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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 19, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. chaos at kabul airport — even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through, with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday — the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel, to go home. if you are linked to the international presence here, you are certainly going to be worried that in this chaotic situation, a taliban member will turn around to you and say, who are you, what did you do? and they may decide that you shouldn't be allowed to leave. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august, passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign
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secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty, after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. the only problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost, or didn't have any leverage. the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the airport would continue to fly, allow planes to fly out, and those people we were getting out, would they be allowed to get out? survivors in haiti ask when is help coming, after saturday's earthquake killed almost 2,000 people. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. and coming up this hour, as the paralympics get under way next week, one campaign will light up uk landmarks to raise awareness of global disability discrimination.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. president biden has said us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond his deadline of the end of the month. and he inisted no americans will be left behind in kabul. the united states is concerned that although us forces are controlling kabul airport, the taliban have ringed the airport's permiter. and afghans — who worked with the us — are being blocked by taliban militants because they don't have travel documents. amid chaotic scenes at the airport, the uk is to deploy another company of soldiers. 12 people have been killed near the airport since sunday.
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the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, said the government's aim is to get about 6,000 people out, adding that british troops would stay as long as us forces are in control of the airport. meanwhile, the uk's foreign secterary, dominic raab, has been accused by the opposition labour party of shamefully putting interpreters�* lives at risk, by not seeking help from an afghan minister. and one interpreter who worked for uk forces in afghanistan has begged the uk prime minister borisjohnson for help, fearing fatal reprisals from the taliban. the first of our reports comes from our north amercia correspondent, david willis. in the afghan capital, people, scared and desperate, are still trying to flee the country. the taliban are coming for me, this girl cries. one of hundreds pressed to the gates of kabul airport in the hope ofjoining a flight out. president biden continues to blame
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the craven capitulation of the afghan government. he conceded it might not be possible to complete the american withdrawal by the deadline in two weeks�* time. americans should understand that troops might have to be there beyond august 31st? no, we're going to try to get it done before august 31. if we don't, we will determine at the time who is left. and? and if there is american citizens left, we are going to stay until we get them all out. the biden administration has brokered a deal with the taliban to allow civilians safe passage to us flights, but with checkpoints throughout the city, bottlenecks abound and the remit of these us soldiers doesn't extend beyond the airport perimeter. the taliban are in and around kabul right now, but they are not
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interfering with our operations. through the state department, the taliban are facilitating the safe passage to the airport of american citizens. that is, us passport holders. despite its conciliatory tone, few believe the taliban will tolerate any challenge to its leadership. a number of demonstrators were reportedly shot dead in the eastern city of jalalabad after the taliban flag was lowered and the afghan tricolour raised in its place. and having promised a more inclusive approach to government, it is not clear what form that might take. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani is in afghanistan's capital kabul, and gave us this update on the situation there. there are two very different scenes. absolute chaos are still continuing at the airport, where hundreds of people, thousands of people
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probably, have been camped out for a number of days, trying to get inside, desperate to leave the country. many of them don't actually have visas or the necessary documentation. it is very unlikely they will be evacuated. but they are still willing to put up with these awful conditions. taliban members are firing into the air trying to control the crowd, at times using sticks and whips to push people back. elsewhere in the city, things seem to be a great deal calmer than they have been in the past few days. more shops, more restaurants are opening up than in previous days. more people are coming out and about. banks remain closed as the many government offices. for fewer women on the streets. you do see some. they are not necessarily wearing the all—encompassing burqa most closely associated with the taliban's last stint in power in the 19905. taliban's last stint in power in the 1990s. things are returning to normal in a way but still a —— an airof normal in a way but still a —— an
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air of deep uncertainty. many people still worried that they could be targeted. it is hard to overstate how much of a presence the taliban have in this city. everywhere you go you see heavily armed fighters patrolling in vehicles seized from the security forces or wandering the streets. very surreal. but this seems to be the new normal. at least for now. flights have gradually resumed. certainly the military evacuation once. some reports that some commercial flights have evacuation once. some reports that some commercialflights have been able to take off as well over the last day. the situation seems to be somewhat more under control compared to the very, very chaotic scenes we saw at the start of the week when people were, thousands of people made their way into the airport, trying to cling onto planes as they were taking off, some even staying tragically holding onto the landing gear after the plane was in the middle of the air and falling to
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their deaths. we haven't seen anything as chaotic as that. there has been a slight improvement, yes. and of course the chaos around the airport makes it difficult, more challenging to evacuate those people who have had visas arranged or have an evacuation process arranged. it's an evacuation process arranged. it's a very challenging atmosphere, environment, around the airport still. 0ur south asia correspondent danjohnson is in delhi. hello to you. we are hearing a lot about the airport, specifically around whether people who may be eligible to get through, to get on a flight, are actually able to do so. what more are you hearing about that? ., , what more are you hearing about that? . , ., ., , that? that is the ma'or sticking oint, that? that is the ma'or sticking point, because, _ that? that is the major sticking point, because, although - that? that is the major sticking point, because, although the i that? that is the major sticking l point, because, although the us, that? that is the major sticking - point, because, although the us, the uk, nato forces, say their evacuation flights are taking off as planned, they are evacuating people, they have admitted they are reliant
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on the taliban, allowing people through the streets of kabul to the airport. there are signs that even foreign nationals with permits, with the eligibility to leave the country, aren't necessarily getting through. they are being held up, having their documents checked by the taliban. sometimes they are not able to get through the crowd. there are families of afghans struggling to leave. there are crowds at the airport. some of the —— those with permits are having their documents checked. that is making others nervous. inevitably, having to come out from your home, your place of safety, exposing yourself essentially to the taliban, with a reason to leave the country, means you are identifying yourself as someone who has probably worked either with the previous government, or with foreign forces. so this is a major sticking point. it will be putting people potentially at risk of taliban retribution, although they have said that won't be the case. we have heard people having a real struggle to make it to kabul
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airport, to make it onto those flights. and the crowds are being controlled increasingly by the use of violence, by the use of force, by taliban fighters, weapons being fired, people being whipped or beaten with chains. the scene does seem to be continually chaotic outside of the airport. us military chiefs have said they can't extend any further beyond the airport perimeter. they are relying on the taliban to control that.— taliban to control that. briefly, has there been _ taliban to control that. briefly, has there been any _ taliban to control that. briefly, has there been any reaction - taliban to control that. briefly, | has there been any reaction yet taliban to control that. briefly, - has there been any reaction yet from the taliban to what president biden had to say about us troops possibly remaining in afghanistan beyond his deadline at the end of the month? not that i have heard. it will be interesting to see what their response to that is, whether that will be welcomed, whether it will be accepted. the taliban has said it will allow the evacuation effort to go on at the airport and it will facilitate safe passage. but we are already seeing what the taliban says and what happens on the ground are not necessarily consistent things.
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signs of people showing defiance in other parts of the country as well. we will have to see how the taliban reacts to that. there are already, days into this new regime, reports of lives being lost in kabul and elsewhere in afghanistan. dan johnson elsewhere in afghanistan. dan johnson in _ elsewhere in afghanistan. dan johnson in delhi. _ a spanish air force plane has arrived from kabul carrying a first group of people evacuated from afghanistan in the early hours this morning. five spanish citizens and 48 afghan nationals landed at a spanish military air base and were welcomed by spain's ministers of foreign affairs and of social incusion. spain reportedly plans to airlift around 500 people including embassy staff and afghans who worked with them and their families from kabul. as we were saying earlier, the foreign secretary dominic raab is facing criticism over the issue of the government's handling of the evacuation of afghan interpreters. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason.
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chris, let me begin, before we get onto that, with that line from president biden saying that us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond his deadline of the end of the month. the uk defence secretary saying so long as they are there, uk troops will remain as well. what do you think that could mean in practice in terms of the pace of the evacuation?— evacuation? hello. it is quite interesting. _ evacuation? hello. it is quite interesting, isn't _ evacuation? hello. it is quite interesting, isn't it? - evacuation? hello. it is quite interesting, isn't it? the - evacuation? hello. it is quite i interesting, isn't it? the extent evacuation? hello. it is quite - interesting, isn't it? the extent to which earlier this week the nature of this story was one of the western powers being completely caught out by the speed and chain of events in afghanistan. and what we are now seeing is an attempt, whilst they try and maintain some sense of control over the situation, particularly at the airport in kabul, are trying to do their best for as long as they can. so what we have had this morning, is the british government responding to the interview thatjoe biden gave
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overnight and saying, look, if america is willing to stay at the airport for a bit longer, perhaps we will have a little bit longer to try and work out how we get out britons and work out how we get out britons and also those who worked for the british military, who now fearfor their lives. we have seen flights leaving every day with britons and interpreters and their families on, and every day that they are able to do that, the british government is going to continue to do that. here is ben wallace. the timetable of august 31 was the existing _ the timetable of august 31 was the existing timetable done during may this year— existing timetable done during may this year when the americans declared _ this year when the americans declared when they would originally leave _ the key here is, you know, things are changing rapidly. that is why to me every hour counts. that is why i'm putting on another company of soldiers today to help with public order to get it through. and if at the end of the day we are allowed to stay longer, we can't stay longer, then that is a real benefit to us all.
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and mr wallace has also been defending the foreign secretary, hasn't he come around this issue of the phone call that he was asked to make to his afghan counterpart with regards to the evacuation of afghan interpreters, which he didn't make, which was delegated apparently to somebody else? so still big questions for him. i know you have been trying to get hold of the foreign secretary. have you managed yet? foreign secretary. have you managed et? ., ., , ~ ., ., yet? no, not yet. we remain on the hunt for dominic _ yet? no, not yet. we remain on the hunt for dominic raab, _ yet? no, not yet. we remain on the hunt for dominic raab, who - yet? no, not yet. we remain on the hunt for dominic raab, who we - yet? no, not yet. we remain on the | hunt for dominic raab, who we know now is back in the uk. he came back for that debate in the house of commons yesterday. he will have woken up this morning to this, the front page of the daily mail. quite a scoop for them. someone, it would appear, within the foreign office, not particularly happy with dominic raab's work rate, or attitude in the job. we knew he was on holiday at a posh, swanky resort in crete. what we didn't know, until we read of the daily mail this morning, was that his officials, last friday, two days
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before the fall of kabul to the taliban, were asking him to ring the then ministerfor taliban, were asking him to ring the then minister for foreign affairs, his opposite number, in the government in afghanistan or to talk about this very business of getting interpreters who have worked with british forces out of the country. now the foreign office say that mr raab was making lots of calls from his hotel room in crete that day, but he did not ring his afghan opposite number. here is ben wallace again, the defence secretary, offering, well, this response. first of all, i can tell you last friday, because i was dealing with it through the night, on saturday as well, the number one problem last week, the only problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost, or didn't have any leverage, the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the airport would continue to fly, to allow planes to fly out, and those people we were getting out, would they be allowed to get out? that was the number one call. that was the only
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thing that mattered. that is why we were planning troop deployment, which we have now done. and no amount of phone calls to an afghan government at that moment in time would have made any difference. what made a difference is what we are doing now. that is why you are seeing families coming out. and as we are on the air, i think 119 afghan families and eligible people will be flying out, followed by another few hundred, and nearly up to 1000 over the next 24 hours. that is what matters now. that very well might be the case, that a call to a minister, who, within a matter of days, would be considering whether to flee the country, may have been somewhat futile. but if that was the case, and it was known to be the case at the time, clearly some of his officials, it would seem, if that is the source of this story, disagreed and felt it was a goal worth making.
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and of course if it was the judgment of the government last friday that the taliban was about to take over afghanistan, bringing a pretty difficult ending to a 20 year foreign—policy adventure, then the question for mr raab's critics, is what was he doing with his trotters up what was he doing with his trotters up on a beach in crete? chris mason in westminster. _ one of the uk's most recent arrivals from afghanistan has told the bbc he faced the prospect of being killed if he stayed in his homeland. he was resettled in glasgow and spoke to our reporter connor gillies. it was the hardest of the most difficult time i had in my life. terrified by the taliban, this man'sjob as an interpreter in afghanistan put his life under threat. i would be, you know, tortured by the taliban. and consequently get killed by them because they perceived interpreters to be traitors.
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there were many incidents with afghan interpreters, they were tortured, killed, beheaded. so, you and your family feared that because of yourjob, that you could have been beheaded? yes, you know, that was the worst thing could happen to someone. he, his wife and a three year old girl fled their home their entire livelihoods, arriving in scotland four weeks ago, under a resettlement programme. it came to me difficult, when i had to say goodbye to my father. i didn't have a chance to hug him because of covid—19, i had to make a very difficult decision over living or getting killed by the insurgents. he is now too scared to be identified overfears his family he left behind will be murdered. it makes the life not meaningful to you because you are waiting for your death. this charity, refuweegee, was born in the wake of the syrian disaster,
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resettling people come here in scotland, who were fleeing war—torn countries. now, it supports up to 150 refugees every single week with things like emergency food parcels, and they are about to get a lot busier. i do think we should be aiming higher, ithink that we have capacity, we have certainly got housing we've got the commitment. now you are here, what was it like, the moment that you touched down in scotland? in here, it was a sense of relief and the life was complete. dr homira rezai is a british—hazara who came to the uk from afghanistan when she was 13. shejoins me now. thank you very much for talking to us today. i know that you have relatives still in afghanistan. have you been able to be in touch with them in the last few days? i have been able to _ them in the last few days? i have been able to be _ them in the last few days? i have been able to be in _ them in the last few days? i have been able to be in touch - them in the last few days? i have been able to be in touch with - them in the last few days? i have i
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been able to be in touch with some of my family members in kabul, but unfortunately, we haven't had any contact from some of my family members in central afghanistan. bind members in central afghanistan. and those who you were able to talk to, what have they sent you about the situation? it what have they sent you about the situation? , ., , ,., , what have they sent you about the situation? , ., , , . ., ., . situation? it is absolutely chaotic. a lot of my _ situation? it is absolutely chaotic. a lot of my cousins, _ situation? it is absolutely chaotic. a lot of my cousins, who - situation? it is absolutely chaotic. a lot of my cousins, who are - situation? it is absolutely chaotic. a lot of my cousins, who are very| a lot of my cousins, who are very active, very vocal, a lot of them are civil rights activists, they are now in hiding. they are going house to house. five minutes ago i received an unconfirmed update that the taliban are going house to house west of kabul, and they are taking out girls whose id two don't match with their families, out girls whose id two don't match with theirfamilies, because out girls whose id two don't match with their families, because these are the girls were hiding in houses and the taliban. 50. are the girls were hiding in houses and the taliban.— and the taliban. so, the taliban auoin and the taliban. so, the taliban going from _ and the taliban. so, the taliban going from house _ and the taliban. so, the taliban going from house to _ and the taliban. so, the taliban going from house to house - and the taliban. so, the taliban l going from house to house trying and the taliban. so, the taliban - going from house to house trying to identify who people are. and these girls who are being taken out, what is happening to them? do you have any idea? indie is happening to them? do you have
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an idea? ~ ., ., ., ., , any idea? we have no idea what is happening- _ any idea? we have no idea what is happening- we — any idea? we have no idea what is happening. we have _ any idea? we have no idea what is happening. we have had - any idea? we have no idea what is happening. we have had cases, i any idea? we have no idea what is happening. we have had cases, or any idea? we have no idea what is i happening. we have had cases, or at least reported cases, where girls have been kidnapped from their homes. ., ~' ., have been kidnapped from their homes. ., ~ ., ., ., ., homes. you know, for you who came to the uk as a _ homes. you know, for you who came to the uk as a teenager, _ homes. you know, for you who came to the uk as a teenager, just _ homes. you know, for you who came to the uk as a teenager, just 13, _ the uk as a teenager, just 13, hearing about this must be absolutely traumatic. give us a sense of what your experience was like when you left? i sense of what your experience was like when you left?— like when you left? i mean, i grew u . like when you left? i mean, i grew u- durin: like when you left? i mean, i grew no during the _ like when you left? i mean, i grew up during the taliban _ like when you left? i mean, i grew up during the taliban regime. - like when you left? i mean, i grew up during the taliban regime. and | like when you left? i mean, i grew i up during the taliban regime. and as a direct consequence i wasn't able to get an education in afghanistan during my childhood. we were only able to have a school built in our village in 2003, and so coming to the uk in 2006, i was only able to go to school about two to three years. coming to the uk i had all the privilege come all the opportunities anyone could get. and i now have three degrees, including a phd. this is something, unfortunately, that the women in afghanistan will not be able to do because they are basic human rights,
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the rights to education, have been stripped away from them. so the rights to education, have been stripped away from them.- the rights to education, have been stripped away from them. so what age were ou stripped away from them. so what age were you when — stripped away from them. so what age were you when you _ stripped away from them. so what age were you when you first _ stripped away from them. so what age were you when you first got _ stripped away from them. so what age were you when you first got an - were you when you first got an education? i were you when you first got an education?— education? i was able to go to school at _ education? i was able to go to school at the _ education? i was able to go to school at the age _ education? i was able to go to school at the age of _ education? i was able to go to school at the age of ten. - education? i was able to go to school at the age of ten. but l education? i was able to go to - school at the age of ten. but coming to the uk i have to start from eight. to the uk i have to start from eiaht. ., ., ., , ., ., ,. .,. eight. you had to start from scratch reall ? eight. you had to start from scratch really? yeah- _ eight. you had to start from scratch really? yeah. what _ eight. you had to start from scratch really? yeah. what are _ eight. you had to start from scratch really? yeah. what are your- eight. you had to start from scratch really? yeah. what are your hopes | really? yeah. what are your hopes for the refugees _ really? yeah. what are your hopes for the refugees from _ really? iez:i what are your hopes for the refugees from afghanistan who may now be able to come to the uk? what would you like to see the government due to give them the maximum amount of support? timer;r government due to give them the maximum amount of support? they will need a lot of — maximum amount of support? they will need a lot of support _ maximum amount of support? they will need a lot of support coming _ maximum amount of support? they will need a lot of support coming to - maximum amount of support? they will need a lot of support coming to this - need a lot of support coming to this country to adjust. they will need a lot of help from very basic things like opening a bank account, for example, or going to the post office, adjusting to the life. and i think there is this urge to help these refugees from the communities as well. the british hazard communities, everybody is very worried about their relatives. if they are able to help anyone coming
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to the uk, the communities can help. i hope the government is able to give these refugees the same opportunities that they were able to give to me, which, as a result, i am able to contribute back to society. thank you so much for talking to us today. the doctor became here from afghanistan at the age of 16. a pro democracy activist from hong kong who was detained by the chinese authorities when trying to flee the city by boat last year has been found guilty of conspiracy to commit collusion with a foreign country. andy li had pleaded guilty to the charges and apologised. 0ur reporter danny vincent joins me now from hong kong. danny, tell us more about this latest twist and turn in this case? well, andy li was one of the first people arrested and charged under the national security law, which was introduced and imposed by the regime
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introduced and imposed by the regime in hong kong last year. when he was originally arrested in august last year, he was detained, he was released on bail. at that point he decided to attempt to flee to taiwan by speedboat. he was then detained again in the mainland, eventually he was returned to hong kong, and today he has faced a court and pleaded guilty to the charge of colluding with a foreign country. now since the national security law was introduced here in hong kong, more than 100 people have been arrested. 0nly than 100 people have been arrested. only one person so far has been charged. sorry, only one person so far has been sentenced. andy li's sentencing will be next year. the court has adjourned that sentencing. but many people here in hong kong are watching very carefully because they feel that the rights under the promises that were entitled to hong kong people when this city was
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returned to china in 1997, they feel that these rights are being eroded and this is yet again another example of that.— and this is yet again another example of that. and this is yet again another examle of that. , ., ~' ,, example of that. danny, thank you for that update. _ example of that. danny, thank you for that update. danny _ example of that. danny, thank you for that update. danny vincent - example of that. danny, thank you for that update. danny vincent in l for that update. danny vincent in hong kong. if you would like to get in touch with me about any of the stories we are covering today, you can do that on twitter. i'd love to hearfrom you if you would like to share any of your thoughts on afghanistan, or what is happening in hong kong, or indeed on the subject of covid. 0n indeed on the subject of covid. on that subject, some news coming into us from the office for national statistics. its latest survey on covid antibodies. more than 90% of uk adults, more than nine in ten, have antibodies to coronavirus, precisely 94% of adults tested by the ons precisely 94% of adults tested by the 0ns during the week ending the 1st of august, at antibodies. that
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was increased from the week before. this is either having had an infection with covid or having received a vaccine. in wales the figure was roughly 93%, roughly the same as a fortnight ago. in northern ireland it was 89%, down from a fortnight ago. in scotland, the same as the uk, 94%, up slightly from 93% two weeks ago. let's talk a bit more about covid. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. the research, led by oxford university, suggests that while the pfizerjab works best initially, both are equally as effective in the long term. earlier i spoke to professor peter 0penshaw, professor of experimental medicine at imperial college london and a member of the uk vaccine network about the findings from the study. i think it is really interesting to be able
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to look at that in detail, at how the different vaccines compare, using these very, very large databases that we have in the uk, and i think it shows just what can be done if you can tap into the sort of resources that the office for national statistics has and to combine that with all of the work that been done in oxford on the vaccines. i think what it shows is that these two main vaccines being used, the pfizer biontech and the astrazeneca vaccine from oxford, seem to operate in a slightly different way, so the rna vaccine seems to deliver very rapid protection, but that doesn't maybe last as long as the protection which you can get against infection if you look at the results from the... so maybe it is inducing so different types of immunity. and with different characteristics, which is
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really important. but if both vaccines, both types of vaccine, are still offering good protection against the delta variance, what does that say about the idea of offering boosters? is offering good protection against the more severe disease, i think that is very important to emphasise that there still is a breakthrough infection in a proportion of people, even if they have been doubly vaccinated. so the question about boosters is a contentious one. i think we really need specific studies on the effect of boosters and those studies are ongoing, we should not prejudge those, and i think everyone is very keen that if we do have surplus vaccines, that they are not necessarily used in this country, but might be sent overseas to be used in people who are in desperate need of vaccination. because even if antibody levels have reduced, and the vaccinations are still actually offering a good deal of protection and you are not seeing, for example, an increase in hospitalisations, serious illness, etc, then, as you say, data is needed then to determine whether or not boosters
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are actually necessary or a good idea at that point. yes, but there are people of course with impaired immune systems for whom boosters will be necessary because they won't have developed a very good response when they have been given the conventional two dose vaccine. there are specific groups who will benefit from boosters, but as a general boost to the vaccine programme, i think we will need to look at the data more. one of the points which we alluded briefly to early i think is the fully vaccinated who become infected with the delta variant have similar levels of virus to the unvaccinated, with the alpha variant, their viral load, was much lower. what does that tell us about the ability of fully vaccinated people to transmit the virus and what does it tell us about being wary about any new variants that might emerge? yes, ok, so the level of virus the estimate using the preliminary chain reaction, the pcr
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reaction, isjust based on how much of the virus' genome... it doesn't necessarily tell you exactly how much infectious virus is present. there is some evidence that people who have been vaccinated, although, if in those with whom there is a breakthrough, the levels are quite high, they do decline more quickly in people who have been vaccinated or in people who maybe have immunity because of some previous exposure. so the rate of decline may be greater, and therefore the infectious period might be different, if you have been vaccinated, so i don't think these data will actually help resolve that particular issue. professor peter 0penshaw. the headlines on bbc news... chaos at kabul airport. even afghans with valid paperwork
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are struggling to get through, with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday. the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel, to go home. the first civilian charter flight carrying refugees from afghanistan has landed in a uk airport. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august, passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty, after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. survivors in haiti ask when is help coming, after saturday's earthquake killed almost 2,000 people. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant.
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five days after a devastating earthquake hit haiti, rural areas are still lacking emergency support and supplies. at least 2,000 people have died and 10,000 more have been injured, with the search for survivors hampered by heavy rains. james clayton reports. as you head out from the city of les cayes to the rural areas, the road is marked by landslides and deep cracks. the village is remote, and the scale of the damage, catastrophic. rose—marie took me to her house. her 15—year—old son was charging his phone when the quake hit. the wall collapsed on him. translation: these are his books.
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he had recently got them so he could start a new year of school. and now, he's gone. i wrap his shirt around my waist. it keeps me strong. when you come to these rural areas, the level of destruction just ups a notch. almost every single house here is completely destroyed. five people were killed in this house alone. and to understand why, you have to look at the cement and rock that these houses are built from. it's really hard to lift this. it's really heavy, and of course, when those kinds of walls fall down, they can cause catastrophic injuries. with no sign of aid or help, many people are living on top of the rubble of what was their homes. "do we have to scream for the government to hear us?" this woman says. "or is life over?" the people of haiti feel like they've been forgotten. and in many ways, they have.
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james clayton, bbc news. with the tokyo parlalympics getting under way next week, a new campaign has been launched to try to improve the lives of more than a billion disabled people around the world. we the 15 will see landmarks light up purple tonight, to highlight the estimated 15% of the global population who are disabled. i'm joined now by former paralympian, anne wafula strike, who uses a wheelchair after contracting polio as a child in kenya. it's lovely to have you with us today. to talk about this campaign. what more can you tell us about it? i think one important thing i would like to stress this morning is that this campaign is about disability, accessibility and inclusion. i think what i want people to realise is that disability does not come with a
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manual. that's right through this campaign, what we are aiming to do is actually put disabled people at the heart of diversity and inclusion in every agenda. we also want to breakdown societal and systemic barriers that are preventing disabled people from fulfilling their lives. we have seen during so many years when disabled people have been marginalised, several people have been excluded, disabled people are termed as people just who like to complain. this campaign is going to complain. this campaign is going to start promoting the interest of those with disabilities. do to start promoting the interest of those with disabilities.— those with disabilities. do you think clients _ those with disabilities. do you think clients that _ those with disabilities. do you think clients that have - those with disabilities. do you think clients that have been i those with disabilities. do you - think clients that have been talked about in the past to promote the very agenda you are talking about have not come to fruition? they have not done enough, they have not done what they set out to do? i not done enough, they have not done what they set out to do?— what they set out to do? i think it would be wrong _ what they set out to do? i think it would be wrong if _ what they set out to do? i think it would be wrong if i _ what they set out to do? i think it would be wrong if i said _ what they set out to do? i think it would be wrong if i said they - what they set out to do? i think it i would be wrong if i said they have not done what it set out to do. i think, to me, the problem is at what
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speed? at what rate? everything has been so slow. let's not even argue that disability has always been an afterthought. governments have all this big and glossy policies that are written down. but the implementation has been a problem. what we are hoping to do is through this campaign we actually hope that by getting all this international big organisations, the coalition of international organisations from the world of sport, human rights, policymakers and businesses, we want to light up the world of possibility, opportunity and inclusivity and i think we are now sort of going to really push this agenda. sort of going to really push this a . enda. sort of going to really push this arenda. _ , agenda. huge symbolism with the liuuhtin agenda. huge symbolism with the liaahtin u- agenda. huge symbolism with the lighting up of _ agenda. huge symbolism with the lighting up of these _ agenda. huge symbolism with the lighting up of these landmarks - agenda. huge symbolism with the| lighting up of these landmarks like the empire state building, the london according to the
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international paralympic committee, 85% of people with disabilities around the world live in poverty, about 50% unemployed, 75% of countries have no laws protecting them. you are talking about degrees, some countries clearly doing a much betterjob than others. a huge platform using the paralympics to get this message across, how do you think that is going to translate beyond the games into real—life? that's a very important question. let's step back. who are these athletes who will be flying the flag of their nations? these are people with disabilities and these are people who are possiblyjust only getting recognition or getting a platform or stage after every four years. so this campaign is going to
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be an everyday occurrence and everyday practice, where we want the world, we want everyone involved, talk about this campaign, be aware of being sensitive about disability. the problem is we have our superstars, our heroes in tokyo, flying the flag of great britain, let me see and every other nation, but what happens when these people come back to their homes? what happens behind closed doors? what happens behind closed doors? what happens to them when the cameras are not ruling and the medals are not being given? that's what should be the most important question. because these people suffer, they struggle. i'm one of them, we are constantly struggling with just waking up everyone in, getting on public transport, writing forjob interviews, being thought or given the opportunity and what i want to
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see is disabled people are notjust about sympathy. we don't want to be portrayed as a group of people who are crying for sympathy. i have always said that what we want is opportunity and i think we the 15 is a thing going to put disability at the heart of the inclusion agenda. abs, the heart of the inclusion agenda. a pleasure to talk to you, thank you very much for telling us more about the campaign. anne wafula strike there. let's return to the situation in afghanistan. i'm joined now by elay ershad, a former member of the afghanistan parliament. the shadow foreign secretary, the labour party's lisa nandy joins me now.
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i want to begin by talking about dominic raab and the report in the news today that he did not, when requested by his officials, call his counterpart in afghanistan to talk about the evacuation of interpreters. the defence secretary ben wallace defending the situation earlier said no amount of phone calls to an afghan government at that time, last friday we are talking about, would have made any difference. what's your response to that? i difference. what's your response to that? 4' ., . ., that? i think the fact foreign secretary — that? i think the fact foreign secretary didn't _ that? i think the fact foreign secretary didn't pick- that? i think the fact foreign secretary didn't pick up - that? i think the fact foreign secretary didn't pick up the l that? i think the fact foreign - secretary didn't pick up the phone to the afghan foreign minister, a government we have supported, fought alongside, evertroops government we have supported, fought alongside, ever troops have supported for 20 years, the idea the foreign secretary wouldn't pick up the phone as the taliban were advancing and standing at the gates of kabul, to see what we could do to help and prevent afghanistan descending into a base for terror again, seems to be extraordinary but what's more extraordinary is the
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defence from the defence secretary who said it would not make any difference. this is a country in which we have had 20 years of involvement, a57 british troops have given their lives. we spent billions of pounds, if ever foreign secretary has no influence over what happens in that country and no ability to get out, the people who have helped and supported us over the last 20 years, who face the potential of being killed if we don't do that very quickly, thatjust seems to me to be even more shameful on the part of the government. it has become increasingly clear dominic raab doesn't have the support of the house of commons, that was clear yesterday when not a single mp spoke in his defence and we believe he should resign and be replaced with somebody who is actually up to doing thatjob. irate somebody who is actually up to doing that 'ob. ~ , ., ., , that 'ob. we understand we are being told that job. we understand we are being told that the — that job. we understand we are being told that the bbc — that job. we understand we are being told that the bbc that _ that job. we understand we are being told that the bbc that he _ that job. we understand we are being told that the bbc that he was - told that the bbc that he was involved in other calls, other conversations, this call was delegated to a more junior minister. argue absolutely clear that the call should have come directly from him?
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he should have been on the phone to the afghan government, that’s the afghan government, that's absolutely _ the afghan government, that's absolutely clear _ the afghan government, that's absolutely clear but _ the afghan government, that's absolutely clear but also - the afghan government, that's absolutely clear but also it - the afghan government, that's absolutely clear but also it has i absolutely clear but also it has emerged that he did not make phone calls to any of the ambassadors in the region until after kabul had fallen. we have had people, tens of thousands of people fleeing afghanistan into neighbouring countries over the last two weeks. we have had communications collapsing with severe consequences for partners in the region. it's not at all clear what calls he was making and there is real anger about this on all sides of the house of commons, from veterans who served in afghanistan on the conservative and labour benches, because our armed forces have gone back into afghanistan to help evacuate people. our ambassador has refused to leave 0ur ambassador has refused to leave and is personally processing these applications at the airport. meanwhile ever foreign secretary and prime minister have been missing in action. �* , prime minister have been missing in action. 3 . ~ prime minister have been missing in action. �*, ., ,, ., .,
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action. let's talk about the airport situation. action. let's talk about the airport situation- he _ action. let's talk about the airport situation. he will— action. let's talk about the airport situation. he will have _ action. let's talk about the airport situation. he will have heard - action. let's talk about the airport situation. he will have heard whati situation. he will have heard what president biden had to say about us troops potentially staying beyond the withdrawal deadline president had set. ben wallace saying this morning as long as the us are running the airport, uk troops will stay. is there a case for the uk irrespective of what the us timetable is, to still work to build a coalition to stay there for longer at the airport if necessary? i a coalition to stay there for longer at the airport if necessary?- at the airport if necessary? i think it is really important _ at the airport if necessary? i think it is really important that - at the airport if necessary? i think it is really important that we - at the airport if necessary? i think it is really important that we get l it is really important that we get all of those people out who we can, who we own a duty to. every single one of them. the afghan nationals who were being targeted by the taliban because they helped and supported us over the last 20 years as well as the british citizens, who are still there and the troops that are still there and the troops that are self—serving. i spoke to the us government this week to ask whether it would be possible for them —— the troops that are still serving. the agreement is not with the uk and the taliban, it is the us and the taliban, it is the us and the taliban as well. those discussions
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are ongoing but i think it would be enormously helpful if the uk and us partnership that has lasted a very long time in afghanistan could last longer in order to get people out. we were not prepared, we had 18 months and just when not prepared. today i am still getting reports directly from people in afghanistan who are being turned away at the perimeter of the airport because they don't have the right paperwork because they have destroyed it in order to safeguard themselves against taliban reprisals. there are reports of the. taliban road blocks. we need allies to step forwards and step as the situation to get people out. in step as the situation to get people out. , ., . ., , ., out. in terms of channels of communication _ out. in terms of channels of communication between - out. in terms of channels of| communication between the out. in terms of channels of- communication between the uk government and the taliban, what do you think the nature of those should be? i you think the nature of those should be? , , ., , ~' be? i said yesterday i think the government — be? i said yesterday i think the government ought _ be? i said yesterday i think the government ought to _ be? i said yesterday i think the government ought to be - be? i said yesterday i think the i government ought to be speaking directly to the taliban in order to safeguard british nationals and the
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afghans who help them as far as i understand it, the foreign secretary did not correct this. there has been no dialogue between the uk government and taliban about the situation at the airport and if the us... situation at the airport and if the us. .. �* situation at the airport and if the us. .. ~ , ., situation at the airport and if the us...�* i. ., ., situation at the airport and if the us... are you aware based on what ou said us... are you aware based on what you said yesterday _ us... are you aware based on what you said yesterday if _ us... are you aware based on what you said yesterday if there - us... are you aware based on what you said yesterday if there are - us... are you aware based on what you said yesterday if there are any| you said yesterday if there are any plans to do that?— you said yesterday if there are any plans to do that? absolutely none. we not no plans to do that? absolutely none. we got no answers _ plans to do that? absolutely none. we got no answers at _ plans to do that? absolutely none. we got no answers at all— plans to do that? absolutely none. we got no answers at all in - plans to do that? absolutely none. we got no answers at all in the - we got no answers at all in the house of commons yesterday. as one leading conservative mp who chairs the select committee said, he suspects the government has lost the confidence of the house on this, there was no clear strategy to deal with the situation. we have got 11 days to get thousands of people out of afghanistan and that's why we are asking the united states to support us because the british government has been asleep at the wheel, have not done the prep work and the consequences for many afghans and british citizens will be appalling unless we get a plan in place very
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urgently. unless we get a plan in place very uraentl . . , unless we get a plan in place very uraentl . ., , ,, ., ., ., urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secreta , urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary. thank _ urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary, thank you _ urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary, thank you very _ urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary, thank you very much - urgently. lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary, thank you very much for i secretary, thank you very much for your time today. i'm joined now by elay ershad, a former member of the afghanistan parliament. she's in kabul. thank you for your time. you have decided to stay there, other politicians have not. why have you decided to stay? i politicians have not. why have you decided to stay?— decided to stay? i think other politicians — decided to stay? i think other politicians were _ decided to stay? i think other politicians were corrupt, - decided to stay? i think other politicians were corrupt, they i decided to stay? i think other- politicians were corrupt, they made mistakes and could not face their people because people honestly voted for them and campaigned for them and now the leaders betrayed us, including some of the mps, including some of the powerful ministers and theyjust some of the powerful ministers and they just left. some of the powerful ministers and theyjust left. for me, i love this country, i want to be in this
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country, i want to be in this country and everyone, all these international community they talk about evacuating people who work there, which can be good, i don't want to have an opinion on this, but people who are in afghanistan, they are in need too. first of all, due towards from different provinces, some people came to kabul and did not have a roof over their head and not have a roof over their head and no food. although they got some places like nick and i'm not sure where they are. but they still need some humanitarian help and also 35 million afghans who are in afghanistan right, girls and women, they need some guarantee for their rights and also, we want the community to facilitate the education and working from home and although the taliban promised us by the time they announced a new
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government, women and girls would be allowed to go to school and they would be allowed to work. what allowed to go to school and they would be allowed to work. what do ou make would be allowed to work. what do you make of _ would be allowed to work. what do you make of those _ would be allowed to work. what do you make of those words? - would be allowed to work. what do you make of those words? what i would be allowed to work. what do | you make of those words? what you make of those words from the taliban? what weight do they carry? i think i have to be optimistic. but still, we need the support of international communities because when they unexpectedly withdraw their troops in a bad situation, you have to take care of those girls who want to go to school and also i think they have to show their support to the girls who... i would like to request international community to think about the girls education and women's education, the ones who were left behind by their
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president and also their politicians.— president and also their oliticians. �* ., politicians. are you worried where the support _ politicians. are you worried where the support will — politicians. are you worried where the support will come _ politicians. are you worried where the support will come from? - politicians. are you worried where l the support will come from? wants the support will come from? wants the us pull—out, once they stop running the airport, the uk and other nations pull out, clearly some countries like russia and china have been talking about their hopes for friend relationships with the taliban government but where do you see that support coming from? if those countries are no longer on the ground, effectively? thea;r those countries are no longer on the ground, effectively?— those countries are no longer on the ground, effectively? they are not on the round ground, effectively? they are not on the ground but _ ground, effectively? they are not on the ground but as _ ground, effectively? they are not on the ground but as members - ground, effectively? they are not on the ground but as members of - ground, effectively? they are not on the ground but as members of nato| the ground but as members of nato countries, i think they have the possibility to be in contact with our leaders and i knew the kind of support that they have to come back and work for us, no. whenever they meet taliban and leaders so that they can also insist on sending girls to school. of course not this
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week, because it is kind of chaotic situation and maybe next week once the announced their new government. ijust the announced their new government. i just want the announced their new government. ijust want some the announced their new government. i just want some kind of support from international communities, if they can do it. otherwise, i want to be optimistic. i'm not sure 100% but i'm sure after announcing the new government they will announce girls and women can go to school and work but still, we need a kind of guarantee from international communities if possible. we want international community support. thank you very much, we appreciate you talking to us. let's bring you some news just coming in to us. the numbers on waiting lists for non—urgent hospital treatment in wales have again hit record levels. there were 62a,909 people waiting injune, with the list climbing steadily each month and up by a1% since the early days of the covid pandemic. a&e waiting time performance,
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with only 69.8% of patients spending less than four hours waiting to be dealt with, was the worst on record. a welsh government spokesperson said, "waiting times for treatment continue to grow. however, it is encouraging to see progress being made with the number of patients waiting over 52 weeks falling for the third month in a row." these latest figures come as wales' health minister pledged £551 million to help health and social services recover from the pandemic. the trial of american r&b singer r kelly has begun in new york. the 5a—year—old is charged with sexual abuse, kidnapping and bribery, charges he denies. if found guilty, he could face between 10 years and life in prison. samira hussain reports.
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for r kelly's many accusers, this federal court in brooklyn is where finally their voices may be heard. jonjelyn savage is here. for years, she has been pushing for charges against kelly. she says her daughter had been held captive by the musician. this will open some people's eyes. what we have known for the last five and a half years when we started this journey, because we knew something wasn't right and we knew that it had to stop. in those opening statements, prosecutors said kelly targeted, groomed and exploited young girls and boys for his own satisfaction. that this case was not about a celebrity who liked to party, but a sexual predator. in his defence, kelly's lawyer argued that he was the victim — the women were liars who misrepresented their ages and benefited from his fame and money. it is a spectacular fall from grace for one of the most successful artists of all time. 0nce referred to as the king of r&b, if kelly is convicted
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on all counts, he faces ten years to life in prison. allegations of sexual abuse are not new for kelly, but the only time he has previously faced criminal charges, back in 2008, he was acquitted. several of r kelly's alleged victims are expected to testify against him, unlike his previous trial back in 2008. and these charges are more serious, and it comes at a time in which the culture has changed. the #metoo movement has made it much harder for rich, famous abusers to hide their misdeeds. a court battle in canada over the extradition of huawei's chief financial officer to the united states has ended after two and a half years. the canadian government prosecutor said the court should have no difficulty in finding mung wanjoe had committed fraud, and so should be handed over to the americans. her defence team deny any fraud. a date for a ruling will be set in october. would—be knights in medieval armour are battling it out with steel swords and axes
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in new york's central park. as tim allman explains, it's all part of a new fitness craze. it was another age, another place. a time, we are told, of chivalry, honour and violence. lots and lots of violence. now you can try it out for yourself, here in new york's central park. these are gladiators nyc, a group who meet up once a month, put on steel armour and then attack each other. it is a combination of medieval compact and mixed martial arts, although there is not much chivalry involved. victory is really not the main point of the fighting for me. i am nowhere near good enough to compete for any sort of place or title or medals. i don't have the time, i don't have the energy, i don't have the money for the kit.
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so i'm just here for the violence — dish and receive. this is pretty gruelling stuff. the armour can weigh up to a5 kilos or more, and it was all the brainchild of a former gladiator of wall street who says he's trying to make a positive difference. we just hit the core of it, which is, be healthy, do fitness. when you start to do more fitness, you eat more healthy, you change your lifestyle, and now we are saving lives. it is a free programme available to anyone who is interested. a chance to improve your fitness and, who knows, become a knight of the big apple. tim allman, bbc news. the tissue used by lionel messi during his farewell adress to the spanish football club fc barcelona is being sold at auction. the tear—soaked tissue was put on the market by an anonymous seller, with the price set at
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$1 million. messi announced earlier this month he would be leaving barcelona, ending his 21—year spell at the club. is that covid—safe? you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. from tomorrow, right the way up to sunday by day and by night, it is going to become more humid than it has been but to once again there is a lot of cloud around, thick enough for some patchy light rain or some drizzle and we've got a weather front bringing some rain and which will turn increasingly showery only through the day. here it is here, it's a fairly weak affair and it's pushing eastwards, eradicating the bright start that we have seen in the east. this clutch of fronts coming our way later on today and tomorrow. we have got some brightness across northern ireland, southern scotland into northern england, north of scotland also seeing some sunshine but through the central swathe, a fair bit of cloud, thick enough for that patchy light rain and drizzle. here is our weatherfront across england, producing again some
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showers and on the other side of that, we see a return to some sunshine, but as temperatures rise, that will spark off some showers and some of those could be heavy. the wind, though, or the breeze, not as brisk as it was yesterday. through this evening and overnight we will hang onto some of the showers, there will be some clear skies, area of cloud and by the end of the night, our first weather front will be starting to edge towards northern ireland. 0vernight lows between 9—1a. not particularly cold. as we go through tomorrow, here is the first weather front, pushing north eastwards, taking its rain with it, and this second weather front also bringing in rain and this one is going to be with us for much of the weekend. on friday, we start off with some sunshine, any mist and fog lifting, there will be areas of cloud, particularly ahead of this weather front, bringing rain through northern ireland into south west england. second weather front bringing further rain into northern ireland, the breeze picking up in the west and starting to feel humid. into saturday, this weather front will be slowly moving eastwards, i say slowly loosely, because it's moving a bit faster
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than we thought this time yesterday. after a dry start across central and eastern parts of england, the weather front moves from the east to the west, bringing rain into the london area through the course of the afternoon. for scotland and northern ireland, we are looking again at some rain, as well, some brighter skies in between and still feeling humid. into sunday, because the rain is coming and quicker on saturday, it will clear quicker on sunday. brighter skies out towards the west. quite breezy, still humid, drier and brighter on monday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: chaos at kabul airport — even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through, with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday. the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel to go home. amidst the desperate crowds at the airport, the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. if you are linked to the international presence here, you are certainly going to be worried that in this chaotic situation, a taliban member will turn to you and say, who are you and what did you do? and maybe decide you shouldn't be allowed to leave. meanwhile, the first civilian charter flight
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carrying refugees from afghanistan has landed at a uk airport. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august, passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. the only problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost didn't have any h. the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the airport would continue to fly, allow planes to fly out, and those people we were getting up, would they be allowed to getting up, would they be allowed to get out? the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant.
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the uk is to deploy another company of soldiers to afghanistan to try to deal with the situation at kabul airport, where people are desperately trying to flee the country. 12 people have been killed near the airport since sunday, with the taliban telling people without the legal right to travel to stay away. the defence secretary, ben wallace, said the government's aim is to get about 6,000 people out, adding that uk troops would stay as long as us forces are in control of the airport. meanwhile, the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has been accused by labour of �*shamefully�* putting interpreters' lives at risk by not seeking help from an afghan minister. but one interpreter who worked for uk forces in afghanistan has begged borisjohnson for help,
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fearing fatal reprisals from the taliban. president biden has said us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond his deadline of the end of the month. and he insisted no americans will be left behind in kabul. the first of our reports comes from our north america correspondent, david willis. in the afghan capital, people, scared and desperate are still trying to flee the country. the taliban are coming for me, this girl cries. one of hundreds pressed to the gates of kabul airport in the hope ofjoining a flight out. president biden continues to blame the chaos on the craven capitulation of the afghan government and conceded it might not be possible to complete the american withdrawal by the deadline in two weeks' time. americans should understand that trips —— that troops might have to be there beyond the 31st of august?
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people will have to understand that we're going to try to get it done before then. but if you don't... we will determine at the time who is left. and? and if there's american citizens left we're going to stay until we get them all out. this administration discretion has brokered a deal with the taliban to allow civilians safe passage to us flights, but with checkpoints throughout the city, bottlenecks are bound and the remit of these us soldiers doesn't extend beyond the airport perimeter. the taliban are in and around kabul right now but they are not interfering with our operation. through the state department, the taliban are facilitating the safe passage to the airport for american citizens, that is us passport holders. despite its conciliatory tone few believe the taliban will tolerate any challenge to its leadership. a number of demonstrators were reportedly shot dead in the eastern city
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of jalalabad after the taliban flag was lowered and the afghan tricolour raised in its place. having promised a more inclusive approach to government, it is unclear what form that might take. our correspondent secunder kermani is in afghanistan's capital kabul and gave us this update on the situation there. we just heard a heavy burst of gunfire that seems to have gone quiet now. we are still waiting for details as to what happened but it was heavier than anything we have heard over the past 2a hours from our location. todayis today is a holy day for shi'ite muslims, so it could be related to that. it muslims, so it could be related to that. .., , muslims, so it could be related to that. _, , ., , , muslims, so it could be related to that. , ., , , ., that. it could be attempts to diserse that. it could be attempts to disperse the _ that. it could be attempts to disperse the crowd. - that. it could be attempts to disperse the crowd. we - that. it could be attempts to disperse the crowd. we are l that. it could be attempts to i disperse the crowd. we are still waiting on those details. in the rest of the city,
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there are two different scenes. chaos continuing at the airport, where hundreds, thousands of people probably, have been camped out, trying to get inside, desperate to leave. many of them don't have visas or the necessary documentation and it is unlikely they will be evacuated. but they are still willing to put up with these awful conditions. taliban members are firing into the air, trying to control the crowd using sticks and whips to push people back. elsewhere in the city, aside from the burst of gunfire, thing seem to be calmer. more shops and restaurants opening up than in previous days and more people coming out and about. banks are closed, as are many government offices. we are seeing fewer women on the streets. you do see some. they are not necessarily wearing the burqa that people most closely associate with the taliban's last stint in power in the 1990s.
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things are returning to normal but still an air of deep uncertainty. many people are worried that despite taliban assurances they may be targeted for links to the government. that could still happen. it is hard to overstate how much of a presents the taliban have in the city. everywhere you go, you see heavily armed fighters patrolling in vehicles seized from security forces and just wandering the streets. very surreal, but this seems to be the new normal in afghanistan, at least for now. new normal in afghanistan, at least for now. i want to show you some quite harrowing pictures now that were filmed in kabul on tuesday and really illustrate the desperation felt my many there. this is the perimeter you can see a young girl, who looks to be about two years old, being lifted over the fence and handed to an american soldier.
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what we don't know, because they have been pictures of that happening in a few instances, we don't know whether those children have been separated by their parents, whether the parents are desperate enough to want those children to at least be able to leave to have a different life, or whether they were reunited with them, but it really does give an indication of the desperation that many are feeling right now in kabul. we can speak now to ram kishan, who is deputy regional director for asia at mercy corps, and had left the country on sunday on the last commercial flight to leave kabul. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us a bit more about the process that you went through in terms of your thoughts and feelings, and also practically in actually getting on that flight to get out?— practically in actually getting on that flight to get out? yes, i was on the last _ that flight to get out? yes, i was on the last commercial _ that flight to get out? yes, i was on the last commercial flight - that flight to get out? yes, i was on the last commercial flight out i that flight to get out? yes, i was i on the last commercial flight out of kabul on sunday. when i landed in
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delhi,... i had a normal check—in and boarding, though we were delayed by an hour because there was a lot of movement in the airport. at that point, we did not realise it would be quite bad and the scenes we have seen on monday and onwards at the airport, desperation, where people are fleeing and running off to the aeroplanes, so i would say i was one of the lucky ones who were able to leave without much chaos, but i had a couple of colleagues who were stuck with a later flight and they are still in kabul and not able to find a way out.— find a way out. you describe ourself find a way out. you describe yourself as _ find a way out. you describe yourself as lucky _ find a way out. you describe yourself as lucky to - find a way out. you describe yourself as lucky to get - find a way out. you describe yourself as lucky to get out | find a way out. you describe i yourself as lucky to get out and thatis yourself as lucky to get out and that is the word that many are using, but there is also that tinge of knowing what you have left behind. how does that make you feel? there are obviously people there that you care for deeply. that there are obviously people there that you care for deeply.- that you care for deeply. that is the biggest _ that you care for deeply. that is the biggest concern _ that you care for deeply. that is the biggest concern we - that you care for deeply. that is the biggest concern we have. i l that you care for deeply. that is i the biggest concern we have. i was still in touch with key members in
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headquarters and we have seen a large number of displaced people in kabul and outside, and we are concerned about the humanitarian needs of those people who have been displaced, either in kabul or outside. we are looking at possibilities to work with our team, our colleagues, and within the humanitarian community to provide much needed humanitarian assistance. as you know, people are desperate, and there are 390,000 people displaced, and about 3.5 million existing afghans displaced. there is a large humanitarian need that we need to step in and support, and we are doing everything we can to work with the people on the ground. what with the people on the ground. what exactl can with the people on the ground. what exactly can your _ with the people on the ground. what exactly can your organisation do? what is it doing right now? and how many are there to carry on doing that work? we many are there to carry on doing that work?— many are there to carry on doing that work? ~ ., , ., ~ that work? we have been working there since _ that work? we have been working there since 1986. _ that work? we have been working there since 1986. we _ that work? we have been working there since 1986. we have - that work? we have been working there since 1986. we have 300 i that work? we have been working l there since 1986. we have 300 plus afghan colleagues who work in eight
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provinces. at the moment, we are providing water and sanitation support for the displaced population in kabul city, and doing an assessment of the need in herat and other places, where we will begin providing human terriers —— humanitarian assistance, mainly for water. and providing protection for women and children who are in the open without much support at the moment. ., ., ., ., ., moment. your organisation works in eiuht moment. your organisation works in eight provinces. _ moment. your organisation works in eight provinces, as _ moment. your organisation works in eight provinces, as you _ moment. your organisation works in eight provinces, as you said - - moment. your organisation works in eight provinces, as you said - whatl eight provinces, as you said — what contact, what communication has there been with the taliban in different areas? i'm assuming that your colleagues have seen up close all around the country what has happened with that swift rise back up happened with that swift rise back up the taliban.— up the taliban. yes, we are still caettin
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up the taliban. yes, we are still getting messages. _ up the taliban. yes, we are still getting messages. obviously i up the taliban. yes, we are still. getting messages. obviously that up the taliban. yes, we are still- getting messages. obviously that is getting messages. 0bviously that is available in the media and everywhere that ngos will not be stopped from working, and we have seen the same situation on the ground. we haven't seen much resistance to our work, we haven't seen push back on the activities we are planning to do. the messages to our team members from the authorities in many other provinces is that we should start our work as soon as possible. we are quite concerned about safety and security, so we will take all actions to keep our team members safe and secure. presumably, you left because you felt you had absolutely no choice, but do you think, would you want to go back? but do you think, would you want to to back? , ., ., , but do you think, would you want to to back? , . . , ~ but do you think, would you want to to back? , ., ., , ~' ., go back? yes, and many like me would like to no go back? yes, and many like me would like to go back — go back? yes, and many like me would like to go back to _ go back? yes, and many like me would like to go back to afghanistan. - go back? yes, and many like me would like to go back to afghanistan. we i like to go back to afghanistan. we have spent years and months in afghanistan. we are really concerned and would like to get back on support communities and our team members who are there in
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afghanistan.— members who are there in afghanistan. members who are there in afuhanistan. ., ,, , . ., afghanistan. thank you very much for “oininu us. caroline kennedy—pipe is a professor of international security at loughborough university specialising in military affairs and afghanistan. thank you forjoining us. i want to start with the situation at the airport. we were bringing viewers those really distressing images of a baby being handed over to soldiers at the airport as people seek to get their loved ones out. america has said it will stay beyond the 31st of august if necessary, to keep running that airport to get american troops out. what are the logistics around keeping an airport open in the context like this? it’s context like this? it's understandably i context like this? it�*s understandably chaotic. the taliban are ringing the perimeter of the airport. my understanding is, at this moment, those with american
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passports are being allowed in without much question. the same is true at the moment, there is a checkpoint allowing uk passport holders through. at the moment, i think we can be not complacent, but the taliban will not take on those with us and west european passports. how long that will persist, we do not know, but the big question, as you point out, is those afghans who are desperate to leave the country, who, as you say, will hand children over if necessary to get on one of the planes leaving for the united states or for europe. at the moment, my understanding is that the us is in control, along with afghan security forces and the uk, inside the perimeter, but the taliban have gathered on the outside and they are turning individuals and groups away
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without legitimate paperwork. it's a mixed scene. the reinforcement, the upscale of american and uk forces i think will be welcome, because one thing we shouldn't lose sight of is the stress levels that our own troops inside the airport will be experiencing. it's an extremely stressful situation for them. sorties are increasing, planes are being over packed, safely, of course, but taking more individuals out of that war zone than we have seen before. out of that war zone than we have seen before-— out of that war zone than we have seen before. ~ ., ., ,, ., seen before. what do you think about the decisions — seen before. what do you think about the decisions being _ seen before. what do you think about the decisions being taken _ seen before. what do you think about the decisions being taken by - seen before. what do you think about the decisions being taken by the i the decisions being taken by the united states, which really holds the cards right now? when america goes, the airport basically full, and that means that anyone else who wants to get out has no guarantee of being able to. the decisions have been taken by america alone in terms of what has happened with the end of
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this mission. we all went in together. i this mission. we all went in together-— this mission. we all went in together. this mission. we all went in touether. ~ ., ., together. i think that that is our rofound together. i think that that is our profound insight. _ together. i think that that is our profound insight. we _ together. i think that that is our profound insight. we did - together. i think that that is our profound insight. we did all- together. i think that that is our profound insight. we did all gol together. i think that that is our. profound insight. we did all go in together, the uk shoulder to shoulder with its nato partner, standing up for article five, an attack on one is an attack on all, and it has been extremely demoralising, i think, and it has been extremely demoralising, ithink, to and it has been extremely demoralising, i think, to see the fragmentation of the so—called special relationship, and biden's unilateral decision, although of course it was president trump who took that decision in 2020 at d'oh hah. in the uk, i think we have been dismayed at the speed that which president biden has taken the drawdown, and the chaotic scenes. much kit has been left behind as afghan forces collapsed, and here, those i speak to in the uk military are also slightly disillusioned or dismayed by the idea that the afghan
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army did not fight well and with courage. tens of thousands of afghan soldiers did perish and lose their lives in the fight against the taliban, so politics is one thing, but the collapse of the afghan army is also to be placed partly at president biden's door in terms of the rapid retraction of military contractors, over 7000 of them. those of us watching who have seen the war unfold note that since 201a the war unfold note that since 201a the afghan army did try, with us and uk support, to stand up against the taliban. it was the politics that on did it all. ., ~ , ., , taliban. it was the politics that on did it all. ., ~ i. , . ., did it all. thank you very much for “oininu did it all. thank you very much for joining us- — as we were saying earlier, the foreign secretary, dominic raab, is facing criticism over the issue of the government's handling of the evacuation of afghan interpreters. let's speak to our political correspondent, chris mason. chris, he was on holiday and didn't
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put in a call, although the government says it would not have made a difference if he did or not. tell us the latest. that is the gist of it. to embellish with a bit more detail, in the big picture, before we get to dominic raab and the whole business of where he was last friday when he was on holiday and what he was doing and what he wasn't doing, is this intense effort now in the uk, as with other countries that have had an involvement in afghanistan, to get their nationals out, and to get out in the context of the uk those who have worked for the british military of the last couple of decades and whose lives and those of their families might be under threat as a result of that. i'm coordinating that is clearly difficult, getting those who are entitled to get on an raf plane to the airport in kabul is difficult as well. the government is keen to carry on doing that for as long as is possible, and they hope, ben wallace the defence secretary was
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saying this morning, they will have slightly longer to do it if president biden, as he suggested in an interview last night, is willing to maintain a presence in kabul, particularly at the apple, for longer than he was originally saying. the timetable of august the 31st was the existing timetable done during may this year, i think, when the americans slipped when they were originally going to leave. that was going to be in may. i think the key here is, you know, things are changing rapidly, that is why to me every hour counts. that's why i am putting in another company of soldiers today to help with public order to get it through. if at the end of the day we are allowed to stay longer, or we can stay longer, then that is a real benefit to us all. chris, in terms of dominic rav, how much pressure do you think he is under over that? much pressure do you think he is under overthat? == much pressure do you think he is under over that?— much pressure do you think he is under over that? . ., ., , under over that? -- dominic raab. he is certainly — under over that? -- dominic raab. he is certainly facing _ under over that? -- dominic raab. he is certainly facing pressure _ under over that? -- dominic raab. he is certainly facing pressure from i is certainly facing pressure from the opposition parties, labour, the lib the opposition parties, labour, the lib dems _ the opposition parties, labour, the lib dems and the snp. some people
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are saying _ lib dems and the snp. some people are saying he should resign or he should _ are saying he should resign or he should be — are saying he should resign or he should be sacked. i don't think that is where _ should be sacked. i don't think that is where he — should be sacked. i don't think that is where he is as far as where the government— is where he is as far as where the government is likely to be in response _ government is likely to be in response to this. their argument is, look, _ response to this. their argument is, look. given— response to this. their argument is, look, given where the afghan government was last friday, in other words _ government was last friday, in other words deteriorating, perhaps that kind of— words deteriorating, perhaps that kind of call wouldn't have counted for very— kind of call wouldn't have counted for very much. let's explain the context — for very much. let's explain the context. dominic raab was on holiday. — context. dominic raab was on holiday, as lots of people do in august — holiday, as lots of people do in august. we are told by the foreign office _ august. we are told by the foreign office he _ august. we are told by the foreign office he was making calls from his hotel— office he was making calls from his hotel room — office he was making calls from his hotel room in crete, but he didn't, we learned — hotel room in crete, but he didn't, we learned in the daily mail this morning. — we learned in the daily mail this morning, ring the opposite number, his opposite number in kabul. his officials _ his opposite number in kabul. his officials suggested he should, to talk about the business of getting interpreters out of afghanistan, and he didn't _ interpreters out of afghanistan, and he didn't it — interpreters out of afghanistan, and he didn't. it was delegated to a more _ he didn't. it was delegated to a more junior minister. here was ben wallace _ more junior minister. here was ben wallace again when asked about this this morning, offering this as a line of— this morning, offering this as a
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line of defence. | this morning, offering this as a line of defence.— this morning, offering this as a line of defence. i can tell you last frida , line of defence. i can tell you last friday, because _ line of defence. i can tell you last friday, because i _ line of defence. i can tell you last friday, because i was _ line of defence. i can tell you last friday, because i was not - line of defence. i can tell you last friday, because i was not dealing| friday, because i was not dealing with it through the night and on saturday, the number one problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost or didn't have any leveraged. the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the airport would continue to fly, allow planes to fly out, and those people we were getting out, would they be allowed to get out. that was the number one call, the only thing that mattered. that is why we were planning troop deployments which we have now done, and now amount of —— no amount of phone calls would have made a difference. what made a difference is what we are doing now, and that is what we are doing now, and that is why you will see families coming out. as we are on the hour, i think 119 afghan families and eligible people will be flying out, followed by another few hundred, and hopefully over the day, up towards
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1000 over the next 20ai was. that is what mattered on friday and is what matters now. it what mattered on friday and is what matters now-— matters now. it may be that that is absolutely the _ matters now. it may be that that is absolutely the case, _ matters now. it may be that that is absolutely the case, given - matters now. it may be that that is absolutely the case, given the i absolutely the case, given the reality— absolutely the case, given the reality on _ absolutely the case, given the reality on the ground in afghanistan last friday — reality on the ground in afghanistan last friday. a phone call may not have _ last friday. a phone call may not have made — last friday. a phone call may not have made any difference, but the question— have made any difference, but the question for dominic raab, if that is the _ question for dominic raab, if that is the case — question for dominic raab, if that is the case and that was known in government, given the commitment that successive british governments have made — that successive british governments have made to afghanistan over 20 years. _ have made to afghanistan over 20 years. why — have made to afghanistan over 20 years, why was the foreign secretary staring _ years, why was the foreign secretary staring down the reality of a big plank— staring down the reality of a big plank of— staring down the reality of a big plank of foreign policy about to unravel. — plank of foreign policy about to unravel, still on holiday? we will put that— unravel, still on holiday? we will put that question to him if we manage — put that question to him if we manage to track him down. he is due to chair— manage to track him down. he is due to chair a _ manage to track him down. he is due to chair a meeting of g7 manage to track him down. he is due to chair a meeting of 67 foreign ministers — to chair a meeting of 67 foreign ministers later today and we may get pictures— ministers later today and we may get pictures of— ministers later today and we may get pictures of that, but he is not doing — pictures of that, but he is not doing a — pictures of that, but he is not doing a news conference. thank you very much- — we've received pictures from the ministry of defence of a civilian charter flight from kabul landing at a midlands airport from kabul. the flight carried eligible afghans under the afghan relocation and assistance policy programme and british nationals who were based in afghanistan.
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the government says it has now relocated more than 2000 afghans under the arap scheme since it began in april. in essex, around 80 afghan interpreters and their families have already arrived in colchester and chelmsford. with me now is the chelmsford city council leader, liberal democrat councillor stephen robinson. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us a bit more, then, about who has arrived in your area?— has arrived in your area? well, last saturda , has arrived in your area? well, last saturday. five _ has arrived in your area? well, last saturday, five families _ has arrived in your area? well, last saturday, five families have - has arrived in your area? well, lasti saturday, five families have arrived in chelmsford, and we are coordinating across essex, the district councils have been discussing how we can welcome these residents to our area, these new residents. i believe the uk is obligated, as their former employer or employer, to look after these people who did so much for our personnel at risk to their own lives, and the uk is obligated to
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look after them, because if they had stayed in afghanistan, they faced death. ~ . stayed in afghanistan, they faced death. . . , stayed in afghanistan, they faced death. ., ., , .,., death. what are the needs who are rimaril death. what are the needs who are primarily thinking _ death. what are the needs who are primarily thinking for _ death. what are the needs who are primarily thinking for the _ death. what are the needs who are i primarily thinking for the moment? obviously, it is all the practical stuff, but are these people who have ever set foot in england before? that's right. some of them didn't realise that britain is quite cold, and so i've been having some really kind offers from local residents for clothes, toys for the children. these are young families mostly, so essex county council is on the case as far as finding them schooling. the local health service is working to get them registered with a local gp, so it's really important that all the different local agencies work together so that they can settle and get off to a good start.
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it's also really important that the home office funds this properly, because local councils' finances have suffered greatly over the last 18 months because of covid, so it is vital the home office does maintain their commitment to funding these families in ourarea. their commitment to funding these families in our area. flan their commitment to funding these families in our area.— families in our area. can you exlain families in our area. can you explain a — families in our area. can you explain a bit _ families in our area. can you explain a bit more _ families in our area. can you explain a bit more about i families in our area. can you l explain a bit more about that? families in our area. can you - explain a bit more about that? what commitments are given currently in terms of funding following the asylum seekers who end up with you? and how many do you think you could realistically accommodate? it is im ortant realistically accommodate? it is important to — realistically accommodate? it is important to point _ realistically accommodate? it 3 important to point out that they are not asylum seekers because they have already been given leave to remain by the british embassy, so they have the right to settle in the uk now. at the moment, they are being accommodated in a hotel in chelmsford and in colchester, which is being funded by the home office. as a local council, there is a housing crisis and we are desperately short of housing, but we
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are trying to put the home office in touch with private sector landlords who hopefully have got properties available so that they can settle in available so that they can settle in a proper house for the long—term. but it's vital that the home office funds that properly, because actually, there is normally a gap between the housing benefit rates and the actual rents in places like chelmsford, where property is fairly expensive, so it's vital that the home office continues to maintain their commitment to fund this properly until they are settled. numbers get bandied around and i know some people don't like talking about these things in terms of numbers because it comes down to needin numbers because it comes down to need in a humanitarian situation, but obviously, from you are talking what about, the numbers kind of get worked out obviously very carefully. do you put a number on the level of people that you could actually
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realistically support in your area? i think the suggestion is that we've got five families at the moment, and that once they have been found proper housing, that there may be others who could follow on. obviously, five families, i mean, in chelmsford, we have 7a,000 households, so we ought to be able to accommodate a few more. as i say, these people worked for british troops, supported them at risk to their own lives in afghanistan, and so, as their employer, we are obligated to them and we should look after them properly.— after them properly. thank you very much forjoining _ after them properly. thank you very much forjoining us, _ after them properly. thank you very much forjoining us, councillor i much forjoining us, councillor stephen robinson from chelmsford council. a coroner has formally opened inquests into the deaths of the five victims of the shooting in plymouth a week ago. in a short hearing, the coroner heard details
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of the fatal injuries inflicted by 22 year old jake davison, who killed himself. the inquests have been adjourned until december. the backlog of patients on nhs waiting lists in wales has risen to another record high. figures forjune show more than 62a,000 people were waiting to start treatment, the highest figure since data was first recorded in 2011. let's get more with our wales correspondent, tomos morgan. talk us through these figures. the fi . ures talk us through these figures. the figures you — talk us through these figures. iis; figures you mention, a1% higher talk us through these figures. iis; figures you mention, 41% higher than figures you mention, a1% higher than levels before covid. the numbers of people waiting more than nine months for treatment in hospital has gone up for treatment in hospital has gone up by a staggering 810% since before the pandemic. a&e and ambulance services have also seen record numbers in attendance, the highest numbers in attendance, the highest number of red calls for ambulances, there was life threatening calls, and the highest number of people in
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attendance at a&es across wales, and they have both seen the worst performance levels on record, the number of people being seen within four hours in a&es across wales is 69%, while the target is 95%. over 7000 people had to wait over 12 hours to be seen. more people started cancer treatment within the last month than the previous one, and the number of people waiting more than a year for nonurgent treatment has started to come down. why is this happening? covid has had a serious impact. nonurgent treatment was postponed during the pandemic, of course. people have been putting off coming to a&e and now they are coming back, as we have seenin now they are coming back, as we have seen in those record attendances, and the waiting lists haven't gone down, they have been increasing, more people being diagnosed with issues, so the waiting lists have gone up again. the health minister has pledged another £1a0 million to
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help deal with waiting list issues in wales, on top of 100 million that was already announced to deal with covid waiting lists. she said the situation will no doubt be continuing to get worse before it does get better. in swansea, one of the three hospitals here, they are trying to alleviate the pressure is on the waiting list. they are moving nonurgent treatment across the three hospital sites to make sure that a&e and trauma treatments don't over run the surgeries in the main hospital. i am in singleton. they are trying to give additional training to nurses so they can deal with injections in the day surgery behind me, training them in eye treatment, and giving additional treatment to the contracts they have with private sector workers, such as people who work in specsavers, to bring down the waiting lists there. the waiting list for eye surgery is only two weeks, down considerably, but i think there is still some way to go,
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well, a long way to go, really, before those levels across the board in wales come down to a reasonable level. . ~ in wales come down to a reasonable level. ., ~' , ., , in wales come down to a reasonable level. . ~ , ., , . in wales come down to a reasonable level. ., ,, , ., , . ., level. thank you very much. time for the weather — level. thank you very much. time for the weather with _ level. thank you very much. time for the weather with carol. _ we are looking at the weather turning more humid. today we have a fair bit of clout. sunny breaks pushing eased by a weak weather front bringing showery rain across england and wales. behind that, a return to sunshine and showers. for scotland and northern ireland, brighter breaks for you, and a lot of cloud they enough or patchy light rain and drizzle, and a breeze not as strong as yesterday. we hang onto as strong as yesterday. we hang onto a few of those showers tonight, clear spells developing, mist and fog patches will form, and by the end of the night a new weather front will be starting to show its hand, making its way into the west of northern ireland. as a result not a cold night. tomorrow, some of us
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starting with sunny skies, mist and fog lifting. rain across northern ireland and into north—west england and western scotland. then further rained behind that coming into northern ireland. —— further rain. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... chaos at kabul airport — even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through — with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday — the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel, to go home. amidst the desperate crowds at the airport — the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august, passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty — after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart
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to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. we start in scotland where the first day of the women's open golf is under way at carnoustie where the conditions have been murky and drizzly this morning. this is what the early leaderboard looks like. pederson one shot off the lead. world number one heavy nelly korda
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is the heavy favourite, having won the pga championship, and the olympic gold. she is the favourite going into this one. as our golf correspondent ian carter says, with a significant increase in prize money this is now the most lucrative championship on the women's calendar. it has increased to $9.8 million. that's a doubling of the purse if you go back a couple of years. it will increase to $6.8 million at least by the time we get to next year at muirfield. the players are thrilled with the development. it isn't equal prize money, it is still around half the purse the men competed for at the open championship a month ago, but the players are united in welcoming this move. they reckon it is a step in the right direction. tottenham fans want the answer to this one, where will harry kane
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be playing his football? the england captain hasn't travelled with the spurs squad for their european match tonight amid speculation over his future at the club. kane — who's been linked with a move to manchester city — is not in portugalfor spurs' europa conference league play—off first leg against pacos de ferreira. it's thought kane's still working on his fitness and manager nuno espirito santo says he can't confirm whether he will be ready for their league game against wolves on sunday. what's happening behind the doors is harry is our player, he's preparing himself, he trained today and he's going to train tomorrow and again on friday. joining the group. and this is how we operate. we don't, we don't really pay much attention to what's being said outside regarding the situation. harry is our player, he's one of the best players in the world and we are very lucky to have him. both celtic�*s men and women's teams were in european action last night — one doing better than the other. the men's team had a great night in glasgow, beating dutch side az alkmaar 2—0 in the first leg of their europa league play—off. but the women's team are out
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of the first qualifying round of the champions league. they were beaten 2—1 by spanish side levante, despite this goal from caitlin hayes. andy murray is out of the cincinnati masters after losing to ninth seed hubert hurkacz. it was the first meeting on the tour between the two players, with two—time champion murray beaten in straight sets by the 2a—year—old pole who beat roger federer in the quarter finals of wimbledon earlier in the year. british number two heather watson is also out. she lost to world number one ashl barty in straight sets. it was the australian's first match since losing in the first round at the tokyo olympics, winning 6—a 7—6. naomi osaka says she felt "ungrateful" at points during the last year for being unable to appreciate her success. the world number two was speaking after coming from a set down to beat american teenager coco gauff in the second round of the cincinnati open.
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osaka withrdrew from the french open and wimbledon earlier this year to focus on her mental health: i'v e i've had a really weird year. chuckles i think may be some of you guys know what happened to me this year. but i feel like i changed my mindset a lot. i think even if i lost i would have felt like i was a winner. there is so much stuff going on in the world. cheering yer... there is so much stuff going on in the world. i feel like just waking up in the morning is a wind. so, yeah. —— waking up in the morning isa so, yeah. —— waking up in the morning is a win. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport
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got some new statistics to bring you on the number of people being pinged. apparently it is falling. last week a total of 261,000. an 80% decrease from the previous week. to break it down, there were 1.5 per case issued by the nhs app in england last week. however, the figures are still above the levels in may. 1.1 pings per case at the beginning of may, but it is still coming down. councils across england are preparing to house up to 20—thousand afghan refugees over the next few years, following the taliban's takeover. more than 200 afghan nationals have already resettled in the uk since 2010. our reporter luxmy gopal has been
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to meet some of them, to hear their experiences. images capturing the desperation to leave afghanistan. watching the news footage of afghans trying to flee were those who have some idea of what they are hoping to escape from. the first time the taliban came to afghanistan, they forced people, for example, praying, dressing, everything. patrees's wife zuhra and her sisters had a difficult life after her mother was widowed. living under taliban rule in the late 90s with restricted rights for women. we were not able to go to school and when you were going outside, there should be a man with you. zuhra and patrees moved to the uk with their two children just under a decade ago. i'm secure here, i'm safe here because in afghanistan, when you wanted to go to office, you are not sure if you would reach the office alive.
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because there were many suicide attacks and the situation was really bad. can you remember what it was like adjusting when you arrived here? i didn't really understand the i language, and it took me a while. i was a bit naughty at school- because when they talked nicely i thought they were shouting. adjusting to a new life brought challenges for the adults as well. despite having high positions and salaries working at international organisations in afghanistan, all zuhra and patrees could get in the uk were part time jobs in a shop or volunteering. i was thinking that when i go there, because i already have education and qualifications, it will be easy for me to find a job. unfortunately when i applied for severaljobs, they say, you don't have the experience of working here. when there was a cleaning job, they were asking me, would you like to apply for thatjob? and they know my background and everything. so it was hurting you. for hameeda hassani, current developments in afghanistan
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are bringing back difficult memories of her own childhood there, until her father moved to the uk in early 2000 as an asylum seeker. i don't remember much about what happened at that time, but all i know is that my father wasn't safe there and he had to escape. she arrived in the country as a 13—year—old who couldn't speak english. it was a bit difficult at the start, especially being a muslim girl and going to school, not knowing the language, the culture, the environment. i think i did face a lot of challenges in terms of bullies calling me names, and, "go back to your country". the opportunity ofjust going to school was a big thing for me. so there was nothing to stop me. she studied law at university and is now working at a solicitors, training to be a lawyer. zuhra and patrees have started again with training as well. she is in herfinal year of a nursing degree, and he's training to be a health assistant. and their children are very much settled. what's your advice to other children coming here from afghanistan to help them adjust in the future?
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don't be, don't be scared to ask questions if you don't understand something. his family, there is no one to take care of them at the moment. now their attention has turned to patrees's father, disabled and still in afghanistan. one of the many people wanting to get out of the country. the uk government has pledged to resettle 5000 afghan refugees here in the first year. tim is from a charity that helps refugees with issues they face when they arrive. how to orient themselves in the local area, how —— how to orientate themselves in the local area, how to get their children settled into school, how to start thinking about getting work, developing their language skills and processing the trauma of being in exile. he welcomes the government's response but says more is needed. the ideal response from the government is a resettlement programme of about 20,000 across two years, 10,000 in each year, plus some kind of additional evacuation programme that simply
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temporarily brings people to safety. without necessarily putting them on a full resettlement programme. driven from their motherland years ago, these families now watch others face the same fate. luxmy gopal, bbc news. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. the research, led by oxford university, suggests that while the pfizerjab works best initially, both are equally as effective in the long term. our health correspondent, naomi grimley reports. for months, the office for national statistics, in partnership with oxford university, has been asking hundreds of thousands of us to do swabs for their research. unlike other studies, which have looked at how effective vaccines are at keeping people out of hospital, this one has looked at how good they are at preventing any infection with the delta variant. to begin with, the effectiveness
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of the pfizerjab appears to be better than the oxford astrazeneca one, but, after a—5 months, pfizer's effectiveness seems to decline faster. what we have found is that effectiveness was initially higher 1a days after a second dose of pfizer compared to astrazeneca. for example, 93% against symptomatic infections for pfizer and 71% for astrazeneca. however, overtime, the effectiveness declines faster with pfizer than for astrazeneca. the more sobering news is that when infections do occur, double—vaccinated people have the same levels of virus in their nose and throat as those who have not beenjabbed. the researchers say this shows the potential for these people to pass on the disease, even if they are protected against serious illness. i can speak now to professor sheena cruickshank, an immunologist and professor
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in biomedical sciences and public engagement at the university of manchester. welcome. thanks for joining welcome. thanks forjoining us. first, what do you read into this research in terms of what it means for boosterjabs? that research in terms of what it means for boosterjabs?— research in terms of what it means for boosterjabs? for booster “abs? that a really good cuestion. for boosterjabs? that a really good question. what _ for boosterjabs? that a really good question. what we _ for boosterjabs? that a really good question. what we are _ for boosterjabs? that a really good question. what we are seeing i for boosterjabs? that a really good question. what we are seeing so i for boosterjabs? that a really good| question. what we are seeing so far is a really clear picture of good, sustained immune response. we've got evidence we can see antibodies at least seven months after infection, and more critically we can see memory to the infection being retained. that means that even if the antibody levels drop we still have the memory of the vaccine or the virus, and the capacity to make more antibodies if we become infected. so, given that that is the case, i don't think there is a strong case for booster vaccines at
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this point in the majority of the population. not when less than 1% of the population in other parts of the world remain to be vaccinated. iithi’heh world remain to be vaccinated. when ou sa world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not — world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not worth — world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not worth it _ world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not worth it in _ world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not worth it in the _ world remain to be vaccinated. when you say not worth it in the majority of people in this country, would you say there are some who should be getting their boosterjabs in september, as discussed? for those who are immunosuppressed - september, as discussed? for those who are immunosuppressed or i september, as discussed? for those i who are immunosuppressed or immune deficient, unable to make a good immune response, they may well need a booster to try and help them make as good a immune response as possible. forthe as good a immune response as possible. for the rest of the population, we aren't seeing evidence at this stage that we need boosters. i5 evidence at this stage that we need boosters. , ., , , boosters. is there anything in this that aives boosters. is there anything in this that gives you _ boosters. is there anything in this that gives you any, _ boosters. is there anything in this that gives you any, sort _ boosters. is there anything in this that gives you any, sort of, - boosters. is there anything in this that gives you any, sort of, that l that gives you any, sort of, that gives any clarity about mixing jabs? it isn't about that at all, but it is interesting to see the different ways the body responds to the differentjabs, which we have known,
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and that has led to suggestions that it is a good idea to mix and match. some studies have already happened, some clinical studies are looking at mixing the jabs, and it looks like that could be even better for the immune response. this is really exciting because particularly in places where there isn't enough access to one type of vaccine, it means they can make the most of the access they have got to give their community is a really good level of protection. it also means we might be able to perhaps tweak the types of vaccine we get. for example, boosting the t cell response. t cells are really critical at helping making antibodies, helping other cells make antibodies, but also killing the virus itself. so, some of the vaccines are even better at triggering the t cells, too. fine triggering the t cells, too. one thin that triggering the t cells, too. one thing thatjumped _ triggering the t cells, too. one thing thatjumped out at me in this research, the time between the first
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and second doses doesn't affect the vaccine's effectiveness. obviously thatis vaccine's effectiveness. obviously that is something we've heard arguments made in terms of it being so much better to wait longer. initially it was a pragmatic decision, but then we were told it was better for the effectiveness of the vaccine. this says that is just not so. the vaccine. this says that is 'ust not so. . , the vaccine. this says that is 'ust not so. ., , ., ,, ., ., not so. initially it appeared that it was better — not so. initially it appeared that it was better for _ not so. initially it appeared that it was better for the _ not so. initially it appeared that it was better for the vaccine i not so. initially it appeared that it was better for the vaccine to l it was better for the vaccine to have that longer gap, but this data, of course, is looking over a much longer period of time, and is saying that ultimately it has no impact. either way, we are still getting a really good level of protection with these vaccines, and i think we should all be very proud of how good the vaccines have been, and how quickly the scientific community have responded to create these vaccines. ih have responded to create these vaccines. , ., _, , , vaccines. in terms of completely caettin to vaccines. in terms of completely getting to a _ vaccines. in terms of completely getting to a point _ vaccines. in terms of completely getting to a point where - vaccines. in terms of completely getting to a point where we i vaccines. in terms of completely getting to a point where we live | getting to a point where we live with the virus, we are now at a stage, the ons latest figures show
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that 9a% of adults have covid antibodies, 89.6% of adults have received their first dose of the vaccine. the vaccine, as discussed, reduces the impact of covid so people come through it in a way they probably wouldn't if they hadn't been vaccines, but in order to really get on top of it, what are your thoughts now on lowering the age at which the vaccination programme is rolled out? we are already looking _ programme is rolled out? we are already looking at _ programme is rolled out? we are already looking at vaccinating i programme is rolled out? we are already looking at vaccinating 16 l already looking at vaccinating 16 and 17—year—olds. that could be really important protecting students at college who are perhaps doing their a—levels. we are seeing a lot of transgression. that could be important for helping, sort of, helping lowering the impacts of the disease. unfortunately we are seeing more cases of long covid. i think we still need to be very mindful of the precautions we take. just because we
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individually might not get that sick with the disease, it doesn't mean that our nearest and dearest won't if they are in that immunodeficient or immunosuppressed category where they are just going to be much or immunosuppressed category where they arejust going to be much more vulnerable. particularly with the ability to transmit the virus, we should still be thinking about things like mask wearing, particularly in crowded spaces, particularly in crowded spaces, particularly when we are going to be in ventilated spaces for a while. moving on, we can have some optimism that this is going to be something we can live with, we can accommodate, and hopefully won't be having the effects. but the worry is only part of the world has these levels of protection, and where the virus will continue to thrive, where you have low levels of vaccination, it is really getting the chance to mutate further and create more variants of concern, and they could
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be quite troubling.— be quite troubling. thanks very much. the foreign secretary dominc raab is facing criticism over the issue of the government's handling of the evacuation of afghan interpreters. the foreign secretary dominc raab is facing criticism over the issue of the government's handling of the evacuation of afghan interpreters — particularly in his decision not to make a personal phone call to his afghan counterpart. here he is going into downing street a few minutes ago. not responding to questions. as paralympians continue to arrive in tokyo ahead of the start of the paralympic games there next week, a new campaign is trying to improve the lives of the more than a billion disabled people around the world. "we the 15" will see landmarks like the london eye and empire state building light up in purple tonight, to highlight the estimated 15% of the global population who live with a disability. joining me now is craig spence
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from the international paralympic committee which is behind this campaign. 15%, that might surprise a lot of people. 15%, that might surprise a lot of --eole. . �* , 15%, that might surprise a lot of aeo ale, ., �* , , 15%, that might surprise a lot of n-eole. ., �*, , . people. that's the first ob'ective ofthe people. that's the first ob'ective of the campaign. * people. that's the first ob'ective of the campaign, to i people. that's the first ob'ective of the campaign, to get i people. that's the first objective of the campaign, to get the i people. that's the first objective l of the campaign, to get the global understanding that actually 15%, one in every seven person in the world, has a disability. i think many people don't realise that it is 15% because many persons with disabilities are hidden from society. what this campaign aims to do is to make the invisible visible and create opportunities for 1.2 billion people.— billion people. what would the concrete hopes _ billion people. what would the concrete hopes to _ billion people. what would the concrete hopes to be - billion people. what would the concrete hopes to be for i billion people. what would the concrete hopes to be for you i billion people. what would the i concrete hopes to be for you from this? . ., . ., , , concrete hopes to be for you from this? _, . .,, , , concrete hopes to be for you from this? . , , ,., this? the concrete hope is this is a ten ear this? the concrete hope is this is a ten year campaign. _ this? the concrete hope is this is a ten year campaign, that _ this? the concrete hope is this is a ten year campaign, that in - this? the concrete hope is this is a ten year campaign, that in ten i this? the concrete hope is this is a l ten year campaign, that in ten years time we don't have to do another campaign. chuckles we want to work with governments, businesses, and the public to create opportunities for persons with disabilities. when you look at the statistics, every one into people with a disability is unemployed. 85% live in poverty. what we have tried to do with this campaign is bring together 20 international
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organisations who share our passion for social inclusion to make a difference. that's what we aim to do by working together for the first time in history to really initiate change for the worlds largest marginalised group. you change for the worlds largest marginalised group.- marginalised group. you are obviously — marginalised group. you are obviously putting _ marginalised group. you are obviously putting the - marginalised group. you are obviously putting the global| marginalised group. you are - obviously putting the global picture there. how does it compare with the situation in this country on the statistics? i situation in this country on the statistics?— situation in this country on the statistics? i mean... this is an international _ statistics? i mean... this is an international campaign, - statistics? i mean... this is an international campaign, but i statistics? i mean... this is an international campaign, but if| statistics? i mean... this is an i international campaign, but if you look at one of the reasons why we are doing this campaign now is the fact that the pandemic has disproportionately impacted persons of disabilities. if you look at the death rate in the uk, 60% of covid deaths are persons with disabilities. because sometimes they are at the back of the queue when it comes to health care. we need to change that and we need to make changes notjust in great britain but around the world. that's why today we have launched a tv campaign in 60 countries, and we are lighting up in 60 countries, and we are lighting up over 120 landmarks around the world purple, the international colour of disability. the
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paralympics _ colour of disability. the paralympics in - colour of disability. the paralympics in london | colour of disability. the | paralympics in london in colour of disability. the paralympics in london in 2012 did a huge amount in terms of recognition and understanding. has that had an enduring legacy, and how important are these events in changing perspectives? i are these events in changing perspectives?— perspectives? i think the paralympics _ perspectives? i think the paralympics is _ perspectives? i think the paralympics is the - perspectives? i think the | paralympics is the world's perspectives? i think the - paralympics is the world's number one event for changing attitudes towards disability. we saw that in great britain in 2012. post—games research showed one in three people in great britain changed their attitudes towards disability. the legacy of that is that six years later 1 legacy of that is that six years lateri million more persons with disabilities are in employment in great britain. the paralympics in great britain. the paralympics in great britain. the paralympics in great britain was a game changer. we want this campaign to be a game changer. notjust for the two weeks we organise the games, but over the next ten years by working with many international organisations who share our passion for changing the world. . �* , . share our passion for changing the world. ., �*, ., .,., ., , world. that's an extraordinary thing to be able to _ world. that's an extraordinary thing to be able to point _ world. that's an extraordinary thing
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to be able to point to _ world. that's an extraordinary thing to be able to point to and _ world. that's an extraordinary thing to be able to point to and say i world. that's an extraordinary thing to be able to point to and say there | to be able to point to and say there arei million more disabled people in employment in this country you would say directly as a result of the paralympics in 2012. i’m would say directly as a result of the paralympics in 2012. i'm not auoin to the paralympics in 2012. i'm not going to claim — the paralympics in 2012. i'm not going to claim the _ the paralympics in 2012. i'm not going to claim the credit - the paralympics in 2012. i'm not going to claim the credit for - the paralympics in 2012. i'm not going to claim the credit for all| the paralympics in 2012. i'm not. going to claim the credit for all of it. the paralympics certainly contributed to it. we have many athletes, and many stories of persons with disabilities who said that prior to london 2012 they applied for multiple jobs, they got interviews, but the moment the employer saw they had a disability they never got through to the second stage. after london 2012 they said they were offered jobs straightaway. because the paralympics help to change attitudes towards disabilities. people started to focus on what worked rather than what didn't. so they focused on ability rather than disability. find ability rather than disability. and it anti—discrimination laws are in place, and companies have an understanding of that. you talk about the high levels of unemployment and poverty, can you
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talk a bit more about that? i unemployment and poverty, can you talk a bit more about that?— talk a bit more about that? i think great britain _ talk a bit more about that? i think great britain is _ talk a bit more about that? i think great britain is one _ talk a bit more about that? i think great britain is one of— talk a bit more about that? i think great britain is one of the - talk a bit more about that? i think great britain is one of the leading | great britain is one of the leading countries in the world but with this campaign the one thing we have found is two thirds of countries around the world have no laws protecting persons with disabilities. this will be a key part of this, and so will businesses. in the last two years, 500 of the world's biggest businesses have put disabilities at the heart of the boardroom agenda. if we can change 500 of the world's biggest businesses, then i think we are making progress.— are making progress. thank you so much. are making progress. thank you so much- great _ are making progress. thank you so much. great to _ are making progress. thank you so much. great to talk _ are making progress. thank you so much. great to talk to _ are making progress. thank you so much. great to talk to you. - now, the weather with carol kirkwood. from tomorrow up until sunday by day and by night it'll become more humid thanit and by night it'll become more humid than it has been. today, once again, there was a lot of cloud around thick enough for some patchy light rain or some drizzle, and we've got a weather front rain or some drizzle, and we've got a weatherfront bringing rain or some drizzle, and we've got a weather front bringing some rain
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in which will turn increasingly shower read through the day. it is a fairly weak affair and it is pushing east, eradicating the bright start we have seen in the east. these fronts coming our way tonight and tomorrow. some brightness across northern ireland, southern scotland come into northern england. north of scotland also seeing some sunshine. in the central suede, some cloud of thick enough for patchy rain and light drizzle. here is a weather front in an arc across england producing again some showers. on the other side of that we see a return to some sunshine but as temperatures rise little spark some showers and some of those could be heavy. the breeze won't be as brisk as yesterday. through this evening and overnight, we hold on to some of those showers. there will be clearer skies, areas of cloud, and ourfirst weather front will be starting to edge towards northern ireland. overnight lows between nine and a0 degrees, so not particularly cold. through tomorrow, he was the first weather front. through tomorrow, he was the first weatherfront. —— nine and through tomorrow, he was the first weather front. —— nine and ia degrees. this second weather front
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will also bring in rain and this one will also bring in rain and this one will be with us for much of the weekend. on friday we start off with some sunshine, any mist and fog lifting, they will be areas of cloud, particularly ahead of this weather front bringing rain through northern ireland into south—west scotland and north—west england. furthering coming into northern ireland with the next weather front and it'll start to feel humid. this weather front will slowly move east. it is moving a little faster than we thought this time yesterday. after a dry start across central and eastern parts, the weather front moves from the west to the east, bringing rain to the london area through the course of the afternoon. for scotland and northern ireland, we are looking again at some rain. brighter skies in between and still feeling humid. into sunday, because the rain is coming in quicker on saturday, it'll clear quicker on sunday, brighter skies out towards the west. it'll be quite breezy, humid, but drierand brighter on
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monday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: amidst desperate crowds at kabul airport, pictures have emerged of the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through, with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday. the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel to go home. if you are linked to the international presence here, you are certainly going to be worried that in this chaotic situation a taliban member will turn to you and say, you know, who are you, what did you do? and may be decide you shouldn't be allowed to leave. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august,
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passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. the only problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost didn't have any leverage. the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the airport would continue to fly, allow planes to fly out, and those people we were getting out, would they be allowed to get out? the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant.
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there have been desperate scences at kabul airport, where the uk is to deploy another company of soldiers to afghanistan — to try to deal with what's described as a "public order" situation as people try to flee the country. none more distressing than the sight of a baby girl of about two—years—old being handed over to american soldiers, presumably by her guardian, so desperate that they have chosen to let her go in the hope of escaping their present plight. 12 people have been killed near the taliban telling people without the legal right to travel to stay awayclaim the chaos is being caused by "foreigners" opening fire to disperse crowds. the defence secretary, ben wallace, said the government's aim is to get about 6,000 people out, adding that uk troops would stay as long as us forces are in control of the airport. meanwhile the foreign secterary, dominic raab, has been accused by labour of �*shamefully�* putting interpreters' lives at risk, by not seeking help from an afghan minister. but one interpreter who worked for uk forces in afghanistan has
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begged borisjohnson for help, fearing fatal reprisals from the taliban. president biden has said us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond his deadline of the end of the month. and he inisted — no americans will be left behind in kabul. the first of our reports comes from our north america correspondent, david willis. in the afghan capital, people, scared and desperate, are still trying to flee the country. the taliban are coming for me, this girl cries. one of hundreds pressed to the gates of kabul airport in the hope ofjoining a flight out. president biden continues to blame the chaos on the craven capitulation of the afghan government and conceded it might not be possible to complete the american withdrawal by the deadline in two weeks' time. americans should understand that troops might have to be there beyond the 31st of august?
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people will have to understand that we're going to try to get it done before then. but if you don't... we will determine at the time who is left. and? and if there's american citizens left we're going to stay until we get them all out. the biden administration has brokered a deal with the taliban to allow civilians safe passage to us flights, but with checkpoints throughout the city, bottlenecks abound and the remit of these us soldiers doesn't extend beyond the airport perimeter. the taliban are in and around kabul right now but they are not interfering with our operation. through the state department, the taliban are facilitating the safe passage to the airport for american citizens, that is us passport holders. despite its conciliatory tone few believe the taliban will tolerate any challenge to its leadership. a number of demonstrators were reportedly shot dead in the eastern city
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of jalalabad after the taliban flag was lowered and the afghan tricolour raised in its place. having promised a more inclusive approach to government, it is unclear what form that might take. our correspondent secunder kermani is in afghanistan's capital kabul and gave us this update on the situation there. we just heard a heavy burst of gunfire that seems to have gone quiet now. we are still waiting for details as to what happened but it was heavier than anything we have heard over the past 2a hours from our location. today is a holy day for shia muslims, so it could be related to that. it could he attempts to disperse the crowd. we are still waiting on those details.
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in the rest of the city, there are two different scenes. chaos continuing at the airport, where hundreds, thousands of people probably, have been camped out, trying to get inside, desperate to leave. many of them don't have visas or the necessary documentation and it is unlikely they will be evacuated. but they are still willing to put up with these awful conditions. taliban members are firing into the air, trying to control the crowd using sticks and whips to push people back. elsewhere in the city, aside from the burst of gunfire, things seem to be calmer. more shops and restaurants opening up than in previous days and more people coming out and about. banks are closed, as are many government offices. we are seeing fewer women on the streets. you do see some. they are not necessarily wearing the burqa that people most closely
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associate with the taliban's last stint in power in the 1990s. things are returning to normal but still an air of deep uncertainty. many people are worried that despite taliban assurances they may be targeted for links to the government. that could still happen. it is hard to overstate how much of a presents the taliban have in the city. everywhere you go, you see heavily armed fighters patrolling in vehicles seized from security forces and just wandering the streets. very surreal, but this seems to be the new normal in afghanistan, at least for now. i want to show you some quite harrowing pictures now that were filmed in kabul on tuesday and really illustrate the desperation felt by many there. here you can see a young girl, who looks to be about two years old, being lifted over the fence at kabul airport and handed to
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an american soldier. we don't know whether the person who was so desperate as we don't know whether the person who was so desperate as to we don't know whether the person who was so desperate as to put we don't know whether the person who was so desperate as to put her we don't know whether the person who was so desperate as to put her over a wall to go off in the care of others, to take her hopefully to a better place, managed to join others, to take her hopefully to a better place, managed tojoin her, or how many other children have been separated from their parents in this way, but those pictures are shocking and do some up the chaos and panic experienced by people in doha right now. colonel richard kemp joins us. colonel richard kempjoins us. so much to pull on the heartstrings of everybody right now. you have a particular perspective, having served there. what are your thoughts as you see these scenes unfold? the contrast as you see these scenes unfold? tue contrast between as you see these scenes unfold? tte contrast between when as you see these scenes unfold? t'te contrast between when i as you see these scenes unfold? tte contrast between when i went there in 2003 and now, in 2003, the people
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were extremely happy, very relieved and thankful to western forces for freeing them off the shackles of the taliban, the horrors of the taliban, and now we can see nothing but desperation as they imagine, which i think they are right to do, they are going to come back, and they fear it so greatly, we have seen horrific scenes of people hanging onto the side of and falling to the death of — the contrast could not be greater. what do you think could or should have happened? t what do you think could or should have happened?— have happened? i don't believe president biden _ have happened? i don't believe president biden should - have happened? i don't believe president biden should have i have happened? i don't believe i president biden should have made have happened? i don't believe - president biden should have made an unconditional decision to withdraw from afghanistan without any concern or consideration for the security or the political situation there. if he hadn't done that, we would not be in this position now, and not only that, but the way he executed the withdrawal was very quick, too fast really for the taliban, i beg your pardon, for the afghan government, which was already in denial about
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american withdrawal, to make plans for a totally new and different situation they were about to face. he withdrew at a high point in the fighting season, when the taliban is at itits most powerful. if he had waited till the autumn and winter, it would have been very different. you don't think necessarily trip should have remained? there was the trump agreement with the taliban, and joe biden said it would have been very difficult to change that. do you agree that this was the right path but it should just have been done differently? tia. path but it should 'ust have been done differently?— done differently? no, i don't believe that, _ done differently? no, i don't believe that, nor— done differently? no, i don't believe that, nor do - done differently? no, i don't believe that, nor do i - done differently? no, i don'tj believe that, nor do i believe president biden when he says he was bound by trump's earlier plan. he had been in office for seven months and had time to do whatever policy he wanted. he was given policy options that were different to this by his staff who reviewed the
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situation comprehensively, and he chose this one. so i don't think it it was right. i think the withdrawal was made worse, and the scenes we are facing now were made absolutely inevitable by the way he withdrew. the fact that the decisions have been taken by the united states when this was a coalition that went in, is there any way at all that there should have been or could have been a situation whereby other nato troops remained? t a situation whereby other nato troops remained?— troops remained? i don't think that's possible. _ troops remained? i don't think that's possible. i— troops remained? i don't think that's possible. i know - troops remained? i don't think that's possible. i know the - troops remained? i don't think - that's possible. i know the defence secretary said he tried to put together some form of british led coalition without the us, made up of other nato countries. i don't think britain really wanted to do that anyway. i think britain is very pleased to be getting up, albeit in such terrible circumstances, and i don't think britain has the capability at the moment, with other commitments and with an army that has been so badly decimated over decades, to be the leading nation in
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a coalition in afghanistan. on top of which, no single member of nato wanted to take part. it doesn't surprise me at all. it does call into question the validity of nato. all it seems to be at the moment is american. ~ . ., american. what will the impact of this be in the _ american. what will the impact of this be in the longer— american. what will the impact of this be in the longer term? - american. what will the impact of this be in the longer term? i - american. what will the impact of| this be in the longer term? i think, obviously. — this be in the longer term? i think, obviously. i— this be in the longer term? i think, obviously, i don't _ this be in the longer term? i think, obviously, i don't need _ this be in the longer term? i think, obviously, i don't need to - this be in the longer term? i think, obviously, i don't need to go - this be in the longer term? i think, obviously, i don't need to go into l obviously, i don't need to go into the impact on afghanistan — i think most people understand how horrific life in that country is likely to be from now on, but in wider terms, i think we will see a steep rise in thejihadist think we will see a steep rise in the jihadist threat from afghanistan. there is a strong presence of taliban and al-qaeda and islamic state in afghanistan, some of whom are fighting with taliban in recent battles in the cities. they will be allowed by the taliban, no matter what they might be saying, to operate and to plan and hopefully not but try and execute attacks
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against the west, on top of which, jihadists around the world will flood into afghanistan, as they did before 9/11. they will meet, plan and try to carry out attacks against the west. they will of course be joining thousands of dangerous terrorist prisoners released by the taliban in recent days. and then we have jihadists around the world celebrating this victory for the taliban. it will encourage them, inspire them and get them to increase their recruiting, and they will become more energised in their campaigns in different countries around the world, so the net effect, i think, is that we will see an increased threat at the level at least that it was at the height of the islamic state's campaign, when they dominated large parts of territory in syria and iraq. colonel richard kemp. — territory in syria and iraq. colonel richard kemp, thank _ territory in syria and iraq. colonel richard kemp, thank you - territory in syria and iraq. colonel richard kemp, thank you for - territory in syria and iraq. colonel. richard kemp, thank you forjoining
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us. we have received footage of an aeroplane from afghanistan landing in the midlands. the government says it has relocated more than 2000 afghans under the arap scheme since it began in april. danjohnsonjoins me from delhi. people who don't have the paper is required to get onto flights from cobble, how are they leaving the country?— leaving the country? that's a difficult situation. _ leaving the country? that's a difficult situation. there - leaving the country? that's a difficult situation. there are l difficult situation. there are reports of some refugees making it across the border, either into pakistan or into iran, but the borders, we are told, are secure in the main, so that will be a tricky move for anybody to make, even people with the right documentation who are eligible for the evacuation flights out of kabul are struggling to make it through to the airport at the moment, sometimes because of the
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sheer number of people in the crowd surrounding the airport, sometimes because of taliban checkpoints, and particularly for afghan refugees, there is the fear that if they step out of the same place to try to go to the port to try to take one of those evacuation flights and get stopped by the taliban and asked for documents in and quizzed about why they qualify for an evacuation flight, that they may in a sense he exposing themselves as having worked either for the previous afghan government orfor either for the previous afghan government or for coalition forces in the past and opening themselves up in the past and opening themselves up to potential reprisals, and at least been stopped from getting to the airport. there are reports of that happening to people who have the documents and are eligible. although uk and us forces have the airport itself secure, there is a certain amount of chaos still in the streets around, and they are reliant on the goodwill of the taliban in essence to protect people's said passage to let them through to the airport, and the us general in
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charge of the operation was clear that he can't exert control any further than the apple perimeter. it doesn't have the capacity to go out and protect people and make sure they can get through the streets of kabul, so they are reliant on taliban goodwill to make that happen. t taliban goodwill to make that ha en. ., taliban goodwill to make that ha en. . ., taliban goodwill to make that ha--en. ., ., , happen. i want to bring in some ictures happen. i want to bring in some pictures we _ happen. i want to bring in some pictures we are _ happen. i want to bring in some pictures we are looking - happen. i want to bring in some pictures we are looking at. - happen. i want to bring in somej pictures we are looking at. let's have a look. this is the airport in kabul, and we can see a plane that we think is about to take off, is due to take off. it's hard to make out what we can see here. there are people gathering around that plane. there have been accounts of the chaos that people have experienced getting onto these flights, one account in particular this morning, an afghanjournalist account in particular this morning, an afghan journalist describing how he got onto that us cargo flight which carried about 630 people out of afghanistan, and how people were jostling to get on it, then it was
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so overcrowded, some had to get off, and some of the concerns about what they were leaving behind. you have been talking about the difficulties of people getting to the airport. are you hearing, what are you hearing about the latest numbers in terms of people leaving afghanistan, notjust terms of people leaving afghanistan, not just obviously this sort terms of people leaving afghanistan, notjust obviously this sort of formalised route but crossing the borders? ., formalised route but crossing the borders? . ., formalised route but crossing the borders? . . , , formalised route but crossing the borders? . ., , , ., borders? there are large numbers of military planes _ borders? there are large numbers of military planes now _ borders? there are large numbers of military planes now able _ borders? there are large numbers of military planes now able to _ borders? there are large numbers of military planes now able to land, - military planes now able to land, load up and take off from kabul airport, mostly taking people to the gulf states initially and they can be flown on from there. there were reports that some of those planes were leaving half empty. in contrast to the scenes at the start of the week, where, in all the chaos, there were planes absolutely crammed with as many people as they could physically take, even beyond the normal capacity of the plane, now there are reports that because people are struggling to get to the ports and sometimes to present the right documentation to get through
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the checkpoints, some planes have been leaving not full to capacity. the uk defence secretary has denied that today, saying all the uk military planes what had been leaving with as many people as they were expecting to take, but it certainly is a really tricky situation. in terms of the numbers leaving by other routes, impossible to say because that is, by its nature, an undocumented activity. the taliban has encouraged people not to participate in it and has encouraged people to stay in the country and has promised there won't be retaliation or reprisals for anything they did in previous lives, but you can understand why the population is so nervous. there are stories of people who had proudly displayed photographs in their home that they had taken with perhaps uk forces. they are now destroying that evidence because they fear the taliban coming house to house, trying to root out who did what sort of work, who showed disloyalty, in their view, to the country, and who is perhaps deserving of punishment in future, is perhaps deserving of punishment infuture, and is perhaps deserving of punishment in future, and there have been some signs of certain amount of violence,
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and of crackdowns in some cities, particularly injalalabad in the east, where the afghan flag was raised yesterday and was met by violence from taliban fighters and lives were lost there. we are seeing at the edges that things are starting to disintegrate even as the taliban are trying to put in place new power structures and government structures. the headlines on bbc news: amidst desperate crowds at kabul airport, pictures have emerged of the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. chaos at kabul airport — even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through — with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. this officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday. the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel to go home. sport and for a full round up, we cross over to the bbc sport centre.
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we start in scotland where the first day of the women's open golf is under way at carnoustie, where the conditions have been murky and drizzly this morning. this is what the early leaderboard looks like. madelene sagstrom of sweden with a one—shot lead. world number one nelly korda is the heavy favourite, having won the pga championship, olympic gold. she is one shot behind. annabelle dimmock is three off the lead, one under through six. the former manchester united and scotland striker denis law has revealed that he's been diagnosed with �*mixed dementia'. law, who is now aged 81, says he wants to be open about his condition. ina in a statement, he said he is suffering from alzheimer's and vascular dementia. he says he and his family are getting support from
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the alzheimer's society charity. he says he wants to remain as optimistic as possible, adding in his statement, i am trying to be positive and determined to continue watching my club, manchester united. i know the road ahead will be hard, demanding, painfuland demanding, painful and ever—changing, and demanding, painfuland ever—changing, and so ask for understanding and patience, as this will not be an easyjourney. tottenham fans want the answer to this one — where will harry kane be playing his football? the england captain hasn't travelled with the spurs squad for their european match tonight amid speculation over his future at the club. kane — who's been linked with a move to manchester city — is not in portugalfor spurs' europa conference league play—off first leg against pacos de ferreira. it's thought kane's still working on his fitness and manager nuno espirito santo says he can't confirm whether he will be ready for their league game against wolves on sunday. he is preparing himself, training
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today and he will train tomorrow. and again on friday. joining the group. this is how we operate. we don't really pay much attention to what is said outside. harry is our player, one of the best in the world and we're very to have him. —— we are very lucky to have him. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. a coroner has formally opened inquests into the deaths the five victims of the shooting in plymouth a week ago. our correspondent sarah ransome is in plymouth. what have you heard? it was a very short hearing this morning. the coronerformally it was a very short hearing this morning. the coroner formally opened and adjourned it. it is an inquest into the deaths of the five victims into the deaths of the five victims in plymouth just a week ago today. we heard more detailfrom the senior
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investigating officer in charge of the police investigation, detective inspector stephen hanley. we heard that 51—year—old maxine davison, there had been an argument with her son, the gunman, jake davison, before he shot her. we also heard that the other four victims involved in the attack didn't know him, that he had gone into the street and shot three—year—old sophie martyn, along with her dad, leave. they died of shot gun once. we heard that stephen washington was a carer for his wife and that he died in the attack while out walking his huskies. and that the other woman who died in hospital, kate sheppard, was an artist. she had medical attention at the scene but died later in the evening in the regional hospital. we
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heard that the koruna adjourned the inquest until december this year —— the coroner. there will be a separate inquest into the death of jake davison later this afternoon. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. the research, led by oxford university, suggests that while the pfizerjab works best initially, both are equally effective in the long term. professorjeremy brown, member of thejcvi and professor of respiratory infection at university college londonjoins me now. welcome and thank you forjoining us. what do you think this research indicates for booster jabs? us. what do you think this research indicates for boosterjabs? t us. what do you think this research indicates for boosterjabs?- indicates for booster “abs? i think it's reassuring h indicates for boosterjabs? i think it's reassuring research _ indicates for boosterjabs? i think it's reassuring research because l indicates for boosterjabs? i think| it's reassuring research because it shows that despite the delta variant be indifferent to the original variant we were infected with and despite protein changing, that we are still getting good protection
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with the vaccines we have. for the booster jabs, with the vaccines we have. for the boosterjabs, that is probably reassuring that it makes the urgent need for a boosterjab in the under 50 population less strong. the need for a boosterjab in people who are more vulnerable to the disease, whose immune system might be weaker because of age or underlying diseases is different, but for the average person, i think this is reassuring. average person, i think this is reassuring-— average person, i think this is reassurinr. ., ~ ., ., ., reassuring. you think that all over 50 should go _ reassuring. you think that all over 50 should go ahead _ reassuring. you think that all over 50 should go ahead with - reassuring. you think that all over 50 should go ahead with the - reassuring. you think that all over - 50 should go ahead with the booster? something it is wrong for the booster programme to be rolled out here while other countries still haven't had jabs to the same level. it hasn't been fully decided at the moment. we are discussing it. i think probably the need to be absolutely sure that severe disease doesn't affect our more vulnerable population, especially those whose immune system is weak, they would
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likely need a booster vaccine. whether somebody with a totally normal immune system who is low risk of infection causing severe infection needs a boosterjab, we will be thinking about that, but the need is less obvious in that group. one of the other interesting findings of this is that the time between first and second doses does not affect the vaccine's effectiveness. the gap was lengthened initially for pragmatic reasons, but obviously now the situation has changed, does it make sense to go back down to a three your four week sense to go back down to a three yourfour week gap? the sense to go back down to a three your four week gap? the observation in this study — your four week gap? the observation in this study is _ your four week gap? the observation in this study is a _ your four week gap? the observation in this study is a little _ in this study is a little contradictory to other data we have. it is clear that if you delay the vaccine to eight weeks between first and second doses, the antibody levels you reach are markedly higher than they would be if you had a three—week between the two doses. doesn't this study indicate that
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they start that high and they do decline anyway and end up around the same baseline?— same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data _ same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data that _ same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data that are _ same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data that are not - same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data that are not as - same baseline? well, sort of. there are other data that are not as clear. are other data that are not as clear as this. there no need to change our schedule because we have vaccinated 90% of people with first doses and i think second doses are at around 70% now, so it won't alter how we do things going forward. we are past the point and we have done that. we know that the increased gap has increased the antibody response in the population overall, and in theory that would be beneficial. the data coming from this study suggests less likely that it has been beneficial, but i don't... there are several studies going around and they are slightly contradictory, so
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it is hard to resolve the issues at the moment. fin it is hard to resolve the issues at the moment-— it is hard to resolve the issues at the moment. ., , , the moment. on that, briefly, there has been controversy _ the moment. on that, briefly, there has been controversy around - the moment. on that, briefly, there has been controversy around over i the moment. on that, briefly, therej has been controversy around over 18 is being able to get the vaccine sort of within a three or four week 93p- sort of within a three or four week gap. would it make sense for them because there was such a greater protection of the two weeks for the gap to be reduced but for it not to be such a controversial issue? right, what we are doing is balancing different benefits. there is the benefit of getting the protection against mild infection you get with two doses, about 50% detection with one dose, versus the protection of having a better antibody response that last for longer. it sort of depends on how prevalent the infection is at the time. if the infection is settling down, the benefit of shortening the gap is less, and the benefit of having higher levels of antibodies lasting for longer and making the need for a boosterjab go further
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into the time distance in the future is better, so it is a bit of a complicated and slightly moving picture, but we don't have any... we are not going to change the decision at this point in time.— at this point in time. thank you very much _ at this point in time. thank you very much for— at this point in time. thank you very much forjoining _ at this point in time. thank you very much forjoining us, - at this point in time. thank you - very much forjoining us, professor jeremy browne. the backlog of patients on nhs waiting lists in wales has risen to another record high. figures forjune show more than 62a thousand people were waiting to start treatment — the highest figure since data was first recorded in 2011. now, it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. from tomorrow and into the weekend up from tomorrow and into the weekend up till sunday, we are looking at the weather turning more humid. today, still a fair bit of cloud, some sunny breaks pushing east one a weak weather front bringing showery rain across england and wales. behind that, a return to sunshine
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and showers. for scotland and northern ireland, brighter breaks but still a lot of cloud thick enough for patchy light rain and drizzle. the breeze not as strong as yesterday. tonight we hang onto a few showers, clear spells developing, some mist and fog patches forming, but by the end of the night, a new weatherfront. to show its hand, making its way into the west of northern ireland. as a result, not a cold night. tomorrow some of us start with sunny skies. the mist and fog will lift, variable amounts of cloud around, the first front bringing rain across northern ireland into south—west scotland and north—west england, the second following hot on its heels bringing further rain into northern ireland. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... amidst desperate crowds at kabul airport — pictures have emerged of the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through — with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants.
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officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday — the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel, to go home. president biden says us troops could remain in afghanistan beyond the end of august, passing his deadline for withdrawal. labour has accused the foreign secretary, dominic raab, of a dereliction of duty — after reports he declined to phone his afghan counterpart to seek help airlifting interpreters out of afghanistan. but the government has defended his actions. the largest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant. let's return to our top story — the situation in afghanistan, as we were saying earlier, the foreign secretary dominc raab is facing criticism over the issue of the government's handling of the evacuation of afghan interpreters. this is him arriving
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at downing street this morning: are you going to resign? no. that was good timing. chuckles a one—word answer, no. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. it was a very brief interaction with journalists. tt it was a very brief interaction with journalists-— journalists. it was. i will try and net journalists. it was. i will try and get more _ journalists. it was. i will try and get more than _ journalists. it was. i will try and get more than one _ journalists. it was. i will try and get more than one word. - journalists. it was. i will try and i get more than one word. dominic journalists. it was. i will try and - get more than one word. dominic raab at least took on the question and he answered it directly. we shouldn't be that surprised by what he said there. i don't think this was likely to be an issue that would prompt his resignation or his sacking, although we have seen opposition parties, including labour, this morning
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saying that would be an appropriate course of action. he was on holiday, is plenty of people are in august, last friday in crete. the situation in afghanistan was escalating but very few people were saying they thought kabul would fall to the taliban as quickly as it did. he was asked by his officials, the daily mail reported, to call his then afghan opposite number to talk about this whole business of getting interpreters who work for the british military out of afghanistan as quickly as possible. he didn't make that call. it was delegated to a junior minister. we would have loved to have had a more extensive conversation with mr raab this morning about his decision making of nearly a week ago. that hasn't happened as of yet. the defence secretary, who was out and about this morning, was asked about it, and offered this as an answer and a
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reflection. last friday, i was up dealing with it through — last friday, i was up dealing with it through the night and on saturday, as well, the number one problem _ saturday, as well, the number one problem last week, the only problem last week, _ problem last week, the only problem last week, wasn't a phone call to the afghan government that was melting — the afghan government that was melting away and had almost... well, didn't— melting away and had almost... well, didn't have _ melting away and had almost... well, didn't have any leverage. the number one challenge last week was weather the airport— one challenge last week was weather the airport would continue to —— would _ the airport would continue to —— would continue to allow flights to id would continue to allow flights to go ahead. that was the only thing that happened. that was the number one calb _ that happened. that was the number one call. that's why we were planning _ one call. that's why we were planning troop deployment, which we have now— planning troop deployment, which we have now done, and no amount of phone _ have now done, and no amount of phone calls — have now done, and no amount of phone calls to an afghan government at that— phone calls to an afghan government at that moment in time would have made _ at that moment in time would have made any— at that moment in time would have made any difference. what made a difference — made any difference. what made a difference is what we are doing now. that's _ difference is what we are doing now. that's why _ difference is what we are doing now. that's why you are seeing families coming _ that's why you are seeing families coming out. i think 119 afghan families— coming out. i think 119 afghan families and eligible people will be flyin- families and eligible people will be flying out, followed by another few hundred, _ flying out, followed by another few hundred, and hopefully over the day leaning _ hundred, and hopefully over the day leaning up— hundred, and hopefully over the day leaning up towards 1000 over the
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next 24—hour is. that's what mattered _ next 24—hour is. that's what mattered on friday and what happens now. mattered on friday and what happens now -- _ mattered on friday and what happens now. —— 24—hours. we mattered on friday and what happens now. -- zit-hours.— mattered on friday and what happens now. -- 24-hours. we don't know who the daily mail— now. -- 24-hours. we don't know who the daily mail source _ now. -- 24-hours. we don't know who the daily mail source is. _ now. -- 24-hours. we don't know who the daily mail source is. they - now. -- 24-hours. we don't know who the daily mail source is. they are - the daily mail source is. they are protecting their source, understandably come of this information that says officials within the foreign office wanted mr raab or suggested to mr raab to make this call. it'll be a source the foreign office, it would be fair to say, to give the daily mail the right to think this story is accurate. nobody is disputing the accuracy of the daily mail story. there were people in the foreign office steeped in foreign affairs and thought this call was worth making, despite what mr wallace says. this is being raised by mr�*s critics, if it was so obvious last friday that the afghan government was about to fall, so bringing a pretty significant end to 20 years of british foreign policy, and the removal of the taliban, why was the
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foreign secretary still on holiday? that question, as far as mr raab is concerned, remains unanswered. thanks very much, chris. more now on our main story — developments in the taliban's takeover in afghanistan. as the evacuation process continues, there are reports that even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through — with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. caroline kennedy—pipe is a professor of international security at loughborough university specialising in military affairs and afghanistan. she told me more about the logistics of keeping the aiport open in kabul. it is understandably chaotic. taliban are ringing the perimeter of the airport. my understanding is that those with american passports are being allowed in without much question. the same is true at the moment. there is a checkpoint allowing uk passport holders through. at the moment, i think we cannot be complacent, but be assured
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that taliban will not take on those with us west european, if i can call it that, passports. how long that will persist, we don't know, but the big question is, as you point outcome of those afghans desperate to leave the country who will hand children over if necessary to get on one of the planes leaving for the us orfor one of the planes leaving for the us or for europe. one of the planes leaving for the us orfor europe. —— as you rightly pointed out, those afghans desperate. as i understand it, the us is in control along with afghan security forces and the uk inside the perimeter, but the taliban have gathered on the outside and are turning individuals and groups away without legitimate paperwork. it is a mixed scene. the reinforcement, the upscale, the uptick of american and uk forces i think it will be welcome because one thing we mustn't lose sight of is the stress levels
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on troops inside the airport. it is an extremely stressful situation for them. planes are being over packed. safely, of course, but taking more individuals, more humans come out of that war zone. more than we've seen before. ~ ., ., ,, that war zone. more than we've seen before. ~ ., ., , ., ~' that war zone. more than we've seen before. ~ ., ., ~ ., before. what do you think about the decisions being _ before. what do you think about the decisions being taken _ before. what do you think about the decisions being taken by _ before. what do you think about the decisions being taken by the - before. what do you think about the decisions being taken by the united| decisions being taken by the united states, which really holds the cards right now, and when america goes the airport basically falls, meaning anybody else who wants to get out has no guarantee of getting out. the decisions have been taken by america alone in terms of what has happened with the end of this mission. we all went in together. t with the end of this mission. we all went in together.— went in together. i think that is a rofound went in together. i think that is a profound insight. _ went in together. i think that is a profound insight. we _ went in together. i think that is a profound insight. we did - went in together. i think that is a profound insight. we did all- went in together. i think that is a profound insight. we did all go . went in together. i think that is a j profound insight. we did all go in together. the uk, shoulder to shoulder with its partners, standing
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up shoulder with its partners, standing up for article five, an attack on one is an attack on all. it's been extremely demoralising, i think, to see fragmentation of the so—called special relationship, and the unilateral decision. although, it was president trump who took that decision in 2020 in doha. in the uk we have been dismayed at the speed at which president biden has taken the drawdown and, of course, the chaotic scenes, i mean much kit has been left behind, you know, as afghan forces collapsed. and here, i think, as well, those i speak to in the uk military are slightly disillusioned or dismayed by the idea that the afghan army didn't fight well and with courage. tens of thousands of afghan soldiers did perish and lose their lives in the fight against the taliban. politics is one thing, but the collapse of
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the afghan army is also to be placed partly at president biden's door in terms of the rapid retraction of military contractors, over 7000 of them. those of us watching who have seen the war unfold know that since 201a the afghan army did try with us and uk support to stand up against taliban. it was the politics that undid it all. in essex, around 80 afghan interpreters and their families have already arrived in colchester and chelmsford. the chelmsford city council leader — liberal democrat councillor stephen robinson told me about the local effort to welcome arriving families. last saturday, five families have arrived in chelmsford, and we are coordinating across essex. the district councils have been discussing how we can welcome these residents, these new residents, to
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our area. residents, these new residents, to ourarea. i residents, these new residents, to our area. i believe that the united kingdom is obligated as a former employer to look after these people who did so much for our personnel, and risk their lives, and the uk is obligated to look after them, and because if they had stayed in afghanistan they faced death. what afghanistan they faced death. what are the needs _ afghanistan they faced death. what are the needs you _ afghanistan they faced death. what are the needs you are _ afghanistan they faced death. what are the needs you are primarily thinking for them? obviously all of the practical stuff, but these people who have never stepped foot in england before.— in england before. exactly. some of them didn't — in england before. exactly. some of them didn't realise _ in england before. exactly. some of them didn't realise britain - in england before. exactly. some of them didn't realise britain is - in england before. exactly. some of them didn't realise britain is quite l them didn't realise britain is quite cold. i've been having some really kind offers from some local residents for clothes and toys for the children. these are young families, mostly, and so essex county council is on the case as far as finding them schooling and... the
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local health service is working to get them registered with their local gp. it's really important that all of the different local agencies work together so that they can settle and get off to a good start. but it is also really important that the home office funds this properly because local councils' finances have suffered greatly over the last 18 months from covid. so it is vital the home office does maintain their commitment to fund these families in our area. can commitment to fund these families in our area. ., ,, commitment to fund these families in our area. . i. , ., ., commitment to fund these families in our area. . , ., ., , ., our area. can you explain a bit more about that. — our area. can you explain a bit more about that, then? _ our area. can you explain a bit more about that, then? what _ our area. can you explain a bit more i about that, then? what commitments are given currently in terms of funding following the asylum seekers who end up with you, and how many do you think you can realistically accommodate? tt you think you can realistically accommodate?— you think you can realistically accommodate? it is important to oint out accommodate? it is important to point out they — accommodate? it is important to point out they are _ accommodate? it is important to point out they are not _ accommodate? it is important to point out they are not asylum - point out they are not asylum seekers because they've already been given leave to remain by the british embassy. they have the right to settle in the uk now. at the moment,
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they are being accommodated in a hotel in colchester and chelmsford which is being funded by the home office. as a local counsel, there is a housing crisis, and we are desperately short of housing. —— local council. but we are trying to put the home office in touch with private sector landlords who, hopefully, have properties available so they can settle in a proper house for the long term. but it is vital that the home office does fund that properly because actually there was normally a gap between the housing benefit rates and the actual rents in places like chelmsford where property is a fairly expensive. so it is vital the home office continues to maintain their commitment to fund them properly until they are settled.— commitment to fund them properly until they are settled. numbers get bandied around. _ until they are settled. numbers get bandied around. people _ until they are settled. numbers get bandied around. people don't - until they are settled. numbers get bandied around. people don't like l bandied around. people don't like talking about these things in terms of numbers because it comes down to needin of numbers because it comes down to
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need in a humanitarian situation but obviously from what you are talking about the numbers get worked out very carefully. do you put a number on the level of people you could actually realistically support in your area? t actually realistically support in your area?— actually realistically support in our area? ~ , , , ., your area? i think this suggestion is we've got _ your area? i think this suggestion is we've got five _ your area? i think this suggestion is we've got five families - your area? i think this suggestion is we've got five families at - your area? i think this suggestion is we've got five families at the l is we've got five families at the moment that once they've been found proper housing that there may be others that could follow on, and obviously five families, i mean come in chelmsford, we have 7a,000 households, so we ought to be able to accommodate a few more. —— i mean, in chelmsford. these people worked for dish troops, supported them at risk to their own lives in afghanistan. —— for british troops. we are obligated. we should look after them properly.
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the headlines on bbc news... amidst desperate crowds at kabul airport — pictures have emerged of the moment a little girl is handed to the safety of american forces. chaos at kabul airport — even afghans with valid paperwork are struggling to get through — with checkpoints guarded by heavily armed militants. officials say 12 people have been killed in and around kabul airport since sunday — the taliban are urging people without the legal right to travel, to go home. the owner of an alpaca which has tested positive for bovine tb, has vowed to fight on despite losing a last—ditch legal attempt to save the animal. helen macdonald said she will "obstruct" anyone who comes to her farm to put down eight—year—old geronimo. i can speak to helen now. thank you forjoining us. there is geronimo right behind you on cue. are you just in a waiting game at the moment? as of that last legal
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avenue being finally exhausted, death row can now enforce the warrant for geronimo any time after a:30pm today? we warrant for geronimo any time after 4:30pm today?— a:30pm today? we lost the opportunity _ a:30pm today? we lost the opportunity to _ a:30pm today? we lost the opportunity to get - a:30pm today? we lost the opportunity to get an - a:30pm today? we lost the - opportunity to get an injunction before thejudicial opportunity to get an injunction before the judicial review application we were granted last week. we cannot get disclosure of data which shows there were nine others at least that have been slaughtered in the way... following the way geronimo was tested who showed no signs of disease. that's a real disappointment. the warrant is still in effect. death row said yesterday that they want me to kill geronimo today. —— defra said yesterday. they then said i consented to his death. i'm not prepared to do that. they can come from any time this afternoon to execute the warrant. after four
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years of basically ask them to produce evidence to support what they did to geronimo four years ago. he hasn't failed two tests, he has failed and un—validated test and misuse of testing which they accepted they had done. this is about a miscarriage ofjustice. not whether he has tb or not. he came from new zealand, from a healthy farm, and he has been in isolation forfour farm, and he has been in isolation for four years. farm, and he has been in isolation forfouryears. geronimo farm, and he has been in isolation forfour years. geronimo has the option to be in isolation for research purposes. we are in a bit of a stand—off situation unfortunately again. of a stand-off situation unfortunatel aaain. , ., , unfortunately again. defra says this has one unfortunately again. defra says this has gone through _ unfortunately again. defra says this has gone through all— unfortunately again. defra says this has gone through all of— unfortunately again. defra says this has gone through all of the - unfortunately again. defra says this| has gone through all of the possible legal stages, all of the arguments you make have been scrutinised, and the fact is as things stand today you do face the prospect of somebody turning up there to put down
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geronimo. what will you do if and when somebody does turn up? we will work within the _ when somebody does turn up? we will work within the law. _ when somebody does turn up? we will work within the law. and _ when somebody does turn up? we will work within the law. and we _ when somebody does turn up? we will work within the law. and we won't - when somebody does turn up? we will work within the law. and we won't be l work within the law. and we won't be making it easy. at the end of the day, twisting middlemiss knows what has gone on with this case. george eustice was misled... —— christine middlemiss. eustice was misled... -- christine middlemiss-— eustice was misled... -- christine middlemiss. you said you will work within the law _ middlemiss. you said you will work within the law but _ middlemiss. you said you will work within the law but you _ middlemiss. you said you will work within the law but you won't - middlemiss. you said you will work within the law but you won't allow| within the law but you won't allow geronimo to be put down. how can you work within the law where there is a legally enforced warrant to do that? i'm not a criminal. i've not done anything wrong. i don't intend on breaking the law. they have a warrant to gain access. but i don't have to make it easy for them. at the end of the day, there are reasonable solutions to be had here. the government know what they did to geronimo for mac years ago. this isn't a cattle testing issue. this isn't a cattle testing issue. this is an issue about senior government officials are manipulating testing. —— what they did to geronimo four
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years ago. -- what they did to geronimo four years ago-— years ago. fact is, it's gone throu~h years ago. fact is, it's gone through the _ years ago. fact is, it's gone through the processes. - years ago. fact is, it's gone through the processes. the| years ago. fact is, it's gone - through the processes. the warrant has been issued. the situation now is that defra intends, having won through the courts, to put geronimo down. just to read a statement from defra saying bovine tb is one of the greatest animal health threats. it causes distress for farming communities across the country. while nobody wants to coal infected animals we need to do everything we can to tackle this disease and stop it spreading and protect the livelihoods of those affected. —— nobody wants to cull. i know you dispute where the geronimo has tb or not, but they have the legal right to put geronimo down. that not, but they have the legal right to put geronimo down. that policy is h ocris . to put geronimo down. that policy is hypocrisy- they _ to put geronimo down. that policy is hypocrisy- they are _ to put geronimo down. that policy is hypocrisy. they are spending - hypocrisy. they are spending taxpayers money on poor testing and not looking at the evidence in these
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cases. this policy is completely flawed. how do you improve if you keep killing all of the animals with the policy? and there is an officer in the uk who doesn't understand basic biological principles. t am basic biological principles. i am sor to basic biological principles. i am sorry to interrupt _ basic biological principles. i am sorry to interrupt again. - basic biological principles. i am sorry to interrupt again. we are almost out of time. do you believe you can still save geronimo? yes. you can still save geronimo? yes, absolutely. _ you can still save geronimo? yes, absolutely, i've _ you can still save geronimo? yes, absolutely, i've got _ you can still save geronimo? yes, absolutely, i've got the _ you can still save geronimo? yes, absolutely, i've got the world - absolutely, i've got the world watching here. what has gone on, it has been absolutely appalling. we will keep fighting because we know the government are wrong. we know they've got data that explains the situation. we said all along what theissue situation. we said all along what the issue was, and they are hiding behind the legislation. it's not good enough. the government needs to look at policy properly instead of sacrificing healthy animals. they need to start doing some proper scientific testing.— need to start doing some proper scientific testing. thank you very much forjoining _ scientific testing. thank you very
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much forjoining us. _ the future ownership of the supermarket chain morrisons is in the spotlight again — a huge new takeover bid is expected later today. our business presenter ben thompson has more. a big—money battle. it could determine the future of our fourth—largest supermarket. you wait more than a century for a takeover bid and then three, yes three, arrive all at once. what is going on exactly? injune, morrisons turned down a £5.5 billion offer from an american finance company. they used to own b&m bargains in the uk and they also own some petrol stations. that was enough to spark a bidding war. last month another finance group entered the fray. it offered more than £6 billion. fortress, as it is known, runs majestic. it looked like it was a done deal, but
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shareholders had to agree to it. there is another potential buyer called apollo. it prompted fortress to raise its bid. so all eyes on whether the bid will be upped again. this is a far cry from morrisons' humble beginnings. it all began in 1899, a market stall run by mr william morrison selling just eggs and butter. that stall became a small shop. and butter. that stall became a smallshop. in more and butter. that stall became a small shop. in more than half a century, very little else changed. fast forward and morrisons grew into the supermarket we know today. with stores mainly in the north of england. in 200a, it bought rival safeway for £3 billion. that gave morrisons a bigger slice of the market in the south. the merger
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wasn't an easy marriage. butjoining forces may morrisons the uk's fourth biggest supermarket. for many years it was run by this man, sir ken morrison, son of the store's originalfounder. his approach morrison, son of the store's original founder. his approach to retail was simple.— retail was simple. what we are t in: to retail was simple. what we are trying to do — retail was simple. what we are trying to do here _ retail was simple. what we are trying to do here is _ retail was simple. what we are trying to do here is to - retail was simple. what we are trying to do here is to recreate | retail was simple. what we are - trying to do here is to recreate the atmosphere of a market, which really is a touch of nostalgia where you can choose your fish, you can look at it, just like fish markets used to be in the old days. but ultimately _ to be in the old days. but ultimately for _ to be in the old days. but ultimately for him - to be in the old days. but ultimately for him it - to be in the old days. but ultimately for him it all came down to price. ultimately for him it all came down to rice. ., ., ., ~ ., ., ., to price. you want to know what a bogof is. — to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it — to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it is — to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it is by _ to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it is by one _ to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it is by one get - to price. you want to know what a bogof is, it is by one get one - to price. you want to know what a l bogof is, it is by one get one free, greatly appreciated by the shopping public. here we go, twice the quantity same price.- public. here we go, twice the quantity same price. under his watch, morrisons _ quantity same price. under his watch, morrisons became - quantity same price. under his watch, morrisons became a i quantity same price. under his i watch, morrisons became a jewel quantity same price. under his - watch, morrisons became a jewel in the crown of british retail. he died in 2017 at the age of 85. you might wonder quite what he would make of all the fuss. yes, what would he make? what has
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sparked the sudden bidding war? morrisons like other supermarket has been counting the cost of the pandemic. in march it announced its profits had halved. but remember morrisons is different from the other supermarkets because it owns a lot of its supplies, factories, farms, and the stores themselves. that is particularly attractive for investment firms like the ones bidding for morrisons because they can sell many of those to raise a bit of cash and rent them back. the company employs more than 100,000 staff. unions are worried about what any takeover could mean for them. there is always nervousness about deals like this. both of the bidders are currently trying to convince the bosses and the shareholders that they would be best suited to take on they would be best suited to take on the morrisons market stall legacy. it isn'tjust the morrisons market stall legacy. it isn't just about the morrisons market stall legacy. it isn'tjust about rising profits. shareholders will look at the latest bid and we will keep you updated with any movement for the fourth
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largest retailer in the uk. the fast moving europe has been ravaged by wildfires this summer with record temperatures across the mediterranean. greece has been badly hit. that is the latest via
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residents here were caught by surprise and just how quickly the flames reached their homes. we watched as it all burned from the front and the back. there was no one, no one here, and we were running. we were running. greece has fought more than 500 wildfires this month alone as the country also battles its most severe heat waves in decades. scientists say it is yet another reminder of the impact of man—made climate change. now, the weather. so far this month temperatures have been running close to normal. the amount of rain we have seen for most places quite close to normal as well but it has been a cloudy august so far, and these cloudy skies really dominating these cloudy skies really dominating
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the weather picture, notjust today but over the next few days as well. the view from space shows extensive cloud cover across the uk right now. to the west we have an area of low pressure. these fronts will be bringing positive rain through friday and the weekend across most areas. through this afternoon we have fairly persistent rain heading in across yorkshire and lincolnshire. that's where the wettest weather will be. a few scattered showers. moving into the midlands and drier weather for scotland and northern ireland. foremost, pretty cloudy, a few breaks in the cloud sheet and a couple of sunny spells coming through. stays cloudy for most, a few mist patches developing, temperatures drifting down, between 11 and 1a degrees. staying relatively mild. friday, i reckon there is a greater chance of seeing more in the way of sunshine for a time across england and wales. probably northern scotland as well. the cloud will thicken further west and for northern ireland, and some
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rain from those fronts i showed you. they will be moving east, bringing wet weather into northern ireland, and eventually the rainbow fringe into parts of western scotland and north—west england and north—west wales, turning cloudy, dull, and damp. the best of any brightness across eastern and northern areas. those weather fronts will be bringing general outbreaks of rain across most areas this weekend. the rain generally clearing through the second half of the weekend. saturday, rain will be moving in. this looks to move in a little faster. that means there is less chance for those temperatures to get much higher across eastern areas of england. generally, high teens to low 20s, the rain heavy at times, particularly across england and wales, but pretty wet for parts of northern ireland and scotland. the worst of the rain clears through sunday. perhaps loitering across parts of eastern england. what follows is a mixture of sunshine and showers. showers could be heavy, thundery, and slow moving, perhaps
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the worst of these across the midlands, centraland the worst of these across the midlands, central and southern england and the south—east. that's your latest weather.
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there's continuing chaos outside the airport in the afghan capital as people try to flee the taliban. footage has emerged of a little girl being handed over to an american solider. the uk government pledges to stay in afghanistan as long as the us maintains control of the airport. none of our planes are leaving empty. i've seen some reports saying that. i can't vouch for all the other nations but our planes never leave empty. if we had spaces on them, we offer them up to other nations. british troops are helping control the crowds and check people's documents. the widow of one us soldier killed serving in afghanistan after the 9/11 attacks is furious the country is back in the hands of the taliban. they went over there to make america safer after what happened at 9/11.
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so, how are we safer now, with the taliban taking over?

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