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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  August 19, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at six, the desperate scramble to escape afghanistan, and life, under taliban rule. to escape afghanistan, some in the crowds at kabul airport hand over their children to us marines, to at least get them on flights to freedom. others begged western embassies for travel papers. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan, but they are desperate. in fact, they are coming to us, asking us, "is it true? will the canadians give me a visa?" the fact is, most of these people will never get one. the uk says it will continue to help people escape, as long as the us military controls of the airport. we are the lucky ones, we made it. there are lots of people who really need help. but one young afghan boy who did
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make it to the uk. his death from a hotel window in sheffield. the foreign secretary says he will not resign over criticism of his overall handling of the refugee crisis. also... new research finds the covid vaccine offers a strong protection against the delta variant. you are superheroes. really? and the paralympicsjoin a global campaign to improve the lives of a billion disabled people around the world. and coming up on the bbc news channel, yorkshire county cricket club has apologised to former player azeem rafiq after an investigation into allegations of racism. good evening and welcome
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to the bbc news at six. there is a desperate scramble to escape afghanistan, as hundreds of people, fearing for their lives under taliban rule, beg and plead to be allowed to board flights out of the country. some in the crowds at kabul airport are handing over their children to startled us marines guarding the perimeter, their hope that if they can't get out, then their children might. many afghans are trying to get exit papers from western embassies and then head in hope to the airport. in a moment, the latest from our correspondent secunder kermani in the capital but nowjonathan beale report on the despairing efforts are meant to leave their homeland. chaotic scenes outside kabul airport, hundreds desperate to get a flight to freedom. even passing toddlers over barricades to troops guarding the perimeter. their hope that if they cannot get out, their children might. this gives a sense of the scale here is a thin line of
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british soldiers trying to keep order. the heartbreak of having to turn away those without the right papers. and there are still fears for those left behind. i papers. and there are still fears for those left behind.— for those left behind. i love this count , for those left behind. i love this country. i _ for those left behind. i love this country, i want _ for those left behind. i love this country, i want to _ for those left behind. i love this country, i want to be _ for those left behind. i love this country, i want to be in - for those left behind. i love this country, i want to be in this - country, i want to be in this country, i want to be in this country, the international community needs to talk about evacuating people who worked with them which can be good. but people who are in afghanistan, first of all due to war from different provinces, some people came to kabul and they don't have a roof over their head and they don't have food.— don't have food. there is some semblance _ don't have food. there is some semblance of _ don't have food. there is some semblance of order _ don't have food. there is some semblance of order inside - don't have food. there is some semblance of order inside the l semblance of order inside the airport, with military evacuation flights continuing. britain says it has already flown out more than a thousand people and is aiming to do that every day. but it still depends on the taliban, who control access to the airport. the us president still having to defend his decision to leave, at least like this. he had
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promised a safe and orderly withdrawal. he had also set a deadline of getting his troops out by the end of the month. now he says they will stay until every us citizen is out.— they will stay until every us citizen is out. �* , , ., citizen is out. americans should understand _ citizen is out. americans should understand that _ citizen is out. americans should understand that troops - citizen is out. americans should understand that troops might i citizen is out. americans should i understand that troops might have citizen is out. americans should - understand that troops might have to be there beyond august 31. know. be there beyond august 31. know, americans will _ be there beyond august 31. know, americans will understand - be there beyond august 31. know, americans will understand we - be there beyond august 31. know, americans will understand we will| americans will understand we will try to _ americans will understand we will try to get — americans will understand we will try to get it done before that. but if we don't. _ try to get it done before that. elf if we don't, they will stay. try to get it done before that. but if we don't, they will stay. if - try to get it done before that. but if we don't, they will stay. if we i if we don't, they will stay. if we don't we will — if we don't, they will stay. if we don't we will determine - if we don't, they will stay. if we don't we will determine at - if we don't, they will stay. if we don't we will determine at the i if we don't, they will stay. if we don't we will determine at the time he was _ don't we will determine at the time he was left. don't we will determine at the time he was left-— don't we will determine at the time he was left.- and _ don't we will determine at the time he was left.- and if _ don't we will determine at the time he was left. and? and if there are american citizens _ he was left. and? and if there are american citizens left, _ he was left. and? and if there are american citizens left, we - he was left. in and if there are american citizens left, we will stay till we _ american citizens left, we will stay lill we get— american citizens left, we will stay till we get them all out.— till we get them all out. britain also sa s till we get them all out. britain also says it _ till we get them all out. britain also says it will _ till we get them all out. britain also says it will stay _ till we get them all out. britain also says it will stay at - till we get them all out. britain also says it will stay at the - also says it will stay at the airport as long as the americans remain, but it is the taliban who control access. there have been acts of apparent defiance to their rule already, with some residents in kabul parading the old national flag is independence day but it is the taliban who are now in charge and will decide what happens next. jonathan beale, bbc news.
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the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has rejected calls to resign, after being accused of a �*catastrophic failure ofjudgement�* in his handling of the afghan crisis. he's been criticised by opposition parties, after it was reported that he failed to follow advice while on holiday, to call his afghan counterpart last friday, to discuss evacuations. the defence secretary, ben wallace, says such a phone call, wouldn't have made any difference. our political correspondent ben wright reports. a potentially life—saving flight as the rescue continues. up to ten planes per day are carrying british nationals and afghan evacuees from the chaos of kabul to the uk. i spoke to a uk resident of afghan origin who we will call sara who is waiting to hear if her father and other family have made waiting to hear if her father and otherfamily have made it waiting to hear if her father and other family have made it out. the ractical other family have made it out. tie: practical hyssop other family have made it out. tue: practical hyssop situation other family have made it out. tt2 practical hyssop situation are different to what the instructions want, a appreciate there are efforts being made to have, you are saying
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tens of flights landing every day and what not, tens of flights landing every day and whatnot, it's tens of flights landing every day and what not, it's not tens of flights landing every day and whatnot, it's not as tens of flights landing every day and what not, it's not as easy as we will land play and job done, it's just not that simple unfortunately. there is now a rush to leave and according to a report in the daily mail, government officials asked the foreign secretary, dominic raab, on friday to urgently call his afghan opposite number in order to arrange help for afghans who worked for the uk. mr rob was not at his usual desk, he was on holiday in crete and the court was delegated to a junior minister in said —— mr raab put laboursaid he minister in said —— mr raab put labour said he should be sacked or quick pond at the idea that the foreign secretary would pick up the phone at the taliban were advancing and standing at the gates of kabul to see what we to help afghanistan descending into a base for terror again seems to me to be extraordinary. but today mr raab shrugged off calls to go. fire extraordinary. but today mr raab shrugged off calls to go.- shrugged off calls to go. are you auoin to shrugged off calls to go. are you
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going to resign? _ shrugged off calls to go. are you going to resign? no. _ shrugged off calls to go. are you going to resign? no. that - shrugged off calls to go. are you going to resign? no. that was i shrugged off calls to go. are you going to resign? no. that was a | shrugged off calls to go. are you i going to resign? no. that was a no and a cabinet _ going to resign? no. that was a no and a cabinet colleague _ going to resign? no. that was a no and a cabinet colleague came - going to resign? no. that was a no and a cabinet colleague came to i going to resign? no. that was a no| and a cabinet colleague came to his defence _ and a cabinet colleague came to his defence. ., , , ., , ., , ~ defence. the only problem last week was not a phone _ defence. the only problem last week was not a phone call— defence. the only problem last week was not a phone call to _ defence. the only problem last week was not a phone call to an _ defence. the only problem last week was not a phone call to an afghan . was not a phone call to an afghan government that was melting away and had almost, or don't have leverage. the number one challenge at the end of last week was whether the would continue to flights and allow planes to fly out and those people that we were able to get out if they were allowed to get out, that was the number one call, the only thing that mattered. . ., ., , number one call, the only thing that mattered. . .. , , , , mattered. dominic raab insists he was working _ mattered. dominic raab insists he was working hard _ mattered. dominic raab insists he was working hard on _ mattered. dominic raab insists he was working hard on holiday, - mattered. dominic raab insists he i was working hard on holiday, getting back to britain in the early hours of monday after the taliban had captured kabul. one phone call might not have changed anything but it adds to the picture of a government blindsided by events and slow to catch up. today mr raab chaired talks with the g7 and other countries. this signal was not subtle. but there is cross—party anger at what has happened in afghanistan and the foreign secretary is feeling the flak. ben
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wright, bbc news, westminster. our correspondent secunder kermani is in kabul now put at what i hope is there that all those people begging to get out at the airport, that they might be able to leave? t to get out at the airport, that they might be able to leave?— to get out at the airport, that they might be able to leave? i was there a short while _ might be able to leave? i was there a short while ago _ might be able to leave? i was there a short while ago and _ might be able to leave? i was there a short while ago and the _ might be able to leave? i was there a short while ago and the situationl a short while ago and the situation is a little calmer than it has been in previous days but still very chaotic, large crowds of people at the different entrances to the airport. still seeing taliban fighters whipping members are background in order to try to control them at times. and some of those people who do have valid permission to travel, to be evacuated, are saying they are struggling to get to the entrances of the airport because of the chaotic situation but many of the other people there, they don't have any visas, don't necessarily even have passports, they don't realistically have much chance of getting out but they have just turned up in the hope that somehow they will manage to escape. there
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have been similarly chaotic scenes outside of the foreign embassies, i was at the canadian embassy earlier and hundreds of people were just standing outside, frantically scribbling their names and passport details on blank pieces of paper which they hand to the taliban hoping somehow that will reach the canadian embassy. in fact, the canadian embassy. in fact, the canadian embassy has already been completely evacuated. in other parts of the city, everyday life is somewhat resuming. i was at a snooker club earlier today as well young men playing snooker, on the face of it normal like resuming but when i spoke to them about how they feel about the current situation, all of them were deeply worried about the future.— about the future. thank you. secunder _ about the future. thank you. secunder kermani _ about the future. thank you. secunder kermani live - about the future. thank you. secunder kermani live in - about the future. thank you. i secunder kermani live in kabul. about the future. thank you. - secunder kermani live in kabul. the government says the uk will contain to help people leave the country as one of the us military remains in control of the airport. more british troops are being sent to help maintain order. our special correspondent,
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lucy manning, has been speaking to one family who managed to escape kabul, and an interpreter who worked with british forces, who's still trapped there. to stay is dangerous, to try to go isn't much safer — but it's a risk many are taking. this man worked in afghanistan, a british afghan, here pictured with the country's former defence minister, thanking him for his work. he and his family were flown out of afghanistan two days ago by the raf and are now quarantining in manchester. yes, i feel good, we are safe. we will start back from scratch in the uk. his wife isn't a dual national. she was told to stay behind and then struggled to get into the airport. the situation is very bad because we were literally inside the compound, we could see the fighting, the shooting. she was crying. when we met her again in that, there was one of the officers,
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he was a british officer, he was actually...he cried too. how was the situation on the plane for everyone? the situation was chaotic. the plane was completely full. one of my children was sitting on the floor. with his work for coalition forces, he feared for his life. we are the lucky ones. we made it. there are lots of people who really need help. others haven't made it out. these, the certificates of a former british interpreter we are calling abdul. good enough to risk his life, but refused permission to come to the uk.
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and what is your message to the british government? the home office says it carries out thorough checks, but his bags are packed with nowhere to go. lucy manning, bbc news. police in south yorkshire have confirmed that a five—year—old boy who fell to his death from a ninth floor window of a hotel in sheffield yesterday was a refugee from afghanistan. south yorkshire police say they are providing support to his family. our home editor mark easton is with me now. what more do we know about the circumstances? this what more do we know about the circumstances?— what more do we know about the circumstances? this is such a tragic sto , the circumstances? this is such a tragic story. the little _ circumstances? this is such a tragic story, the little boy _ circumstances? this is such a tragic story, the little boy was _ circumstances? this is such a tragic story, the little boy was just - circumstances? this is such a tragic story, the little boy was just five i story, the little boy was just five years old and had been evacuated from agonist on along with his four siblings and parents, we understand his father worked for the british embassy —— from afghanistan. the
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family travelled to the uk about a fortnight ago under the home office scheme to bring out interpreters and support staff whose lives obviously were at risk from the taliban. the home office has been struggling to find accommodation for afghan refugees, particularly large families like this one. i understand the hotel in sheffield, the metropolitan, had been used to house asylum seekers already but in recent days some of those asylum seekers had been moved out because of concerns over the safety of the building, particularly the windows. but the home office is so desperate to find somewhere to put these afghan refugees that they were put into that hotel despite those concerns. in a statement, the home office i simply said, "we are extremely saddened by the tragic death of a child at a hotel in sheffield and police are providing support and while the investigation continues, we are providing accommodation and support." but there are serious questions for the home office point at what steps were taken to ensure this hotel was safe
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enough to put vulnerable families with young children in? and further questions because the home office has already come under significant criticism in recent months for the poor quality of asylum seeker accommodation. why was a little boy was apparently saved from afghanistan allowed to die in england? afghanistan allowed to die in encland? a ~ afghanistan allowed to die in encland? ~ ., ~ afghanistan allowed to die in encland? ~ . ~' the origins of the war in afghanistan, lie in the attacks of september the 11th, when nearly 3000 people died. al-qaeda had used their safe haven in afghanistan, to plan the atrocity, which eventually resulted in a us led coalition to remove the taliban government that sheltered them. the return of the militants to power has raised fears afghanistan will once again become a base for terror attacks, as aleem maqbool reports from new york. in the soaring skyline of lower manhattan, there remains a heart—rending gap where the towers of the world trade center once stood. their footprints turned into memorials for the victims. within a month of the horrific acts
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which took their lives, 7,000 miles away military operations were being launched. the war in afghanistan of course was started in the name of those who died at this spot nearly 20 years ago, in trying to find their killers, in trying to ensure an attack like that never happened again. but some of those relatives left behind are now among those who are furious at how it has all ended. ao—year—old katherine wolf from swansea was working on the 97th floor of the north tower when it was struck by a plane. no remains of hers were ever identified. her husband charles says there's no question the war was justified, and that he had certainly celebrated the death of osama bin laden, but that he has been shocked by recent events. the situation that just occurred in afghanistan over the weekend was inexcusable.
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absolutely inexcusable. what they did was pull out — how they did it was absolutely wrong. absolutely wrong. after this debacle this last weekend, i do not feel proud of our leaders, i feel proud about our nation but not our current leaders. each room has a little piece ofjoe in it. christine lemm feels a huge amount of pride for her husband, joe. he was in the new york police at the time of the 9/11 attacks and was one of those who pulled bodies from the rubble. that day was the reason he re—enlisted and went to fight in afghanistan. but it was there that he was killed. they went over there to make america safer after what happened at 9/ii. so how are we safer now, with the taliban taking over? i'm sick to my stomach. looking at a 20—year war wherejoe and over 2,300 soldiers have died in the afghan war,
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all to be given back to the taliban. joe was specifically killed by a taliban suicide bomber. christine's son was just four years old when he saluted the coffin of his father. for all the sacrifice, there are suddenly fears the chaos far away means a new, more dangerous area here. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in new york. the government's latest coronavirus figures now, and they show there were over 36,500 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period, which means, on average, there were over 30,000 new cases per day in the last week. 6,379 people are currently in hospital with the virus. 113 deaths were recorded in the past 2a hours, with an average of 96 deaths a day in the past week. on vaccinations, 87.3% of adults in the uk have now had theirfirstjab —
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that's now measured as the percentage of those aged 16 and over in the population. it was previously measured as a percentage of 18 and overs. and 75.7% have had two jabs. the biggest survey of covid infection in the uk has found that both the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines are still offering good protection against the delta variant, the dominant strain in the uk. but researchers also found that fully vaccinated adults can harbour virus levels as high as those who are unvaccinated if infected with the delta variant. here's our medical editor, fergus walsh. 16—year—olds in newcastle were taking up the offer of a covid vaccine today, ahead of returning to school and college. new research shows the younger you are, the more durable the protection from the vaccine and for now, they are being offered only a single dose. analysis of pcr tests from more
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than a third of a million volunteers has shown the delta variant is more able to cause infection in fully immunised adults than previous strains. the study found that two doses of the pfizer vaccine initially gave more than 90% protection against symptomatic covid infection, compared to around 70% for the oxford astrazeneca jab. but over the course of three months, the protection offered by the pfizer jab fell significantly, whereas that of the astrazeneca vaccine remained more stable. the researchers believe that both vaccines will offer similar and still significant protection at around four to five months and it's worth stressing that the vaccines give very strong protection against severe covid illness. the study also showed that double vaccinated adults harboured the same levels of virus if they get infected
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with delta as unvaccinated people. what that means is they definitely have the potential to pass that virus onto other people and so it's really important to take precautions. if you do get covid, despite being vaccinated, don't assume you can't pass it on. so what does all this mean for third booster doses, which ministers are planning to roll out for the over 50s from next month? the scientists who will make the final decision say it is still up in the air. we do need to know that there are people who actually need boosting. we would want to avoid getting into a situation where we were giving boosters on a just in case basis because you could end up being locked into a position of really not knowing whether your boosters were required or who or when they were needed. but israel is already offering booster doses to the over 50s in a bid to curb a huge spike in infections. other wealthy nations
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plan to folllow suit, even while most poorer countries have barely started protecting the most vulnerable. fergus walsh, bbc news. our top story this evening... the desperate scramble of those trying to escape afghanistan, and life, under taliban rule. and it's the most lucrative event in womens golf — event in women's golf — the womens open gets under way on the east coast of scotland. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel, the former manchester united and scotland striker denis law reveals he's been diagnosed with alzheimers and vascular dementia at the age of 81. a new global campaign aims to improve the lives of the one billion disabled people, who make up 15% of the world's population. called �*we, the 15,�* many live in poverty, unlikely to go to school
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and half are out of work. the international paralympic committee hasjoined the campaign, ahead of next week's delayed tokyo 2020 paralympic games. with more, here's paul carter. the leicester cobras used to play every week but, like many other things, the pandemic put a stop to that. for players sam and ray, off the court challenges as disabled people remain. there are still steps everywhere, there is still not enough access or facilities when you get to the place where you need to go. i have been discriminated against, in employment, in general, in going about your daily life. it was hoped that london 2012 would be a turning point for disability awareness in the uk. some who won medals at those games say that nine years on, despite a higher profile, disability rights is still heavily dependent on access to resources.
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i would go up and down schools in the uk with the message, i it doesn't matter if you have an artificial leg, _ you can do anything. and about five years into that, i i realised, gosh, that's not true. the reality is if you have i a disability and a good chunk of money, you can do everything. what we are lacking unfortunately in different parts of the world i is money and investment and a commitment that i everybody should be able to fulfil their potential. i you are superheroes. really? a new campaign led by the international paralympic committee is aiming to highlight and tackle the issues faced by the world's 1 billion disabled people — 15% of the global population. called �*we the 15', the campaign brings together a host of international organisations across business, culture and sport. it is beyond sport. we want to tackle employment, we want to tackle poor mobility, changing legislation in nations
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at an international level. how do you ensure that that momentum is kept up and gives us lasting change in seven, eight, nine, ten years from now? we cannot rely only on the paralympics. if we rely only on the paralympics, we will have a limited impact. that's why we need the business sector, employment, access to education. it is only a few days until the tokyo paralympics get under way, but measuring whether this campaign brings about change may take longer. this awareness needs to go down to every day, notjust, oh yes, we've had the paralympics, very good, and then, you know, we all go back into wherever it is they think we go. paul carter, bbc news. let's take a look at some of the day's other top stories... the number of people waiting for non—urgent hospital treatment in wales, has hit an all time high. injune, there were 624,000 people on waiting lists,
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that's around 20% of the population. those needing orthopaedic or trauma treatment, had the longest waits. a coroner has formally opened inquests into the deaths of the five victims of a mass shooting in plymouth a week ago. in a short hearing, the senior coroner, ian arrow, heard details of the fatal injuries inflicted by 22—year—old jake davison, who killed himself. the former manchester united and scotland striker, denis law, who's 81, has revealed he's been diagnosed with alzheimer's disease. the 81—year—old says he'll be doing his best to tackle the condition, and hopes to be able to continue watching manchester united at old trafford, for as long as he's able. secondary schools in glasgow are helping some of the city's poorest familes to apply for benefits to which they're entitled, but fail to claim. it's a new initiative to try to stem the rise in child poverty in britain, with the social mobility commission, saying almost one in three children, that's more than four million youngsters, are living in poverty.
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our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, reports from glasgow. don't squash me. happy, carefree children at a summer camp for disadvantaged youngsters from glasgow. the scheme provides fun and free food to families who'd otherwise struggle during the holidays. for mum of two, nicole henderson, the camp, run by the charity achieve more scotland, has been a godsend. having clubs like this have always been helpful because obviously, they are in nine o'clock until three o'clock so people are not having to worry about where lunch is coming from, whatever, which is really good. i definitely wouldn't have been able to afford to send the two kids to a club every single day like this. around one in three children in glasgow live in poverty. in an innovative scheme, the council is to link every secondary school in the city with a financial inclusion officer, who will encourage parents to apply for benefits they are eligible for but don't claim.
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the solution to poverty is to get money into family households, into the pocket or their bank account or whatever, and that's where we are always challenged, trying to reach out to these families. and the great thing about this programme is that it builds on that trust that parents already have with their local school. st mungo's academy was part of a pilot project last year. they helped around 60 families claim nearly £200,000 in extra benefits, money, they say, that is having a direct impact. we have a lot of families that the young person is the carer for the parent, because they've maybe got a mental health condition, or they are struggling financially and now looking at those families we've already supported and seen the difference in the young person in terms ofjust their attendance and actually accessing the learning, it's been significant. around 11.3 million children live in poverty across britain. a figure that's on the rise and other councils are showing interest in glasgow initiative. what this scheme taps
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into is a little—known fact about welfare system. around £15 billion worth of benefits are unclaimed. money that millions of people could get but don't know they are entitled to. a lack of money doesn'tjust mean children miss out, it adds to tensions at home. often reducing the time and space to study. this initiative could therefore lead to long—term benefits as well as financial gains. michael buchanan, bbc news, glasgow. golf, and the womens open has got under way today at carnoustie, one of the uk's most challenging courses. a big increase in prize money means this year the winner will take home nearly half a milion pounds. here's our women's sport reporterjo currie. the women's open at carnoustie on scotland's east coast — the final major of the year. and with an increase in prize money, now the most lucrative tournaments. fresh from her olympic gold medal in tokyo, all eyes were on world number one, nellie korda. and she didn't disappoint. as eight birdies saw her shoot into an early lead.
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will it hold its line? it will. last year's surprise winner sophia popov started well, but then this... carnoustie by name, carnasty by nature. she battled back, though, to finish on par. the british players had mostly struggled, but not former champion georgia hall. she shone on day one, at one point, topping the leaderboard, but now one stroke off the pace. level with scotland's louise duncan, an amateur taking her moment on the big stage. well, she's within the lead as well. at the head of the field are south korea's sai—young kim and sweden's magdalene sagstrom. both on five under par, and up their level with them poised is korda. jo currie, bbc news. time for a look at the weather here's chris fawkes. today has been a cloudy day and that is one of the noticeable features of august this year. it has not been dry everywhere, we have seen hefty
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showers developed across wales initially and then move into central portions of england. they will be moving east with time. low pressure is lacking and these weather fronts will bring bands of rain over the next couple of days or so. overnight, there were showers pushing into east anglia before fading after midnight, there will be a lot of cloud around tonight and if you mist patches as well. temperatures ten to 1a degrees. the first sign of the rain arriving, i showed you those weather fronts a moment ago, will be for northern ireland. further east there is chance of seeing more breaks in the cloud. it may stay bright for northern scotland, eastern england and perhaps east wales into the afternoon but rain will be starting to write for west scotland, north—west england, north west scotland, north—west england, north—west wales as well. the top temperature is 22. low pressure is bringing these weather fronts across the country. they cleared through so
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sunday looks like being the better of the

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