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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 20, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today. with desperate crowds continuing to mass outside kabul airport, plans are made to double evacuation efforts over the weekend. more pressure on the foreign secretary dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made. the manchester united and scotland legend denis law is diagnosed with dementia. he says the road ahead will be demanding, and painful. good morning from one of the world's
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largest defence firms, training up the next generation of engineers. what impact has the pandemic out on youth and employment? ifind out later. tottenham under par in portugal. the manager's left scratching his head at their loss in europe, but it's after he left harry kane and most of the first team at home. and a huge week for rob burrow ends with a hero's welcome as he returns to headingley in front of an adoring leeds rhinos crowd. spells of sunshine for many today but rain arriving in the west later which sets us up for an unsettled weekend. more details throughout the morning. it's friday, 20th august. our top story. evacuation efforts from afghanistan are set to accelerate over the weekend, as desperate crowds continue to gather in the capital trying to flee the country. continue to gather in the capital a nato official in kabul says
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the number of evacuations will double, while the united states says around 6000 people are due to leave on 20 flights in the coming hours. this report from our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani. this is crowd control taliban style. outside the airport, thousands of people desperate to leave. this is the road anyone being evacuated has to travel along. the taliban repeatedly stopped us filming. they don't like the images of so many afghans fleeing their rule. they've denied claims they are at times preventing some afghans with valid documents from entering the airport. but many of those here don't have a visa. they are still hoping somehow to leave. "i want to go anywhere else other than here," says this man. "all the embassies and offices are closed, what can i do?"
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then taliban fighters bring the interview to an end. the taliban are everywhere you go in kabul. they are heavily armed. but, for the most part, in the city, they are friendly. outside the canadian embassy, more chaos. hundreds of people frantically scribbling their names on pieces of paper, hoping it will somehow lead to a visa. the embassy has already been evacuated. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan, but they are desperate. in fact, they are coming to us. they have asked, "is it true, will the canadians give me a visa?" the fact is, most of these people will never get one. this family haven't spoken to anyone at the embassy, but heard rumours that if they turn up, they'll find help. "there's war, misery. i can't even buy bread for my children," says this man.
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new footage of the even more chaotic scenes at the airport earlier this week. some parents so desperate, they hand their children over. and new details, too, on the horrifying story of those who lost their lives. one of the young men who fell from a plane, clinging to it even after take—off — a talented footballer who had played for the national youth team. 19—year—old zaki anwari, part of a generation of afghans now facing a deeply uncertain future. we're joined now from westminster by our political correspondent nick eardley. nick, there's growing pressure on the foreign secretary, dominic raab, over this call. yesterday we heard this call, that
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was supposed to be made to dominic raab�*s counterpart in the afghan government before it collapsed was delegated to a junior minister, and it was about getting interpreters who worked with the uk out of the country, giving the deteriorating situation. yesterday we were told it had been delegated to a junior minister. today, it has emerged with a report from the daily mail that it was not made at all. the call did not happen. the government said that is because the situation meant the afghan government collapsed and there was not any time to make it. we heard ministers defend dominic raab yesterday. saying it would not have made much of a difference because the situation had got so bad, so quickly. but it raises the question about whether the uk government could have done more, whether dominic raab could have been more engaged in the process and whether if he had made the call
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himself, it might have happened before the afghan government collapsed. it adds to pressure on him. political opponents in westminster say the foreign secretary should resign. i do not think he is going to do that. he made it clear yesterday he was not minded to do so. there are these questions swirling about about whether the government here reacted too slowly to what was going on in afghanistan last week.— the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees after a five—year—old boy who recently arrived in the uk fell to his death from a window on the ninth floor of a hotel. mohammed munib majeedi and his family were put up at the hotel in sheffield as part of the government's resettlement scheme. home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. a new life in a new country that's ended in tragedy. this hotel in sheffield is now the scene of a major investigation
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into a dreadful accident. the victim — a five—year—old afghan boy, mohammed munib majeedi. he had recently arrived with his parents and four siblings from kabul — refugees given protection in the uk because his father worked in the british embassy. police and ambulances were called to the 0yo metropolitan hotel on wednesday afternoon, after the boy fell from a ninth—floor window. the translator working with the afghan families being housed there said all of them were devastated. the boy and his family came to the uk under the government scheme to protect people who were at risk from the taliban. the home office says everyone is deeply saddened at the tragic death. refugee charities are demanding a wider investigation as to how families arriving in the uk are being treated. there are claims that some residents had concerns about windows. those claims may be part of the police investigation. but while the home office says
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it was told of no safety concerns, it has moved all families to alternative accommodation. dominic casciani, bbc news. a coronavirus boosterjab scheme is likely to start next month, according to the health secretary. sajid javid said the most vulnerable would be offered a third jab first, before a possible rollout to other groups. it comes as the world health organisation has questioned the ethics of an extra dose when the majority of people in poorer countries haven't had any. covid lockdown measures have been extended in sydney for at least another month. from monday, a curfew will be imposed in the worst—affected parts of the city after the state of new south wales registered nearly 650 cases. meanwhile, a nationwide lockdown in new zealand has also been extended until wednesday, after new covid cases were found in the capital, wellington. a record 20 places have applied to be the next uk city of culture.
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the government awards the title every four years, helping to bring tourism and investment to different areas. this year, groups of towns were encouraged to apply, and there have been bids from every nation in the uk. the winner will be announced next year. entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. in the week when a hollywood—style sign appeared on a slagheap overlooking wrexham, it has been confirmed that the town is now aiming to become the uk city of culture 2025. wrexham county borough's entry is one of 20 that have been put forward. including a bid spanning both sides of the scotland—england border. dumfries and galloway and the scottish borders are joining forces with northumberland, cumbria and the city of carlisle — a combined area almost 15 times the size of london. and cornwall�*s bid is very much as a county, rather than its only city, truro. coventry�*s time as the city
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of culture has not gone to plan. covid meant that the start was delayed five months. but events are now up and running. the 360 allstars start a three—week run there today. and the organisers insist that the city has benefited. the city of culture is really the beginning of a journey, it's not the end of the journey. it's the beginning of thinking about the role that culture can play in cities in bringing people together and creating pride and expressing identity, in supporting regeneration and economic development, in promoting tourism and really putting your city on the map. a long list will be revealed at the end of next month, with the winner announced in may, as coventry�*s year in the spotlight comes to an end. colin paterson, bbc news. we will find out in the new year who
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it will be. look at this. a tricky to catch peacock has been seen strutting around a residential street in birmingham, helping itself to food from local vegetable patches, and flying onto nearby roofs. they are very noisy. beautiful. the rspca says it would like to catch the bird, which has some string caught around his leg, and return him to his owner, orfind a suitable home. they are very, very noisy. you know when you stay somewhere and they have peacocks and you think fantastic and they wake you up and by the end of your stay, you do not like peacocks any more. if anyone is a peacock... we need to find out if somebody has reported a peacock missing. to take it back home. maybe they have a call for the peacock. they cannot fly? itjumped.
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where has itjumped from? well it canjump where has itjumped from? well it can jump because we saw it jumped from the fence to the roof. if it has come from warwickshire, thatis if it has come from warwickshire, that is a lot ofjumping. 0ptometrists across the uk say they're diagnosing higher numbers of children with short—sightedness since the start of the pandemic. the college of optometrists says this is down to less time being spent outside due to covid restrictions and more time using screens. fiona lamdin has been speaking to one family about how they manage their eye health. like many children, keira, oliver and lauren love spending time inside on screens. right, guys, screens off, time to get outside, please. but their parents are all too aware of the damage it could be doing to their eyes. both ali and james are optometrists. with three young kids, they do spend quite a lot of time on the screen, especially in the holidays. and if they've had a lot
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of time on the screen, we are mindful to try to get them outside, because being outside, that can negate the fact that they have been sat on the screen all morning, potentially. and just trying to limit that time and make them have regular breaks. where are you concerned during lockdown their eyesight might deteriorate? yes, especially our eldest, because she operably spent the most because she probably spent the most time on the screen and she's a little bit short—sighted already. so, yeah, i was conscious that could potentially get worse over the last year. do your parents limit how much time you spend on your screen? an hour on the school days. no we have half an hour on school | days and an hour at the weekend. | no we have an hour and a half at the weekends. we have half an hour and then an hour. 0h. 0k, come and have a seat here for me, monty. eight—year—old monty is having his eyes tested for the first time in two years. we are going to do a little check for you today. last time we saw you was september 2019, so it has been a little while.
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during lockdown, opticians did stay open but, according to the college of optometrists, around 6 million appointments were postponed. i think i was concerned because we had not been to the optician's for a long time. and also, certainly, monty hasjust come out of isolation, so he has spent quite a lot of time playing minecraft with his friends as the only way of sort of chatting to them. and he's been getting closer and closer to the screen as he's been playing. so itjust seemed a bit, for boy whose onlyjust eight, being really close to the screen, seemed a bit odd. oh, so you are a little bit short—sighted. we've got —i.25 on the right and a —i on the left. and as with so many children, monty will need a pair of glasses. we are definitely seeing a huge increase in the myopia for children and at a younger age. we know that patients who spend a lot of time indoors and a lot of time with near work are more
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at risk of becoming short—sighted. we have had a lot of children who have had to be at home, home—schooling, and they've had to use screens all day. and probably a huge decrease in outdoor time, as well, because, for a time, we were very limited with the amount of time we could be outdoors. so the combination of the two could have a huge impact on the rate of myopia. and so, this summer, the college of optometrists is encouraging children to spend at least two hours a day outside. there is good evidence that shows that the more time you spend outside, particularly between the ages of five and 12, the less likely you are to become short—sighted. and that's because that when you are outside, your eyes are more relaxed, you are focusing on objects further away. we also think that the sunlight might affect the way that the eye that the eye grows. so actually spending time, not using a device outside, the sunlight's actually encouraging
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a child's eye to grow into the right shape for adulthood. 0k, come and have a seat there, monty. an increasing number of pupils like monty will be heading back to school with glasses next term. pop those on and keep them out, any that you try on. but, in the meantime, his mum says he will be spending much of the summer outdoors. fiona lamdin, bbc news. let's take a look at today's papers where the crisis in afghanistan continues to dominate. "bad call, minister" is the headline in today's daily mail, which is focused on foreign secretary dominic raab. it claims that a crucial phone call about the evacuation of afghan interpreters, delegated to a junior minister never took place and suggests that mr raab�*s job was "hanging by a thread". the times reports that three of britain's most senior civil servants, whose departments are overseeing the evacuation from afghanistan, are on holiday.
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the paper says the permanent secretaries at the foreign office, the home office and the ministry of defence are all on leave. an image of a mother handing her child to an american soldier at kabul airport dominates the metro's front page. it says the woman was "begging" the soldier to save her daughter. it describes how other women threw their babies over razor wire in the hope they would be put on a military flight out of the capital. scotland and manchester united legend denis law is pictured on the back of this morning's mirror. known as the king, law is the sixth member of the united 1968 european cup—winning side to have been diagnosed with dementia. we will be speaking about the impact of dementia on footballers and the questions that are being asked about playing, in the legacy of that time.
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we will talk to the son of nobby stiles later and how the sporting world is dealing with this. there have been discussions in terms of brain injuries in the world of sport and how that is now being addressed. football, cricket, everywhere. we will talk about those issues. denis law, one of my earliest memories was my dad would take me for a walk to his house and my dad is a manchester united fan and we would walk past denis law's house. when? when i was a kid, in the 70s. he is not in the same house? i very much doubt it. you did the piecejust now i very much doubt it. you did the piece just now on eyes and being on screen is too much. in the mirror today, gone fishing, mum. a study that flips it the other way
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and said 2000 parents, a study of them said their kids are spending more time outside with 90% of children going famous five on us. spending more time outside in the pandemic and they have loved being out in the open air and they are into camping, and building a den, fishing, things they have not done before. fishing is nicely into this story i have seen. the daily mail. here is a question. why can a fish that has been caught be a record—breaker at one point but not when it is caught again. and it will weigh more. may be at loss weight in between. this is interesting. there is a big fish, catfish, called goliath. a quarter of a century ago goliath was
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caught, 1997, in bedfordshire. and then the fish. i will call it he. weighed 62 lb and accepted as the biggest caught in the uk and was named after goliath. all fine. then, goliath was caught again. goliath now weighs 110 lb. but does not count as a record because the committee change the rules in 2000 because catfish are no longer included in the rules because it is not a native species. i also have clothing advice. for me? swimwear. 0f for me? swimwear. of choice? the bigger, more baggy, the better. you are wrong. skimpy speedos.
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budgie smugglers, as they are nicknamed, they are back in fashion. is this the tom daley effect? it is the tom daley effect. tom daley�*s, i think they call them skimps, out ranked daniel craig's. the budgie smugglers win over the james bond shorts. i am sticking with baggy ones and doing everybody a favour. what a week it's been for rob burrow. first, his documentary was shortlisted for a national television award, next came the release of his autobiography, then, last night, he was back amongst the fans who adored him during his rugby league career. rob and his family were guests of honour at headingley stadium as his old side leeds rhinos played huddersfield in the super league. it was the first time he'd been
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in front of that crowd in more than 18 months, and breakfast�*s luxmy gopal was there. those turning up at headingley were not just fans watching those turning up at headingley were notjust fans watching a match, they were a rugby league family welcoming back rob burrow. he were a rugby league family welcoming back rob burrow.— back rob burrow. he is an amazing scrum-half. _ back rob burrow. he is an amazing scrum-half, amazing _ back rob burrow. he is an amazing scrum-half, amazing personality. l back rob burrow. he is an amazing i scrum-half, amazing personality. he scrum—half, amazing personality. he scored the finest try in the rugby league grand final at old trafford in 2011. he is an inspiration to the rest of the team.— in 2011. he is an inspiration to the rest of the team. people who watched him transform — rest of the team. people who watched him transform from _ rest of the team. people who watched him transform from lad _ rest of the team. people who watched him transform from lad to _ rest of the team. people who watched him transform from lad to legend. - him transform from lad to legend. really emotional. an emotional night for all the family who will be here. when you have watched him coming through from being a boy, obviously it is not a nice situation, but we are there for him.— are there for him. people who followed his _ are there for him. people who followed his journey _ are there for him. people who followed his journey through l are there for him. people who - followed his journey through super league wins and now his battle with
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motor neurone disease. figs league wins and now his battle with motor neurone disease. as someone with a degenerative _ motor neurone disease. as someone with a degenerative condition - motor neurone disease. as someone with a degenerative condition to - motor neurone disease. as someone with a degenerative condition to see| with a degenerative condition to see him handle it with grace, it is so great. him handle it with grace, it is so areat. . , him handle it with grace, it is so areat. ., , ., him handle it with grace, it is so ireat, ., , , ., ., him handle it with grace, it is so areat. .,, ., , , ., ., ., great. he has always been one of our favourite players. _ great. he has always been one of our favourite players. determination. - great. he has always been one of our favourite players. determination. i. favourite players. determination. i aet uuite favourite players. determination. i get quite emotional— favourite players. determination. i get quite emotional when - favourite players. determination. i get quite emotional when talking l get quite emotional when talking about_ get quite emotional when talking about him — get quite emotional when talking about him he— get quite emotional when talking about him. . , get quite emotional when talking about him. ., , , ., about him. he has been an inspiration _ about him. he has been an inspiration to _ about him. he has been an inspiration to the _ about him. he has been an inspiration to the club - about him. he has been an| inspiration to the club since starting his career. you could not get a better leeds legend. it is ureat to get a better leeds legend. it is great to be _ get a better leeds legend. it is great to be back _ get a better leeds legend. it is great to be back at headingley after so long _ great to be back at headingley after so long i_ great to be back at headingley after so long. i am overwhelmed to be shortlisted for the award. i have the backing of the greatest sport in the backing of the greatest sport in the world — the backing of the greatest sport in the world. i am proud as to how people — the world. i am proud as to how people have rallied round me since my diagnosis. i people have rallied round me since my diagnosis-_ my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. _ my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. i— my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. i think _ my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. i think it - my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. i think it will- my diagnosis. i could not tell you what it means. i think it will be i what it means. i think it will be emotional. we are really looking forward to it. i emotional. we are really looking forward to it.— emotional. we are really looking forward to it. i am happy we take the ball out— forward to it. i am happy we take the ball out to _ forward to it. i am happy we take the ball out to the _ forward to it. i am happy we take the ball out to the referee. - forward to it. i am happy we take the ball out to the referee. what| the ball out to the referee. what reaction do _ the ball out to the referee. what reaction do you _ the ball out to the referee. what reaction do you think _ the ball out to the referee. what reaction do you think there - the ball out to the referee. harriet
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reaction do you think there will be from the crowds?— reaction do you think there will be from the crowds? massive crowd to cheer. i from the crowds? massive crowd to cheer- i might— from the crowds? massive crowd to cheer. i might need _ from the crowds? massive crowd to cheer. i might need to _ from the crowds? massive crowd to cheer. i might need to wear - cheer. i might need to wear headphones. so cheer. i might need to wear headphones.— cheer. i might need to wear headphones. cheer. i might need to wear headhones. . ., ., ., headphones. so excited to go on the itch. headphones. so excited to go on the nitch. at headphones. so excited to go on the pitch- at the — headphones. so excited to go on the pitch. at the stadium _ headphones. so excited to go on the pitch. at the stadium where - headphones. so excited to go on the pitch. at the stadium where crowds. pitch. at the stadium where crowds only recently _ pitch. at the stadium where crowds only recently returned, _ pitch. at the stadium where crowds only recently returned, a _ pitch. at the stadium where crowds only recently returned, a 10,000 . only recently returned, a 10,000 strong standing ovation as the guest of honour appeared. cheering . last time he was here, for a testimonial match, was a year and a half ago. the reception this time was no less warm. a seven minute round of applause, a nod to the number seven shirt he wore during his career. it number seven shirt he wore during his career. . , number seven shirt he wore during his career. ., , , ,., number seven shirt he wore during his career-— his career. it has been so good to be back at — his career. it has been so good to be back at the _ his career. it has been so good to be back at the ground _ his career. it has been so good to be back at the ground and - his career. it has been so good to be back at the ground and to - his career. it has been so good to be back at the ground and to see | his career. it has been so good to i be back at the ground and to see the support has been fantastic. what be back at the ground and to see the support has been fantastic. what was it like seeing — support has been fantastic. what was it like seeing him _ support has been fantastic. what was it like seeing him go _ support has been fantastic. what was it like seeing him go onto _ support has been fantastic. what was it like seeing him go onto the -
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it like seeing him go onto the pitch? i it like seeing him go onto the itch? . . it like seeing him go onto the itch? ., ., ., ., . , it it like seeing him go onto the -itch? ., ., ., ., . , it was pitch? i managed not to cry. it was emotional but _ pitch? i managed not to cry. it was emotional but really _ pitch? i managed not to cry. it was emotional but really good. - pitch? i managed not to cry. it was emotional but really good. victory | emotional but really good. victory for leeds rhinos. and a shout out to the man who inspired it. i was really crying- _ the man who inspired it. i was really crying- i _ the man who inspired it. i was really crying. i did _ the man who inspired it. i was really crying. i did not - the man who inspired it. i was really crying. i did not think. the man who inspired it. i was really crying. i did not think i l really crying. i did not think i would — really crying. i did not think i would but _ really crying. i did not think i would but it was really emotional. lovely— would but it was really emotional. lovely to — would but it was really emotional. lovely to see him back at headingley. lovely to see him back at headingley-— lovely to see him back at headinule. ., ., ., headingley. emotionalto see him there, a headingley. emotionalto see him there. a lump _ headingley. emotionalto see him there, a lump in _ headingley. emotionalto see him there, a lump in the _ headingley. emotionalto see him there, a lump in the throat - headingley. emotionalto see him i there, a lump in the throat moment. i am there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so _ there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad — there, a lump in the throat moment. lam so glad to— there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad to see _ there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad to see him _ there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad to see him back- there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad to see him back on- there, a lump in the throat moment. i am so glad to see him back on thel i am so glad to see him back on the pitch. i am so glad to see him back on the itch. ., . , i am so glad to see him back on the itch. ., ., , , ., ., pitch. tonight has been amazing. i was looking _ pitch. tonight has been amazing. i was looking forward _ pitch. tonight has been amazing. i was looking forward to _ pitch. tonight has been amazing. i was looking forward to coming - pitch. tonight has been amazing. i | was looking forward to coming back to the _ was looking forward to coming back to the place where i had the time of my life _ to the place where i had the time of my life from being a little boy in the crowd — my life from being a little boy in the crowd to having the spectacle of a day _ the crowd to having the spectacle of a day set _ the crowd to having the spectacle of a day set for my book launch. i would — a day set for my book launch. i would not _ a day set for my book launch. i would not change the outcome of my life regardless, no matter what. what a wonderful occasion for him. and so much support for him. just taking it all from them, the
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energy. and they have done so much to raise the profile of motor neurone disease. still to come on breakfast. long—term youth unemployment has hit a five—year high, with more than 200,000 under—25s out of work for more than six months. we'll hear from young people about how they view their career prospects. we'll have that shortly and bring you the latest news and weather, but the time now is... time for the weather. those clouds look very dramatic. a gorgeous picture but very reflective of what is happening around the country. it absolutely is. we have had a mix over the past week. it has been cloudy with rain around. temperatures have not been great. today there should be sunshine on offer in many parts of the uk. there
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will be rain in the west later which sets up for an unsettled story through the weekend. a weather front moving in later. before it gets there, we have high pressure in charge. with the high in the south—east and a low moving in for the west, we will see southerly winds developing. that will bring some fairly mild, slightly humid weather today. we have a lot of low cloud to start. in much of the uk the cloud will break, so sunny spells developing across parts of scotland, eastern england, southern wales. this rain works in from the west affecting northern ireland today. the breeze picking up. most places will have light winds and in the sunny spells, temperatures not doing too badly today. we could see
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up doing too badly today. we could see up to 24. but feeling cooler in the north of scotland. in the evening, the rain starts to work further eastwards. a soggy evening in parts of scotland. 0vernight pushing into western parts of england and wales. should stay dry over night in east anglia and south—east england. temperatures on the mild side. saturday starts on an unsettled note. rain moving in quicker than predicted. it starts off in the west. heavy bursts. there will be brighter weather moving in from the west later but equally heavy showers and perhaps a rumble of thunder. the rain arriving in east anglia and the south—east in the middle of the afternoon. temperatures not great. looking ahead through saturday night
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and into sunday, low pressure starts to drift towards the east. still sitting to the east during the day on sunday so we could start the day with perhaps persistent rain in east anglia and the south—east. some scattered showers left here and there. temperatures 17—22, possibly. but sunny skies working in from the west and it looks like high pressure will keep things mostly dry and settled into next week. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning. after 50 years on our screens, a question of sport is the longest—running sports quiz show in the world. we'll catch up with new team captains, sam quek and ugo monye, ahead of the new series. we'll also look ahead to the start of the paralympic games in tokyo with former swimmers 0llie hynd
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and kate grey. the city of culture award has helped to reinvent and reinvigorate parts of the uk resulting in a record number of entries for the 2025 competition. we'll hear from the people behind some of them. 18 million people in afghanistan, nearly half of the population, depend on life—saving assistance. the country was already suffering from extreme drought, before the displacement caused by the taliban takeover. international aid charities have appealed for more funding in order to provide continued support. we'rejoined now from kabul by nilab mobarez, acting president of the afghan red crescent society. thank you so much forjoining us
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here on breakfast, i know you're incredibly busy and these are difficult times. could you maybe just start explaining to us, what's the latest, what are you seeing on the latest, what are you seeing on the streets of the afghan capital? thank you very much for inviting me. the situation is still very much, you know, i can say unusual. the shops are still almost closed, especially for food items. shops are still almost closed, especially forfood items. patrols are the corners, and it is completely different situation than last week. �* ., , last week. and how frightening is it for ou last week. and how frightening is it for you and — last week. and how frightening is it for you and your — last week. and how frightening is it for you and your family _ last week. and how frightening is it for you and your family and - last week. and how frightening is it for you and your family and those l for you and your family and those you love? for you and your family and those ou love? ~ . , . for you and your family and those ou love? ~ ., , for you and your family and those ou love? ~ .,, ., , ,., ., you love? well, as a person who should not _ you love? well, as a person who should not be _ you love? well, as a person who should not be frightened, -
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you love? well, as a person who i should not be frightened, because i have responsibilities, and i try to think about them, i have to lead our organisation and to do that to alleviate human suffering. it's not easy, i can confess.— easy, i can confess. let's talk about what — easy, i can confess. let's talk about what you _ easy, i can confess. let's talk about what you are _ easy, i can confess. let's talk about what you are focusing l easy, i can confess. let's talk. about what you are focusing on, easy, i can confess. let's talk- about what you are focusing on, that humanitarian aid effort. took us through what you're trying to do and the challenges right now. yes. through what you're trying to do and the challenges right now. yes, thank ou. you the challenges right now. yes, thank you- you know— the challenges right now. yes, thank you. you know that _ the challenges right now. yes, thank you. you know that before _ the challenges right now. yes, thank you. you know that before this - the challenges right now. yes, thank you. you know that before this huge | you. you know that before this huge instability took place, afghanistan was already going towards a very bad natural disaster, with just about 80% of the territory suffering from drought. 18 million people, half of the population, is food insecure.
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the un and the government of the time two months ago, at the end of june and beginning ofjuly, launched an appealfor the drought june and beginning ofjuly, launched an appeal for the drought to ask for $1.3 billion. today, the situation is worsening because of this instability. and the weakness and the lack of systems functioning, like financial systems, banks, logistics, and the migration and movement of the population makes it more difficult to work as you already said, and thousands of people are rushing towards the airport and towards embassies. just thinking to flee the country. and
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all of this is extremely concerning. what i can say about our organisation is that we are active all over the country, and we can work. certainly with lots of difficulties, but we are open across the country, we have 34 branches which are delivering services with almost 140 text and mobile health clinics. this is one part of the... 0k, clinics. this is one part of the... ok, that is helping us to reach the people. also, with the support of the international movement of red cross and red crescent, which we are part of it, we can receive the
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support. we can be strengthened by this amazing network. i support. we can be strengthened by this amazing network.— support. we can be strengthened by this amazing network. i imagine that deliverin: this amazing network. i imagine that delivering aid. _ this amazing network. i imagine that delivering aid, the _ this amazing network. i imagine that delivering aid, the logistics - this amazing network. i imagine that delivering aid, the logistics of - delivering aid, the logistics of getting around the country and reaching those communities, those people that need your help, is tremendously difficult right now. it is difficult, yes. the fighting is much less. before, the problem was that fighting was making everybody slowdown. now, it's a different kind of, you know, difficulty, which is a lack of governmental systems and international ngos, and the slowdown or the fact that systems cannot work, even up to two days ago, yesterday was a holiday but on wednesday, banks were not working.
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this is another type of difficulty but absolutely, it is existing. brute but absolutely, it is existing. we will have to let you go in a moment, i know you have a huge amount of work to do, but on a personal level, i know you are very busy doing this work and helping other people, have you ever thought at any point in the last few days about your own safety and trying to leave?— and trying to leave? besides the fact that everybody _ and trying to leave? besides the fact that everybody was - and trying to leave? besides the i fact that everybody was completely shocked, no, i'm going to go to work and i am going to work in my office. but the uncertainty is there, you know, for everybody, not for me. there isn't fighting, there are... there isn't fighting, there are... there isn't fighting, there are... there is a rush towards the airport and embassies. but otherwise, i
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would like to work.— would like to work. doctor nilab mobarez, thank _ would like to work. doctor nilab mobarez, thank you _ would like to work. doctor nilab mobarez, thank you very - would like to work. doctor nilab mobarez, thank you very much l would like to work. doctor nilab - mobarez, thank you very much indeed forjoining us here on breakfast, we wish you well. from the red crescent society in afghanistan. her wish you well. from the red crescent society in afghanistan.— society in afghanistan. her last comment there _ society in afghanistan. her last comment there was, _ society in afghanistan. her last comment there was, i - society in afghanistan. her last comment there was, i hope - society in afghanistan. her last comment there was, i hope i i society in afghanistan. her last | comment there was, i hope i can continue. we will be talking to a government minister at 7:30am about the latest in kabul. let's have a look at the sport now. there was much speculation about whether a certain mr harry kane would be playing for his team, i say it is his team, it is technically his team still. a, his team, it is technically his team still. ~ ., ., ,, . ., ., his team, it is technically his team still. ., ., ,, . ., ., ., still. a lot of speculation as to harry they _ still. a lot of speculation as to harry they at _ still. a lot of speculation as to harry they at tottenham. - still. a lot of speculation as to harry they at tottenham. the | still. a lot of speculation as to - harry they at tottenham. the talking point in now, they beat manchester city last weekend, but last night they lost to a portuguese team whose
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entire team cost the same as eric dier. questions are being asked now. the tottenham manager, nuno espirito santo, has defended his decision to leave harry kane and most of his first team at home, for their defeat in portugal last night. pacos de ferreira beat spurs 1—0 in the first leg of their europa conference league play—off. lucas silva scoring the only goal. despite the loss, the new spurs boss said he'd make the same decision to leave kane and his starting 11 from sunday's win over manchester city at home, in favour of younger players getting game time. but better news for rangers. an alfredo morelos goal helped the scottish champions to a 1—0 win over armenian side alashkert in the first leg of their europa league play—off. in the play—offs for the europa conference league, stjohnstone drew one all with austrian team lask. chris kane opened the scoring for the scottish premiership side, before lask equalised from a penalty. meanwhile, aberdeen lost 1—0 to fk qarabag in azerbaijan. jurgen klopp has said any liverpool fans whojoin in homophobic chants are "idiots".
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it's after liverpool's away match at norwich last weekend when alleged homophobic chants were directed at the chelsea player billy gilmour who's on loan to the canarys. klopp was talking to the founder of liverpool's lgbt fan group and said there are far better songs to sing. the second round has just got under way at the aig women's open at carnoustie, with world number one and olympic champion nelly korda one of the women to watch. she's in a three way tie for the lead. england's georgia hall and scottish amateur louise duncan will hope maintain their challenge today. they're both one shot off the lead, although it could have been better for 2018 champion hall,
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who bogeyed on the last. yorkshire have apologised to former player azeem rafiq, saying he was the victim of what they call "inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour", after he accused the club of racism. rafiq said last year that instiutional racism at the club had left him close to taking his own life. an independent investigation started last september, and the ecb wrote to the club this week to ask for a copy of the findings. rafiq has questioned yorkshire's reference to "inappropriate behaviour" and said it's been a difficult 12 months. a year of trying to get people to listen. a year of giving them the opportunity to do the right thing and what we end up with is a statement that turns racism into "inappropriate behaviour". imean... i'm frustrated, i'm pretty angry. glamorgan's 58—year wait
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for a one—day cricket trophy is over after they beat durham in the royal london cup final. glamorgan captain kiran carlson top scored with 82 as they set durham a target of 297. and durham fell well short in reply, all out for 238. the final wicket was taken by veteran bowler michael hogan, who's 40 years old and said he'd been working 17 years for a moment like that. and maybe a moment to forget for one fan in the crowd. it probably seemed like a good idea at the time, trying to catch one of kiran carlson's massive sixes. he not only couldn't hold on to it, but ended up in a heap under an umbrella. fantastic! definitely worth a look, he maintained his dignity, of course. ., �* ., ., , course. no, he didn't! that was brilliant, we _ course. no, he didn't! that was brilliant, we needed _ course. no, he didn't! that was
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brilliant, we needed that. - has revealed that he has alzheimer's and vascular dementia. the 81—year—old says he's "trying to be positive" but admitted he would no longer be able to sign autographs forfans, and the days ahead would be "hard, demanding and painful". we're joined now by kate lee, chief executive of the alzheimer's society. good morning to you. very distressing news for denis law and his family of course. but i would imagine also, a positive thing that someone with the profile of denis law is talking about this. absolutely. we know that dementia remains absolutely shrouded in stigma, people find it very hard to admit that they have got the condition, that they have had that difficult diagnosis. when people shy away of talking about it, it means
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that they cannot get the support of organisations like ours who can now be there to help the family with the support and guidance they need over the coming years. fantastic and inspiration as always from denis and his family who have been incredible in their support of us as well, and coming out and talking about his diagnosis. coming out and talking about his diaunosis. �* , ., ., coming out and talking about his diaunosis. �* ,, . , diagnosis. and you have been in touch with _ diagnosis. and you have been in touch with the _ diagnosis. and you have been in touch with the family _ diagnosis. and you have been in touch with the family to - diagnosis. and you have been in touch with the family to offer i touch with the family to offer support? touch with the family to offer su ort? , touch with the family to offer su . oft? , ., , touch with the family to offer su--ort? , ., , ., , support? yes, the family had been workin: support? yes, the family had been working with _ support? yes, the family had been working with the _ support? yes, the family had been working with the alzheimer's - support? yes, the family had been i working with the alzheimer's society for a little while, denis's daughter is doing a sponsored walk at the moment, and they are also supporting our campaign working with lots of different football clubs and different football clubs and different sports, cricket and rugby as well, to look how we can do everything from making grants more dementia friendly to investing in
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vital research in understanding the link between football and dementia. let's talk about the diagnosis, vascular dementia and alzheimer's, take us through what the implications of those are. dementia is a ranae implications of those are. dementia is a range of— implications of those are. dementia is a range of symptoms, _ implications of those are. dementia is a range of symptoms, the - implications of those are. dementia j is a range of symptoms, the easiest way to talk about the mention is the —— dementia is a range of symptoms, things like memory loss, but also for getting your words, repeating, lots of things as well. that can be because with lots of different conditions, for example alzheimer's, we still know very little about how people develop it and there is a lot of research work to be done there. vascular dementia is another form of research work to be done there. vascular dementia is anotherform of dementia which is a clogging up of veins and arteries in the brain, a little bit like heart disease, which
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means a healthy lifestyle is important for brain health. there are other causes of dementia as well. so really understanding why, again with things like professional football, particularly professional football, particularly professional football with the constant heading that they do during training, understanding why that would make a disease like alzheimer's start to form. it's so vital, our new study that we are funding in collaboration with the fa to understand why that's happening is so vital. the with the fa to understand why that's happening is so vital.— happening is so vital. the football association _ happening is so vital. the football association has _ happening is so vital. the football association has said _ happening is so vital. the football association has said that, - happening is so vital. the football association has said that, the - happening is so vital. the football association has said that, the fal association has said that, the fa has helped to lead the way in ground—breaking research into links with football. we have a clear and unwavering commitment both financially and with resources to support objective and thorough research going forward. the fact that we have statements like this from the fa is significant, and we
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have the likes of alan shearer and chris sutton making real point is about how training for the professional footballers and the game needs to adapt or at least be mindful of the impact of heading the ball. . . mindful of the impact of heading the ball. ., ., ., , , ball. yeah, and we have been seen and been very _ ball. yeah, and we have been seen and been very welcome _ ball. yeah, and we have been seen and been very welcome to - ball. yeah, and we have been seen and been very welcome to see - ball. yeah, and we have been seen. and been very welcome to see some limitations around heading in training coming in over recent months, about how long heading practice can continue, about the distance that a ball can be kicked to be headed, because it's about those great big power shots that footballers are practising for when they take a corner. everybody wants those footballers to score that amazing goalfrom those footballers to score that amazing goal from a those footballers to score that amazing goalfrom a header, that wins the cup. so we understand what a vital part of football heading is, but we need to ensure it is safe as possible and in order to do that we are working alongside the fa who have shown incredible commitment along with other footballing
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agencies and bodies and clubs themselves, in really helping us, working alongside the alzheimer's society to understand the key implication. and also i should say working alongside us promoting the services of alzheimer's society, our support services. anyone that is struggling or worried about their memory, they need to just go on our website and get in touch. we have a support line and we can help people work that through and we can offer vital support including face—to—face support if that's what people need. so we are delighted that the fa partnership will help us promote those services.— partnership will help us promote those services. ., , . ., those services. thanks very much for that advice there. _ those services. thanks very much for that advice there. kate _ those services. thanks very much for that advice there. kate lee, - those services. thanks very much for that advice there. kate lee, chief- that advice there. kate lee, chief executive of the alzheimer's society, thank you forjoining us. spoke about the unemployment rate coming down, the record rise injobs available. but here is an interesting statistic. youth unemployment hit a five year high during the pandemic. sarah is in blackburn for us this
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morning to find out what this means for the career prospects of the under 25s. yes, that's right, good morning from one of the world's largest defence firms. this is where they assemble parts of the raf hawkjets, used by the world famous red arrows display team. across the uk, they have got 2500 apprentices and graduates, some of them are busy working away this morning and we will have a having a chat with some of them shortly. as you said, the pandemic has had a big impact on young people. nationally the number of teenagers doing apprenticeships has fallen and there are concerns about long—term youth unemployment. i have been catching up unemployment. i have been catching up with some young people from a range of sectors to find out about their hopes for the future. i think it will easily take at least two or three years to be getting
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back to where i was pre—pandemic. i had five interviews between february and march. three of them were rescinded because of the pandemic. a lot of what you realised from the past year is - like, life is short. you might as well be doing something that you love i and what you're passionate about. when we first met portrait photographer drew back in october, covid restrictions were tightening and his manchester business was struggling. i already cut down all my expenses. i haven't left the house in months so i stopped paying for my office. i've got rid of all of that stuff. and it's not enough. today his outlook is much brighter. as entertainment and art venues have reopened, his bookings are coming back but he knows the recovery will take time. what was the longest period of time that you went without any work? about 11 weeks. and how did you get through that period financially? honestly, i don't know how i got through it. compared to a regular month, i'm still at around 40, 50%
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of what i was doing pre—pandemic. it's building and it's getting there but it's painfully slow. during the pandemic, competition forjobs has been fierce. here in hull, 20% of people live in workless households. david has two degrees and had applied for more than 100 jobs. you're out of control of your own life, at a point as to, where's the money going to come? you can't really think long term. so you're constantly thinking about, how am i going to get a job? in the end, he left his home city and moved to manchester to find new opportunities. he is now working for an organisation which supports disabled people. if you're the type of person that's applied for a lot ofjobs, like anybody had at the minute, i suppose, and you don't get those responses, it can really hurt. i do count myself lucky that i've ended up in this position. for others, lockdown has led to reinvention.
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cece from london quit herjob in advertising to follow her artistic dreams. i've gone from a large office in the middle of soho to be home painting in my bedroom. it's definite ups and downs of kind of, this is the most exciting thing ever and, oh, my god, what have i done? and the career change is paying off. she's just moved into her own studio. being able to actually work on bigger pieces, have people come into the studio and see the work and talk to them and it not being in my bedroom, and on a more practical level not smelling paint fumes every night and actually not waking up with a headache is really nice. and while it may take longer for their careers to recoverfrom the pandemic, there is optimism for better times ahead. sarah corker, bbc news, in hull. so, you can hear that that covid is already having a big impact onjob prospects. we will have a chat with
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some of the apprentices here working away. good morning, chris. you have had a bit of a radical career change?— had a bit of a radical career chance? ~ , ,, , change? absolutely, i spent six ears in change? absolutely, i spent six years in a _ change? absolutely, i spent six years in a major— change? absolutely, i spent six years in a major retailer - change? absolutely, i spent six years in a major retailer in i change? absolutely, i spent six i years in a major retailer in retail, and i have always had a fascination with engineering and military aircraft, and i've always wanted to work on them. my previous career gave me the confidence to try for this career. and i'm loving it, absolutely loving it, the hands—on engineering skills, you can't do any better than working, learning and earning all of the same time. and bae systems, the friendship scheme —— apprenticeship scheme here is absolutely fantastic. itruism -- apprenticeship scheme here is absolutely fantastic.— absolutely fantastic. was it difficult to _ absolutely fantastic. was it difficult to get _ absolutely fantastic. was it difficult to get onto - absolutely fantastic. was it difficult to get onto it? i absolutely fantastic. was it i difficult to get onto it? there are some times 1000 applicants for the causes, i understand? it is competitive _ causes, i understand? it is competitive but _ causes, iunderstand? it 3 competitive but through processes that make sure that you complete the application correctly and try your very best, you can really give
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yourself the best chances to be successful in the application. find successful in the application. and what do you _ successful in the application. and what do you think your future job role could be? you're going to be working on aircraft, the next generation, of aircraft engineers? absolutely, my dream is to become a skilled operator on latest computer and numerically controlled machinery in the business, on f 35 typhoon, all of the other aircraft, i want to be in the business doing my role. i wish you all the better for the future, thank you very much. also with me is nicole. you are relatively new to the business, aren't you? talk to me about why you decided you wanted to go down the friendship route. i did decided you wanted to go down the friendship route.— friendship route. i did -- apprenticeship _ friendship route. i did -- apprenticeship route. i i friendship route. i did -- i apprenticeship route. i did a friendship route. i did -- _ apprenticeship route. i did a couple of science _ apprenticeship route. i did a couple of science and maths and engineering projects— of science and maths and engineering projects back in 2019, and i got an insight _ projects back in 2019, and i got an insight into— projects back in 2019, and i got an insight into apprenticeships and spoke _ insight into apprenticeships and spoke to— insight into apprenticeships and spoke to more people and i thought it was— spoke to more people and i thought it was a _
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spoke to more people and i thought it was a fabulous place to work and a fabulous — it was a fabulous place to work and a fabulous company to work for. you have been here _ a fabulous company to work for. ym. have been here since january? a fabulous company to work for. you have been here since january? yes, | a fabulous company to work for. you | have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 — have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 intake. _ have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 intake. |f_ have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 intake. if you _ have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 intake. if you are i have been here since january? yes, i am the 2020 intake. if you are not i am the 2020 intake. if you are not workin: am the 2020 intake. if you are not working here. _ am the 2020 intake. if you are not working here, what _ am the 2020 intake. if you are not working here, what were - am the 2020 intake. if you are not working here, what were some i am the 2020 intake. if you are not working here, what were some of| am the 2020 intake. if you are not i working here, what were some of the other options you looked at when it came to your career? i other options you looked at when it came to your career?— came to your career? i would have one to came to your career? i would have gone to college. — came to your career? i would have gone to college, or _ came to your career? i would have gone to college, or i _ came to your career? i would have gone to college, or i would - came to your career? i would have gone to college, or i would have . gone to college, or i would have gone _ gone to college, or i would have gone to— gone to college, or i would have gone to uni. i enjoy engineering so i gone to uni. i enjoy engineering so i would _ gone to uni. i enjoy engineering so i would have ended up in some sort of engineering. but i am glad i found— of engineering. but i am glad i found myself here. this of engineering. but i am glad i found myself here.— of engineering. but i am glad i found myself here. this feels a bit like an interview _ found myself here. this feels a bit like an interview question, - found myself here. this feels a bit like an interview question, but i like an interview question, but where do you see yourself in five years time, what would be your dreams? i years time, what would be your dreams? ., ~' years time, what would be your dreams? ., ~ ., , , dreams? i would like to finish my friendship. _ dreams? i would like to finish my friendship, hopefully _ dreams? i would like to finish my friendship, hopefully i _ dreams? i would like to finish my friendship, hopefully i will - dreams? i would like to finish my friendship, hopefully i will be i dreams? i would like to finish my friendship, hopefully i will be in i friendship, hopefully i will be in one of— friendship, hopefully i will be in one of the sites, putting the aircraft _ one of the sites, putting the aircraft together, final as emily, sending — aircraft together, final as emily, sending it — aircraft together, final as emily, sending it to where it needs to be. we have _ sending it to where it needs to be. we have talked a lot —— final assembly and telling it where it needs to be. we have talked about the impact of the pandemic on young people and getting into training, did it cause a delay to you starting your course, did you have to do anything from home? we
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your course, did you have to do anything from home?— your course, did you have to do anything from home? we were delayed eiuht few anything from home? we were delayed eight few months, _ anything from home? we were delayed eight few months, i _ anything from home? we were delayed eight few months, i was _ anything from home? we were delayed eight few months, i was meant - anything from home? we were delayed eight few months, i was meant to i eight few months, i was meant to start— eight few months, i was meant to start in_ eight few months, i was meant to start in september, and it was pretty— start in september, and it was prettyjanuary, but that was ba being _ prettyjanuary, but that was ba being very covid safe so it is a safe _ being very covid safe so it is a safe place _ being very covid safe so it is a safe place to work in. —— it is about— safe place to work in. —— it is about bae _ safe place to work in. —— it is about bae systems being very covid—safe. about bae systems being very covid-safe— about bae systems being very covid-safe. , , ., ., covid-safe. these people are at the ve start covid-safe. these people are at the very start of — covid-safe. these people are at the very start of their _ covid-safe. these people are at the very start of their careers _ covid-safe. these people are at the very start of their careers and i covid-safe. these people are at the very start of their careers and they. very start of their careers and they are hoping they will progress into well—paid high skilled jobs in the future. if that was an interview question, nicole got thejob, if that was an interview question, nicole got the job, she was brilliant! nicole got the “ob, she was brilliant! . , nicole got the “ob, she was brilliant! ., , ., ., brilliant! that is one of the hardest questions. - brilliant! that is one of the hardest questions. one i brilliant! that is one of the hardest questions. one of| brilliant! that is one of the i hardest questions. one of those brilliant! that is one of the _ hardest questions. one of those ones where you think, i have to answer it in a way that no one else is going to answer, it's like the awful one, what's your biggest weakness? and then you have got to answer it in a positive. g0 then you have got to answer it in a ositive. ,., ., ., , then you have got to answer it in a ositive. ., ., , ,., positive. go on then, what is your bi est positive. go on then, what is your biggest weakness? _ positive. go on then, what is your biggest weakness? too _ positive. go on then, what is your biggest weakness? too many i positive. go on then, what is your biggest weakness? too many to i positive. go on then, what is your i biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get _ biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get that _ biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get that job. _ biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get that job. the - biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get that job. the show i biggest weakness? too many to list, i wouldn't get that job. the show is i i wouldn't get that “0b. the show is onl two i wouldn't get that “0b. the show is only two and _ i wouldn't get that “0b. the show is only two and a — i wouldn't get that job. the show is
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only two and a half— i wouldn't get that job. the show is only two and a half hours! - i wouldn't get that job. the show is only two and a half hours! thank i only two and a half hours! thank ou! the only two and a half hours! thank you! the love — only two and a half hours! thank you! the love i'm _ only two and a half hours! thank you! the love i'm feeling - only two and a half hours! thank you! the love i'm feeling in i only two and a half hours! thank you! the love i'm feeling in the l you! the love i'm feeling in the studio is immense. can you rescue us, sarah? good morning! the weather is looking mixed over the next few days, we have some unsettled weather on the way for the weekend but it will not be a brighter, and there is some sunshine today. this is the scene in norfolk, some blue skies and cumulus cloud. we will see sunshine today breaking through the cloud in many parts of the uk but also some rain arriving in the west and that is going to linger particularly into tomorrow. that is all courtesy of this weather front, you tomorrow. that is all courtesy of this weatherfront, you can tomorrow. that is all courtesy of this weather front, you can see tomorrow. that is all courtesy of this weatherfront, you can see it weaving its way in from the atlantic. still high—pressure to the south—east so not moving through in a hurry. ahead of the rain, mild air, the wind is coming in from the south or south westerly direction. feeling reasonably warm and humid where you see that sunshine. we have got cloud around this morning, a
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little bit of mist and fog around, but through the day, the sunshine is breaking holes in the cloud. sunny spells across parts of scotland, eastern england, brightness for wales and for northern ireland a lot of cloud, aplix of patchy rain becoming —— outbreaks of patchy rain but that is becoming more persistent. light winds today, temperatures up to 22 for the warmest spots, could be a degree or to hire where you see longer spells of sunshine. the rain in the west, heading into the evening it pushes into part of scotland, north—west england later arriving across wales and south—west england. east anglia and south—west england. east anglia and the south—east should avoid the wet weather, so still mild. clear skies moving in across saturday morning. but then outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland, northern england and wales and the
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south—west, edging eastwards through the day. east anglia and the south—east will see the rain during the afternoon. some sunny skies behind the rain but you could catch some sharp showers or thunderstorms for northern ireland, wales and the south—west of scotland. temperatures not great, 17 to 21 degrees on saturday. into the second half of the weekend, it looks like we will gradually lose the area of low pressure so it starts to move away towards the east. still fairly close by in the east during sunday so we could see a few sharp showers first thing across east anglia at the south—east. most of the uk sees dry weather on sunday but a few isolated showers building through the afternoon down the spine of the country. 17 to 21, 22 across wales and south—west england in the brighter skies later on in the afternoon on sunday. sunday will be the better day of the weekend weather—wise. as we head into sunday
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night and monday, we lose the area of low pressure towards the east, higher pressure dominated across the uk but the winds rotating around the area can from a north—easterly direction at times. so the outlook is that the high pressure will keep things dry and settled, you can see sunny symbols of the outlook. the headlines are next. will keep things mostly dry and settled into next week.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. with desperate crowds continuing to mass outside kabul airport, plans are made to double evacuation efforts over the weekend. we are with the derbyshire community, moved to tears by scenes in afghanistan but now motivated to help. this lorry is being filled with donations for afghan children who have arrived in the country with nothing but the clothes on their back. more pressure on the foreign secretary dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made. increased screen time and a lack of time outside is being blamed
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for a growth in the number of children being diagnosed as short—sighted. it's friday 20th august. evacuation efforts from afghanistan are set to accelerate over the weekend, as desperate crowds continue to gather in the capital. a nato official in kabul says the number of evacuations will double and that more than 18,000 people have already left the country since the taliban took over. the united states says around 6000 people are due to leave on 20 flights in the coming hours. 0ur afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani joins us now. we secunder kermani joins us now. spoke to you yestt things we spoke to you yesterday. how are things this morning, how have they changed over the past 2a hours? i changed over the past 24 hours? i was at the airport yesterday afternoon and the situation was a little calmer than it has been in
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previous days, but still pretty chaotic. you have thousands of people there who do not have visas, no realistic prospect of being evacuated, but who are so desperate they have turned up at the airport hoping somehow they will be able to find their way out of the country. that crowd at times surging forward and the taliban firing into the air at times, hitting them with whips at times. that is causing problems for people who do have valid travel documents. we understand foreign nationals are finding it somewhat easier to get here into the airport but for afghans being relocated because they have links with the international presence here and our particular vulnerable, they are finding it difficult. i spoke to a former interpreter who work with the british forces who is waiting to find out when he can order a flight.
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he said some friends had missed theirflight because of he said some friends had missed their flight because of the chaotic situation at the airport. i heard reports of the taliban at times making things a bit difficult, making things a bit difficult, making access to the airport difficult for afghans who had the right documents. yesterday it seemed clear that alabama were losing patience with these scenes being broadcast internationally —— it seemed clear that the taliban were losing patience. those wanting access to the airport, they have to talk to the taliban because they are in control of this city. us and uk forces are adjusting control of two gates at the airport. the rest of the city, the airport, are under taliban control.— the city, the airport, are under taliban control. ~ ,, ., taliban control. when the us and uk talk about stepping _ taliban control. when the us and uk talk about stepping up _ taliban control. when the us and uk talk about stepping up evacuation i talk about stepping up evacuation flights, getting thousands more out, does that seem realistic to you,
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given what you are seeing and the difficulty people are having getting to the airport? i difficulty people are having getting to the airport?— to the airport? i think that will be a big challenge. _ to the airport? i think that will be a big challenge. there _ to the airport? i think that will be a big challenge. there are - to the airport? i think that will be | a big challenge. there are reports at times that some of the planes flying out have not always been that full. so managing the chaotic situation around the airport is going to be a challenge. and there are many other people who would be eligible for relocation who have not yet received any positive response from the embassy and the concern from the embassy and the concern from them about their future, after the international mission formally ends at the end of the month and they are basically on their own. thank you. we're joined now from westminster by our political correspondent nick eardley. all of this going on on the ground but there are politics around this with the foreign secretary dominic
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raab criticised again over whether or not phone calls were made to his counterpart, that department by anyone from his department ahead of the chaotic scenes we saw. this anyone from his department ahead of the chaotic scenes we saw.— the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running _ the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running a _ the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running a couple _ the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running a couple of _ the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running a couple of days - the chaotic scenes we saw. this has been running a couple of days now. | been running a couple of days now. this was about a call the foreign secretary was urged to make by officials to his counterpart in the now fallen afghan government to try to get interpreters who helped the uk out of the country amidst the rapid advance of the taliban. yesterday, we reported that dominic raab did not make that call because he was on holiday and he asked a junior minister to do it instead. today, it has emerged the phone call did not happen at all. the government says that is because the rapidly changing situation in afghanistan meant it was not
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possible. there are a lot of questions being asked about this. had dominic raab made the call himself, but would he have been bumped up the queue and managed to get a phone call with the afghan foreign minister to make this case. it paints a picture we have heard from opposition parties that the government was not prepared for what happened and what it did happen, it acted too slowly. dominic raab was asked to make the call on friday. it was the monday before he came back from holiday and by that point kabul had fallen. opposition parties say dominic raab should resign. i do not think he has intention of doing so at the moment. yesterday he said he was not going to. the government would say that call itself probably would say that call itself probably would not have made a huge deal of difference. we heard that argument from the defence secretary. it adds to the questions about why the government was not more prepared,
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why it did not act quicker.— the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees after a five—year—old boy, who recently arrived in the uk, fell to his death from a window on the ninth floor of a hotel. mohammed munib majeedi and his family were put up at the hotel in sheffield as part of the government's resettlement scheme. home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. a new life in a new country that's ended in tragedy. this hotel in sheffield is now the scene of a major investigation into a dreadful accident. the victim — a five—year—old afghan boy, mohammed munib majeedi. he had recently arrived with his parents and four siblings from kabul — refugees given protection in the uk because his father worked in the british embassy. police and ambulances were called to the 0yo metropolitan hotel on wednesday afternoon, after the boy fell from a ninth—floor window.
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the translator working with the afghan families being housed there said all of them were devastated. the boy and his family came to the uk under the government scheme to protect people who were at risk from the taliban. the home office says everyone is deeply saddened at the tragic death. refugee charities are demanding a wider investigation as to how families arriving in the uk are being treated. there are claims that some residents had concerns about windows. those claims may be part of the police investigation. but while the home office says it was told of no safety concerns, it has moved all families to alternative accommodation. a coronavirus boosterjab scheme is likely to start next month, according to the health secretary. sajid javid said the most vulnerable would be offered a third jab first, before a possible rollout to other groups. it comes as the world health organisation has questioned
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the ethics of an extra dose when the majority of people in poorer countries haven't had any. covid lockdown measures have been extended in sydney for at least another month. from monday, a curfew will be imposed in the worst—affected parts of the city after the state of new south wales registered nearly 650 new cases. meanwhile, a nationwide lockdown in new zealand has also been extended, until wednesday, after new covid cases were found in the capital, wellington. a record 20 places have applied to be the next uk city of culture. the government awards the title every four years, helping to bring tourism and investment to different areas. you said places deliberately. this year, groups of towns were encouraged to apply and there have been bids from every nation in the uk. the winner will be announced next year. entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports.
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in the week when a hollywood—style sign appeared on a slagheap overlooking wrexham, it has been confirmed that the town is now aiming to become the uk city of culture 2025. wrexham county borough's entry is one of 20 that have been put forward. including a bid spanning both sides of the scotland—england border. dumfries and galloway and the scottish borders are joining forces with northumberland, cumbria and the city of carlisle — a combined area almost 15 times the size of london. and cornwall�*s bid is very much as a county, rather than its only city, truro. coventry�*s time as the city of culture has not gone to plan. covid meant that the start was delayed five months. but events are now up and running. the 360 allstars start a three—week run there today. and the organisers insist that the city has benefited. the city of culture is really
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the beginning of a journey, it's not the end of a journey. it's the beginning of thinking about the role that culture can play in cities in bringing people together and creating pride and expressing identity, in supporting regeneration and economic development, in promoting tourism and really putting your city on the map. a long list will be revealed at the end of next month, with the winner announced in may, as coventry�*s year in the spotlight comes to an end. you may like this. i do not think it would work here. a prototype of a human—oid robot, designed for dangerous, repetitive, or boring work is set to be launched by tesla next year. at a showcase of his company's developments in artificial intelligence, tesla boss elon musk said the robot would eliminate tasks people don't like to do.
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it will run on the same technology used by tesla's self—driven vehicles. will it put the bins out? yes. make you a cup of tea. that is not necessarily a boring or repetitive tasks. sort out the washing. it does not look particularly friendly. a nice little smile painted on it might help. scary. at half past seven we will talk to the minister for the armed forces and get an update on what is happening in kabul. as refugees from afghanistan begin arriving in the uk, communities here are collecting donated clothes, toys and toiletries to help them settle in.
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jayne mccubbin is at a restaurant in the peak district where volunteers are handing out essential items. they are working right now. one thing that is coming out of this is... obviously, so many of us have been saddened by images we have seen, that people are stepping up. kindness is being shown. absolutely. 100%. good morning. good morning to all the guys on the lorry. this is a human chain of kindness. the bags are coming out. they put out an appeal. they have seen the news and been moved to tears but now they want to act. these donations have flooded in notjust in derbyshire but around the country. yesterday we talked to individuals trying to make
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a difference. community groups, charities in derbyshire, london, milton keynes, manchester, all over the country. look at this, people want to help. this is where we are sorting clothes that have been donated. so much here. ridiculous. i can't believe how many donations we have had. it is not even 48 hours since we put out a plea on facebook asking for help. tonight, this high peak restaurant will open to customers. all coming up now. today, it is a focus for those who want to help. it really is coming in thick and fast. two days ago, these volunteers heard that 110 afghan refugees had just arrived in a hotel 20 miles away. we have got baby equipment, pushchairs. just essentials. essentials, basics. things that we take for granted. among them, pregnant women and 64 children.
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the social worker told you these children had just arrived. just arrived with nothing. arrived with nothing, just the clothes on their back and that's it. yeah, these children have arrived from a war zone with literally the clothes on their back. more stuff coming in. at what point are we going to say no? it's all down here. malc is a civil servant here on his day off. people want to help? yes, yes. and these are the images that moved him. 3500 miles away, a small child is held up to american troops, her parents desperate for access to the airport, to safety. you are humble. you think how lucky we are here. women were throwing babies over the razor wire, - so people could collect them - and take them away from afghanistan. that is heartbreaking. i am a parent. to think that you could do that. although that is the best thing for your child, it must be... i you cannot comprehend, it is horrendous. - i will add those to the pile.
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the people of manchester have also been moved. we put the appeal out for women's stuff, children's stuff, maternity. toys, recreation, socks. we have got everything, really. and money. people have donated money. if they could not come here in person. how much in 48 hours? i think, at the moment, we are on £43,000. we have three hotels with afghan nationals who have supported the british troops, and their families. these are afghan people who are fleeing the taliban takeover in kabul. they have supported our troops, they have supported our nationals and now they are here and we want to support them. in milton keynes, this church is helping families who have just arrived without even a coat. 16 items. we also have some shoes and coats you can have as well. 0k? lovely smile. it is a balance between giving them
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what they need to help settle in the community, but also to let them know they are welcome here. we found that many of the families are quite cold when they come here, because they are leaving 40—degree heat and they are coming to what we think is quite warm and we are going around in t—shirts and they are thinking it is very chilly. dinesh is here with his wife and children. there are new shoes. a football. small things that can never replace their home. stability. their family still at risk back in afghanistan because of the work he once did to help us. an interpreter with the british, so many have watched the news wishing they knew a way to help. kay is a university lecturer. i spent last night processing requests for phone credit for a number of refugees to top up
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as you would with a mobile phone in this country. that is such a small thing, but an absolute lifeline. it is, and we hear stories all the time of what difference it has made to people, what that phone call meant. it feels like a small thing but it is something, it is something i can do. and i think that is the important thing to remember. if everyone does a small thing, it makes a massive difference. these are the small acts of kindness in a huge political storm, and so very many more still in need of help. so many acts of kindness right across the country. come and meet some of the team. this is a restaurant. it will be a restaurant tonight but today a hive of activity with people wanting to help. lots of baby goods coming out. hello. linda, where should you be today? i
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baby goods coming out. hello. linda, where should you be today?— where should you be today? i should be on holiday — where should you be today? i should be on holiday in _ where should you be today? i should be on holiday in anglesey. _ where should you be today? i should be on holiday in anglesey. we - where should you be today? i should be on holiday in anglesey. we have l be on holiday in anglesey. we have dela ed be on holiday in anglesey. we have delayed the — be on holiday in anglesey. we have delayed the holidays. _ be on holiday in anglesey. we have delayed the holidays. why - be on holiday in anglesey. we have delayed the holidays. why are - be on holiday in anglesey. we have delayed the holidays. why are you | delayed the holidays. why are you doin: delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? _ delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? because _ delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? because it _ delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? because it is - delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? because it is such - delayed the holidays. why are you doing this? because it is such a i doing this? because it is such a great cause for the children. and because of the donations we have had, so many, unbelievable. the? because of the donations we have had, so many, unbelievable. they are auoin to a had, so many, unbelievable. they are going to a distribution _ had, so many, unbelievable. they are going to a distribution centre - had, so many, unbelievable. they are going to a distribution centre and - going to a distribution centre and onto a hotel in east cheshire where there are 64 children who have arrived with nothing but the clothes on their back. let me introduce claire andjill. on their back. let me introduce claire and jill. they should be in work today. you have been given special dispensation by your bosses. my special dispensation by your bosses. my bosses more than happy for us to time off. i my bosses more than happy for us to time off. , ., ., , my bosses more than happy for us to timeoff. , ., ., , time off. i sent a text to my boss sa in: time off. i sent a text to my boss saying please _ time off. i sent a text to my boss saying please can _ time off. i sent a text to my boss saying please can i _ time off. i sent a text to my boss saying please can i have - time off. i sent a text to my boss| saying please can i have tomorrow off? and _ saying please can i have tomorrow off? and they understood? yes. what imaaes off? and they understood? yes. what images made — off? and they understood? yes. what images made you _ off? and they understood? yes. what images made you think, _ off? and they understood? yes. what images made you think, i _ off? and they understood? yes. what images made you think, i have - off? and they understood? yes. what images made you think, i have got. off? and they understood? yes. what images made you think, i have got to | images made you think, i have got to do something? the images made you think, i have got to do something?— do something? the amount of stuff --eole do something? the amount of stuff people have — do something? the amount of stuff people have brought _ do something? the amount of stuff people have brought and _ do something? the amount of stuff people have brought and donated. l people have brought and donated. yesterday van after van load. and a 90—year—old lady who knitted us
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brand—new toys for the kids. that brand-new toys for the kids. that really touched _ brand-new toys for the kids. that really touched me. _ brand-new toys for the kids. that really touched me. it _ brand—new toys for the kids. that really touched me. it was so cute. and the _ really touched me. it was so cute. and the sense of community and everyone — and the sense of community and everyone pulling together and helping — everyone pulling together and helping everyone out. it is touching- _ helping everyone out. it is touching- l— helping everyone out. it is touching. i can _ helping everyone out. it is touching. i can introduce l helping everyone out. it 3 touching. i can introduce peat. say good morning to the nation, and ex—marine helping. matt, crouching down. matt served in afghanistan. why are you here and how do you feel about this situation? it is why are you here and how do you feel about this situation?— about this situation? it is mixed emotions- _ about this situation? it is mixed emotions- i— about this situation? it is mixed emotions. i have _ about this situation? it is mixed emotions. i have served - about this situation? it is mixed emotions. i have served in - emotions. i have served in afghanistan for the purpose i was there for. i am seeing what is happening there now. i think there is negativity about how it is going at the moment whereas people like ourselves here to help support those people. if it were my own family and children and grandchildren, i would want somebody to do the same and
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help them and put them into a better situation. a lot of mixed emotions about it. . . situation. a lot of mixed emotions about it. , ., ., ., , about it. there is a lot of empathy and warmth _ about it. there is a lot of empathy and warmth in _ about it. there is a lot of empathy and warmth in charity _ about it. there is a lot of empathy and warmth in charity here. - about it. there is a lot of empathy and warmth in charity here. do - about it. there is a lot of empathy| and warmth in charity here. do you think there are pockets where that does not exist, does that trouble you? does not exist, does that trouble ou? . �* does not exist, does that trouble ou? , �* ., ., does not exist, does that trouble ou? ,~., ., , does not exist, does that trouble ou? , ~ ., ., , you? yes. a lot of people will look at it a different _ you? yes. a lot of people will look at it a different way _ you? yes. a lot of people will look at it a different way and _ you? yes. a lot of people will look at it a different way and do - you? yes. a lot of people will look at it a different way and do not - at it a different way and do not think you should be helping the people who are escaping out the country. whereas it is a different situation. they need help and support, they need people like ourselves to do that. you support, they need people like ourselves to do that.— support, they need people like ourselves to do that. you were in the paras- _ ourselves to do that. you were in the paras. toured _ ourselves to do that. you were in the paras. toured in _ ourselves to do that. you were in | the paras. toured in afghanistan. you want to help. get back to work! listen, where is sally? come on over. sally has coordinated this. just one facebook post. after i received a phone call on tuesday at
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5pm i contacted everybody we know on social media through our charity. what a response. and in the past 12 hours. ., , �* , ., what a response. and in the past 12 hours. �* , ., ~ ., hours. people in bristol. all over the place- _ hours. people in bristol. all over the place- we — hours. people in bristol. all over the place. we had _ hours. people in bristol. all over the place. we had phone - hours. people in bristol. all over the place. we had phone calls. hours. people in bristol. all over. the place. we had phone calls from people in kendal, bristol, people travelling from stockport this morning. inundated with people offering help, donations, continual support. it offering help, donations, continual su ort. . offering help, donations, continual su ort. , ., , , support. it is tremendous. it is blowin: support. it is tremendous. it is blowing your — support. it is tremendous. it is blowing your mind. _ support. it is tremendous. it is blowing your mind. even - support. it is tremendous. it is blowing your mind. even this l support. it is tremendous. it is - blowing your mind. even this morning couple came up and asked, how can we help? sally was like, get upstairs. yesterday there was a lad out on a walk. we were bringing people in. i said are you busy? he said, i am going for a run. said are you busy? he said, i am going fora run. i said are you busy? he said, i am going for a run. i said, said are you busy? he said, i am going fora run. isaid, know said are you busy? he said, i am going for a run. i said, know you are not, get inside and help us. this is the spirit across the country. we will talk to these guys later and then the van is going to help the 64 children who arrived
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with nothing but their clothes on the back. studio: that is inspiring to see. so much for their day. they will do hard at work today than ever. thank you all. that is the spirit of this country. so much help needed. we'rejoined now from stockholm by the chief executive of the refugee council, enver solomon. good morning. that is one community in the uk putting in effort to help those afghan refugees arriving in this country. but there is so much help going to be needed. absolutely, and it is a phenomenal _ help going to be needed. absolutely, and it is a phenomenal effort - help going to be needed. absolutely, and it is a phenomenal effort by - and it is a phenomenal effort by those people in the peak district. i think it is amazing that the british communities are responding in this way. these are families who have fled for their lives, literally with the clothes on their back, that face
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extreme trauma. they are vulnerable. important to remember that as well as afghans, there are lots of people who come to this country seeking protection who have fled war, persecution and terror around the globe. the reality is they do not always get a warm welcome when they come. we know the majority of communities in this country recognise those who need protection deserve it and should be given a warm welcome. for deserve it and should be given a warm welcome.— deserve it and should be given a warm welcome. ., .., , ., ,, warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking _ warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking what _ warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking what can _ warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking what can we - warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking what can we do - warm welcome. for community groups in the uk thinking what can we do to l in the uk thinking what can we do to help? i suppose it is important to get it right. what help is needed on a practical level? what are the items that would be useful to people arriving? we items that would be useful to people arrivin: ? ~ . items that would be useful to people arrivin- ? . ., ., ,, items that would be useful to people arrivin ? . ., ., ,, , arriving? we are working with 17 families from _ arriving? we are working with 17 families from afghanistan - arriving? we are working with 17 families from afghanistan in - families from afghanistan in yorkshire. i was speaking to the team yesterday and they were saying they literally arrive with nothing.
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they do not have toiletries, they do not have many clothes. sometimes they only have the shoes they arrived in. they do not have clothes for their kids. those basic necessities are things that people can help with. and then there are lots of ways people can try to support the big need there will be to support these families. not every local area and local authority is necessarily so keen on settling afghan families so people can get in touch with their local council, mp, make the case for welcoming families in their community and show support generally by supporting an organisation like mine, the refugee council, donating to us and other charities working with refugees, or volunteering. we have hundreds of volunteers with us and many other organisations have volunteers. if
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they want to share support they can join a national campaign called together with refugees. there is community sponsorship where communities come together and sponsor a family to settle in their community by setting up a charity and working with that family and supporting them to integrate in the uk. ., ,_ supporting them to integrate in the uk. ., ., supporting them to integrate in the uk. you say you have worked with families who _ uk. you say you have worked with families who have _ uk. you say you have worked with families who have arrived - uk. you say you have worked with families who have arrived from - families who have arrived from afghanistan and are now in yorkshire. we have reported the sad story about a five—year—old boy who appears to have fallen to his death from a hotel window having just arrived here. have you managed to establish anything about the circumstances? we establish anything about the circumstances?— establish anything about the circumstances? ~ ., ., ., ~' circumstances? we are not working in that hotel in — circumstances? we are not working in that hotel in sheffield, _ circumstances? we are not working in that hotel in sheffield, we _ circumstances? we are not working in that hotel in sheffield, we are - that hotel in sheffield, we are working in another hotel close by. a real tragedy for that family, and such a terrible story. what we do know is the home office has had to
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move at speed to find hotel accommodation for afghan families, because it has not been possible for local authorities to find housing for them. local authorities to find housing forthem. normally, a local authorities to find housing for them. normally, a family would be taken by an agency like ours to a house. that had been setup and organised by local councils somewhere across the country. often in yorkshire, the north and other parts. what has happened is because it has been difficult to find housing at such short notice, the home office has had to use hotels. it is not clear whether all the necessary health checks have been done. i imagine they had been done by the home office but in this incident we do not know the details and there needs to be an investigation to find out if anything was overlooked. and steps not taken to ensure all potential risks were minimised for that family
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put in that hotel. we risks were minimised for that family put in that hotel.— put in that hotel. we will await the results of that _ put in that hotel. we will await the results of that investigation. - put in that hotel. we will await the results of that investigation. we i results of that investigation. we will take a look ahead to the start of the paralympics in tokyo. with former swimmers ollie hynds and kate grey. now it's time for the weather with sarah. we may say the weather is looking ok but you have all the real knowledge. good morning. it is not looking too bad. we have spells of sunshine around. things are up and down over the next couple of days and through the next couple of days and through the weekend with some rain. most should see brightness. this is the picture this morning. the sunshine breaking holes in the
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cloud and sunny spells breaking through but there is rain arriving in the west later initially across northern ireland and then pushing across the rest of the uk as we move through the next 24 hours, courtesy of the weather front here. we still have high pressure not far away in the south—east. before the rain arrives, it will bring in slightly warmer airfrom a arrives, it will bring in slightly warmer air from a southerly direction. no heatwave but things feeling reasonably warm and humid when you see sunshine. sunny spells in scotland, central and eastern england. also in wales at times. in northern ireland, the rain arrives. some of it persistent in the afternoon. the breeze picking up in the west. further east, most places seeing light winds. in the sunshine, up seeing light winds. in the sunshine, up to 22. feeling cooler across the north of scotland. into the evening
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and rain continues northwards and eastwards. soggy in scotland and north—west england. later the rain arriving in south wales and south west england. east anglia staying dry overnight. saturday morning, we start with a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain. it will be followed by brighter skies from the west but there could be showers and thunderstorms later in the day. rain reaching the south—east in the middle of the afternoon. temperatures not great at this time of year. 17—21 on saturday. low pressure eventually moves away to the east but on sunday sitting close enough to eastern england to bring blustery showers first thing.
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elsewhere, a fair amount of dry weather but scattered showers on sunday afternoon and a high of around 17—22. the best of the bright weather in the south—west. looking into the new week, high pressure builds. the wind rotating around that. a relatively cool fields of the weather at times but sunny spells in many areas over the next five days. more weather in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. 6,000 people are due to leave afghanistan this morning on 20 flights bound for the united states. a nato official in kabul says evacuation efforts will double over the weekend. it comes as the situation in the capital remains volatile, as desperate crowds continue attempts to flee the country. we'rejoined now byjames heappey,
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minister for the armed forces. good morning. thank you for your time with us today. can you tell me at this moment in time, we are seeing reports that there is going to be a limited number of days for the british evacuation flights, that's reported in the times, saying that's reported in the times, saying that they could stop in five days, is that true? i that they could stop in five days, is that true?— that they could stop in five days, is that true? i don't recognise that exact date that _ is that true? i don't recognise that exact date that is _ is that true? i don't recognise that exact date that is in _ is that true? i don't recognise that exact date that is in the _ is that true? i don't recognise that exact date that is in the times - exact date that is in the times reporting. very obviously this is not a process that can go on forever. the international effort will come to an end, that's why we are focused on accelerating the evacuation as best we can, in the last 24—hour to be brought out 963 people which is a significant acceleration on the 24—hour period before that, and we will at least match that number again today. that's because we recognise that at some point this... i don't know
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whether it it will be in two days, five days or ten days, that focuses us on making sure everything of light has as many people on as possible and processing people as efficiently as we can. what possible and processing people as efficiently as we can.— efficiently as we can. what will determine _ efficiently as we can. what will determine the _ efficiently as we can. what will determine the end _ efficiently as we can. what will determine the end point? - efficiently as we can. what will determine the end point? the| efficiently as we can. what will - determine the end point? the end of the united states _ determine the end point? the end of the united states mission. _ determine the end point? the end of the united states mission. presidentj the united states mission. president biden has implied _ the united states mission. president biden has implied that _ the united states mission. president biden has implied that that - the united states mission. president biden has implied that that could - the united states mission. president biden has implied that that could be| biden has implied that that could be extended beyond august 31, so we're literallyjust extended beyond august 31, so we're literally just waiting to extended beyond august 31, so we're literallyjust waiting to see, when they go, go? literallyjust waiting to see, when they go. go?— they go, go? yes, kabul international— they go, go? yes, kabul international airport - they go, go? yes, kabul international airport is i they go, go? yes, kabul- international airport is currently entirely a military airfield, the air traffic control, the fuelling of the firefighting, everything is delivered by the us air force. as long as the us is there, the international effort can continue. so when they draw down, everyone else must as well. you so when they draw down, everyone else must as well.— so when they draw down, everyone else must as well. you mention that ou are else must as well. you mention that you are making _ else must as well. you mention that you are making sure _ else must as well. you mention that you are making sure that _ else must as well. you mention that you are making sure that planes - else must as well. you mention that. you are making sure that planes were filled with as many people as possible, would you like to comment on the images we have seen showing a
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near empty flight? i repatriate you in flight? near empty flight? i repatriate you in fli . ht? . near empty flight? i repatriate you in fliuht? , ., , , ., in flight? yes, the reality is that take-off and _ in flight? yes, the reality is that take-off and landing _ in flight? yes, the reality is that take-off and landing slots - in flight? yes, the reality is that take-off and landing slots at - in flight? yes, the reality is that i take-off and landing slots at kabul take—off and landing slots at kabul are at a premium and so are spaces on the ground. that means the no one country can leave their aircraft on hours and hours on the ground, so we are using nine aircraft that circulate between the uae and kabul, and we are then having and we are then f circulate between the uae and kabul, and we are then f —— we would like to see every we —— flight full, we do that by not having full flights but making sure that we take people who are ready when the plane lands. there are people with papers who are ready, they are ready to go but
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actually are being prevented from accessing the airport by some parts of the taliban. can anything be done to help them, or are ourforces, our mite, is that all focused at the airport? mite, is that all focused at the airort? ~ . . , mite, is that all focused at the airort? ~ . ., , airport? well, certainly, the troops themselves — airport? well, certainly, the troops themselves are _ airport? well, certainly, the troops themselves are physically - airport? well, certainly, the troops themselves are physically at - airport? well, certainly, the troops themselves are physically at the i themselves are physically at the airport. and i don't think that we can meaningfully go beyond the airport without risking a confrontation with lower—level groups of taliban, and if that were to happen, clearly if there was a fight, that would make the humanitarian effort all the more challenging. i think the troops are in the right place. what i'm hearing is that when people are being turned away by the taliban, it is because the taliban are being officious over the taliban are being officious over the paperwork that they are carrying, rather than malicious. the paperwork that they are carrying, ratherthan malicious. but every time we hear stories like that, our people on the ground are making sure they have a conversation with the taliban to make sure that people are not turned away again. the bigger problem has been the
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crowds, so yesterday the team on the ground did some re—engineering of the design of the handling centre in order to try to ease some of the crowd control challenges, and that should mean that people find it easier to get through into the handling centre and into the system. you will be aware that there are reports that guards who were at the british embassy in kabul are not being afforded uk protection, because they were contractors, the labour party has described this as a shameful betrayal, do you agree? the contract shameful betrayal, do you agree? tue: contract which i shameful betrayal, do you agree? tu2 contract which i think you are referring to, they did get to the effort this morning and they have been extracted.— been extracted. they have been extracted? _ been extracted. they have been extracted? the _ been extracted. they have been extracted? the contract - been extracted. they have been extracted? the contract if- been extracted. they have been extracted? the contract if you i been extracted. they have been i extracted? the contract if you are referrin: extracted? the contract if you are referring to _ extracted? the contract if you are referring to that _ extracted? the contract if you are referring to that one, _ extracted? the contract if you are referring to that one, yes, - extracted? the contract if you are referring to that one, yes, they i extracted? the contract if you are. referring to that one, yes, they are in the process of it.— in the process of it. thank you for that update- _ in the process of it. thank you for that update. can _ in the process of it. thank you for that update. can we _ in the process of it. thank you for that update. can we talk- in the process of it. thank you for that update. can we talk about i in the process of it. thank you for l that update. can we talk about your view at this moment in time? you have said that politicians, not
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soldiers, will be held to account, and that no soldier who has served there should feel ashamed or feel that the work they did was to waste. when should politicians, and how should politicians be held to account? i should politicians be held to account? ., .,. , account? i feel that quite acutely, because i sit _ account? i feel that quite acutely, because i sit in _ account? i feel that quite acutely, because i sit in both _ account? i feel that quite acutely, because i sit in both camps. i'm i account? i feel that quite acutely, because i sit in both camps. i'm a| because i sit in both camps. i'm a veteran afghanistan and iraq and northern ireland, and i'm fiercely proud of what i did there, and i'm fiercely proud of the work my colleagues did whilst they were there. and now i am a politician, and i've been intimately involved in the execution of the extraction over the execution of the extraction over the last few weeks and i was evolved over the last year in discussions over the last year in discussions over what our future presence should be in afghanistan if neither should be in afghanistan if neither should be one at all. ijust be in afghanistan if neither should be one at all. i just want to make the point of veterans everywhere that whilst people like me is politicians will need to be held to account for the decisions we made in the way that it has all gone, absolutely none of what is happening
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in kabul and afghanistan right now takes away from their heroism, their professionalism, their sacrifice, while they were on their tours. when they were on their tours, what they were focused on was making a difference within those six months, to the people who were in the community is that they were there to protect. they did thatjob brilliantly and they shall hold their heads up high, and not think that in any way what is happening in kabul today reflect on the service and sacrifice.— kabul today reflect on the service and sacrifice. ., ., ., , ., ~' and sacrifice. how long do you think the taliban will— and sacrifice. how long do you think the taliban will maintain _ and sacrifice. how long do you think the taliban will maintain this, i i the taliban will maintain this, i was say patients, —— i will say patients, allowing people to move to the airport without any protection outside the airport? i the airport without any protection outside the airport?— outside the airport? i don't know that the taliban _ outside the airport? i don't know that the taliban would _ outside the airport? i don't know that the taliban would be - outside the airport? i don't know that the taliban would be in i outside the airport? i don't know that the taliban would be in any | that the taliban would be in any rush to stop this. if you wanted to look at this in the crudest sense, they have been waiting for 20 years, why not wait another two weeks? what they want is to be in charge in afghanistan and they know full well that if they made it out of the
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international community and get themselves into a scrap with the international community —— if they made it hard for the international community and get themselves into a scrap with the international community, that moment of being a child would be put in jeopardy. community, that moment of being a child would be put injeopardy. we can be pretty confident that —— being in charge would be put in jeopardy. we can be confident that the situation on the ground will hold but this is not an open—ended process and it will come to an end which is why every day counts and we are working every second of every day across government to make sure we get out as many people as we can. there has been criticism about the british government's preparedness for this, for the move forward by the taliban, the takeover of kabul, and you will be aware that there is criticism of the foreign secretary dominic raab for him, him not making a phone call to his counterpart in afghanistan, oranyone a phone call to his counterpart in afghanistan, or anyone in his department making a phone calljust days before evacuation processes and
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chaos ensued in kabul. is that acceptable from a foreign secretary? there is a lot on that question. to take the last part of it first, i don't think that phone call at the back end of last week would have changed the trajectory on either the speed at which government have fallen in afghanistan nor the speed at which we get the air bridge up and running... {lin at which we get the air bridge up and running...— at which we get the air bridge up and running... on that point, let's ick u- and running... on that point, let's pick up on — and running... on that point, let's pick up on that. — and running... on that point, let's pick up on that, but _ and running... on that point, let's pick up on that, but we _ and running... on that point, let's pick up on that, but we would i and running... on that point, let's| pick up on that, but we would have known about it, we would not have been surprised by it if that phone call had been made? i been surprised by it if that phone call had been made?— call had been made? i don't recognise — call had been made? i don't recognise that. _ call had been made? i don't recognise that. i— call had been made? i don't recognise that. i think i call had been made? i don't recognise that. i think the i call had been made? i don't i recognise that. i think the speed call had been made? i don't - recognise that. i think the speed at which it was happening is becoming clear by the back end of last week, the fall of kandahar, jalalabad, happened far quicker than anyone expected it to and then it became clear that the whole thing was going to fall quicker including the fall of kabul. ,., �* ,, ,, to fall quicker including the fall ofkabul. ., of kabul. don't you think people on the round of kabul. don't you think people on the ground would _ of kabul. don't you think people on the ground would have _ of kabul. don't you think people on the ground would have known i of kabul. don't you think people on | the ground would have known about it? we
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the ground would have known about it? ~ i'm the ground would have known about it?_ i'm talking _ the ground would have known about it?_ i'm talking about... i it? we did,... i'm talking about... i'm saying — it? we did,... i'm talking about... i'm saying that — it? we did,... i'm talking about... i'm saying that these _ it? we did,... i'm talking about... i'm saying that these cities - it? we did,... i'm talking about... i'm saying that these cities fell- i'm saying that these cities fell far quicker than we thought they would and then we thought that kabul would and then we thought that kabul would fall far quicker so the decision was made to send the troops forward. i want to pick up on your earlier question on the preparedness of government, the drawdown of the military presence in afghanistan is long planned because the trump dough hire deal meant that the 1st of may this year was always the moment. —— the trump doha deal. and the evacuation plan has been planned for years. preparedness was not the issue, the speed at which we have had to execute the plan is very much was a surprise. but i don't know that anyone phone call would have made a difference because we could see on the tv that jalalabad and kandahar fell quickly then we thought they would have done so the expectation was that kabul would full afterwards quickly.—
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full afterwards quickly. could an hinu full afterwards quickly. could anything have _ full afterwards quickly. could anything have been - full afterwards quickly. could anything have been done i full afterwards quickly. could i anything have been done better full afterwards quickly. could anything have been done better by the government? i anything have been done better by the government?— the government? i think there will be a time for _ the government? i think there will be a time for these _ the government? i think there will be a time for these questions i the government? i think there will be a time for these questions and | be a time for these questions and the recriminations that that comes with it, but i will say at the moment, at every level and the government from senior minister to people on the ground, they are all working to get people out as quickly as possible and i am hugely proud of what people are doing.— what people are doing. james heappey, _ what people are doing. james heappey, listed _ what people are doing. james heappey, listed for— what people are doing. james heappey, listed for the i what people are doing. james| heappey, listed for the armed forces, thank you for your time. —— ministerfor the armed forces, thank you for your time. —— minister for the armed forces. thank you forjoining us. if you have been missing sport from japan, fear not! the paralympics are very nearly here. paralympics gb has selected a 227 strong team to compete in tokyo next week, including a record number of female athletes. some of those are already established international stars, while others are hoping to make a big impact on their debut. we're joined now by former paralympic swimmers kate grey and ollie hynd.
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you have your medals! you take them everywhere you go? yes. you have your medals! you take them everywhere you go?— everywhere you go? yes, i must admit... held — everywhere you go? yes, i must admit... held them _ everywhere you go? yes, i must admit... held them up! - everywhere you go? yes, i must admit... held them up! it i everywhere you go? yes, i must admit... held them up! it was i admit... held them up! it was difficult to _ admit... held them up! it was difficult to find _ admit... held them up! it was difficult to find them - admit... held them up! it was difficult to find them because | admit... held them up! it was i difficult to find them because they were just stuffed away! i have my two golds from rio... held were just stuffed away! i have my two golds from rio. . ._ were just stuffed away! i have my two golds from rio... held them up to that camera _ two golds from rio... held them up to that camera with _ two golds from rio... held them up to that camera with a _ two golds from rio... held them up to that camera with a red _ two golds from rio... held them up to that camera with a red light. i to that camera with a red light. this is the gold from rio and this is from london 2012. you this is the gold from rio and this is from london 2012.— this is the gold from rio and this is from london 2012. you say they are buried — is from london 2012. you say they are buried away _ is from london 2012. you say they are buried away somewhere i is from london 2012. you say they are buried away somewhere but i l is from london 2012. you say they i are buried away somewhere but i bet when you get them out for important occasions to show them off, you still get a real thrill when you look at those achievements. absolutely, i'm so proud to have been able to represent my country, never mind if you have won gold medals and got to stand on the podium. irate medals and got to stand on the odium. ~ . �* medals and got to stand on the odium. ~ ., �* ., podium. we haven't said what you did them for, tell— podium. we haven't said what you did them for, tell us? _ podium. we haven't said what you did them for, tell us? in _ podium. we haven't said what you did them for, tell us? in swimming, i i podium. we haven't said what you did them for, tell us? in swimming, i am| them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer- — them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer- two _ them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer. two golds _ them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer. two golds in _ them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer. two golds in rio, - them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer. two golds in rio, one i them for, tell us? in swimming, i am a swimmer. two golds in rio, one of| a swimmer. two golds in rio, one of the 200 medley and one was 400
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freestyle. in the gold in london was 200 medley. you freestyle. in the gold in london was 200 medley-— 200 medley. you are still beaming when ou 200 medley. you are still beaming when you talk— 200 medley. you are still beaming when you talk about _ 200 medley. you are still beaming when you talk about it. _ 200 medley. you are still beaming when you talk about it. it's - when you talk about it. it's actually infectious, - when you talk about it. it's actually infectious, it's making me smile! _ actually infectious, it's making me smile! �* , . . actually infectious, it's making me smile! �* , ., , ., ~' actually infectious, it's making me smile! �* , ., , ., ,, ., smile! any medals you would like to share? not round _ smile! any medals you would like to share? not round my _ smile! any medals you would like to share? not round my neck - smile! any medals you would like to share? not round my neck right i smile! any medals you would like to i share? not round my neck right now? i would have — share? not round my neck right now? i would have got _ share? not round my neck right now? i would have got them _ share? not round my neck right now? i would have got them out _ share? not round my neck right now? i would have got them out if- share? not round my neck right now? i would have got them out if i - share? not round my neck right now? i would have got them out if i had i i would have got them out if i had known! _ i would have got them out if i had known! i— i would have got them out if i had known! i am lucky enough to be in broadcasting and i interviewed him at the _ broadcasting and i interviewed him at the end — broadcasting and i interviewed him at the end of his race and i remember that at the end of his race and i rememberthat beaming at the end of his race and i remember that beaming smile when he -ot remember that beaming smile when he got that— remember that beaming smile when he got that gold medal around his neck, very well_ got that gold medal around his neck, very well deserved. the got that gold medal around his neck, very well deserved.— very well deserved. the paralympics are finally happening, _ very well deserved. the paralympics are finally happening, how - very well deserved. the paralympics are finally happening, how much - very well deserved. the paralympics are finally happening, how much of| very well deserved. the paralympics| are finally happening, how much of a relief is actually taking place? fix, relief is actually taking place? a massive relief, not only for the athletes — massive relief, not only for the athletes to know that they have got athletes to know that they have got a games _ athletes to know that they have got a games to go and compete at consider— a games to go and compete at consider they have had an extra year of training, _ consider they have had an extra year of training, but it is massive for paralympics and disability sport in generat _ paralympics and disability sport in general. this is the main time when paralympics — general. this is the main time when paralympics gets to have that moment in the _ paralympics gets to have that moment in the spotlight and people are reminded of all these amazing role models _ reminded of all these amazing role models that are competing at the
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highest _ models that are competing at the highest levels, just like the olympians. and actually smashing it, honefuttx _ olympians. and actually smashing it, hopefully. it is a high bar for team gb to— hopefully. it is a high bar for team gb to follow but they are always brilliant — gb to follow but they are always brilliant at these major events, always — brilliant at these major events, always finishing top or near top of the table — always finishing top or near top of the table in previous games. i'm hoping _ the table in previous games. i'm hoping the — the table in previous games. i'm hoping the last year has not hampered their plans too much. speaking — hampered their plans too much. speaking to my friends are still competing, they are arriving now and finishing _ competing, they are arriving now and finishing their holding camps and they are — finishing their holding camps and they are desperate to start competing. they are desperate to start competing-— they are desperate to start competing. they are desperate to start com -aetin. ~ ,, ~' they are desperate to start com -aetin. ~ i. ~ . . competing. when you think the change was in terms — competing. when you think the change was in terms of. _ competing. when you think the change was in terms of, i _ competing. when you think the change was in terms of, i am _ competing. when you think the change was in terms of, i am genuinely - competing. when you think the change was in terms of, i am genuinely as - was in terms of, i am genuinely as excited about the olympics and the paralympics, but that was not always the case. there was a change in media coverage and understanding, we understand the different categories of people's functioning, how their bodies function, when did that change happen and how important has it been? i change happen and how important has it been? ~' ., ., change happen and how important has it been? ~ ., ., ::' ., it been? i think london 2012 was reall bi it been? i think london 2012 was really big in _ it been? i think london 2012 was really big in that _ it been? i think london 2012 was really big in that change, - it been? i think london 2012 was really big in that change, it - really big in that change, it showcased what a paralympian can do
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and brought it to the forefront of the people's mines. that momentum has been building and building since london 2012. it's really exciting. i was lucky enough to go to the 2008 paralympics, to watch, i don't like to give him too much credit, but to watch my brother, and of course kate competed in those games as well. it really changed my life and inspired me, they gave me a purpose and a driverfor my me, they gave me a purpose and a driver for my life, to achieve what he did. this i think the paralympics have been very special in that way and it has energised people. [30 have been very special in that way and it has energised people. do you do the brownlee _ and it has energised people. do you do the brownlee brothers _ and it has energised people. do you do the brownlee brothers thing - and it has energised people. do you | do the brownlee brothers thing when one does really well and the other one does really well and the other one calls the other up and says, i have more gold medals?- one calls the other up and says, i have more gold medals? yes, we are very competitive. _ have more gold medals? yes, we are very competitive, not _ have more gold medals? yes, we are very competitive, notjust _ have more gold medals? yes, we are very competitive, notjust in - very competitive, notjust in swimming but in life. he very competitive, not 'ust in swimming but in life. he watching now, wh swimming but in life. he watching now. why don't — swimming but in life. he watching now, why don't you _ swimming but in life. he watching now, why don't you hold - swimming but in life. he watching now, why don't you hold up - swimming but in life. he watching now, why don't you hold up your. now, why don't you hold up your medals— now, why don't you hold up your medals again. _ now, why don't you hold up your medals again, really _ now, why don't you hold up your medals again, really taunt - now, why don't you hold up your medals again, really taunt him. i now, why don't you hold up your. medals again, really taunt him. he onl medals again, really taunt him. only has one gold! medals again, really taunt him. he only has one gold! you _ medals again, really taunt him. he only has one gold! you have - medals again, really taunt him. he only has one gold! you have been. only has one gold! you have been talkin: to
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only has one gold! you have been talking to a _ only has one gold! you have been talking to a lot _ only has one gold! you have been talking to a lot of— only has one gold! you have been talking to a lot of paralympian - only has one gold! you have been talking to a lot of paralympian isl talking to a lot of paralympian is head of travelling to japan, what are they excited about, what are they concerned about? i are they excited about, what are they concerned about?— are they excited about, what are they concerned about? i think it is auoin to they concerned about? i think it is going to be _ they concerned about? i think it is going to be a _ they concerned about? i think it is going to be a different _ they concerned about? i think it is going to be a different games, - they concerned about? i think it is i going to be a different games, there is no getting away from that. at the end of the day it is a paralympic games, just to represent your country and to be at that level and get to experience that is so special. i'm still really good friends with a lot of guys on the team, so chatting with them and hearing how their preparation and training is going, they are all really excited.— training is going, they are all really excited. training is going, they are all reall excited. ., . , really excited. you could have been there, couldn't _ really excited. you could have been there, couldn't you? _ really excited. you could have been there, couldn't you? you _ really excited. you could have been there, couldn't you? you decided . there, couldn't you? you decided against, talk us through that decision. ! against, talk us through that decision. ~' ., against, talk us through that decision. ~ ., . decision. i think for me, i gave it a decision. ithink for me, i gave it a no, decision. i think for me, i gave it a go. but — decision. i think for me, i gave it a go. but it— decision. i think for me, i gave it a go. but it got— decision. i think for me, i gave it a go, but it got to _ decision. i think for me, i gave it a go, but it got to a _ decision. i think for me, i gave it a go, but it got to a point - decision. i think for me, i gave it a go, but it got to a point where l a go, but it got to a point where former mentor being —— for my mental well—being, it was better to step away from the sport. it was a really tough decision, i would have loved tough decision, i would have loved to have been in tokyo competing and experiencing another paralympic games but it wasn't to be, i had to make the right decision for myself
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so i will be watching and supporting this time. ,., ., ., i. so i will be watching and supporting this time. ., . this time. good for you. kate, i was askin: this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this — this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this question _ this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this question a _ this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this question a lot _ this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this question a lot ahead - this time. good for you. kate, i was asking this question a lot ahead of i asking this question a lot ahead of the olympics, and i always like to learn something new. i was saying a moment ago that you learned about different categories and how they compete, but apart from that, i will learn all of that, but what is the sport i need to watch and know more about? . sport i need to watch and know more about? , ,., . sport i need to watch and know more about? , . ., sport i need to watch and know more about? , ,., . ., ., sport i need to watch and know more about? , . ., ., . about? there is so much going on at the paralympics. _ about? there is so much going on at the paralympics, there _ about? there is so much going on at the paralympics, there are - the paralympics, there are guaranteed medals at every sport. we have the _ guaranteed medals at every sport. we have the likes of dame sarah storey who will— have the likes of dame sarah storey who will be — have the likes of dame sarah storey who will be making history in the velodrome, i know she was on your show— velodrome, i know she was on your show not _ velodrome, i know she was on your show not too — velodrome, i know she was on your show not too long ago. swimming has lots of— show not too long ago. swimming has lots of exciting young athletes coming — lots of exciting young athletes coming through, maisie summers newton, — coming through, maisie summers newton, any chalice who is probably one of— newton, any chalice who is probably one of those athletes who has benefited from the extra year of training — benefited from the extra year of training. but we have two new sports. — training. but we have two new sports. we _ training. but we have two new sports, we have para tae kwon do, which _ sports, we have para tae kwon do, which was — sports, we have para tae kwon do, which was very entertaining in the
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olympics. — which was very entertaining in the olympics, and also para badminton. these _ olympics, and also para badminton. these athletes have a long two weeks ahead _ these athletes have a long two weeks ahead of— these athletes have a long two weeks ahead of them but they have already started _ ahead of them but they have already started thinking about how they separate — started thinking about how they separate when they come home. there will be _ separate when they come home. there will be a _ separate when they come home. there will be a brilliant homecoming for these _ will be a brilliant homecoming for these athletes, the national lottery are aware _ these athletes, the national lottery are aware that these athletes have not been _ are aware that these athletes have not been able to get the big celebration at the end of their events— celebration at the end of their events and have organised a big event _ events and have organised a big event like — events and have organised a big event like you saw team gb had last week _ event like you saw team gb had last week they— event like you saw team gb had last week. they will be coming together and celebrating with entertainment and celebrating with entertainment and music— and celebrating with entertainment and music and there is an opportunity for the public to go along _ opportunity for the public to go along and thank the national lottery and the _ along and thank the national lottery and the athletes for their amazing work _ and the athletes for their amazing work. assuming that you have played the national lottery from the 1st of june, _ the national lottery from the 1st of june. you — the national lottery from the 1st of june, you can enter a ballot which means— june, you can enter a ballot which means you — june, you can enter a ballot which means you can become someone who wins a _ means you can become someone who wins a pair— means you can become someone who wins a pair of— means you can become someone who wins a pair of tickets, 3500 tickets available _ wins a pair of tickets, 3500 tickets available to go along to wembley to cheer— available to go along to wembley to cheer on— available to go along to wembley to cheer on and celebrate the amazing thing _ cheer on and celebrate the amazing thing is _ cheer on and celebrate the amazing thing is that the power athletes have _ thing is that the power athletes have done. and hopefully have a really _ have done. and hopefully have a really great evening of entertainment. the national lottery has done _ entertainment. the national lottery has done so much of these athletes
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over the _ has done so much of these athletes over the years and a lot of them would _ over the years and a lot of them would not — over the years and a lot of them would not be there today competing in tokyo. _ would not be there today competing in tokyo. |— would not be there today competing in tokyo, i know myself and ollie would _ in tokyo, i know myself and ollie would not — in tokyo, i know myself and ollie would not have been where we were in our competitive careers, if it wasn't — our competitive careers, if it wasn't for— our competitive careers, if it wasn't for them. it's great that they— wasn't for them. it's great that they are — wasn't for them. it's great that they are putting on these celebration events because what really _ celebration events because what really broke my heart watching the olympics _ really broke my heart watching the olympics was all of the athletes finishing, looking around and wondering, who are they looking for to thank? _ wondering, who are they looking for to thank? they have been able to come _ to thank? they have been able to come home and i hope that the paralympics will be able to do the same _ paralympics will be able to do the same at _ paralympics will be able to do the same at the national lottery paralympics team gb homecoming. hopefully_ paralympics team gb homecoming. hopefully they will have lots of medals around their necks. thank you very much forjoining us, kate and ollie, lots of late night over the next couple of weeks watching? definitely. ! next couple of weeks watching? definitel . . , ., . next couple of weeks watching? definitel . , . , definitely. i bet you are still smilin: definitely. i bet you are still smiling as _ definitely. i bet you are still smiling as broadly - definitely. i bet you are still smiling as broadly at - definitely. i bet you are still smiling as broadly at the . definitely. i bet you are still| smiling as broadly at the end definitely. i bet you are still- smiling as broadly at the end as you are now! the tokyo paralympics start on tuesday and you can follow the action on bbc radio 5 live and on the bbc sport website. optometrists across the uk say they're diagnosing more children with short—sightedness
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since the start of the pandemic. so if you are warning your children that they have spent too much time on screens, you might be right! the college of optometrists says this is down to less time being spent outside due to covid restrictions and more time using screens. fiona lamdin has been speaking to one family about how they manage their eye health. of course, schooling has changed as well, they have been doing online lessons. fiona lamdin has been speaking to one family about how they manage their eye health. like many children, keira, oliver and lauren love spending time inside on screens. right, guys, screens off, time to get outside, please. but their parents are all too aware of the damage it could be doing to their eyes. both ali and james are optometrists. with three young kids, they do spend quite a lot of time on the screen, especially in the holidays. and if they've had a lot of time on the screen, we are mindful to try to get them outside, because being outside, that can negate the fact
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that they have been sat on the screen all morning, potentially. and just trying to limit that time and make them have regular breaks. where are you concerned during lockdown their eyesight might deteriorate? yes, especially our eldest, because she probably spent the most time on the screen and she's a little bit short—sighted already. so, yeah, i was conscious that could potentially get worse over the last year. do your parents limit how much time you spend on your screen? an hour on the school days. no we have half an hour on school | days and an hour at the weekend. | no we have an hour and a half at the weekends. we have half an hour and then an hour. oh. ok, come and have a seat here for me, monty. eight—year—old monty is having his eyes tested for the first time in two years. we are going to do a little check for you today. last time we saw you was september 2019, so it has been a little while. during lockdown, opticians did stay open but, according to the college of optometrists,
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around 6 million appointments were postponed. i think i was concerned because we had not been to the optician's for a long time. and also, certainly, monty hasjust come out of isolation, so he has spent quite a lot of time playing minecraft with his friends as the only way of sort of chatting to them. and he's been getting closer and closer to the screen as he's been playing. so itjust seemed a bit, for boy whose onlyjust eight, being really close to the screen, seemed a bit odd. oh, so you are a little bit short—sighted. we've got —i.25 on the right and a —i on the left. and as with so many children, monty will need a pair of glasses. we are definitely seeing a huge increase in the myopia for children and at a younger age. we know that patients who spend a lot of time indoors and a lot of time with near work are more at risk of becoming short—sighted. we have had a lot of children who have had to be at home, home—schooling, and they've had
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to use screens all day. and probably a huge decrease in outdoor time, as well, because, for a time, we were very limited with the amount of time we could be outdoors. so the combination of the two could have a huge impact on the rate of myopia. and so, this summer, the college of optometrists is encouraging children to spend at least two hours a day outside. there is good evidence that shows that the more time you spend outside, particularly between the ages of five and 12, the less likely you are to become short—sighted. and that's because that when you are outside, your eyes are more relaxed, you are focusing on objects further away. we also think that the sunlight might affect the way that the eye grows. so actually spending time, not using a device outside, the sunlight's actually encouraging a child's eye to grow into the right shape for adulthood. ok, come and have a seat there, monty. an increasing number of pupils like monty will be heading back
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to school with glasses next term. pop those on and keep them out, any that you try on. but, in the meantime, his mum says he will be spending much of the summer outdoors. fiona lamdin, bbc news. we're joined now by optometrist holly geraghty. good morning to you. there will be lots of parents and young children watching this, we are still in the summer holidays, thinking, do i need to go get my eyes checked right now, what should i be thinking? what is your advice? film; what should i be thinking? what is your advice?— what should i be thinking? what is your advice? any child over the age of five or six _ your advice? any child over the age of five or six should _ your advice? any child over the age of five or six should be _ your advice? any child over the age of five or six should be going - your advice? any child over the age of five or six should be going for. your advice? any child over the age of five or six should be going for a i of five or six should be going for a yearly site to test anyway, regardless of if you are having any —— site test. regardless if you are having problems with vision. but there have been less routine tests during lockdown so this is the time to book them in, especially before the school starts again. i to book them in, especially before the school starts again.— the school starts again. i guess that is part _
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the school starts again. i guess that is part of _ the school starts again. i guess that is part of the _ the school starts again. i guess that is part of the increase, - the school starts again. i guess l that is part of the increase, there is a backlog of people to see so the numbers go up? it is is a backlog of people to see so the numbers go up?— is a backlog of people to see so the numbers go up? it is probably quite late in picking _ numbers go up? it is probably quite late in picking things _ numbers go up? it is probably quite late in picking things up _ numbers go up? it is probably quite late in picking things up because . numbers go up? it is probably quite late in picking things up because of| late in picking things up because of the pandemic, but there are a multitude of factors why we see this general increase in short—sightedness in children. mas short-sightedness in children. was it 'ust the short—sightedness in children. was itjust the pandemic short—sightedness in children. was it just the pandemic or the itjust the pandemic or the increasing anyway? for years, we have been sitting and talking about children spending too much time in front of tv screens, then it was tablets or phones, is it really all down to the pandemic? his. tablets or phones, is it really all down to the pandemic? no, there was a reneral down to the pandemic? no, there was a general trend _ down to the pandemic? no, there was a general trend of— down to the pandemic? no, there was a general trend of using _ down to the pandemic? no, there was a general trend of using screens - a general trend of using screens more, and worldwide there has been a general increase in short—sightedness in children. children are becoming short—sighted earlier but obviously with the pandemic, and the more screens used, distance learning, children have been sitting at screens more. this was carried _ been sitting at screens more. this was carried out _ been sitting at screens more. this was carried out in _ been sitting at screens more. this was carried out in hong kong, this research, so it is a global issue? it is. . , .,
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research, so it is a global issue? it is. . y., ., research, so it is a global issue? it is. . ., . , it is. can you do anything, if your kids develop _ it is. can you do anything, if your kids develop some _ it is. can you do anything, if your kids develop some short - it is. can you do anything, if your kids develop some short and - it is. can you do anything, if your| kids develop some short and they it is. can you do anything, if your - kids develop some short and they are spending time on screens, can reducing or stopping the screen time reversed the short—sightedness or once you have got it, you have got it? , ., , ., . once you have got it, you have got it? ,., __ once you have got it, you have got it? ,., ., it? usually once you have short-sightedness - it? usually once you have short-sightedness it - it? usually once you havej short-sightedness it does it? usually once you have - short-sightedness it does increase short—sightedness it does increase as you grow and your eyes are still developing. we do advise reducing screen time where possible, although it has been very difficult at the distance learning. it is more about reducing social interactions on devices and social time on screens, try and reduce the onset, take the —— make the onset less of myopia. when children's i site is developing, which happens for how long? obviously when they are born, how long does the training continue of their eyes? lip how long does the training continue of their eyes?—
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of their eyes? up until the age of seven to eight — of their eyes? up until the age of seven to eight is _ of their eyes? up until the age of seven to eight is the _ of their eyes? up until the age of seven to eight is the most - of their eyes? up until the age ofj seven to eight is the most critical time, if something is picked up, it's better to have corrective glasses at that stage. it it's better to have corrective glasses at that stage.- it's better to have corrective glasses at that stage. if you are still developing, _ glasses at that stage. if you are still developing, what _ glasses at that stage. if you are still developing, what should i still developing, what should parents be doing? they say take it outside, but what is the point, is it that you are looking at things far away? it that you are looking at things far awa ? . it that you are looking at things far awa ? , ., it that you are looking at things farawa? , ., , far away? yes, part of the problem with screens _ far away? yes, part of the problem with screens is _ far away? yes, part of the problem with screens is it's _ far away? yes, part of the problem with screens is it's a _ far away? yes, part of the problem with screens is it's a short - with screens is it's a short distance on the long period of time so it puts a lot of pressure on the is focusing power. walking around i's focusing power. walking around outside seems to reduce the onset of short—sightedness, it's about the light levels and things being at different distances that you are looking at. different distances that you are looking at— different distances that you are lookin: at. �* , . looking at. are there things that we as arents looking at. are there things that we as parents can _ looking at. are there things that we as parents can do _ looking at. are there things that we as parents can do to _ looking at. are there things that we as parents can do to help _ looking at. are there things that we as parents can do to help our - looking at. are there things that we as parents can do to help our kids l as parents can do to help our kids if they are using screens? increasing text size or buying bigger screens so that they are not straining on smaller ones? it sounds like i have given up before we have started here as a dad, but does that make a difference? it started here as a dad, but does that make a difference?— make a difference? it can, yes. thins make a difference? it can, yes. things being — make a difference? it can, yes. things being that _
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make a difference? it can, yes. things being that little - make a difference? it can, yes. things being that little bit - things being that little bit further, encouraging children to sit, if they are having to use a screen, setting a bit further, the role of thumb is the elbows length away is the correct distance. and if children are using zoom for teaching, if you can pitch in a tv screen or something a bit further away or a larger screen, it makes a difference. we away or a larger screen, it makes a difference-— difference. we have come full circle, i remember _ difference. we have come full circle, i remember being - difference. we have come full l circle, i remember being taught difference. we have come full - circle, i remember being taught as a child that if i watch tv i would get short—sighted and get square eyes, and now we are saying that they have to watch tv because it is better than a phone! we to watch tv because it is better than a phone!— to watch tv because it is better than a phone! to watch tv because it is better than a hone! . . ., , than a phone! we are not putting the blame on anyone _ than a phone! we are not putting the blame on anyone because _ than a phone! we are not putting the blame on anyone because screen - blame on anyone because screen -based _ blame on anyone because screen —based learning has happened during the pandemic. it is summer holidays and you _ the pandemic. it is summer holidays and you said, get it checked as quickly— and you said, get it checked as quickly as— and you said, get it checked as quickly as possible. i remember when i quickly as possible. i remember when i started _ quickly as possible. i remember when i started wearing glasses and i was really— i started wearing glasses and i was really worried about what people would _ really worried about what people would say, whether they would suit me, would say, whether they would suit me. the _ would say, whether they would suit me, the practicalities of it. if someone _ me, the practicalities of it. if someone does have to start wearing glasses. _ someone does have to start wearing glasses, what do you learn and have
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to get _ glasses, what do you learn and have to get used — glasses, what do you learn and have to get used to? it�*s glasses, what do you learn and have to get used to?— to get used to? it's 'ust the routine oft to get used to? it's 'ust the routine of making _ to get used to? it'sjust the routine of making sure - to get used to? it'sjust the routine of making sure thatj to get used to? it'sjust the - routine of making sure that glasses are being worn when you have been advised to buy your optician, so for most children who are advised glasses, it is full time wear. making sure that even at home, children are wearing glasses and getting used to the fact that they are wearing them every day. but! getting used to the fact that they are wearing them every day. and get frames that — are wearing them every day. and get frames that you _ are wearing them every day. and get frames that you love. _ are wearing them every day. and get frames that you love. there's - are wearing them every day. and get frames that you love. there's more | frames that you love. there's more variety these _ frames that you love. there's more variety these days, _ frames that you love. there's more variety these days, when _ frames that you love. there's more variety these days, when we - frames that you love. there's more variety these days, when we were i variety these days, when we were kids, there was one type of glasses. i have some really funky ones. i left my— i have some really funky ones. i left my glasses. once we get make up back here, _ left my glasses. once we get make up back here, my glasses are coming back here, my glasses are coming back on. _ back here, my glasses are coming back on. i— back here, my glasses are coming back on, i love them, they are cool. don't _ back on, i love them, they are cool. don't worry, — back on, i love them, they are cool. don't worry, if— back on, i love them, they are cool. don't worry, if you have to wear glasses. — don't worry, if you have to wear glasses, they are very cool! headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. with desperate crowds continuing to mass outside kabul airport, plans are made to double evacuation efforts over the weekend. we efforts over the weekend. are with some of the vei people we are with some of the very many people who watched those scenes in afghanistan and then were motivated to help. they are making collections to help. they are making collections to support more than 100 afghan people at a hotel 20 miles away, to send a message we are here for you, how can we help, you are welcome. the manchester united and scotland legend denis law is diagnosed with dementia. good morning from one of the world's largest defence firms where they are training up the next generation of aircraft engineers but what impact
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has the pandemic had on youth unemployment? and a huge week for rob burrow ends with a heroes welcome as he returns to headingley in front of an adoring leeds rhinos crowd. it's friday, 20th august. evacuation efforts from afghanistan are set to accelerate over the weekend, as desperate crowds continue to gather in the capital. armed forces ministerjames heappey told breakfast that almost 1000 people have left kabul on an raf flight in the last 2a hours and the government expects to match that number in the coming days. but it is unclear how long the uk evacuation plan will last. this report from our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani. this is crowd control taliban style. outside the airport, thousands of people desperate to leave. this is the road anyone being evacuated has to travel along.
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the taliban repeatedly stopped us filming. they don't like the images of so many afghans fleeing their rule. they've denied claims they are at times preventing some afghans with valid documents from entering the airport. but many of those here don't have a visa. they are still hoping somehow to leave. "i want to go anywhere else other than here," says this man. "all the embassies and offices are closed, what can i do?" then taliban fighters bring the interview to an end. the taliban are everywhere you go in kabul. they are heavily armed. but, for the most part, in the city, they are friendly. outside the canadian embassy, more chaos. hundreds of people frantically scribbling their names on pieces of paper, hoping it will somehow
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lead to a visa. the embassy has already been evacuated. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan, but they are desperate. in fact, they are coming to us. they have asked, "is it true, will the canadians give me a visa?" the fact is, most of these people will never get one. this family haven't spoken to anyone at the embassy, but heard rumours that if they turn up, they'll find help. "there's war, misery. i can't even buy bread for my children," says this man. new footage of the even more chaotic scenes at the airport earlier this week. some parents so desperate, they hand their children over. and new details, too, on the horrifying story of those who lost their lives. one of the young men who fell from a plane, clinging to it even after take—off — a talented footballer who had played for the national youth team.
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i9—year—old zaki anwari, part of a generation of afghans now facing a deeply uncertain future. we're joined from westminster by our political correspondent nick eardley. we were talking earlier on about the evacuation effort and we have new numbers about how many people are coming out and also the politics around this. he had that phrase that soldiers will not be held to account for this, soldiers will not be held to account forthis, it soldiers will not be held to account for this, it will be the politicians held to account. interesting that the government seems to think it is in a pretty good place with the number of people evacuated every day from kabul up to 950 and the hope from kabul up to 950 and the hope from ministers its it will get up to 1000 very soon but there is the big
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question about whether things could be done better this time last week when the tallow band was on the advance toward kabul. the foreign secretary dominic _ advance toward kabul. the foreign secretary dominic raab _ advance toward kabul. the foreign secretary dominic raab is - advance toward kabul. the foreign secretary dominic raab is under. secretary dominic raab is under pressure. there are calls for him to resign from some quarters, because he did not make a phone call to his afghan counterpart to try to speed up afghan counterpart to try to speed up the process of getting some interpreters who worked with the uk out. yesterday we reported that cole did not take place because dominic raab had said a junior minister would do it —— that phone call did not take place. it turns out the phone call never happened. the government said that is because things change so quickly and it was not possible. and we heard james heappey saying this morning that phone call would not have made a difference because things were changing so quickly. it raises the question. the opposition parties are
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asking, and some tory mps are starting to ask it about why the uk government was not better prepared for the taliban to make the speedy advances it did last weekend. second, why it did not react faster in the aftermath, after it became clear the afghan government would collapse. clear the afghan government would collase. . the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees after a five—year—old boy, who recently arrived in the uk, fell to his death from a window on the ninth floor of a hotel. mohammed munib majeedi and his family were put up at the hotel in sheffield as part of the government's resettlement scheme. home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. a new life in a new country that's ended in tragedy. this hotel in sheffield is now the scene of a major investigation into a dreadful accident. the victim — a five—year—old afghan
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boy, mohammed munib majeedi. he had recently arrived with his parents and four siblings from kabul — refugees given protection in the uk because his father worked in the british embassy. police and ambulances were called to the oyo metropolitan hotel on wednesday afternoon, after the boy fell from a ninth—floor window. the translator working with the afghan families being housed there said all of them were devastated. the boy and his family came to the uk under the government scheme to protect people who were at risk from the taliban. the home office says everyone is deeply saddened at the tragic death. refugee charities are demanding a wider investigation into how families arriving in the uk are being treated. there are claims that some residents had concerns about windows. those claims may be part of the police investigation. but while the home office says it was told of no safety concerns, it has moved all families to alternative accommodation. dominic casciani, bbc news.
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the snp and the green party have agreed a new power—sharing partnership in scotland. the deal would take the greens into government for the first time anywhere in the uk. it would also give the scottish government a majority to pass legislation including a new independence referendum bill. the co—operation agreement between the two parties stops short of a full coalition. a coronavirus boosterjab scheme is likely to start next month, according to the health secretary. sajid javid said the most vulnerable would be offered a third jab first, before a possible rollout to other groups. it comes as the world health organisation has questioned the ethics of an extra dose when the majority of people in poorer countries haven't had any. coventry is the current uk city of culture. a record 20 places have applied to be the next uk city of culture.
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the government awards the title every four years, helping to bring tourism and investment to different areas. this year, groups of towns were encouraged to apply and there have been bids from every nation in the uk. the winner will be announced next year. entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. in the week when a hollywood—style sign appeared on a slagheap overlooking wrexham, it has been confirmed that the town is now aiming to become the uk city of culture 2025. wrexham county borough's entry is one of 20 that have been put forward. including a bid spanning both sides of the scotland—england border. dumfries and galloway and the scottish borders are joining forces with northumberland, cumbria and the city of carlisle — a combined area almost 15 times the size of london. and cornwall�*s bid is very much as a county, rather than its only city, truro. coventry�*s time as the city of culture has not gone to plan. covid meant that the start
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was delayed five months. but events are now up and running. the 360 allstars start a three—week run there today. and the organisers insist that the city has benefited. the city of culture is really the beginning of a journey, it's not the end of the journey. it's the beginning of thinking about the role that culture can play in cities in bringing people together and creating pride and expressing identity, in supporting regeneration and economic development, in promoting tourism and really putting your city on the map. a long list will be revealed at the end of next month, with the winner announced in may, as coventry�*s year in the spotlight comes to an end. colin paterson, bbc news. good luck to them and great to see coventry finally happened and people are enjoying it. i remember seeing it and they
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adapted brilliantly to the presentation. the times we are in. the former manchester united footballer and scotland's record goal scorer, denis law, has revealed he has alzheimer's and vascular dementia. the 81—year—old said he was diagnosed last year and wanted to be open about his condition. he is among a group of former footballers to speak out about the disease, after links were found with players heading the ball repeatedly during their careers. a warning that ben philip's report contains flashing images. the lawman. commentator: denis law scored for scotland! - one of scotland's and the world's greatest ever footballers, scoring in this famous win against world champions england at wembley in 1967. today, he confirmed in a statement that he has been diagnosed with mixed dementia. he said...
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the denis law legacy trust is saddened to hear the news that denis has been diagnosed with mixed dementia. arguably, denis is scotland's most famous footballer. he is the most famous aberdonian footballer. i don't think there is any doubt about that. denis is a fantastic person, a fantastic character. the 81—year—old is the latest former player to reveal he is suffering from a degenerative brain disease. a glasgow university study in 2019 found that former footballers are three and a half times more likely to die from dementia. it has led to stricter guidelines
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on heading footballs for young people during training. we have really got to now unpick exactly what is this link between professional football, particularly heading, and dementia, so we can start to plan out what is it that we need to do in order to keep each generation of professional footballers say. of professional footballers safe. denis law's long list of achievements are celebrated in aberdeen, where he was born. this statue was unveiled in 2012 in recognition of his contribution to the world of sport. denis law now wishes to use his profile to shine a spotlight on a condition that impacts thousands of people around the world. ben philip with that report. we're joined now byjohn stiles, son of the 1966 world cup winner, nobby stiles, who was also diagnosed with dementia. good morning. how are you? ok, thank you. i am upset about denis. what you. i am upset about denis. what feelinus you. i am upset about denis. what feelings does _ you. i am upset about denis. what feelings does that _ you. i am upset about denis. what feelings does that bring _ you. i am upset about denis. what feelings does that bring up, when you remember what you went through?
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denis is a family friend and we are devastated for him and his family. the courage he has shown by coming out is fantastic. in the courage he has shown by coming out is fantastic.— out is fantastic. in terms of tellin: out is fantastic. in terms of telling the _ out is fantastic. in terms of telling the world _ out is fantastic. in terms of telling the world this - out is fantastic. in terms of telling the world this is - out is fantastic. in terms of - telling the world this is happening, what does that mean? he knows this will highlight vascular dementia, alzheimer's, and so much needs to be done. it alzheimer's, and so much needs to be done. ., , , , . ., done. it does, but my dad was diagnosed _ done. it does, but my dad was diagnosed without _ done. it does, but my dad was diagnosed without signs. - done. it does, but my dad was diagnosed without signs. it - done. it does, but my dad was| diagnosed without signs. it was done. it does, but my dad was - diagnosed without signs. it was not alzheimer's. he donated his brain. it was cte, the same thing that happened with the american footballers. that is what killed my dad stop it is from head impact. denis law is the latest member of that squad your dad was part of, who have made this announcement and had this issue. .. , . . , this issue. exactly, which means almost half _ this issue. exactly, which means almost half of _ this issue. exactly, which means almost half of the _ this issue. exactly, which means almost half of the outfield - this issue. exactly, which means almost half of the outfield team | almost half of the outfield team have suffered with dementia. it
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cannot be a coincidence for me. the same with the 66 team. if you take it half of the team got dementia, that was 1968, they were one team. there are 91 other teams who will have the same figures. i believe thatis have the same figures. i believe that is how big this is.— have the same figures. i believe that is how big this is. when you heard about _ that is how big this is. when you heard about denis _ that is how big this is. when you heard about denis yesterday, . that is how big this is. when you l heard about denis yesterday, what that is how big this is. when you - heard about denis yesterday, what is your instant reaction? i heard about denis yesterday, what is your instant reaction?— your instant reaction? i was not surprised- _ your instant reaction? i was not surprised- l _ your instant reaction? i was not surprised. i was _ your instant reaction? i was not surprised. i was totally - your instant reaction? i was not surprised. i was totally not - surprised. i was totally not surprised. i was totally not surprised. any footballer, centre forward who has headed the ball, willie stewart brought out a study recently on top of the last one that said that depending on the position you played, defender, centre forward, doing heading in training, you were five times more likely to develop early onset dementia. i talk to some of the lads my age who played. they are literally terrified. that is the word they use. terrified they may develop
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early onset dementia. i use. terrified they may develop early onset dementia. i remember that study because _ early onset dementia. i remember that study because it _ early onset dementia. i remember that study because it talked - early onset dementia. i remember that study because it talked about| that study because it talked about the rate in goalkeepers who do not really head the ball, was far lower. absolutely. it is not rocket science. we have the study, but your brain is a jelly in a hard case. if you batter that about tens of thousands of times, there will be in effect. to me it is blatantly obvious. it is staring us in the face. as of yet... the government did an enquiry. they were damning regarding the fa and pfa not doing what they should do. i have been moaning a lot about it but now i want to see positive change. hopefully with denis coming out as he has that might happen. the hopefully with denis coming out as he has that might happen.- hopefully with denis coming out as he has that might happen. the fa has said it has helped _ he has that might happen. the fa has said it has helped to _ he has that might happen. the fa has said it has helped to lead _ he has that might happen. the fa has said it has helped to lead the - he has that might happen. the fa has said it has helped to lead the way - said it has helped to lead the way in ground—breaking research into the links with football and we have a statement, we have a commitment financially and with resources to
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support robust research going forward collaborating with an independent task force to advanced studies in this area. when you speak to people and they say they are terrified, what comfort is there for them? ., . . ., them? not much at the moment. i soke to them? not much at the moment. i spoke to two _ them? not much at the moment. i spoke to two former _ them? not much at the moment. i spoke to two former premier- them? not much at the moment. i i spoke to two former premier league champions in the past week and they are worried their memory is starting to go. are worried their memory is starting to to. ~ . . to go. when we were chatting, during the reort to go. when we were chatting, during the report earlier, _ to go. when we were chatting, during the report earlier, i _ to go. when we were chatting, during the report earlier, i said _ to go. when we were chatting, during the report earlier, i said how- to go. when we were chatting, during the report earlier, i said how do - the report earlier, i said how do you feel about this diagnosis, your father passed away in 2020 and you will grieve him for ever. we spoke about what it is like to approach your father, when it was time for him to be diagnosed. i asked her soon after the diagnosis did he make it public. soon after the diagnosis did he make it ublic. ., ' . . , . it public. how difficult was that? b the it public. how difficult was that? by the time _ it public. how difficult was that? by the time we _ it public. how difficult was that? by the time we had _ it public. how difficult was that? by the time we had done - it public. how difficult was that? by the time we had done it - it public. how difficult was that? by the time we had done it and i it public. how difficult was that? i by the time we had done it and got to the diagnosis, dad was not really
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aware, so it was easier then. there is a terrible stigma with dementia. like, they have gone crackers, they are mad. effectively dementia is brain damage. dementia should be treated the same as other diseases and illnesses. but it is not. it is like it is old age, what happens. it is not, it is brain damage and everyone should be entitled to get care at the point of need. because it is brain damage. d0 care at the point of need. because it is brain damage.— it is brain damage. do you think more dignity — it is brain damage. do you think more dignity needs _ it is brain damage. do you think more dignity needs to _ it is brain damage. do you think more dignity needs to be - it is brain damage. do you think l more dignity needs to be afforded and how can it be done?- more dignity needs to be afforded and how can it be done? coming out like denis house, _ and how can it be done? coming out like denis house, trying _ and how can it be done? coming out like denis house, trying to _ and how can it be done? coming out like denis house, trying to get - and how can it be done? coming out like denis house, trying to get rid i like denis house, trying to get rid of the stigma, but the football, people get dementia, but the football seems to me should be taken care of by football and that is what i want to see.
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care of by football and that is what i want to see-— care of by football and that is what i want to see. ~ . ,, . ., , i want to see. alan shearer mentions it, a lot of i want to see. alan shearer mentions it. a lot of people _ i want to see. alan shearer mentions it, a lot of people coming _ i want to see. alan shearer mentions it, a lot of people coming out - i want to see. alan shearer mentions it, a lot of people coming out now. . it, a lot of people coming out now. to me, come at being able to speak to you, you seem annoyed. i paras to me, come at being able to speak to you, you seem annoyed. i was very an: to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before _ to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but — to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but now— to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but now i _ to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but now i want _ to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but now i want to i to you, you seem annoyed. i was very angry before but now i want to see i angry before but now i want to see positive change, i want the fa and football authorities take it seriously, stop denying it, accept it and deal with it in a positive way. that is what i want now. you want people _ way. that is what i want now. you want people talking about it and politicians dealing with it and the fa to confront it. but i bet you want your dad and denis law to be remembered for who they were. what was their relationship like? denis had a great _ was their relationship like? denis had a great sense _ was their relationship like? denis had a great sense of— was their relationship like? denis had a great sense of humour. i was their relationship like? lie! 3 had a great sense of humour. dad would laugh all the time. they got on great. unless they played against each other when they would kick lumps out of each other! but they respected each other. they got on
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very well. it is very sad. attention has been given to my dad and denis because they were great players. but people playing for lower division clubs will be going through the same. ., , ._ clubs will be going through the same. ., , , same. you played football. in terms of our same. you played football. in terms of your generation, _ same. you played football. in terms of your generation, as _ same. you played football. in terms of your generation, as well. - same. you played football. in terms of your generation, as well. you i of your generation, as well. you have spoken to others who fear. i am have spoken to others who fear. i am concerned but _ have spoken to others who fear. i am concerned but in _ have spoken to others who fear. i am concerned but in my— have spoken to others who fear. ! —n concerned but in my career i spent most of it on the bench. maybe that might redeem me. but i should not joke about this matter, it is something i am passionate about. you are not on the bench now, you are here. putting it at the forefront now. people will listen because you have had that personal experience. thank you. fix. have had that personal experience. thank ou. �* . have had that personal experience. thank ou. . , ., ,, have had that personal experience. thank ou. . , . ,, we have reported on the situation at
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kabul airport with people trying to get out of afghanistan. as refugees from afghanistan begin arriving in the uk — communities here are collecting donated clothes, toys and toiletries to help them settle in. jane mccubbin will bring you a story of compassion. look at the people there working together and sharing in times of need, there are people here who will make sure those in need will get help. absolutely. they are nearly there. these are the last bag is coming out. they have slowed down for this moment. three days ago, 110 afghan refugees... there you got, the last
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bag. 110 afghan refugees arrived in a hotel 20 miles away. amongst them, 64 children with only the clothes on their back. two days ago these guys put an appeal on facebook. my goodness. the reaction has been amazing. more than 1000 bags of goods for these children to help them out. bravo. make the driver. come on, he normally delivers bottles of water this time of the morning. today he will go to a depot and take these goods onto the hotel. how do you feel doing this? it is how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is _ how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is very _ how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is very nice. _ how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is very nice. you - how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is very nice. you have i how do you feel doing this? it is nice? it is very nice. you have a| nice? it is very nice. you have a 'ob to nice? it is very nice. you have a job to do- _ nice? it is very nice. you have a job to do. everybody _ nice? it is very nice. you have a job to do. everybody behind i nice? it is very nice. you have a| job to do. everybody behind me, nice? it is very nice. you have a i job to do. everybody behind me, take a bow. iwant job to do. everybody behind me, take a bow. i want to read messages that came over social media. they are really rather special. let me tell
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you this. this is sally the coordinator here. people showing humanity, empathy and compassion, this is the country i like to see. this is from alistair, the fine people have helped to restore my faith in humanity. sam, this is the uk i recognise and love. so many have been inspired. she has gone. so many people have been inspired. by what you guys have done. you are making a difference. 64 children, 20 miles away, they have got nothing. nothing at all. people far and wide have come together and we have done this in 48 hours and i want to say a massive thank you to everyone donating, giving up time today, let's keep it going and keep britain going like this. this is a positive
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thing to do. we going like this. this is a positive thing to do— thing to do. we spoke to matt before, thing to do. we spoke to matt before. a _ thing to do. we spoke to matt before, a former _ thing to do. we spoke to matt before, a former veteran. i thing to do. we spoke to matt| before, a former veteran. give thing to do. we spoke to matt i before, a former veteran. give your kids away. mick, where are you? there r 5000 afghan refugees due this year, about 20,000 over the coming five years. and so many more behind them but need help. these are some of the individuals, the community is making a difference that want to send out this message. how can we help, what can we do? there we go. it has been lovely seeing cars beeping, seeing these guys making the effort. a great spirit down here. off you go. cheering . really amazing to see. the hotel
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is 20 miles away. it will go to a depot and everything sorted. all the bags have been itemised, babies, baby boys, baby girls, toys, teenage boys and girls. cribs, nappies, you name it. it is all on the van. back to you. studio: well done to them from us. we needed to see something was happening. what has she found? she is making way for another lorry to arrive. always organising and on top of stuff. it does make you feel good. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come. after 50 years on our screens, a question of sport is the longest—running sports quiz show in the world. we'll catch up with new team captains — sam quek and ugo monye — ahead of the new series.
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someone will give us an insight as to what it is like to be a contestant. that will be interesting. we'll have that shortly and bring you the latest news and weather. now time for the weather with sarah. bring usjoy. good morning. a little bit ofjoy bring usjoy. good morning. a little bit of joy today with some bring usjoy. good morning. a little bit ofjoy today with some sunshine around. the past week the weather has not been changing, stuck in a rut. we have had cloud and temperature is not great. a blip over the weekend with some rain but then things will turn drier into next week. this picture shows breaks in the cloud. many places will see spells of sunshine today. some rain will arrive in the west. wet weather has pushed across northern ireland already. drizzle elsewhere. this weather front will bring the
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unsettled weather later and through the weekend. before it arrives, we have southerly winds ahead of it, bringing relatively mild, humid weather today. cloud, that is breaking up now. sunny spells developing tickly and central scotland, eastern england and in wales. northern ireland, things turning wet in the morning. some of the rain persistent. a breeze developing around the irish sea coast. lighterwind developing around the irish sea coast. lighter wind further east. temperatures not doing too badly with a high of possibly 24 in some spots. in northern scotland, only 15-17. spots. in northern scotland, only 15—17. rain continues to progress further east this evening. turning wet in north—west england and south—west scotland. also in wales and south—west england. east anglia and south—west england. east anglia and the south—east should stay dry
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overnight. still mild with temperatures in the mid teens. tomorrow, this weather front already across wales, south—west england, parts of scotland, edging eastwards through the day. likely to bring wet weather to east anglia and the south—east by the afternoon. rain will be followed by sunshine from the west but also scattered and potentially heavy downpours. not feeling particularly great, particularly when you have rain arriving. sunday, low pressure will ease away towards the east. still close to eastern england. early showers in the east on sunday. elsewhere, showers building. the best of the bright weather in wales, south—west england, northern ireland. sunday looking like the drier day of the weekend. temperatures not great. further
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ahead, high pressure builds. not much in the way of rain. quite a lot of dry weather. some sunny skies and the forecast but temperatures still not great. more weather in about half an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. what a week it's been for the leeds rhinos legend rob burrow. first his documentary about life with motor neurone disease was shortlisted for a national television award, next came the release of his autobiography, then last night he was back amongst the fans. rob and his family were guests of honour at headingley stadium as his old side played huddersfield in the super league. it was the first time he'd been in front of that crowd since his emotional testimonial more than 18 months ago. breakfast�*s luxmy gopal was there.
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those turning up at headingley were notjust fans watching a match, they were a rugby league family welcoming back rob burrow. he's an amazing scrum—half, amazing personality. he scored the finest try ever in the rugby league grand final at old trafford in 2011. he's an inspiration to the rest of the team. people who watched him transform from [ad to legend. really emotional. an emotional night for all the family, who will be here. when you have watched him come through from being a boy. obviously, it is not a nice situation, but, yeah, we are all there for him. people who have followed his journey through super league wins and now his battle with motor neurone disease. as someone who has a degenerative condition, to see rob handle it with such grace, it's so great.
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he has always been one of our favourite players. determination. ijust get quite emotional when talking about him. i he has been an inspiration to the club since starting his career. you could not get a better leeds legend. it is great to be back at headingley after so long. i am completely overwhelmed to be shortlisted for an nta award. i know i have the backing of the greatest sport in the world, rugby league. i am so proud of how everyone has rallied round me since my diagnosis. i could never tell you just what it means. the no—tears policy i think will be put to the test tonight. i think it will be emotional. but we are really looking forward to it. i am so happy we get to take the ball out to the referee. what reaction do you think there will be from the crowds? massive crowd cheer. i might even need to wear headphones. so excited to go on the pitch.
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at the stadium, where crowds only recently returned, a 10,000—strong standing ovation as the guest of honour appeared. cheering. last time he was here, for a testimonial match, was a year and a half ago. the reception this time no less warm. a seventh—minute round of applause — a nod to the number seven shirt he wore for leeds during his 17—year career. it has been so good to be back at the ground and to see all the support. it has been fantastic. what was it like seeing rob go onto the pitch? i managed not to cry. it was emotional but really good. victory for leeds rhinos. and a shout—out to the
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man who inspired it. i was really crying. i did not think i would be, but it was really emotional. lovely to see him back at headingley. it was emotional to see him there, i and a lump—in—the—throat moment. i am very proud to see him back on the pitch. tonight has been amazing. i don't look forward to having the attention on me, but i was really looking forward to coming back to the place where i had the time of my life from being a little boy in the crowd, to have had the spectacle of a day set for my book launch. i need to thank so many people. but i would not change the outcome of my life regardless, no matter what. that smile, what a night for rob. we're joined now by leeds rhinos assistant coach and rob's former team—mate, jamie jones—buchanan. good morning. that looks like some emotional evening, wasn't it? it
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good morning. that looks like some emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional. — emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional. good _ emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional, good to _ emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional, good to have _ emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional, good to have the - emotional evening, wasn't it? it was emotional, good to have the crowds| emotional, good to have the crowds backin emotional, good to have the crowds back in and wonderful to have rob back in and wonderful to have rob backin back in and wonderful to have rob back in the ground as well. rob burrow himself, and that core of players, they fulfilled a dream in that stadium. and every time they walk out onto the pitch is emotional. rob burrow has been a force of resilience notjust through the last 18 months but through his career, he redefined the paradigms and wrote the rule book about what rugby players can be and he fulfilled his potential. he is still inspiring people today. yesterday we were running — inspiring people today. yesterday we were running a _ inspiring people today. yesterday we were running a piece, _ inspiring people today. yesterday we were running a piece, he _ inspiring people today. yesterday we were running a piece, he was- inspiring people today. yesterday we | were running a piece, he was smaller than the average rugby player, but he was fast, small but no one could catch on. he he was fast, small but no one could catch on. ., . he was fast, small but no one could catch on. . , . , ., , catch on. he was rapid, he was amazing- _ catch on. he was rapid, he was amazing- he — catch on. he was rapid, he was amazing. he used _ catch on. he was rapid, he was amazing. he used his - catch on. he was rapid, he was amazing. he used his talents. catch on. he was rapid, he was l amazing. he used his talents and abilities to the maximum. he was world class. when you read his book,
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when he was eight, nine or ten, people said, he was a great player but too small. you ask any big rugby player who played against rob burrow, they would be scared to death, because he wasjust burrow, they would be scared to death, because he was just too fast to catch. death, because he was 'ust too fast to catch. ~ . death, because he was 'ust too fast to catch. ~ , , to catch. whenever we see him we see that smile, to catch. whenever we see him we see that smile. his — to catch. whenever we see him we see that smile, his nature _ to catch. whenever we see him we see that smile, his nature and _ to catch. whenever we see him we see that smile, his nature and his - that smile, his nature and his family, it'sjust positivity, what does that bring, when he's back there at headingley? it’s does that bring, when he's back there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right _ there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right at _ there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right at the _ there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right at the centre - there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right at the centre of- there at headingley? it's amazing. rob was right at the centre of that | rob was right at the centre of that group, he has got these rica duvets nuances, this comedic —— these ricky gervais is nuances. he has a comedic character, and that is the forefront of who he is, and that is in his book. and when he can type it out, it shines through in his text messages. and we have a new generation of players, some played
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last night, it's great for them to see rob burrow and be around that culture that we created during that time. �* . ., , time. and the crowds last night... yes, time. and the crowds last night... yes. he's — time. and the crowds last night... yes. he's an _ time. and the crowds last night... yes, he's an icon. _ time. and the crowds last night... yes, he's an icon. i— time. and the crowds last night... yes, he's an icon. i do _ time. and the crowds last night... yes, he's an icon. i do think i time. and the crowds last night... yes, he's an icon. i do think the l yes, he's an icon. i do think the word gets bandied about too often but he is iconic. we saw a statue of john holmes there, and i'm sure there will be one of rob. as small as rob is, the impact that he has had on people's lives is massive. it was an honour to have played with him and i'm grateful because we love him and i'm grateful because we love him to bits. , ., . him and i'm grateful because we love him to bits-— him to bits. there you are together on the field- _ him to bits. there you are together on the field. you _ him to bits. there you are together on the field. you gave _ him to bits. there you are together on the field. you gave him - him to bits. there you are together on the field. you gave him a i him to bits. there you are together on the field. you gave him a win i on the field. you gave him a win last night. how much of a difference, how much do you think it gave the players are left on the field last night, knowing that rob was there? it field last night, knowing that rob was there? ., . . field last night, knowing that rob was there? . , , ., field last night, knowing that rob was there? . , , . ., , was there? it has been a really tourh was there? it has been a really tough year _ was there? it has been a really tough year with _ was there? it has been a really tough year with covid, - was there? it has been a really tough year with covid, a i was there? it has been a really tough year with covid, a fair. was there? it has been a really. tough year with covid, a fair few injuries, suspensions, but the young players have got to take that mantle. and seeing lads
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players have got to take that mantle. and seeing [ads like rob, in that picture here, tackling people three times the size of him, showing that nothing is impossible. against all the odds this year, it's really, really difficult time but those young boys that are playing there,, they've been through the meal. —— through the mill. it has been a baptism of fire. but they have those pictures to show them what real fortitude and resilience looks like. and that translates to results. yes. and that translates to results. yes, that's what — and that translates to results. yes, that's what sport _ and that translates to results. yes, that's what sport is _ and that translates to results. yes, that's what sport is about, - and that translates to results. “as that's what sport is about, the winner is king!— winner is king! no, it's about takinr winner is king! no, it's about taking part- _ winner is king! no, it's about taking part. never, _ winner is king! no, it's about taking part. never, never! it| winner is king! no, it's about. taking part. never, never! it is rood to taking part. never, never! it is good to get — taking part. never, never! it is good to get a _ taking part. never, never! it is good to get a result, _ taking part. never, never! it is good to get a result, the i taking part. never, never! it is| good to get a result, the strong huddersfield side, it was a war of attrition but we got there in the end. a, . attrition but we got there in the end. , . ., end. maybe you will get another win because the — end. maybe you will get another win because the documentary _ end. maybe you will get another win because the documentary is - because the documentary is shortlisted for an mta award, a e—voting that? shortlisted for an mta award, a e-voting that?— shortlisted for an mta award, a e-voting that? absolutely, we are
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all passing — e-voting that? absolutely, we are all passing around _ e-voting that? absolutely, we are all passing around on _ e-voting that? absolutely, we are all passing around on social- e-voting that? absolutely, we are j all passing around on social media and onwhatsapp. it's really important, there are a couple of real shining stars that have come out of the game in the north, they have transcended the game and the north of england. they have raised awareness about the catastrophe that it is for a lot of peoples lives. hopefully they will keep going with research and development. obviously rob will be busy _ research and development. obviously rob will be busy because _ research and development. obviously rob will be busy because he - research and development. obviously rob will be busy because he is i research and development. obviously rob will be busy because he is goingl rob will be busy because he is going to the awards, and he is raising awareness, that he is your mate, your friend, awareness, that he is your mate, yourfriend, how is awareness, that he is your mate, your friend, how is your friendship in terms of, when you have someone who is struggling with something, there is a balance how much space you give them and then how much you are there being regular mates. although the communication is
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different, his wit and humour is still there, so how is that for you? it's a love, i don't mind saying that, it is a greek version, sacrificial love that we have in the group, and that was forged through years of ups and downs, success and failures in sport, seeing ourselves at our strongest and our we kissed. we were like a pride of [ions who would go out to —— and our weakest. we are like a pride of [ions would go out and hunt, you would have to go out and hunt, you would have to go and hunt even if you did not feel like it, and that has been passed on to the next generation of players. these moments have exemplified and provide what it's about. you're absolutely right, he is my friend, as is all that group, and they will be forever. the actual winning trophies and the big games have
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become incidental, it all becomes about the people. and it is all absolutely about the journey as opposed to the destination. that's what is the real gold that comes out of that fire. i what is the real gold that comes out of that fire. , ., . , ., of that fire. i tell you what, you are integration _ of that fire. i tell you what, you are integration in _ of that fire. i tell you what, you are integration in the _ of that fire. i tell you what, you are integration in the dressing i are integration in the dressing room, aren't you? i used to be! —— inspirational in the dressing room. fantastic words! he inspirational in the dressing room. fantastic words!— inspirational in the dressing room. fantastic words! he is lucky to have ou as a fantastic words! he is lucky to have you as a mate- _ fantastic words! he is lucky to have you as a mate. we _ fantastic words! he is lucky to have you as a mate. we are _ fantastic words! he is lucky to have you as a mate. we are all— fantastic words! he is lucky to have | you as a mate. we are all privileged to have him- — you as a mate. we are all privileged to have him. ok, _ you as a mate. we are all privileged to have him. ok, that's— you as a mate. we are all privileged to have him. ok, that's lovely. i to have him. ok, that's lovely. thank you _ to have him. ok, that's lovely. thank you for— to have him. ok, that's lovely. thank you forjoining _ to have him. ok, that's lovely. thank you forjoining us. i thank you forjoining us. the time is 8:42am. long—term youth unemployment is at a five year high. we are particularly focusing on those under the age of 25. the challenge _ those under the age of 25. the challenge they _ those under the age of 25. tue: challenge they face is even tougher than the rest of us. sarah is in blackburn for us this morning talking to a group of young people,
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asking what it means for their career prospects, when they are under 25. good morning from one of the world's largest dispense firms, —— defence firms, they are training the next generation of aircraft engineers and at the moment they are working on the raf hawkjet which is flown by the raf hawkjet which is flown by the red arrows display team. they have two and a half thousand apprentices and graduates, many of them here in the north of england. as you said, the pandemic has had a big effect on young people. there are concerns about long—term youth unemployment and i have been catching up with three people from different sectors to find out about their hopes for the future. i think it will easily take at least two or three years to be getting back to where i was pre—pandemic. i had five interviews between february and march. three of them were rescinded
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because of the pandemic. a lot of what you realised from the past year is i like, life is short. you might as well be doing something that you love i and that you're passionate about. when we first met portrait photographer drew back in october, covid restrictions were tightening and his manchester business was struggling. i already cut down all my expenses. i haven't left the house in months so i stopped paying for my office. i've got rid of all of that stuff. and it's not enough. today his outlook is much brighter. as entertainment and art venues have reopened, his bookings are coming back but he knows the recovery will take time. what was the longest period of time that you went without any work? about 11 weeks. and how did you get through that period financially? honestly, i don't know how i got through it. compared to a regular month, i'm still at around 40, 50% of what i was doing pre—pandemic. it's building and it's getting there but it's painfully slow. during the pandemic, competition
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forjobs has been fierce. here in hull, 20% of people live in workless households. david has two degrees and had applied for more than 100 jobs. you're out of control of your own life, at a point as to, where's the money going to come? you can't really think long term. so you're constantly thinking about, how am i going to get a job? in the end, he left his home city and moved to manchester to find new opportunities. he is now working for an organisation which supports disabled people. if you're the type of person that's applied for a lot ofjobs, like anybody has at the minute, i suppose, and you don't get those responses, it can really hurt. i do count myself lucky that i've ended up in this position. for others, lockdown has led to reinvention. cece from london quit herjob in advertising to follow her artistic dreams. i've gone from a large office in the middle
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of soho to being at home painting in my bedroom. it's definite ups and downs of kind of, this is the most exciting thing ever and, oh, my god, what have i done? and the career change is paying off. she's just moved into her own studio. being able to actually work on bigger pieces, have people come into the studio and see the work and talk to them and it not being in my bedroom, and on a more practical level not smelling paint fumes every night and actually not waking up with a headache is really nice. and while it may take longer for their careers to recoverfrom the pandemic, there is optimism for better times ahead. so, you can hear their covid is already having an impact on career choices. ted is with us, you are in the apprenticeship scheme here, good morning. the first thing i wanted to ask you about, bae systems is
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bucking the trend in terms of nationally, fewer 16 and 17—year—olds have been going on friendships in the last year, what are you saying here with your programme? —— going on apprenticeships? taste programme? -- going on apprenticeships?- programme? -- going on apprenticeships? programme? -- going on a- --renticeshis? ~ . , . apprenticeships? we are seeing an increase of 1596 _ apprenticeships? we are seeing an increase of 1596 on _ apprenticeships? we are seeing an increase of 1596 on a _ apprenticeships? we are seeing an increase of 1596 on a applicant i apprenticeships? we are seeing an increase of 1596 on a applicant in i increase of 15% on a applicant in 2021. we put that down to, we have a very copyrighted outreach programme in education where we work closely with schools and universities —— a very comprehensive outreach programme, and we worked very hard last year to move a lot of programmes virtually so we could continue to engage with that population. we also offer around 50 different apprenticeships across all of our uk locations, from level two to a level 6 degrees, and the success of those programmes, and we have excellent success rate, people who complete our programmes, stay with us long term for a career. there are concerns about long—term youth unemployment and what impact that has on young people in terms of
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income and well—being, and careers going forward, what are employers doing to help those people get the skills they need? it’s doing to help those people get the skills they need?— skills they need? it's a very important _ skills they need? it's a very important aspect _ skills they need? it's a very important aspect of- skills they need? it's a very important aspect of what i skills they need? it's a very| important aspect of what we skills they need? it's a very i important aspect of what we do within bae systems, we do try make sure our programmes reach a much broader range, and we have worked closely, we are part of a programme which has been running since 2014 and we have had 650 people on that programme, and we continue to run those virtually. and that's often a very good opportunity to work for some. we are looking to have a programme on kick—start before the end of the year as well. lots programme on kick-start before the end of the year as well.— end of the year as well. lots of thin . s end of the year as well. lots of things going — end of the year as well. lots of things going on _ end of the year as well. lots of things going on here _ end of the year as well. lots of things going on here and i end of the year as well. lots of things going on here and they. end of the year as well. lots of i things going on here and they are about to start a class here. the apprenticeship schemes last between three and five years. amelia and david are on these programmes. amelia, you joined injanuary, talk to me about why you went on this
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career path. to me about why you went on this career path-— to me about why you went on this career ath. , . . i. . career path. ever since a young age i had a career path. ever since a young age i had a huge _ career path. ever since a young age i had a huge passion _ career path. ever since a young age i had a huge passion for _ career path. ever since a young age i had a huge passion for aircraft, i i i had a huge passion for aircraft, i joined the ed cadets, and i picked engineering subjects, and i really wanted to have a hands—onjob. and you classroom work. i did a lot of research and i found that bae systems gave that opportunity. and going on a taster weekend here, it confirmed that this is where i wanted to be.— confirmed that this is where i wanted to be. . i. . , wanted to be. and you have been t in: to wanted to be. and you have been trying to encourage _ wanted to be. and you have been trying to encourage more - wanted to be. and you have been trying to encourage more women| wanted to be. and you have been i trying to encourage more women into the sector by working with schools? yes, i worked with some primary schoolchildren, changing their perspective on who an engineer is and what they do. and we also made it aware to them that it is possible that anybody can be an engineer. a male, female, anyone can be an engineer and it really made that day, that it's possible for them to do. ., day, that it's possible for them to do. . . . . do. that a fantastic message. david is here as well. _
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do. that a fantastic message. david is here as well. you _ do. that a fantastic message. david is here as well. you are _ do. that a fantastic message. david is here as well. you are about i is here as well. you are about halfway through your apprenticeship programme, so two years into a four—year course, what is the end goal, what you want to do? i’m goal, what you want to do? i'm ho-rin goal, what you want to do? i'm hoping in _ goal, what you want to do? i'm hoping in the — goal, what you want to do? i'm hoping in the coming months i can start— hoping in the coming months i can start working on the newer projects, the f _ start working on the newer projects, the f 35— start working on the newer projects, the f 35 and — start working on the newer projects, the f 35 and the tempest, and when i come _ the f 35 and the tempest, and when i come out _ the f 35 and the tempest, and when i come out i _ the f 35 and the tempest, and when i come out i can go into the tempest itself— come out i can go into the tempest itself when — come out i can go into the tempest itself when it is in service. you have to explain _ itself when it is in service. you have to explain to _ itself when it is in service. you have to explain to me, - itself when it is in service. gm. have to explain to me, they are different models of aircraft? thea;r different models of aircraft? they are, es. different models of aircraft? they are. yes- so _ different models of aircraft? they are, yes. so the _ different models of aircraft? they are, yes. so the tempest - different models of aircraft? they are, yes. so the tempest is i different models of aircraft? they are, yes. so the tempest is the next generation— are, yes. so the tempest is the next generation of aircraft that bae systems is going to be making, currently— systems is going to be making, currently the typhoon is in service and they— currently the typhoon is in service and they will be replacing them. is and they will be replacing them. is it competitor to get on the course? —— competitive? it is, but i got through— —— competitive? it is, but i got through on— —— competitive? it is, but i got through on a stem course, so anything — through on a stem course, so anything you can do like that will help. _ anything you can do like that will hel. ., . anything you can do like that will hel, ., , , anything you can do like that will hel. . , , ., anything you can do like that will hel. . , , . ., anything you can do like that will
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help. there has been a lot of discussion — help. there has been a lot of discussion on _ help. there has been a lot of discussion on the _ help. there has been a lot of discussion on the impact i help. there has been a lot of discussion on the impact of. help. there has been a lot of i discussion on the impact of the pandemic on young people. you had to do some virtual learning? yes. pandemic on young people. you had to do some virtual learning?— do some virtual learning? yes, we have been — do some virtual learning? yes, we have been lucky _ do some virtual learning? yes, we have been lucky enough _ do some virtual learning? yes, we have been lucky enough to - do some virtual learning? yes, we have been lucky enough to be i do some virtual learning? yes, we| have been lucky enough to be able do some virtual learning? yes, we i have been lucky enough to be able to work from _ have been lucky enough to be able to work from home for the duration so we had _ work from home for the duration so we had not — work from home for the duration so we had not been impacted too much. i we had not been impacted too much. i am disrupting a class at the moment, they are learning about the ejector seats and over here we have some apprentices, learning to be aircraft fitters, and electricians. fabulous work today. thank you so much. fascinating knowing that there are opportunities and people are very enthusiastic and thinking, right, ican and people are very enthusiastic and thinking, right, i can do this, and get on with it. thinking, right, i can do this, and get on with it— thinking, right, i can do this, and get on with it. they have suffered so much, get on with it. they have suffered so much. that _ get on with it. they have suffered so much, that generation. - get on with it. they have suffered so much, that generation. even i so much, that generation. even though this week we were talking about more vacancies than ever, for that generation, it is an even bigger challenge.— that generation, it is an even bigger challenge. yes, that person who had five _ bigger challenge. yes, that person who had five interviews _ bigger challenge. yes, that person who had five interviews in - bigger challenge. yes, that person who had five interviews in a - bigger challenge. yes, that person who had five interviews in a few i who had five interviews in a few weeks. after 50 years on our screens, a question of sport is the longest—running sports quiz show in the world. it returns next month for a new series with a new host, paddy mcguinness,
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and team captains, sam quek and ugo monye. let's take a look at them in action. who, by beating julius indongo in august 2017 became the undisputed light welterweight world champion? terence crawford. bingo. no messing. over to the captain now, sammy has got to get it on that five. come on, sam. that's so harsh because you were so close to being perfect, but it wasn't. sam and ugojoin us now. it isa it is a new look! good morning. how are you feeling about being up this early in the morning? you are used to it! ht early in the morning? you are used to it! , ., .,
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early in the morning? you are used to it! , ., . you to it! it is the new normal. you must be _ to it! it is the new normal. you must be fully _ to it! it is the new normal. you must be fully immersed - to it! it is the new normal. you must be fully immersed in - to it! it is the new normal. you must be fully immersed in all i to it! it is the new normal. you | must be fully immersed in all of to it! it is the new normal. you - must be fully immersed in all of it. ugo, you mustjust be a bit terrified with what she knows. she has been terrified with what she knows. sue: has been basically doing terrified with what she knows. su9: has been basically doing the olympics in prep for question of sport. olympics in prep for question of sort. :, :, olympics in prep for question of sort. ., :, ., olympics in prep for question of sort. :, :, :, , , sport. hang on a minute! this is 'ust a sport. hang on a minute! this is just a taster _ sport. hang on a minute! this is just a taster of _ sport. hang on a minute! this is just a taster of the _ sport. hang on a minute! this is just a taster of the show. - sport. hang on a minute! this is just a taster of the show. the i just a taster of the show. the olympics— just a taster of the show. the olympics was relevant, talking about the olympics, we have had loads of brilliant _ the olympics, we have had loads of brilliant olympians coming on with their medals, and we had an opportunity to do some free revision whilst _ opportunity to do some free revision whilst covering the olympics, a bit of priming — whilst covering the olympics, a bit of priming. but i know nothing about rugby— of priming. but i know nothing about rugby compared to 21. you get all of his questions right. —— compared to ugo _ his questions right. -- compared to uao. ,, his questions right. -- compared to uio. ,, , , :, his questions right. -- compared to uao. ,, , , ., , his questions right. -- compared to u:o. ,, , , ., , , ugo. she is trying to set me up! know your _ ugo. she is trying to set me up! know your enemy. _ ugo. she is trying to set me up! know your enemy. exactly. - ugo. she is trying to set me up! know your enemy. exactly. but | ugo. she is trying to set me up! | know your enemy. exactly. but it ugo. she is trying to set me up! - know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun. — know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun, amazing. _ know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun, amazing. it _ know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun, amazing. it is _ know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun, amazing. it is fun - know your enemy. exactly. but it has been so fun, amazing. it is fun but i been so fun, amazing. it is fun but a massive — been so fun, amazing. it is fun but a massive responsibility _ been so fun, amazing. it is fun but a massive responsibility of - been so fun, amazing. it is fun but a massive responsibility of taking i a massive responsibility of taking on the _ a massive responsibility of taking on the mantle _ a massive responsibility of taking on the mantle which _ a massive responsibility of taking on the mantle which is _ a massive responsibility of taking on the mantle which is a - a massive responsibility of taking . on the mantle which is a programme which _ on the mantle which is a programme which is _ on the mantle which is a programme which is the — on the mantle which is a programme which is the longest—running - on the mantle which is a programme
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which is the longest—running quiz- which is the longest—running quiz sports _ which is the longest—running quiz sports show— which is the longest—running quiz sports show in _ which is the longest—running quiz sports show in the _ which is the longest—running quiz sports show in the world - which is the longest—running quiz sports show in the world but - which is the longest—running quiz sports show in the world but hasi sports show in the world but has also had — sports show in the world but has also had some _ sports show in the world but has also had some brilliant- sports show in the world but has. also had some brilliant characters and faces— also had some brilliant characters and faces the _ also had some brilliant characters and faces the familiar _ also had some brilliant characters and faces the familiar with - also had some brilliant characters and faces the familiar with at - also had some brilliant characters i and faces the familiar with at home. yes, and faces the familiar with at home. yes. show— and faces the familiar with at home. yes. showthat— and faces the familiar with at home. yes, show that been _ and faces the familiar with at home. yes, show that been on— and faces the familiar with at home. yes, show that been on for- and faces the familiar with at home. yes, show that been on for 50 - and faces the familiar with at home. | yes, show that been on for 50 years. there is a real sense of responsibility but people will see with the first show, there is a real sense of familiarity. if with the first show, there is a real sense of familiarity. i! it with the first show, there is a real sense of familiarity.— sense of familiarity. if it ain't broke, don't _ sense of familiarity. if it ain't broke, don't do _ sense of familiarity. if it ain't broke, don't do too - sense of familiarity. if it ain't broke, don't do too much - sense of familiarity. if it ain't i broke, don't do too much fixing. sense of familiarity. if it ain't - broke, don't do too much fixing. so there _ broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are _ broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are similar— broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are similar themes— broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are similar themes but- broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are similar themes but a - broke, don't do too much fixing. so there are similar themes but a bit. there are similar themes but a bit of new— there are similar themes but a bit of new stuff? _ there are similar themes but a bit of new stuff?— there are similar themes but a bit of new stuff? , , :, ., , of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and — of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and the _ of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and the mystery _ of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and the mystery guest - of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and the mystery guest but i of new stuff? yes, you have the buzz around and the mystery guest but itl around and the mystery guest but it does have its own personality because you have three different faces on it. how the driving it has been phenomenal. —— paddy at the wheel driving it, and we have had some of the best of the best around the world and they come on and say, this is my childhood dream. i don't know if there is another sports quiz show out there, or any show, apart from this one... we show out there, or any show, apart from this one. . ._ show out there, or any show, apart from this one... we are not a sports
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show! where — from this one... we are not a sports show! where people _ from this one... we are not a sports show! where people step _ from this one... we are not a sports show! where people step away i show! where people step away thinkin: , show! where people step away thinking. that _ show! where people step away thinking, that is _ show! where people step away thinking, that is a _ show! where people step away thinking, that is a bucket i show! where people step away thinking, that is a bucket list i thinking, that is a bucket list ticked. , , ., , thinking, that is a bucket list ticked. , , ., thinking, that is a bucket list ticked. , , :, , ., ticked. the olympians are saying that, that feels _ ticked. the olympians are saying that, that feels like _ ticked. the olympians are saying that, that feels like so _ ticked. the olympians are saying that, that feels like so long i ticked. the olympians are saying that, that feels like so long ago i that, that feels like so long ago though. — that, that feels like so long ago though, that clip. the shoes to fill, though, that clip. the shoes to fill: matt: _ though, that clip. the shoes to fill, matt, philand sue, they though, that clip. the shoes to fill, matt, phil and sue, they were iconic _ fill, matt, phil and sue, they were iconic you — fill, matt, phil and sue, they were iconic. you don't stay in a job that long _ iconic. you don't stay in a job that long if— iconic. you don't stay in a job that long if you — iconic. you don't stay in a job that long if you aren't good at it and they— long if you aren't good at it and they were — long if you aren't good at it and they were brilliant. it has been good _ they were brilliant. it has been good to— they were brilliant. it has been good to make the show hours and put our personality on it because ultimately, the are not met and phit _ ultimately, the are not met and phit they— ultimately, the are not met and phil. they are big shoes to fill —— we are _ phil. they are big shoes to fill —— we are not— phil. they are big shoes to fill —— we are not matt and phil. and you have _ we are not matt and phil. and you have beeri— we are not matt and phil. and you have been on it, naga. you we are not matt and phil. and you have been on it, naga.— we are not matt and phil. and you have been on it, naga. you were on sam's team. _ have been on it, naga. you were on sam's team, won't _ have been on it, naga. you were on sam's team, won't you? _ have been on it, naga. you were on sam's team, won't you? how- have been on it, naga. you were on sam's team, won't you? how did i have been on it, naga. you were on | sam's team, won't you? how did you :et on? sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we — sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we don't _ sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we don't need _ sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we don't need to _ sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we don't need to talk- sam's team, won't you? how did you get on? we don't need to talk about| get on? we don't need to talk about it. iwon't get on? we don't need to talk about it- i won't give _ get on? we don't need to talk about it. i won't give any _ get on? we don't need to talk about it. i won't give any spoilers. - get on? we don't need to talk about it. i won't give any spoilers. you i it. i won't give any spoilers. you were chosen _ it. i won't give any spoilers. you were chosen about _ it. i won't give any spoilers. were chosen about your
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it. i won't give any spoilersm were chosen about your expertise engulf? were chosen about your expertise en:ulf? �* , were chosen about your expertise en:ulf? �*, ., were chosen about your expertise en:ulf? �*, , engulf? let's about something else! when ou engulf? let's about something else! when you heard _ engulf? let's about something else! when you heard you _ engulf? let's about something else! when you heard you had _ engulf? let's about something else! when you heard you had naga i engulf? let's about something else! when you heard you had naga on i engulf? let's about something else! l when you heard you had naga on your team, where you thrilled, and are you thrilled now? i team, where you thrilled, and are you thrilled now?— team, where you thrilled, and are you thrilled now?- the i team, where you thrilled, and are you thrilled now?- the joy l team, where you thrilled, and are you thrilled now? i was! thejoy of you thrilled now? i was! the 'oy of the programme fl you thrilled now? i was! the 'oy of the programme is i you thrilled now? i was! the 'oy of the programme is the i you thrilled now? i was! the 'oy of the programme is the love i you thrilled now? i —"�* the joy of the programme is the love and it is not about— the programme is the love and it is not about winning, _ the programme is the love and it is not about winning, it _ the programme is the love and it is not about winning, it is _ the programme is the love and it is not about winning, it is that - the programme is the love and it is not about winning, it is that taking| not about winning, it is that taking part _ not about winning, it is that taking part i_ not about winning, it is that taking part i don't— not about winning, it is that taking part. i don't mean _ not about winning, it is that taking part. i don't mean it— not about winning, it is that taking part. i don't mean it at— not about winning, it is that taking part. i don't mean it at all. - not about winning, it is that taking part. i don't mean it at all. i'm i part. i don't mean it at all. i'm not _ part. i don't mean it at all. i'm not spoiling _ part. i don't mean it at all. i'm not spoiling it. _ part. idon't mean it at all. i'm not spoiling it, my— part. i don't mean it at all. i'm not spoiling it, my team i part. i don't mean it at all. i'm not spoiling it, my team was l part. i don't mean it at all. i'm l not spoiling it, my team was not part. i don't mean it at all. i'm i not spoiling it, my team was not the only one _ not spoiling it, my team was not the only one which — not spoiling it, my team was not the only one which performed _ not spoiling it, my team was not the only one which performed not i not spoiling it, my team was not the only one which performed not to i not spoiling it, my team was not the only one which performed not to itsi only one which performed not to its best ability — only one which performed not to its best ability-— best ability. that sounds like you are shifting _ best ability. that sounds like you are shifting the _ best ability. that sounds like you are shifting the blame. _ best ability. that sounds like you are shifting the blame. i'm i best ability. that sounds like you are shifting the blame. i'm just l are shifting the blame. i'm 'ust sa in:, are shifting the blame. i'm 'ust saying, performances i are shifting the blame. i'm 'ust saying, performances to i are shifting the blame. i'mjust saying, performances to be i are shifting the blame. i'm just i saying, performances to be good are shifting the blame. i'm just - saying, performances to be good on all sides _ saying, performances to be good on all sides ll— saying, performances to be good on all sides. , ~ saying, performances to be good on all sides. , . , , all sides. it is exciting, because it is different, _ all sides. it is exciting, because it is different, it _ all sides. it is exciting, because it is different, it has _ all sides. it is exciting, because it is different, it has a _ all sides. it is exciting, because it is different, it has a new - all sides. it is exciting, because i it is different, it has a new theme tune, _ it is different, it has a new theme tune, different colours and different set. the pressure is on to be the _ different set. the pressure is onto be the first— different set. the pressure is on to be the first female captain as well. of course — be the first female captain as well. of course. the show has always involved. people inevitably will always say, it's not as good as this, that all the other, it has always changed and become what it is, you know?
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always changed and become what it is. you know?— always changed and become what it is, you know? definitely, and as sue was so amazing _ is, you know? definitely, and as sue was so amazing in _ is, you know? definitely, and as sue was so amazing in that _ is, you know? definitely, and as sue was so amazing in that female - is, you know? definitely, and as sue was so amazing in that female role l was so amazing in that female role of making — was so amazing in that female role of making matt and phil behave in keeping _ of making matt and phil behave in keeping them under control. having paddy— keeping them under control. having paddy from an entertainment background, he has his sense of humoun — background, he has his sense of humour. �* , ,. ., , yes, humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and bein: humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a — humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a female _ humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a female in _ humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a female in that _ humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a female in that role, - humour. and he is mischievous! yes, and being a female in that role, it - and being a female in that role, it is a massive — and being a female in that role, it is a massive response verity, i want to gel— is a massive response verity, i want to get the _ is a massive response verity, i want to get the questions right and show that females know about sport. it is fun, that females know about sport. it is fun. people — that females know about sport. it is fun, people need to tune in and see why _ fun, people need to tune in and see why do _ fun, people need to tune in and see wh . ~' , ., why. do tune in, i think you will have a laugh. — why. do tune in, i think you will have a laugh, you _ why. do tune in, i think you will have a laugh, you will— why. do tune in, i think you will have a laugh, you will have - why. do tune in, i think you will| have a laugh, you will have such why. do tune in, i think you will. have a laugh, you will have such a laugh. i have had a love doing it. and it's notjust about the three of us, it's the guests. it’s and it's notjust about the three of us, it's the guests.— us, it's the guests. it's a great atmosphere- _ us, it's the guests. it's a great atmosphere. i— us, it's the guests. it's a great atmosphere. itell_ us, it's the guests. it's a great atmosphere. i tell you - us, it's the guests. it's a great atmosphere. i tell you what, l us, it's the guests. it's a great i atmosphere. i tell you what, you have _ atmosphere. i tell you what, you have lteen— atmosphere. i tell you what, you have been liusy_ atmosphere. i tell you what, you have been busy doing _ atmosphere. i tell you what, you have been busy doing this, - atmosphere. i tell you what, you have been busy doing this, i- atmosphere. i tell you what, you i have been busy doing this, i know you record — have been busy doing this, i know you record lows _ have been busy doing this, i know you record lows in— have been busy doing this, i know you record lows in a _ have been busy doing this, i know you record lows in a day, - have been busy doing this, i know you record lows in a day, getting. you record lows in a day, getting through— you record lows in a day, getting through them _ you record lows in a day, getting through them. good _ you record lows in a day, getting through them. good job - you record lows in a day, getting through them. good job too. - you record lows in a day, getting| through them. good job too. you you record lows in a day, getting - through them. good job too. you have your work— through them. good job too. you have your work cut — through them. good job too. you have your work cut out _ through them. good job too. you have your work cut out. would _ through them. good job too. you have your work cut out. would you - through them. good job too. you have your work cut out. would you like - through them. good job too. you have your work cut out. would you like a i your work cut out. would you like a little _ your work cut out. would you like a little message, _ your work cut out. would you like a little message, a _ your work cut out. would you like a little message, a special— your work cut out. would you like a | little message, a special message?
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hello! _ little message, a special message? hello! good — little message, a special message? hello! good morning. _ little message, a special message? hello! good morning. olympic- hello! good morning. olympic comrades, sammer. i have missed you. and fellow contestant ugo, for strictly, lovely to see you both. i think they want me to say, i'm going to get you, punk, but i think we know the scale of what is coming ahead. i'm part terrified and a little bit excited. i'm really looking forward to getting to know you and the other contestants over the next few weeks and i wish all the next few weeks and i wish all the best. the most important question is for sam, where is your allegiance going to lie, the man go toe to toe with on a question of sport, every time that studio, or are you going to go through the strong bond that we formed over the olympics? which way is it going, sam? m]! olympics? which way is it going, sam? �* olympics? which way is it going, sam? . , olympics? which way is it going, sam? , , olympics? which way is it going, sam? , i“, , sam? alli can say is, my phone is buzzinu. sam? alli can say is, my phone is buzzing. whoever _ sam? alli can say is, my phone is buzzing. whoever you _ sam? alli can say is, my phone is buzzing. whoever you are - sam? alli can say is, my phone is buzzing. whoever you are with - sam? all i can say is, my phone is| buzzing. whoever you are with that there is your _ buzzing. whoever you are with that there is your person. _
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buzzing. whoever you are with that there is your person. have - buzzing. whoever you are with that there is your person. have you - buzzing. whoever you are with that there is your person. have you got| there is your person. have you got one football _ there is your person. have you got one football team _ there is your person. have you got one football team or— there is your person. have you got one football team or one - there is your person. have you got one football team or one sports i one football team or one sports team? ., . , one football team or one sports team? ., ~ , ., one football team or one sports team? ., ~ ., ., , team? no. always have a back-up, uao. team? no. always have a back-up, uo. it team? no. always have a back-up, ugo- it will— team? no. always have a back-up, ugo- it will be _ team? no. always have a back-up, ugo. it will be whoever _ team? no. always have a back-up, ugo. it will be whoever is _ team? no. always have a back-up, ugo. it will be whoever is wearing i ugo. it will be whoever is wearing the most sparkles _ ugo. it will be whoever is wearing the most sparkles every - ugo. it will be whoever is wearing the most sparkles every night. . ugo. it will be whoever is wearing the most sparkles every night. i l the most sparkles every night. i like the most sparkles every night. like your the most sparkles every night. i like your style. ugo _ the most sparkles every night. i like your style. ugo has - the most sparkles every night. i like your style. ugo has a - the most sparkles every night. i like your style. ugo has a head | like your style. ugo has a head start, sparkling _ like your style. ugo has a head start, sparkling away! - like your style. ugo has a head start, sparkling away! he - like your style. ugo has a head start, sparkling away! he has l like your style. ugo has a head i start, sparkling away! he has your first about, i reckon! good luck with all of it. a question of sport returns friday the 3rd of september. you are watching bbc breakfast.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. door—to—door manhunt — a un document warns the taliban has stepped up its search for people who worked for nato forces or the previous afghan government. more pressure on the foreign secretary, dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made at all. the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees, after a five—year—old boy fell to his death from a hotel window in sheffield. morrisons has accepted an improved offer from one of the two american private investment groups involved in a takeover battle for the company. the deal would be worth £7 billion.

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