghanistan as far as we can was the expression used. without troops there and based on
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what you know of the taliban then and now, do you think those hopes are in vain? i and now, do you think those hopes are in vain?— are in vain? i am not quite sure what they _ are in vain? i am not quite sure what they are _ are in vain? i am not quite sure what they are grounded - are in vain? i am not quite sure what they are grounded on, - are in vain? i am not quite sure what they are grounded on, to | are in vain? i am not quite sure l what they are grounded on, to be honest, anita. we have withdrawn our military, in the last year we have reduced by two thirds the amount of foreign aid with the uk have been putting into afghanistan, so i am not sure on what basis the foreign secretary thinks we will be able to exercise influence. we have withdrawn our military, slash the foreign aid budget by two thirds and our ambassador has packed up and gone. apart from broadcasting on the bbc world service to afghanistan, i don't know how he thinks he can do it. ., ~ , ., don't know how he thinks he can do it. ., ~ i. ., don't know how he thinks he can do it. thank you for your thoughts this mornin: , it. thank you for your thoughts this morning. lord _ it. thank you for your thoughts this morning, lord dannatt. _ the speed at which events have unfolded in afghanistan has caused widespread shock — not least for those with family and friends living there. tim muffett has been speaking to members of london's afghan community.
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fearful and scared things will get worse. afghanistan is in fire. my family don't have water, food. they are sleeping on the road. i have kids. i am a mother. last night i couldn't sleep. people dying for no reason, people torturing for no reason. why? because they are human? i ask great britain to help them, to have the humanity. that's all i can say. the afghanistan and central asian association centre in feltham, west london. for 20 years, this organisation has offered support to the afghan community in the uk. most who come here have friends and family in a country in crisis. the speed at which the situation has changed has proved shocking. over the weekend the taliban reached kabul. there are kids suffering. there are old people,
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seniors, homeless people. the situation has clearly changed dramatically. have you been speaking to your family? yeah, their life is in danger. we don't know what will happen next. it's a shame. it's a shame for all of us. not only me, for all of the human beings, all of the communities around the world. maria's mother and four sisters are in the afghan capital. three weeks ago, my father, he passed away. now they are by themselves. on friday, before the taliban reached the city, she managed to speak to them. i'm watching the situation right now. people are coming from the provinces. the girls have nothing to do but stay on the streets. they were begging
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for money and for food and water. it is a bad situation. getting worse day by day. talking to your sister in those circumstances, how hard is that for you? it is too much. it is heartbreaking for me because this situation, i can't do for them anything. amidst the despair there are positive moments here. lessons in farsi for children, many of whom have never been to the country of their parents�* birth. and classes in english for adults looking to improve their language skills. as well as food, advice and support. how important is this place at the moment, given the terrible things happening in afghanistan? i think this place plays a vital role. people are becoming very, very, notjust upset, but also anxious and confused about what will happen
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in the future. events 3500 miles away have never felt so close to home. tim muffett, bbc news. with me is bahar, founder of the bahar women's association in leeds. she is here to talk more about her experiences as somebody who left afghanistan in the late 90s. thank you forjoining us. i know many of their women in the afghan women's association and leeds came to escape the taliban, yourself included. tell us about why you felt compelled to leave and how you got out of afghanistan?— leave and how you got out of afghanistan? leave and how you got out of afuhanistan? ., ., ., afghanistan? thanks for having me. yes, afghanistan? thanks for having me. yes. many. — afghanistan? thanks for having me. yes. many. many — afghanistan? thanks for having me. yes, many, many people _ afghanistan? thanks for having me. yes, many, many people left- yes, many, many people left afghanistan because of the war. i
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left in 1996, 97, it was the first year that the taliban got into kabul and i had to leave because my life was in danger. at that time i was a young teenage girl and i lost my mother, my two brothers, my four cousins and also i lost my dad during the russian war, i never saw him. so it was very, very difficult is a situation, i could knuckle out of the house, schools were closed, nobody could go to work, no food, no money, nothing, it was a very difficult time for me and i had no one to even bury my own mother because my brothers were hiding from the taliban to another safer place and my mum died in my arms. it was very hard for me but i managed
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somehow to bury her on the day of her death. i had to start myjourney to leave and find a better life, it took about two or three years to get took about two or three years to get to my final destination, i think. now i am here for about 21 years. you have built a life here, and listening to your story of huge loss, so many members of your family, the trauma you went through, you are obviously an incredibly strong person to have coped with all of that and build a new life so i can only imagine what it has been like for you watching the scenes over the last few days, including in kabul. what has been running through your mind as you watch those pictures? i your mind as you watch those
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ictures? . your mind as you watch those pictures?— your mind as you watch those ictures? ., ~ ,, .,, pictures? i am thinking like i lost my parents _ pictures? i am thinking like i lost my parents today, _ pictures? i am thinking like i lost my parents today, i _ pictures? i am thinking like i lost my parents today, i lost - pictures? i am thinking like i lost my parents today, i lost my - pictures? i am thinking like i lost - my parents today, i lost my country, i had no mother and now i have no motherland. i am worried about those women and girls, my family were left there, i am so proud of our afghan women who have achieved with education like doctors, engineers, pilots, many, many intelligent women we have, and they cannot follow their dreams any more, they are staying at home, they cannot go out to the shop. what will happen to ourfuture, our cannot go out to the shop. what will happen to our future, our children's future? i don't know. every day, the first couple of years when i arrived into the uk from 2000, i had nightmares, i could not forget what happened to me and other people in
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afghanistan, but slowly when i started working on this association, helps people in the community, providing advocacy activities, english classes and helping others, i felt much better and english classes and helping others, ifelt much better and moved on and that was myjourney ifelt much better and moved on and that was my journey to ifelt much better and moved on and that was myjourney to help people, but to be honest people calling me a survivor, i cannot survive helping others by watching them dying everyday. everyday i cry, i have nightmares, i cannot sleep, i cannot imagine what is happening to those women and children sleeping on the streets and parks of kabul right now. they are all hopeless. i don't know what will happen to us, to afghanistan. would i ever go back? can i go back, can i find my family
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again? my children never saw their grandparents, i could not go and get to know my relatives. i think every 20 years, generation to generation, we are suffering. and it is enough, to be honest, we have had enough. i wonder, bahar, what you think when you hear taliban spokesman talking, and it is always spokesman, isn't it, speaking about women's rights and the rights to education when they say they want people to start routine life with full confidence? how do you react? to routine life with full confidence? how do you react?— routine life with full confidence? how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences _ how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences we _ how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences we have _ how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences we have had - how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences we have had in - how do you react? to be honest, with the experiences we have had in the i the experiences we have had in the past, we want to believe that. it is just a show. in kabul at the moment, people act normal but mentally, emotionally, physically, they are damaged, they are scared to go out, they don't know if they are coming back alive or not. women are hiding. all of a certain everything
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happened, to be honest. people who were working on not working, they have no money, they cannot provide food for their children right now, it is a crisis happening and iron trying to reduce in fundraising to send some money. right now, agencies and banks are closed, we cannot even help ourfamilies, people and banks are closed, we cannot even help our families, people cannot send money to their families, the government is shut, there is no money and anybody can help themselves also vital. some people died during the war or were killed during the terrorist attacks, some people are now dying from the anger, angry stomach. it is really hard, i cannot see my people like that. i know you are talking about how difficult it is from afar to help and how badly you feel for the people buy, how worried you are, but nonetheless you are trying to do
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your bit at home in leeds, he won the other members of the afghan women's association, trying to raise money to send medical aid so that people can buy food. what are you doing? fist people can buy food. what are you doin: ? �* ., ., , people can buy food. what are you doin. ? �* ., ., , ., doing? at the moment the only way to doing? at the moment the only way to do something. — doing? at the moment the only way to do something. l _ doing? at the moment the only way to do something, i am _ doing? at the moment the only way to do something, i am cooking _ doing? at the moment the only way to do something, i am cooking and i do something, i am cooking and providing food to others and whatever donation they gave me i am raising that money, also many friends from the british community in the asian community are trying to help us and donate some money to the organisation. it is not enough yet and by the time we have enough i am sure there will be a way we can send that money back home to our family and otherfamilies who that money back home to our family and other families who are in that money back home to our family and otherfamilies who are in risk of crisis. to be honest we will do as much as we can. at the moment all be can do is reassure people, talk to them and give emotional support.
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right now i smile, i cover my face with my make up but at night i stay awake and cry, i cannot imagine, to be honest, because whatever i had seen it all repeating again and again. we cannot move on, to be honest. i cannot even think what will happen or is happening to us, but i hope there are plans, that they think about human rights. i would like the well to think about this, not to forget about afghanistan. —— i would like the world to think about this. for the last couple of weeks the world was quiet about it, now it is headline news. i hope that afghan people have not been forgotten, to be honest. i hope they can open their doors and welcome them and host them and look after them because we have been suffering a lot these 40 years.
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bahar, thank you so much for bravely telling us about your experiences, we really appreciate that. bahar from the afghan women's association in leeds. the time is 9:31am now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. the next couple of days, the weather will remain fairly cloudy for most of us and also quite cool for the time of year. today, we have been watching a band of rain push away from the south—east, a lot of cloud left behind it, thick enough for some patchy light rain and drizzle, generally murky, the best of any brightness across parts of shetland, eastern scotland, north east england, east wales and towards the south—west. temperatures 14 to about 20 degrees. through this evening and overnight we hang onto a lot of cloud. still some light rain, some drizzle, more rain coming in across shetland, as a result, it's not going to be a cold night,
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most of us staying in double figures with overnight lows 11—14. tomorrow we lose this rain from shetland, it clears off into the sea, again, a lot of cloud around, the best of the breaks in the shelter of the hills and mountains in the east, eastern scotland, parts of eastern england, east wales, top temperatures 21. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... kabul airport reopens following a day of desperation and chaos, in which thousands tried to flee afghanistan after the taliban took control of the capital us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan, saying the mission was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. new zealand announces a snap lockdown — after the country detected its first case of locally transmitted covid—19 since february.
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haiti suffers further. after the death toll in saturday's earthquake passes 1,400 — a tropical storm makes landfall on the island. bob dylan is being sued by a woman who says he sexually abused her in 1965 when she was 12 years old. he denies the allegations. sport, and time for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. we arejoined by we are joined by sally nugent. good morning everyone. naomi osaka struggled through her first news conference since the controversy over refusing to speak to media at the french open. osaka became emotional shortly after being asked about "dealing with press conferences", the four—time grand slam winner is preparing to play in cincinnati this week. when you say, i'm not crazy about dealing with you guys, what does that refer to? you have said you don't especially
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like the press conference format. that seems to be obviously the most widely used means of communicating to the media and through the media to the public. that's interesting. i would say the occasion, like, when to do the press conference is what i feel is the most difficult. ok, i think we're just - going to take a quick break, we will be back in one moment. andy murray beat richard gasquet at the cincinatti open. murray, who has won the tournament twice, eased into the second round with a 6—4, 6—4 victory over gasquet. britain's dan evans is out though beaten by diego schwartzman. i thought i did well. i think i moved pretty well for my first singles match in a while on the hard courts. certainly a little bit more
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confidence in my movement than i did when i played him here a couple of years ago, the first match i played, singles match, since i had the metal hip put in so i was a bit apprehensive and he uses all of the angles on the court really well and makes you move a lot so you need to move well against him. and i did that tonight. afghanistan has withdrawn its two athletes from next week's paralympics in tokyo. zakia khudadadi was set to become the first afghan woman to take part in the paralympics. but, because of the chaos at kabul airport, they're unable to travel. it's devastating, it's devastating. for me, this was history in the making. this was just, we were going to make history. first female athlete to compete, first paralympian. the growth of paralympians. we wanted through her to use her as a role model to showcase, give her publicity to say, if she is able to do it, you can do it as well to encourage more participants. england will begin the t20 world cup in october with a repeat of the 2016 final
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against holders west indies. south africa and australia join england and the west indies in their super 12s group along with two yet—to—be—determined qualifiers, who could be ireland or scotland. meanwhile, the test team are 1—0 down in their series with india after a dramatic final day in the second test at lord's. england were favourites at the start of the day. quick wickets would have seen them chasing less than 200 but instead jasprit bumrah helped his side to a lead of 271 before they declared. and england's batting got off to a terrible start when both openers were removed for ducks. they steadily lost wickets and with less than 50 balls left to survive were all out for 120. we are counting more on rishab to stay there and get us runs but what bumrah did was unbelievable and i think we felt that the momentum shifted in the morning because of that
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partnership and we just knew we needed to pull them out today and we definitely had a crack at the result. it is part of cricket sometimes, fair play to them, good partnership, hit it in some very unusual areas which asked difficult questions of us. i think if i had time again, i would probably manage it slightly differently. that's all the sport for now. new zealand is imposing a nationwide lockdown from midnight local time, after the country detected its first community case of coronavirus for six months. it will last for seven days in auckland, the largest city, where the case was detected, and three days in the rest of new zealand. it's not yet confirmed if the case is the highly tra nsmissable delta variant. here's new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern. public health officials have been working at pace this afternoon to gather information on the case and their movements and i will pass to dr bloomfield shortly to set out the facts as we currently know them. including locations of interest that
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had been identified so far. but first, i want to assure new zealand that we have planned for this eventuality. and that we will now be putting in place that plan to contain and stamp out covid—19 once again. let's talk to our correspondent in sydney, shaimaa khalil. a characteristically decisive move from jacinda ardern in response to this new case. from jacinda ardern in response to this new case-— from jacinda ardern in response to this new case. that's right, they've done so well. _ this new case. that's right, they've done so well, it's _ this new case. that's right, they've done so well, it's the _ this new case. that's right, they've done so well, it's the first - this new case. that's right, they've done so well, it's the first case i this new case. that's right, they've done so well, it's the first case in l done so well, it's the first case in six months so they have something to protect the success, they've always had an elimination policy of snap lock downs and closed borders, that one is no different. interestingly, the prime minister used sydney where i am as an example of what happens when you don't get on top of the outbreak and the cases spread. the number of cases here remains stubbornly high, she says we don't
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want what happened to sydney to happen in new zealand. there are a couple of things that were health officials. first, they are not really sure whether it is the delta variant even though they say they are treating it as one and the other is that they still cannot find a link, they have not been able to find a link between the case and overseas travel or hotel quarantine. this means there could be members of the community that are close contacts and also there could be many exposure at sites so they are going in, going hard. they are going fast. the prime minister used her famous phrase of the team of 5 million should unite together to try and contain this outbreak but of course as well the fact vaccination numbers have been low, about 20% of people had been vaccinated, they've been trying to ramp these numbers up, it will be suspended for a couple of days to make sure this is happening safely under the
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restrictions but mainly, really, they want to try and contain the outbreak, make sure they trace all the close contacts to make sure that the close contacts to make sure that the delta variant, if that is, does not spread quickly.— let's return to afghanistan, our top story. we have now the founder and director of the afghanistan and central asian association in west london. thank you, doctor, for joining us. you cannot like many afghans living in the uk have a story of having to flee afghanistan. tell us your story. i story of having to flee afghanistan. tell us your story.— tell us your story. i think the news that we are — tell us your story. i think the news that we are looking _ tell us your story. i think the news that we are looking at _ tell us your story. i think the news that we are looking at now - tell us your story. i think the news that we are looking at now is i that we are looking at now is devastation, disaster, and a human
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rights violation. it's happening in afghanistan. we are as a diaster community looking for a new kind of opposition, a new transition for the future of afghanistan. to make sure afghanistan will not become a safe haven for international terrorism. we are very grateful for the support provided by great britain for the past 20 years. we have had nato intervention since then, in 2001, now the people of afghanistan are feeling very anxious, there is a lot of anxiety and they don't know what will be happening for the future of afghanistan and for the future of themselves. this is a very tragic event. the taliban already started persecuting people, searching house
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by house, defying anyone working with the previous government or the us military, all of our embassies are working, the media, they are killing them. there was already some incidents in kabul and in other provinces. there are some unreported human rights violations committed by the taliban. so i came to the uk in 1999 as a refugee on the back of a lorry, a refrigerated container. i have similar experience that the people of afghanistan now are facing under the taliban regime in afghanistan and that is why millions of people now are hoping for the future, how they can leave the country, find a safe place for themselves and their family members and their children.— and their children. given what you went through. _ and their children. given what you went through, could _
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and their children. given what you went through, could you - and their children. given what you went through, could you have i went through, could you have imagined that what is happening now would happen? and that it would happen with such speed? this would happen? and that it would happen with such speed?- would happen? and that it would happen with such speed? this is the devastation that _ happen with such speed? this is the devastation that we _ happen with such speed? this is the devastation that we did _ happen with such speed? this is the devastation that we did not - happen with such speed? this is the devastation that we did not expect, | devastation that we did not expect, that the taliban take over control of the country so fast. at the same time there is an announcement that they made since last month of withdrawal of their troops from afghanistan as well as allowing the taliban, allowing the taliban, there was an announcement made by the us administration, it created a serious state of anarchy, gap, serious opportunity for the taliban to
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improve their confidence and sees the provinces as well as the capital of the country. d0 the provinces as well as the capital of the country-— of the country. do you think the taliban in _ of the country. do you think the taliban in 2021 _ of the country. do you think the taliban in 2021 art _ of the country. do you think the taliban in 2021 art substantially| taliban in 2021 art substantially different from the taliban of the late 1990s? and when they talk about in this statement today, urging people to start routine life with full confidence, what do you make of that? i full confidence, what do you make of that? ., �* 4' full confidence, what do you make of that? ., �* ~ ., that? i don't think the taliban attitude has _ that? i don't think the taliban attitude has changed - that? i don't think the taliban attitude has changed now, i that? i don't think the taliban - attitude has changed now, compared to 1996 or 1999. the taliban, they are the same people. they are providing misleading information to the foreign correspondence, the foreign media. and according to the latest news, they are even, there are a number of cases of women's
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rights abuses, taking women and having forced marriage which in a muslim country is a very, very terrible situation, to take the girls in front of the family members and take them with themselves and having forced marriage, as well as there are serious human rights violations committed by the taliban where they killed thousands of afghan soldiers and people who were working with the afghanistan army for the past 20 years. i don't think the taliban attitude has changed, the taliban attitude has changed, the taliban attitude has changed, the taliban has become more extreme, more radical. and more fundamentalist. and more violent. yes, this is the problem that the international media sometimes
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misunderstand the statements coming from the taliban. and according to the news we receive on the ground from afghanistan, the reality completely is different than some of the media broadcast from afghanistan.— the media broadcast from afuhanistan. ., ., ,, the media broadcast from afuhanistan. ., ., afghanistan. doctor, we thank you so much for your— afghanistan. doctor, we thank you so much for your time _ afghanistan. doctor, we thank you so much for your time today. _ the headlines, kabul airport reopens after the taliban took control of the capital and thousands try to flee. the us president defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan saying the mission was counterterrorism and not nation—building. new zealand announces a snap lock down after the country detected its first case of locally transmitted covid—19 since february.
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uk job vacancies hit a record 953,000 in the three months tojuly, according to official figures. unemployment fell to 4.7% in the three months tojune, down slightly on the previous quarter, while average pay rose 7.4% — that's according to the office for national statistics. our business correspondent alice baxter has more. good morning. these numbers from the office for national statistics seem to point to a jobs market in recovery as the economy to point to a jobs market in recovery as the economy opens to point to a jobs market in recovery as the economy opens up after the pandemic. and as the furlough scheme winds down. employment is up across all measures, unemployment is down. there are a number of unfilled jobs across a variety of sectors which underpins concerns that we have been hearing from industry about labour shortages. let's take a little
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deeper into the numbers. jonathan boyesis deeper into the numbers. jonathan boyes is a labour market economist at the cip d, the body which represents human resources and people development. good to talk to you this morning. what do you make of these numbers? the you this morning. what do you make of these numbers?— you this morning. what do you make of these numbers? the headlines are fantastic, especially _ of these numbers? the headlines are fantastic, especially on _ of these numbers? the headlines are fantastic, especially on the _ fantastic, especially on the employment figures, some of the statistics— employment figures, some of the statistics i— employment figures, some of the statistics i think need some attention or the forward—looking ones _ attention or the forward—looking ones. there is always a lead time of recruitment. — ones. there is always a lead time of recruitment, the vacancies don't 'ust recruitment, the vacancies don't just tell— recruitment, the vacancies don't just tell us — recruitment, the vacancies don't just tell us what was happening in the past _ just tell us what was happening in the past but hint at what will happen— the past but hint at what will happen over the next few months. there's_ happen over the next few months. there's also some indications there will not _ there's also some indications there will not be — there's also some indications there will not be mass redundancies over the next _ will not be mass redundancies over the next few months from the insolvency service. it's a positive set of _ insolvency service. it's a positive set of figures in the forward—looking one suggest the end of furlough will be a relatively painless — of furlough will be a relatively painless period with minimaljob losses — painless period with minimaljob losses gf— painless period with minimal 'ob losses. .., , painless period with minimal 'ob losses. , ., ., , losses. of course all of these numbers _ losses. of course all of these numbers have _ losses. of course all of these numbers have to _ losses. of course all of these numbers have to be - losses. of course all of these numbers have to be seen i losses. of course all of these i numbers have to be seen through losses. of course all of these - numbers have to be seen through the prism of what happened last year and how woeful of course a lot of the
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data was on all of these measures last year during the pandemic. absolutely. he decided to pay figures, — absolutely. he decided to pay figures, 7.4%, obviously this is a nominal— figures, 7.4%, obviously this is a nominal rate _ figures, 7.4%, obviously this is a nominal rate of pay growth but that is largely— nominal rate of pay growth but that is largely because at the beginning of the _ is largely because at the beginning of the pandemic, many people were on furlough _ of the pandemic, many people were on furlough and their pay was reduced so there _ furlough and their pay was reduced so there is— furlough and their pay was reduced so there is this bass effect, now their— so there is this bass effect, now their pay— so there is this bass effect, now their pay is— so there is this bass effect, now their pay is going back up we are getting _ their pay is going back up we are getting these extraordinary numbers. it is interesting to think about where — it is interesting to think about where we _ it is interesting to think about where we were this time last year and that— where we were this time last year and that is— where we were this time last year and that is where forecasts were for things— and that is where forecasts were for things to _ and that is where forecasts were for things to be quite tired now and they are — things to be quite tired now and they are not. we were expecting unemployment to be about 7.5%, getting _ unemployment to be about 7.5%, getting towards the kind of post—crash territory which is quite painful— post—crash territory which is quite painful figures but as we stand now, they are _ painful figures but as we stand now, they are at _ painful figures but as we stand now, they are at under 5%, 4.7%. yes, it's been— they are at under 5%, 4.7%. yes, it's been a — they are at under 5%, 4.7%. yes, it's been a very strange year for the labour— it's been a very strange year for the labour market and that's done some _ the labour market and that's done some strange things to the figures. we need _ some strange things to the figures. we need to dig a little deeper but
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there _ we need to dig a little deeper but there are — we need to dig a little deeper but there are experimental statistics that are — there are experimental statistics that are giving us a little bit of a more _ that are giving us a little bit of a more real—time picture. experimental statistics— more real—time picture. experimental statistics on _ more real—time picture. experimental statistics on vacancy suggest in july, _ statistics on vacancy suggest in july, they— statistics on vacancy suggest in july, they actuallyjust exceeded 1 million. _ july, they actuallyjust exceeded 1 million, this is quite extraordinary, it tells us not necessarily that there are more jobs than there _ necessarily that there are more jobs than there were before the pandemic but actually, employment and hours worked _ but actually, employment and hours worked is _ but actually, employment and hours worked is still below pre—pandemic levels _ worked is still below pre—pandemic levels but — worked is still below pre—pandemic levels but what it tells you is that all of _ levels but what it tells you is that all of these employers are looking for workers at the same time and that's— for workers at the same time and that's where these recruitment difficulties are really starting to bite _ difficulties are really starting to bite. the — difficulties are really starting to bite. �* , , difficulties are really starting to bite. a difficulties are really starting to bite. . , bite. as we say, 'ob vacancies across a variety i bite. as we say, job vacancies across a variety of _ bite. as we say, job vacancies across a variety of sectors, i across a variety of sectors, entertainment, accommodation, food, we will have to see what happens. the chancellor saying in response to these figures i note there could still be bumps on the road but the date is promising, there are now more for use on payroll at any point since march 2020, the number of people on furlough the lowest since the scheme launched. as you say positive headlines at this point but
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to be continue, i think, as with all data when it comes to digging deeper. jonathan, thank you. back to you in the studio.— you in the studio. alice, many thanks. let's turn to another big story now — and the wildfires burning in parts of europe. there are reports of thousands of people being evacuated in the south of france near saint tropez as what's being described as a 'fierce' wildfire spreads across part of the region. my colleague, geeta guru—murthy is in one of the areas affected. she was told to leave her house near cogolin as the fires approached — and filmed what she saw. it's been absolutely terrifying. i was living here just for a few days with the children on holiday. and we got a call very late last night, from the villa company we had rented from, saying we had to get out immediately because there was a huge fire. we threw ourselves into the car. drove down the tiny narrow path in the direction we were told
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to drive towards and immediately came up against, turned a corner and came up against flames, literally on the side of the road. we tried to turn around, car went into a ditch so we had to run sort of a mile up the other direction. with flames incredibly nearby and huge fires on both sides of the road. we were very lucky, we came to another villa which had a couple of members of the family who owned vineyards and forests in the area we were staying, they were voluntary fire workers. and so they took us in and told us to stay inside, my husband went out to help because the problem was that the villa was surrounded by fires on both sides and a third fire, in fact. so we were, on all sides, huge blazes, with the wind changing direction and theyjust were hoping
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the wind would drive the fires perpendicularly on either side of the house we were in and not in our direction. they were very worried about sparks coming, my husband and the other men there were walking around with buckets of water, putting them out amongst this incredibly thick smoke. we were trying to contact the fire authorities but the people we were with said no one would come for where we are because they were focused on the town and the bigger population areas but it was very, very frightening, flames were very thick and very fierce and very close. and ijust didn't know how we were going to get out at one point because the road in one direction was blocked with flames. and we couldn't get to the car. and in the other direction it was closed off completely and it went up into the mountains but they had closed it off because of the fire. so our only option, we were told,
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by the people that we were with, was to run into the hills but we had seen wild boar as we were running, it was completely dark, obviously. or tojump into the swimming pool. we were literally googling what to do. my my colleague there explaining the situation she and her family found themselves in during those forest fires in the south of france. areas of haiti worst hit by saturday's devastating earthquake have been flooded by heavy rains brought by a tropical storm. aid workers had been rushing to the region before the storm hit. at least 1400 people are known to have died in the quake. almost 7,000 are injured in the quake and hospitals are struggling to care for them, as our correspondentjames clayton reports. many of these people were asleep when the earthquake hit, their homes caving in. it's hard enough to treat survivors
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of any natural disaster, but when the hospitals themselves are under fear of collapse, it makes it all the more difficult. well, this hospital is simply too unsafe to have people stay inside, so they've brought everyone outside here. they've tried to place them undertrees, undertents, to try and keep them cooler and out of the hot sun. but what you're seeing here, just 48 hours after the quake, the doctors have run out of painkillers, they've run out of antibiotics and there are major concerns about things like infection. elsie had just woken up when the earthquake hit. her son has a serious compound fracture and needs to be taken to the airport to be lifted out. seeing him in such pain is overwhelming. there simply aren't enough facilities to treat people in this remote part of the country. from the hospital some of the injured are taken to this airport, waiting for a flight out to the capital port—au—prince. like 19—year—old tanya,
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who is pregnant. so you woke up and basically tried to run out, but then the house collapsed on top of her? she says her leg hurts and she has abdominal pain. most of the hospitals here are in need of the basics. iv solutions, bandages, medications, including antibiotics and pain management medications. they're in the same situation where they've run out. overall it's dire. you know, we're sitting here with three hospitals that are moving patients to the airport for transportation out. there's no coordination. a tropical storm here is also preventing flights in and out of the capital. the people here need help, but at the moment not enough is coming. james clayton, bbc news. i will be talking to a representative of the red cross in haiti about their efforts in the latest on the situation there. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol hello again. today we have started off on a fairly cloudy note with some
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patchy light rain and some drizzle. really that is going to be the forecast for the next few days. you can add cool into that as well, temperatures below average for this stage in august. this weather front has been producing rain, now clearing off onto the near continent, you see from the isobars which are quite close together that it's going to be breezy. cloudy as we head into the afternoon for most, with that patchy light rain and drizzle, particularly on the coastal hills. it should brighten up at times across shetland, parts of eastern scotland, north—east england, south—east wales, dorset and the west country, these white circles represent the average wind speed, as you see it's really breezy. temperatures today 14 to about 20 degrees, yesterday, the top temperature was in strathallan in perth and kinross, reaching 21.8, not expecting that today. this evening and overnight, we hang onto a lot of cloud. there will be some patchy light rain and drizzle and also some more rain coming in across shetland in particular. temperatures falling away to 11—15 , again, not going to be particularly cold. tomorrow we start with a lot
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of cloud, the rain clearing into the sea, like today, we see some breaks in the shelter of the mountains, particularly to the east, parts of eastern scotland, north—east england, east wales, parts of the south—west for example, temperatures up to 21 degrees. as we head for wednesday into thursday we have a new weather front coming in from the west, heading eastwards, its northern extent is open to question. distinct lack of isobars, not going to be such a brisk breeze on thursday. a bright start in the south—east, as this weather front comes in bringing increasingly patchy rain eastwards, that will be eradicated. for scotland and northern ireland, you are going to have a cloudy day again, some light rain and drizzle here and there. thursday evening we say goodbye to that weather front, into friday we have a new one coming our way. a lot of dry weather to start the day on friday, some sunshine around, areas of cloud floating around as well and as the weather front comes in from the atlantic,
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you see eventually it brings rain in across northern ireland. temperatures on friday, 13 in the north, to 21.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the taliban announce a general amnesty for government officials, urging them to return to work following their takeover of the capital kabul. us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from the country, saying the mission was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. i stand squarely behind my decisions. after 20 years, i've learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw us forces. in the uk, the foreign secretary says the government is looking at a bespoke resettlement scheme for vulnerable afghans we are working on that very carefully, we've always been a big hearted nation, you've got a home secretary and foreign

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