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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 20, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. door—to—door manhunt — a un document warns the taliban has stepped up its search for people who worked for nato forces or the previous afghan government. more pressure on the foreign secretary, dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made at all. the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees, after a five—year—old boy fell to his death from a hotel window in sheffield. morrisons has accepted an improved offer from one of the two american private investment groups involved in a takeover battle for the company. the deal would be worth £7 billion.
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in scotland the snp and the greens agree a new power—sharing agreement, but stop short of a formal coalition. the subscription site onlyfans has announced it will block sexually explicit photos and videos from october. tracking by air, land and sea — kenya undertakes it's first national wildlife census — counting all the animals in the country. good morning and welcome to bbc news. in towns and cities around afghanistan, the taliban have
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stepped up their search for people who've worked for nato forces or the previous afghan government. a report for the un says the taliban has lists of individuals and is arresting or threatening to kill family members of targets, unless they surrender. now, in other developments amnesty international has accused the taliban of killing and torturing nine men from afghanistan's hazara minority last month. amnesty said the killings were a "horrifying indicator of what taliban rule may bring". meanwhile, the united states says it's intensified its evacuation efforts from afghanistan, by attempting to fly thousands more people out of the capital kabul. and here, the foreign secretary dominic raab is facing growing pressure to resign after it emerged a phone call he asked a junior minister to make, to his afghan counterpart, never took place.
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our afghanistan correspondent, secunder kermani, is in kabul, and has more details on the situation there — and the amnesty report into the taliban killings of the hazara minority. this is in malistan district in ghazni province, where we've had for a number of weeks now reports of the murder of a number of civilians. in fact, i spoke to one family. they said that two of their sons had been accused by the taliban of working for the government, of working with army. it wasn't true. by the time they brought their id cards out to show to the taliban, the taliban had already shot them in the head. amnesty international detailing the murder of nine other civilians in that area. this is a couple of weeks back when the taliban took it over. and, as you say, there's particular concern about the treatment of the hazara minority. they are a community that has long been persecuted.
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i have to say that yesterday — hazara minority are members of the shia sect of islam and yesterday was a holy day for them. they were holding rallies here. some members of the community saying that they felt safe, that they didn't feel they had anything to fear from the taliban. but in this area, in ghazni province, there seems to have been, for some reason or another, very worrying reports of these massacres and these extrajudicial killings by the taliban. i think it underlines the rather chaotic situation in the country. what is happening in one place might not be happening in another. we were just speaking to one senior localjournalist in eastern afghanistan and he said a group of taliban fightersjust turned up at his house to question him, were trying to confiscate his vehicle. another group of taliban fighters then turned up and tried to protect him. difficult to really understand and to fathom exactly what the group's central policy is. they say they have issued an amnesty for all those linked to the government, that people have nothing to fear, but many aren't necessarily feeling
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reassured by that and they do worry they will be targeted. certainly around the airport, the taliban are not keen on us filming, they don't want these scenes of so many afghans fleeing the country to be broadcast internationally any more. i think they want to project an image of stability and that undermines it. it is interesting, the tone of different taliban members. you can see kind of a big disparity at times. very friendly, very approachable, talking to us, offering us tea, wanting to know who we are, where we come from. at other times, very aggressive, threatening to break our camera. so that really i think speaks to this kind of broader dichotomy in the taliban's behaviour at the moment. on the one hand, they are engaging in discussions with senior political figures here in afghanistan about a future system of governance, and many taking that as a very promising sign that any kind of new government might not necessarily be solely dominated by the taliban even though they are in such firm control of the country. on the other hand, we've had reports
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like the one drawn out for the united nations about people being targeted, members of... former members of the intelligence services, people who had cooperated with international forces being systematically hunted down and detained by the taliban, well a real dichotomy, and it's not always easy to get reliable information, particularly from outside of kabul, with many localjournalist either having fled the country, trying to flee the country are being too worried to report what's really going on. that was secunder kermani with the latest in afghanistan. 18 million people in afghanistan, nearly half of the population, depend on life—saving assistance. the country was already suffering from extreme drought before the displacement caused by the taliban takeover. international aid charities have appealed for more funding in order to provide continued support. nilab mobarez, acting president of the afghan red crescent society, is in kabul and explained the difficulties they're facing. the fighting is much less.
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before the problem was that the fighting was making everybody slow down. now it's a different kind of, you know, difficulty, which is lack of governmental systems and international ngos and the slowdown for the fact that systems cannot work, even up to two days ago. yesterday was a holiday but on wednesday banks were not working, so this is another type of difficulty but absolutely, it is existing. that was nilab mobarez speaking to us earlier. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, is facing further scrutiny, after it emerged that a phone call he was urged to make last week — to help evacuate interpreters
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from afghanistan — never actually happened. our political correspondent nick eardley is at westminster. the pressure is growing on him, as are the questions, nick. it is indeed. dominic _ are the questions, nick. it is indeed. dominic raab - are the questions, nick. it 3 indeed. dominic raab was on holiday last week when the taliban were making some pretty rapid advances throughout afghanistan, and last friday officials at the foreign office urged him to call his counterpart in afghanistan to try and speed up the process of getting some interpreters who had worked with the uk out of the country. we knew yesterday that mr raab didn't make that call. he said he had delegated it to a junior minister, but this morning we find out through the daily mail that the call wasn't made at all. the reason the foreign office says is that there was a rapidly changing situation in the country and they just simply wasn't enough time to set up that call. we
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have also heard ministers on the airwaves this morning saying that evenif airwaves this morning saying that even if that call had been made it might not have made that much of a difference because things were changing so quickly, but there has been considerable criticism of dominic raab for not making the call in the first place, and i think there will be even more criticism now that we know that call didn't take place at all. a couple of questions the government will be asked. one, had mr raab agreed to make the call, would it have happened, would he have had enough priority to make sure that conversation with what was the then afghan government happen, and, secondly, why didn't he then returned from his holiday until the monday, if the government knew how rapidly deteriorating the situation was over friday and saturday when kabul was eventually taken over by the taliban on sunday. opposition parties have called on mr raab to resign. there is no sign of that happening. when he was asked about
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it yesterday the foreign secretary said he wasn't going to do so. but i think it also helps the opposition paint a picture of a government that wasn't prepared, firstly, for the taliban's rapid advance and the collapse of the afghan government, but secondly there will now be accusations that the government took too long to act when it became clear that the taliban was taking over. nick eardley, thank you very much indeed. lots of questions there, highlighted by nick eardley. let's pick up straightaway and get a few answers to those hopefully. let's discuss this with colonel richard kemp, former commander of the british forces in afghanistan. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. that point of a call not being made, yes, i know you are not involved in this, but would you have expected something to have come from a higher level of the government? yes, absolutely. ithink a higher level of the government? yes, absolutely. i think it was a dire _ yes, absolutely. i think it was a dire situation and it got even worse
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but it _ dire situation and it got even worse but it... there could have been assistance _ but it... there could have been assistance from the government in kabul_ assistance from the government in kabul to— assistance from the government in kabul to help the interpreters we wanted _ kabul to help the interpreters we wanted to evacuate and other people we wanted _ wanted to evacuate and other people we wanted to move out. i think one thing _ we wanted to move out. i think one thing that— we wanted to move out. i think one thing that may be misunderstood in some _ thing that may be misunderstood in some quarters is that in particular if you _ some quarters is that in particular if you are — some quarters is that in particular if you are dealing with the afghans, and the _ if you are dealing with the afghans, and the same goes for many other countries — and the same goes for many other countries in — and the same goes for many other countries in the region, they won't deal with— countries in the region, they won't deal with someone at the lower ievet~ _ deal with someone at the lower ievet~ it — deal with someone at the lower level. it has to be the equivalent, it has— level. it has to be the equivalent, it has to _ level. it has to be the equivalent, it has to be — level. it has to be the equivalent, it has to be the equivalent of them, and that— it has to be the equivalent of them, and that is— it has to be the equivalent of them, and that is extremely important for afghans _ and that is extremely important for afghans. certainly, even if they would _ afghans. certainly, even if they would answer the call, they would be influenced _ would answer the call, they would be influenced by it, and i have experienced that myself working in afghanistan that, you know, for example. — afghanistan that, you know, for example, if somebody at a higher level— example, if somebody at a higher level than— example, if somebody at a higher level than me sent me with a message to his _ level than me sent me with a message to his opposite number, i wouldn't be received. iwould be ignored. so that is— be received. iwould be ignored. so that is important. i think this whole — that is important. i think this whole attitude in a way typifies what _ whole attitude in a way typifies what has — whole attitude in a way typifies what has often been seen throughout this campaign in afghanistan, which
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is a ministerial lack of urgency, tack— is a ministerial lack of urgency, tack of— is a ministerial lack of urgency, lack of understanding of the need to put as— lack of understanding of the need to put as much effort as quickly as possible — put as much effort as quickly as possible behind decision—making and behind _ possible behind decision—making and behind gaining resources and support for the _ behind gaining resources and support for the fighting. it is crucial, in many— for the fighting. it is crucial, in many cases, in a conflict situation. they— many cases, in a conflict situation. they expect — many cases, in a conflict situation. they expect our soldiers to do that yet somehow very often ministers themselves don't do the same thing. why do— themselves don't do the same thing. why do you _ themselves don't do the same thing. why do you think that is, colonel? is it something that has developed more recently or not? i is it something that has developed more recently or not?— more recently or not? i think it is, because certainly _ more recently or not? i think it is, because certainly in _ more recently or not? i think it is, because certainly in recent - because certainly in recent generations we have very few politicians and even fewer political leader— politicians and even fewer political leader mikes who have had military experience, who have experienced confiict _ experience, who have experienced conflict first hand —— leaders who have _ conflict first hand —— leaders who have had — conflict first hand —— leaders who have had. and understand the need for, have had. and understand the need for. as— have had. and understand the need for, as churchill would call it, actionm _ for, as churchill would call it, action... but in previous generations i think there were far
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more, _ generations i think there were far more, given we had gone through two world _ more, given we had gone through two world wars, _ more, given we had gone through two world wars, far more political leaders — world wars, far more political leaders with no tricks into had a greater— leaders with no tricks into had a greater understanding of the sort of thing _ greater understanding of the sort of thing i_ greater understanding of the sort of thin. ., , i. greater understanding of the sort of thin. ., , ,, ., greater understanding of the sort of thin. ., , ., , thing. i am sure you have been watchin: thing. i am sure you have been watching things _ thing. i am sure you have been watching things unfold - thing. i am sure you have been watching things unfold over - thing. i am sure you have been| watching things unfold over the weekend. you must have played through a scenario that you would have expected. what should have happened? have expected. what should have ha ened? ~ have expected. what should have ha--ened? ~ , , have expected. what should have ha ened? ~ , , happened? well, my first point i think would _ happened? well, my first point i think would be _ happened? well, my first point i think would be that _ happened? well, my first point i think would be that we - happened? well, my first point i think would be that we should i happened? well, my first point i - think would be that we should not... well, _ think would be that we should not... well, president biden should not have made a decision to unconditionally withdraw, but given that is— unconditionally withdraw, but given that is what he did back in may i think— that is what he did back in may i think the — that is what he did back in may i think the real problem was the speed at which _ think the real problem was the speed at which he _ think the real problem was the speed at which he did it. it was far too quick. _ at which he did it. it was far too quick. and — at which he did it. it was far too quick. and it _ at which he did it. it was far too quick, and it didn't give time for the afghan government and the afghan security— the afghan government and the afghan security forces to readjust and plan and prepare for a totally different situation — and prepare for a totally different situation they were now facing in so n1any_ situation they were now facing in so many ways — situation they were now facing in so many ways. secondly, he did it at the height— many ways. secondly, he did it at the height of the taliban fighting season~ — the height of the taliban fighting season. if he had waited and maybe, you know. _ season. if he had waited and maybe, you know, did do more drawn—out withdrawal. —
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you know, did do more drawn—out withdrawal, waited at least until the autumn of the winter, then we would _ the autumn of the winter, then we would not — the autumn of the winter, then we would not have been in the taliban fighting _ would not have been in the taliban fighting season. we are now at the height— fighting season. we are now at the height of— fighting season. we are now at the height of the taliban fighting season~ _ height of the taliban fighting season. in the autumn and winter they far— season. in the autumn and winter they far less potent. they tend to, you know. — they far less potent. they tend to, you know, the a great deal less active. — you know, the a great deal less active. and _ you know, the a great deal less active, and therefore we would not have seen — active, and therefore we would not have seen i— active, and therefore we would not have seen i don't think the real descent— have seen i don't think the real descent into chaos we have seen now and the _ descent into chaos we have seen now and the speed of the fall of the afghan— and the speed of the fall of the afghan government. and i think... there _ afghan government. and i think... there was— afghan government. and i think... there was a — afghan government. and i think... there was a great deal of unpreparedness, i'm sure, among the british— unpreparedness, i'm sure, among the british and _ unpreparedness, i'm sure, among the british and the american governments about what— british and the american governments about what was going to happen. they didn't— about what was going to happen. they didn't really— about what was going to happen. they didn't really appreciate it and it meant — didn't really appreciate it and it meant they weren't properly advised or their— meant they weren't properly advised or their advisers did not have the necessary— or their advisers did not have the necessary assessments and intelligence from the ground. coionei— intelligence from the ground. colonel kemp, i'm so sorry to interrupt, but i'd like to get this last point from you. it is what it is, the taliban are saying they want to form an inclusive government. what is it like talking and working
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with the taliban? i mean, realistically. you have been there, you have been on the ground. what is coming up? how do you see a form of recognition of a government that includes the taliban?— includes the taliban? well, i'm certain that _ includes the taliban? well, i'm certain that the _ includes the taliban? well, i'm certain that the only _ includes the taliban? well, i'm certain that the only real... - includes the taliban? well, i'm| certain that the only real... the taliban— certain that the only real... the taliban have changed quite a lot. they— taliban have changed quite a lot. they have — taliban have changed quite a lot. they have learned a lot in 20 years. but the _ they have learned a lot in 20 years. but the sort — they have learned a lot in 20 years. but the sort of thing they have learned — but the sort of thing they have learned is i think rate of strategic thinking, — learned is i think rate of strategic thinking, which we saw in this campaign, _ thinking, which we saw in this campaign, where they effectively took the — campaign, where they effectively took the north first which was the iriggest _ took the north first which was the biggest problem area they had faced, and, biggest problem area they had faced, and. you _ biggest problem area they had faced, and, you know, that is a different kind of— and, you know, that is a different kind of approach from the last time. secondly, _ kind of approach from the last time. secondly, they have become more media _ secondly, they have become more media serving, so they know what to say -- _ media serving, so they know what to say -- media— media serving, so they know what to say —— media savvy. they know what to say— say —— media savvy. they know what to say to _ say —— media savvy. they know what to say to the — say —— media savvy. they know what to say to the west to lull them into a false _ to say to the west to lull them into a false sense of confidence, and i think— a false sense of confidence, and i think they— a false sense of confidence, and i think they want that. they don't want _ think they want that. they don't want any— think they want that. they don't want any second thoughts from the west _ want any second thoughts from the west. they don't want us to decide to stay— west. they don't want us to decide to stay a _ west. they don't want us to decide to stay a irit— west. they don't want us to decide to stay a bit longer or deploy more forces _ to stay a bit longer or deploy more forces and — to stay a bit longer or deploy more
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forces and i— to stay a bit longer or deploy more forces and i think that is why they will be _ forces and i think that is why they will be keen to let western forces complete — will be keen to let western forces complete their evacuation and get out, and _ complete their evacuation and get out, and i— complete their evacuation and get out, and i don't think we will seem — out, and i don't think we will seem they— out, and i don't think we will see... they don't want clashes between — see... they don't want clashes between western forces and the taliban, — between western forces and the taliban, but given that the taliban and our— taliban, but given that the taliban and our forces are in such close proximity— and our forces are in such close proximity in _ and our forces are in such close proximity in kabul that may not be avoidable — proximity in kabul that may not be avoidable. it may be we do see ciashes. — avoidable. it may be we do see clashes, particularly as i understand the taliban from the south _ understand the taliban from the south in — understand the taliban from the south in helmand where we have been fighting _ south in helmand where we have been fighting extensively in recent years are coming north to help secure kabul. — are coming north to help secure kabul. and _ are coming north to help secure kabul, and that could certainly mean ciashes _ kabul, and that could certainly mean ciashes in _ kabul, and that could certainly mean clashes in terms of sort of revenge killings— clashes in terms of sort of revenge killings and — clashes in terms of sort of revenge killings and things like that against _ killings and things like that against our soldiers. sol killings and things like that against our soldiers. so i think that— against our soldiers. so i think that is— against our soldiers. so i think that is the _ against our soldiers. so i think that is the immediate situation. in the longer— that is the immediate situation. in the longer term, the taliban will be 'ust the longer term, the taliban will be just as _ the longer term, the taliban will be just as brutal, just as savage as they— just as brutal, just as savage as they ever— just as brutal, just as savage as they ever were before, and we all know _ they ever were before, and we all know the — they ever were before, and we all know the way they operate. i think the very— know the way they operate. i think the very idea of diplomatic recognition for people who, first of all, enabled the 9/11 attacks, the worst _ all, enabled the 9/11 attacks, the worst terrorist attack ever, and secondly — worst terrorist attack ever, and secondly have been murdering and
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butchering their way around afghanistan for many years, including killing many of our troops, _ including killing many of our troops, i_ including killing many of our troops, i think it's the same as thinking — troops, i think it's the same as thinking about having diplomatic relations— thinking about having diplomatic relations with the islamic state when _ relations with the islamic state when they controlled territory in syria _ when they controlled territory in syria and — when they controlled territory in syria and iraq. to me, it is unthinkable. at the moment at least. uniess _ unthinkable. at the moment at least. unless we _ unthinkable. at the moment at least. unless we do see evidence that what they say— unless we do see evidence that what they say actually is the case, but i don't _ they say actually is the case, but i don't believe it will be.— don't believe it will be. colonel richard kemp, _ don't believe it will be. colonel richard kemp, thank _ don't believe it will be. colonel richard kemp, thank you - don't believe it will be. colonel richard kemp, thank you very l don't believe it will be. colonel - richard kemp, thank you very much for your time this morning on bbc news. former commander there of the british forces in afghanistan in 2003. the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees after a five—year—old boy who recently arrived in the uk with his family fell to his death from a window on the ninth floor of a hotel. mohammed munib majeedi and his family were put up at the hotel in sheffield as part of the government's resettlement scheme.
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our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, reports. a new life in a new country that's ended in tragedy. this hotel in sheffield is now the scene of a major investigation into a dreadful accident. the victim, a five—year—old afghan boy, mohammed munib majeedi. he had recently arrived with his parents and four siblings from kabul — refugees given protection in the uk because his father worked in the british embassy. police and ambulances were called to the oyo metropolitan hotel on wednesday afternoon, after the boy fell from a ninth—floor window. the translator working with the afghan families being housed there said all of them were devastated. the boy and his family came to the uk under the government scheme to protect people who were at risk from the taliban. the home office says everyone is deeply saddened at the tragic death. refugee charities are demanding a wider investigation into how families arriving in the uk are being treated. there are claims that some residents had concerns about windows.
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those claims may be part of the police's investigation. but while the home office says it was told of no safety concerns, it has moved all families to alternative accommodation. dominic casciani, bbc news. in scotland, a new power—sharing agreement between the snp and the greens has been agreed. the deal will take the greens into a national government for the first time anywhere in the uk. it will also give the scottish government a majority to pass legislation at holyrood, including a new independence referendum bill. the co—operation agreement between the two parties stops short of a full coalition. one of the uk's biggest supermarket chains, morrisons, has accepted an improved offer from one of the two american private investment groups battling to take over the company. the morrisons board said that the £7 billion dealfrom clayton, dubilier and rice was good value for shareholders,
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whilst also protecting the firm's "fundamental character". with me now is our business correspondent, katy austin. let's get the latest on this. this is the latest step in let's get the latest on this. this is the latest step— let's get the latest on this. this is the latest step in what has now become a bidding _ is the latest step in what has now become a bidding war _ is the latest step in what has now become a bidding war over- is the latest step in what has now. become a bidding war over briton's fourth largest supermarket. there was a previous offer from a different group in the us, about £6.7 billion, fortress group. this offerfrom clayton, dubilier and offer from clayton, dubilier and rice offerfrom clayton, dubilier and rice is £7 billion and morrison's board is recommending this to shareholders now. you might think morrisons might look an attractive prospect at the moment because retailers have done quite well through the pandemic. people are always going to want to buy food, and morrisons has a number of characteristics that are a bit different. it owns most of its sites for example, which is quite different to a lot of other supermarkets that might have sold
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some and lease them back. both bidders have been keen to stress they won't just sell off those sites, they want to keep them. morrisons also has its own supply chain, one of the largest producers of fresh food in the uk, so that is another important characteristic these bidders might have their eye on. it really both of them saying they don't really want to change anything and that is one of the reasons the morrisons board has recommended this to shareholders. the shareholders to get the final say, and we understand now they will be a meeting in october where they will be able to vote on this proposal. will be able to vote on this pt°p°sal-_ will be able to vote on this ro osal. . , . ,, i. will be able to vote on this ro osal. ., , . ~' ,, , proposal. 0k, katy, thank you very much for that. _ proposal. 0k, katy, thank you very much for that. the _ proposal. ok, katy, thank you very much for that. the final— proposal. 0k, katy, thank you very much for that. the final word - proposal. 0k, katy, thank you very much for that. the final word in - much for that. the final word in october. the subscription site onlyfans, known for its adult content, you. —— has announced it will block sexually explicit photos and videos from one october. onlyfans said the change had come after pressure from banking partners. the site has grown during the pandemic and says it
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has 130 million users. the announcement comes after bbc news had approached the company for a response to leaked documents concerning accounts which posted illegal content. thousands of people have been unlawfully detained in police custody in england and wales because of delays in transferring them to mental health beds. a 2018 government report looked at seven police forces and estimated there were as many as 4,500 cases per year. unlawful detainment occurs when police powers to hold someone under criminal law end but a bed can't be found. sean dilley reports. i was in bed and he came into my room with a pillow and put the pillow over my face. and i managed to push him away and i asked him, "why are you doing this to me?" and he says, "my thoughts are telling me if i kill you now, "i won't experience the pain of you dying when i grow up."
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this is blue. this is thomas, annette's 15—year—old son. earlier this year, he twice attempted to take his mother's life. but she insists he's not a killer and he's not a criminal. instead, she says, he was experiencing an acute mental health crisis. so the next thing, i could hear them saying, "right, we're going to arrest you on suspicion "of attempted murder." my heart sank. i didn't call them to have him arrested. i called them to help him. thomas was taken to southend police station. the next day, he was identified as needing hospital admission, but it wasn't until three and a half days after his arrest that he was found a suitable bed. essex police said that after his arrest thomas was bailed. following his release from custody they supported him in a safe environment within essex police premises, in a specially designated room for vulnerable children while they worked hard with their partners in health and social care to find the best
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place for him to receive the care he needed. but thomas' case isn't isolated. we used freedom of information laws to force publication of a sensitive government report from july 2018 that showed up to 3,500 cases where people in mental health crisis were unlawfully detained in police custody in england and wales in a year. a lack of suitable mental health beds was most often the cause. police sources have told me they've been working closely with nhs partners to reduce significantly the number of times people are unlawfully held until beds become available. nobody, though, has been able to provide any figures, as they're not recorded, and the picture's different too depending where you are, with some forces managing to end the practice completely and in other areas unlawful detentions are still happening. you're damned if you do, you're damned if you don't. it was the concerns of this recently retired chief constable that prompted the report. there's a point that comes
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where actually somebody could be released from custody, wasn't being released from custody, and at that point i would deem that to be unlawful detention, whilst we're waiting for a bed, a mental health bed, to become available. a number of my colleague chief constables around the country said that the chief has given the authority for people to be kept unlawfully in custody and if any challenges that came, then the chief would deal with that. this approved mental health professional, who prefers to remain anonymous, attends custody and has the power to detain people under the mental health act. but he can only do that when beds are available. people like me are being asked to do things without being resourced or equipped to do it properly. i would describe the system as being dysfunctional and struggling to cope. i felt like my heart was wrenched out of me. it really broke me. they need to put more funding into it. and they need to help people. they need to support these
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children and adults. the government says it is committed to supporting people experiencing a mental health crisis, but annette marshall thinks they system has failed her and her son. sean dilley, bbc news. sophie corlett is from the mental health charity, mind. shejoins us now. thank you she joins us now. thank you for joining us on bbc news. what do you make of what you have just heard and also the pressure is being put the system? also the pressure is being put the s stem? ~ ., , also the pressure is being put the s stem? ~ . , ., , also the pressure is being put the s stem? ~ . , ., system? well, really, that is a really tragic — system? well, really, that is a really tragic story _ system? well, really, that is a really tragic story for - system? well, really, that is a really tragic story for the - really tragic story for the marshalls, _ really tragic story for the marshalls, and - really tragic story for the j marshalls, and obviously really tragic story for the - marshalls, and obviously that is really tragic story for the _ marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands— marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands of— marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands of stories. _ marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands of stories. if _ marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands of stories. if you - marshalls, and obviously that is one of thousands of stories. if you are l of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis — of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis and _ of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis and your— of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis and your mind - of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis and your mind is - of thousands of stories. if you are in a crisis and your mind is in - in a crisis and your mind is in meltdown, _ in a crisis and your mind is in meltdown, effectively, - in a crisis and your mind is in meltdown, effectively, you l in a crisis and your mind is in i meltdown, effectively, you are probably— meltdown, effectively, you are probably very _ meltdown, effectively, you are probably very frightened - meltdown, effectively, you are probably very frightened and l probably very frightened and confused, _ probably very frightened and confused, happily— probably very frightened and confused, happily setting - probably very frightened and confused, happily setting isi probably very frightened and i confused, happily setting isjust absolutely— confused, happily setting isjust absolutely the _ confused, happily setting isjust absolutely the wrong _ confused, happily setting isjust absolutely the wrong place - confused, happily setting isjust absolutely the wrong place youl confused, happily setting is just - absolutely the wrong place you need to he _ absolutely the wrong place you need to he obviousiy— absolutely the wrong place you need to be. obviously in _ absolutely the wrong place you need to be. obviously in thomas's - absolutely the wrong place you need to be. obviously in thomas's case i to be. obviously in thomas's case moved _ to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him — to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him out _ to be. obviously in thomas's case
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moved him out of— to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him out of the _ to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him out of the cell, - to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him out of the cell, but. to be. obviously in thomas's case moved him out of the cell, but inl moved him out of the cell, but in many— moved him out of the cell, but in many cases— moved him out of the cell, but in many cases people _ moved him out of the cell, but in many cases people will _ moved him out of the cell, but in many cases people will remain . moved him out of the cell, but in many cases people will remain in moved him out of the cell, but in. many cases people will remain in a cell. many cases people will remain in a ceii~ it _ many cases people will remain in a ceii~ it noisy. — many cases people will remain in a cell. it noisy, cold, _ many cases people will remain in a cell. it noisy, cold, a _ many cases people will remain in a cell. it noisy, cold, a cold - cell. it noisy, cold, a cold environment _ cell. it noisy, cold, a cold environment not - cell. it noisy, cold, a cold . environment not necessarily cell. it noisy, cold, a cold - environment not necessarily in temperature _ environment not necessarily in temperature at— environment not necessarily in temperature. atjust _ environment not necessarily in temperature. at just the - environment not necessarily in| temperature. at just the wrong environment not necessarily in- temperature. atjust the wrong place when what _ temperature. atjust the wrong place when what you're _ temperature. atjust the wrong place when what you're needing _ temperature. atjust the wrong place when what you're needing it - when what you're needing it somewhere _ when what you're needing it somewhere safe _ when what you're needing it somewhere safe and - when what you're needing it - somewhere safe and welcoming. it absolutely — somewhere safe and welcoming. it absolutely shows _ somewhere safe and welcoming. it absolutely shows that _ somewhere safe and welcoming. it absolutely shows that people - somewhere safe and welcoming. it absolutely shows that people are l somewhere safe and welcoming. it . absolutely shows that people are not getting _ absolutely shows that people are not getting what — absolutely shows that people are not getting what they _ absolutely shows that people are not getting what they need _ absolutely shows that people are not getting what they need at _ absolutely shows that people are not getting what they need at the - absolutely shows that people are not getting what they need at the right . getting what they need at the right time _ getting what they need at the right time any— getting what they need at the right time anyweight— getting what they need at the right time. any weight when _ getting what they need at the right time. any weight when you're - getting what they need at the right time. any weight when you're in i getting what they need at the right l time. any weight when you're in that sort of— time. any weight when you're in that sort of state — time. any weight when you're in that sort of state to — time. any weight when you're in that sort of state to move _ time. any weight when you're in that sort of state to move to _ time. any weight when you're in that sort of state to move to the - time. any weight when you're in that sort of state to move to the right - sort of state to move to the right environment, _ sort of state to move to the right environment, where _ sort of state to move to the right environment, where you - sort of state to move to the right environment, where you can - sort of state to move to the right| environment, where you can start getting _ environment, where you can start getting care — environment, where you can start getting care and _ environment, where you can start getting care and support, - environment, where you can start getting care and support, is- environment, where you can starti getting care and support, is really, you know. — getting care and support, is really, you know. it— getting care and support, is really, you know. it is— getting care and support, is really, you know, it is terrible. _ getting care and support, is really, you know, it is terrible. white - getting care and support, is really, | you know, it is terrible. white what picture _ you know, it is terrible. white what picture do — you know, it is terrible. white what picture do you _ you know, it is terrible. white what picture do you have _ you know, it is terrible. white what picture do you have at _ you know, it is terrible. white what picture do you have at the - you know, it is terrible. white what picture do you have at the moment| picture do you have at the moment about— picture do you have at the moment about the _ picture do you have at the moment about the pressure _ picture do you have at the moment about the pressure there _ picture do you have at the moment about the pressure there is - picture do you have at the moment about the pressure there is on - picture do you have at the momentl about the pressure there is on bets. -- and what picture do you have. what is going _ -- and what picture do you have. what is going on _ -- and what picture do you have. what is going on out _ -- and what picture do you have. what is going on out there? - -- and what picture do you have. what is going on out there? 0ur| what is going on out there? our understanding is there is a great pressure — understanding is there is a great pressure on _ understanding is there is a great pressure on beds _ understanding is there is a great pressure on beds at _ understanding is there is a great pressure on beds at the - understanding is there is a great. pressure on beds at the moment. understanding is there is a great - pressure on beds at the moment. in some _ pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas— pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas of— pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas of the _ pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas of the country— pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas of the country this - pressure on beds at the moment. in some areas of the country this does| some areas of the country this does seem _ some areas of the country this does seem to _ some areas of the country this does seem to work— some areas of the country this does seem to work in _ some areas of the country this does seem to work in a _ some areas of the country this does seem to work in a much _ some areas of the country this does seem to work in a much better- some areas of the country this does seem to work in a much better wayl seem to work in a much better way but in _ seem to work in a much better way but in other— seem to work in a much better way but in other areas— seem to work in a much better way but in other areas of— seem to work in a much better way but in other areas of the _ seem to work in a much better way but in other areas of the country. but in other areas of the country there _ but in other areas of the country there is— but in other areas of the country there is a — but in other areas of the country there is a huge _ but in other areas of the country there is a huge pressure - but in other areas of the country there is a huge pressure on- but in other areas of the country| there is a huge pressure on beds but in other areas of the country. there is a huge pressure on beds to there is a huge pressure on beds to the extent— there is a huge pressure on beds to the extent that _ there is a huge pressure on beds to the extent that when _ there is a huge pressure on beds to the extent that when people - there is a huge pressure on beds to the extent that when people are . the extent that when people are admitted —
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the extent that when people are admitted they— the extent that when people are admitted they are _ the extent that when people are admitted they are in _ the extent that when people are admitted they are in their- the extent that when people are admitted they are in their local. admitted they are in their local area, _ admitted they are in their local area, they— admitted they are in their local area, theyare— admitted they are in their local area, they are not _ admitted they are in their local area, they are not being - admitted they are in their local i area, they are not being admitted admitted they are in their local - area, they are not being admitted at the iocai— area, they are not being admitted at the local area — area, they are not being admitted at the local area but _ area, they are not being admitted at the local area but they— area, they are not being admitted at the local area but they are _ area, they are not being admitted at the local area but they are being - the local area but they are being moved _ the local area but they are being moved around _ the local area but they are being moved around the _ the local area but they are being moved around the country. - the local area but they are beingl moved around the country. there the local area but they are being - moved around the country. there has been an— moved around the country. there has been an attempt— moved around the country. there has been an attempt to _ moved around the country. there has been an attempt to stop _ moved around the country. there has been an attempt to stop this - been an attempt to stop this happening _ been an attempt to stop this happening but _ been an attempt to stop this happening but they- been an attempt to stop this happening but they are - been an attempt to stop this - happening but they are struggling to make any— happening but they are struggling to make any inroads _ happening but they are struggling to make any inroads on _ happening but they are struggling to make any inroads on that _ happening but they are struggling to make any inroads on that some - happening but they are struggling to . make any inroads on that some people are being _ make any inroads on that some people are being moved — make any inroads on that some people are being moved around _ make any inroads on that some people are being moved around the _ make any inroads on that some people are being moved around the country. are being moved around the country away from _ are being moved around the country away from home, _ are being moved around the country away from home, they _ are being moved around the country away from home, they are - are being moved around the countryl away from home, they are struggling to get— away from home, they are struggling to get into _ away from home, they are struggling to get into hospital. _ away from home, they are struggling to get into hospital. we _ away from home, they are struggling to get into hospital. we know- away from home, they are struggling to get into hospital. we know that i to get into hospital. we know that one view _ to get into hospital. we know that one view is— to get into hospital. we know that one view is there _ to get into hospital. we know that one view is there is _ to get into hospital. we know that one view is there is no _ to get into hospital. we know that one view is there is no good - to get into hospital. we know that l one view is there is no good support before, _ one view is there is no good support before, so— one view is there is no good support before, so before _ one view is there is no good support before, so before the _ one view is there is no good support before, so before the pandemic, - one view is there is no good supporti before, so before the pandemic, one of the _ before, so before the pandemic, one of the things. — before, so before the pandemic, one of the things, people _ before, so before the pandemic, one of the things, people are _ before, so before the pandemic, one of the things, people are reaching i of the things, people are reaching services _ of the things, people are reaching services when _ of the things, people are reaching services when they— of the things, people are reaching services when they are _ of the things, people are reaching services when they are in - of the things, people are reaching services when they are in crisis i services when they are in crisis rather— services when they are in crisis rather than _ services when they are in crisis rather than having _ services when they are in crisis rather than having good - services when they are in crisis i rather than having good services before _ rather than having good services before which _ rather than having good services before which might _ rather than having good services before which might actually - rather than having good services. before which might actually prevent them from — before which might actually prevent them from going _ before which might actually prevent them from going into _ before which might actually prevent them from going into a _ before which might actually prevent them from going into a crisis - before which might actually prevent them from going into a crisis and i them from going into a crisis and actually— them from going into a crisis and actually needing _ them from going into a crisis and actually needing this _ them from going into a crisis and actually needing this sort - them from going into a crisis and actually needing this sort of - actually needing this sort of intensive _ actually needing this sort of intensive support. - actually needing this sort of intensive support.— actually needing this sort of intensive support. you mentioned there were _ intensive support. you mentioned there were some _ intensive support. you mentioned there were some places _ intensive support. you mentioned there were some places across i intensive support. you mentioned| there were some places across the country that were doing a good job. where are they and and why are they getting it right? thea;r where are they and and why are they getting it right?— getting it right? they are different laces and getting it right? they are different places and for _ getting it right? they are different places and for different _ getting it right? they are different places and for different reasons, l places and for different reasons, actuaiiy — places and for different reasons, actuaiiy we _ places and for different reasons, actually. we know— places and for different reasons, actually. we know areas - places and for different reasons,
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actually. we know areas in - places and for different reasons, actually. we know areas in eastl actually. we know areas in east london — actually. we know areas in east london where _ actually. we know areas in east london where they— actually. we know areas in east london where they have - actually. we know areas in east london where they have been l actually. we know areas in east - london where they have been really -ood london where they have been really good at _ london where they have been really good at putting _ london where they have been really good at putting in— london where they have been really good at putting in good _ london where they have been really good at putting in good early- good at putting in good early intervention— good at putting in good early intervention so— good at putting in good early intervention so that - good at putting in good early intervention so that actuallyl good at putting in good early. intervention so that actually the need _ intervention so that actually the need for— intervention so that actually the need for peopie _ intervention so that actually the need for people to _ intervention so that actually the need for people to go _ intervention so that actually the need for people to go into - intervention so that actually the need for people to go into crisisj need for people to go into crisis and then— need for people to go into crisis and then when _ need for people to go into crisis and then when people - need for people to go into crisis and then when people have - need for people to go into crisisl and then when people have been need for people to go into crisis - and then when people have been in hospital— and then when people have been in hospital and — and then when people have been in hospital and at _ and then when people have been in hospital and at discharge _ and then when people have been in hospital and at discharge from - hospital and at discharge from hospital— hospital and at discharge from hospital they _ hospital and at discharge from hospital they get _ hospital and at discharge from hospital they get really - hospital and at discharge from hospital they get really good i hospital they get really good support _ hospital they get really good support on— hospital they get really good support on the _ hospital they get really good support on the other- hospital they get really good support on the other side. i hospital they get really good i support on the other side. that means— support on the other side. that means you _ support on the other side. that means you can— support on the other side. that means you can discharge - support on the other side. thatl means you can discharge people earlier— means you can discharge people eariier so— means you can discharge people eariier so you _ means you can discharge people earlier so you have _ means you can discharge people earlier so you have fewer- means you can discharge peoplej earlier so you have fewer people means you can discharge people . earlier so you have fewer people in debts, _ earlier so you have fewer people in debts, it— earlier so you have fewer people in debts, it means— earlier so you have fewer people in debts, it means that _ earlier so you have fewer people in debts, it means that when - earlier so you have fewer people in debts, it means that when people i earlier so you have fewer people in l debts, it means that when people do need to— debts, it means that when people do need to go— debts, it means that when people do need to go into — debts, it means that when people do need to go into hospital— debts, it means that when people do need to go into hospital they- debts, it means that when people do need to go into hospital they can - debts, it means that when people do need to go into hospital they can goi need to go into hospital they can go and quicker — need to go into hospital they can go and quicker it— need to go into hospital they can go and quicker. it actually— need to go into hospital they can go and quicker. it actually reduces - need to go into hospital they can go and quicker. it actually reduces the | and quicker. it actually reduces the number— and quicker. it actually reduces the number of— and quicker. it actually reduces the number of peopie _ and quicker. it actually reduces the number of people who _ and quicker. it actually reduces the number of people who are - and quicker. it actually reduces the number of people who are actuallyl number of people who are actually reaching _ number of people who are actually reaching crisis. _ number of people who are actually reaching crisis. dealing _ number of people who are actually reaching crisis. dealing with - number of people who are actually reaching crisis. dealing with it- reaching crisis. dealing with it sooner — reaching crisis. dealing with it sooner. ~ ., ~' reaching crisis. dealing with it sooner. ~ . ~ ., sooner. when we talk about the eo - le sooner. when we talk about the --eole in sooner. when we talk about the people in crisis _ sooner. when we talk about the people in crisis and _ sooner. when we talk about the people in crisis and needing - sooner. when we talk about the people in crisis and needing the j people in crisis and needing the help, has that characteristic or profile changed? who are we talking about? i am thinking particularly during the pandemic. taste about? i am thinking particularly during the pandemic.— about? i am thinking particularly during the pandemic. we are talking about anybody- _ during the pandemic. we are talking about anybody. during _ during the pandemic. we are talking about anybody. during the _ during the pandemic. we are talking| about anybody. during the pandemic we are _ about anybody. during the pandemic we are particularly— about anybody. during the pandemic we are particularly talking _ about anybody. during the pandemic we are particularly talking about - we are particularly talking about younger — we are particularly talking about younger peopie _ we are particularly talking about younger people because - we are particularly talking about younger people because their. we are particularly talking about - younger people because their mental health— younger people because their mental heaith has— younger people because their mental health has been— younger people because their mental health has been affected _ younger people because their mental health has been affected much - younger people because their mental health has been affected much more| health has been affected much more by the _ health has been affected much more by the pandemic, _ health has been affected much more by the pandemic, so _ health has been affected much more by the pandemic, so we _ health has been affected much more by the pandemic, so we are - health has been affected much more by the pandemic, so we are seeing l by the pandemic, so we are seeing increasing — by the pandemic, so we are seeing increasing numbers _ by the pandemic, so we are seeing increasing numbers of _ by the pandemic, so we are seeing increasing numbers of younger - by the pandemic, so we are seeing. increasing numbers of younger people who are _ increasing numbers of younger people who are first _ increasing numbers of younger people who are first coming _ increasing numbers of younger people who are first coming to _ increasing numbers of younger people who are first coming to the _ who are first coming to the attention— who are first coming to the attention of— who are first coming to the attention of services - who are first coming to the
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attention of services or - who are first coming to the i attention of services or where services — attention of services or where services first _ attention of services or where services first came _ attention of services or where services first came to - attention of services or where services first came to the - attention of services or where - services first came to the attention of them _ services first came to the attention of them when _ services first came to the attention of them when they— services first came to the attention of them when they are _ services first came to the attention of them when they are in _ services first came to the attention of them when they are in a - services first came to the attention of them when they are in a much . of them when they are in a much worse _ of them when they are in a much worse state _ of them when they are in a much worse state than _ of them when they are in a much worse state than they— of them when they are in a much worse state than they have - of them when they are in a much worse state than they have been| worse state than they have been before, — worse state than they have been before, so — worse state than they have been before, so people _ worse state than they have been before, so people are _ worse state than they have been before, so people are not- worse state than they have been before, so people are not beingi before, so people are not being picked — before, so people are not being picked up — before, so people are not being picked up at _ before, so people are not being picked up at that _ before, so people are not being picked up at that earlier - before, so people are not being picked up at that earlier point. i before, so people are not being. picked up at that earlier point. we are talking — picked up at that earlier point. we are talking about _ picked up at that earlier point. we are talking about young _ picked up at that earlier point. we are talking about young people . picked up at that earlier point. we . are talking about young people more generally, _ are talking about young people more generally, i— are talking about young people more generally, i suppose, _ are talking about young people more generally, i suppose, to— are talking about young people more generally, i suppose, tojust - are talking about young people more generally, i suppose, tojust those . generally, i suppose, tojust those ending _ generally, i suppose, tojust those ending up — generally, i suppose, tojust those ending up in — generally, i suppose, tojust those ending up in police _ generally, i suppose, tojust those ending up in police custody. - generally, i suppose, tojust those ending up in police custody. we i generally, i suppose, tojust thosei ending up in police custody. we are talking _ ending up in police custody. we are talking about — ending up in police custody. we are talking about people _ ending up in police custody. we are talking about people with _ ending up in police custody. we are talking about people with eating. talking about people with eating disorders, — talking about people with eating disorders, but— talking about people with eating disorders, but also _ talking about people with eating disorders, but also people - talking about people with eating disorders, but also people who. disorders, but also people who already— disorders, but also people who already had _ disorders, but also people who already had mental— disorders, but also people who already had mental health - disorders, but also people who - already had mental health problems, so that— already had mental health problems, so that peopie — already had mental health problems, so that people already— already had mental health problems, so that people already known - already had mental health problems, so that people already known to - so that people already known to services — so that people already known to services whose _ so that people already known to services whose mental- so that people already known to services whose mental health i so that people already known to i services whose mental health has deteriorated — services whose mental health has deteriorated more _ services whose mental health has deteriorated more during - services whose mental health has deteriorated more during the - deteriorated more during the pandemic— deteriorated more during the pandemic and _ deteriorated more during the pandemic and her— deteriorated more during the pandemic and her reaching . deteriorated more during the . pandemic and her reaching crisis faster~ _ pandemic and her reaching crisis faster. , ., ., ,, , ., faster. sophie corlett, thank you very much _ faster. sophie corlett, thank you very much indeed. _ now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. the weather hasn't been changing in a hurry over recent days. we've had a fair amount of cloud and temperatures on the cool side. a bit of sunshine around but we have got some rain arriving from the west later on today.
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before it arrives, sunny spells for many areas but it is looking a bit unsettled through the weekend. now the morning cloud and mist clearing to leave some sunny spells during the afternoon for much of the uk. some persistent rain, though, pushing across northern ireland at times and the breeze picking up in the west too. but ahead of that, 22 or 23 degrees in the sunnier spells. this evening and overnight sees that rain pushing across much of scotland, into northern england as well and arriving across south—west england and wales too. the south—east of england and east anglia stays dry over night and some drier weather moving into northern ireland as well. temperatures overnight, 13—16 degrees. into saturday, early morning, rain particularly in the north and the west edges its way eastwards through the day. some sunny spells but also some heavy, possibly thundery showers for the west later on, 17—21 degrees. hello this is bbc news — i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: door—to—door manhunt — a un document warns the taliban has
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stepped—up its search for people who worked for nato forces or the previous afghan government. more pressure on the foreign secretary, dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made at all. the home office is being urged to review accommodation for afghan refugees, after a five—year—old boy fell to his death from a hotel window in sheffield. morrisons has accepted an improved offerfrom one of the two american private investment groups involved in a takeover battle for the company. the deal would be worth £7 billion. in scotland — the snp and the greens agree a new power sharing agreement, but stop short of a formal coalition. tracking by air, land and sea — kenya undertakes it's first national wildlife census, counting all the animals in the country.
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we will catch up with the all—important sports news. here's jane dougal. good morning, lovely to see you. we are going to start with the gulf. england's georgia hall is in contention for the aig women's open after a good start to her second round at carnoustie. she's two shots off the lead in the final major of the year. hall parred the first two holes, staying at a—under, but then birdied three in herfront nine to go to 7—under. scottish amateur louise duncan is three shots back after two birdies and two bogeys. top of the leaderboard is south korean kim sei young on 9—under. overnightjoin leader and olympic gold medalist nelly korda tees off at around 12.50. football and, despite the disappointment of a defeat
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for tottenham in europe, new head coach nuno espirito santo said he would pick the same team again, without harry kane and most of his first team. tottenham lost 1—0 to portuguese minows pacos de ferreira in the first leg of their europa conference league play—off. lucas silva scoring the only goal. despite that, nuno said he had no regrets leaving harry kane and his starting xi from sunday's win over manchester city at home, in favour of younger players getting game time. in scotland, rangers got a better european result. an alfredo morelos goal helped the scottish champions to a 1—0 win over armenian side alashkert in the first leg of their europa league play—off. in the play—offs for the europa conference league, stjohnstone drew 1—1 with austrian team lask. chris kane opened the scoring for the scottish premiership side, before lask equalised from a penalty. meanwhile, aberdeen lost 1—0 to fk qarabag in azerbaijan. in the last hour, arsenal have confirmed they have permanently signed midfielder
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martin odegaard from real madrid. the norweigen international — who spent the second half of last season on loan with arsenal — has re—joined the club for a fee reported to be in the region of £30 million. odegaard is unlikely to take part in sunday's game against chelsea as his visa application process is ongoing. chelsea midfielder kai havertz has said he's raising funds to help flood victims in his home country of germany. at least 58 people have died in after torrential rain hit the west of the country, leaving nearly 4,000 residents in emergency accommodation. havertz has donated custom made boots and 200,000 euros towards red cross germany who are helping to re—home families. from the one day to the other day, your friends are not there. maybe you've lost one of your family members. also, i don't know, your home and all these things. it seems
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like far—away and also like the past and nobody is talking about it any more but still the people, they are just living and sleeping in small rooms with a lot of other people and they don't have, for example, energy or something like that. so it's hard for me and i want to help. to tennis and world number two naomi osaka is out of the cincinnati masters after a surprise third—round defeat to a wildcard player. world number 76 jil teichmann beat the japanese star in three sets, 3—6, 6—3, 6—3 in the best victory of her career. osaka made 41 unforced errors in the match and only hit 17 winners. the reigning us and australian open champion recently took a break from tennis after experiencing anxiety and depression. cricket, and it's the eliminators in the hundred this afternoon, with a place in tomorrow's inaugural final up for grabs. this evening, southern brave play
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trent rockets in the men's competition, but first up in the women's, it's the oval invicibles who host birmingham phoenix and invicibles bowler tash farrant has already got her sights on the top prize. imean, i i mean, i have seen the trophy, actually, it's i mean, i have seen the trophy, actually, its huge. so i don't know if i can pick that up but i reckon a couple of us could. obviously with it being 30, it makes it even more special. for us, getting to the final and the brave doing well and being underdogs, we are feeling confident. i think we have some big match players and i'm sure we will do our best to try and get there. and you can watch oval invicibles versus birmingham phoenix from 2.30 on bbc two. more sport on bbc news a little later on. thank you very much indeed. some business news for you now. government borrowing fell injuly compared with a year earlier as the removal of most covid
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restrictions in england gave the economy a boost. our economics correspondent andy verity has more. how are they looking? well, it's uuite how are they looking? well, it's quite interesting. _ how are they looking? well, it's quite interesting. just _ how are they looking? well, it's quite interesting. just at - how are they looking? well, it's quite interesting. just at the - how are they looking? well, it's| quite interesting. just at the rate of which borrowing is dropping. as you know, the government borrowing figures track the deficit, the amount the chancellor rishi sunak exceeds in his spending what he's getting in in taxes. you have to borrow the rest in order to cover that spending but the government borrows it from itself. the bank of england is the main creditor to the government so if you are borrowing from yourself, first of all it makes it a lot less urgent to pay it back. debt interest payments are very low and have been bawling in the last month. also, the overall amount that is being borrowed officially is dropping so rapidly that some critics may say, well, why do you need cuts, why do you need to freeze public sector pay? the government will say it is the plan working. if you look at the figures, £10.4
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billion injuly. that is still the second—highest borrowing injuly ever. normally injuly you get big money coming in from self sx tax receipts but the pandemic is quite different. but10.4 receipts but the pandemic is quite different. but 10.4 billion is about 10 billion less thanjuly last year. if you look at the amounts borrowed in the year to date, that is a lot less. it is down by £62 billion from the amount in the same four months of last year tojust 78 the amount in the same four months of last year to just 78 billion. that is interesting because it is £28.8 billion less than i was forecasting budget, when rishi sunak was setting the path for spending ahead. in that budget, rishi sunak decided to spend more than he was raising. it was if you like a giveaway budget because the i think it was you have to get the economy going again. but now borrowing is falling cyclically, it will undermine the case for saying we have to cut spending now. it is
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interesting because a lot of what has fixed this problem or made it a lot easier at least its tax money rolling in rather than any kind of drops in spending.— rolling in rather than any kind of drops in spending. thank you very much indeed. _ drops in spending. thank you very much indeed. thank— drops in spending. thank you very much indeed. thank you. - youth unemployment hit a 5 year high during the pandemic. sarah corker has been finding out what this means for the career prospects of the under 25s. i think it will easily take at least two or three years to be getting back to where i was pre—pandemic. i had five interviews between february and march. three of them were rescinded because of the pandemic. a lot of what you realised from the past year is - like, life is short. you might as well be doing something that you love and that _ you're passionate about. when we first met portrait photographer drew back in october, covid restrictions were tightening and his manchester business was struggling. i already cut down all my expenses. i haven't left the house in months so i stopped paying for my office.
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i've got rid of all of that stuff. and it's not enough. today, his outlook is much brighter. as entertainment and art venues have reopened, his bookings are coming back but he knows the recovery will take time. what was the longest period of time that you went without any work? about 11 weeks. and how did you get through that period financially? honestly, i don't know how i got through it. compared to a regular month, i'm still at around 40, 50% of what i was doing pre—pandemic. it's building and it's getting there but it's painfully slow. during the pandemic, competition forjobs has been fierce. here in hull, 20% of people live in workless households. david has two degrees and had applied for more than 100 jobs. you're out of control of your own life, at a point as to, where's the money going to come? you can't really think long term. so you're constantly thinking about, how am i going to get a job?
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in the end, he left his home city and moved to manchester to find new opportunities. he is now working for an organisation which supports disabled people. if you're the type of person that's applied for a lot ofjobs, like anybody has at the minute, i suppose, and you don't get those responses, it can really hurt. i do count myself lucky that i've ended up in this position. for others, lockdown has led to reinvention. cece from london quit herjob in advertising to follow her artistic dreams. i've gone from a large office in the middle of soho to being at home painting in my bedroom. it's definite ups and downs of kind of, this is the most exciting thing ever and, oh, my god, what have i done? and the career change is paying off. she's just moved into her own studio. being able to actually work on bigger pieces, have people come into the studio and see the work and talk to them and it not being in my bedroom, and on a more practical level not
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smelling paint fumes every night and actually not waking up with a headache is really nice. and while it may take longer for their careers to recoverfrom the pandemic, there is optimism for better times ahead. sarah corker, bbc news, in hull. that report by sarah corker. optometrists across the uk say they're diagnosing higher numbers of children with short—sightedness since the start of the pandemic. the college of optometrists says this is down to less time being spent outside due to covid restrictions — and more time using screens. fiona lamdin has been speaking to one family about how they manage their eye health. like many children, keira, oliver and lauren love spending time inside on screens. right, guys, screens off,
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time to get outside, please. but their parents are all too aware of the damage it could be doing to their eyes. both ali and james are optometrists. with three young kids, they do spend quite a lot of time on the screen, especially in the holidays. and if they've had a lot of time on the screen, we are mindful to try to get them outside, because being outside, that can negate the fact that they have been sat on the screen all morning, potentially. and just trying to limit that time and make them have regular breaks. were are you concerned during lockdown their eyesight might deteriorate? yes, especially our eldest, because she probably spent the most time on the screen and she's a little bit short—sighted already. so, yeah, i was conscious that could potentially get worse over the last year. do your parents limit how much time you spend on your screen? an hour on the school days. no, we have half an hour on school days and an hour at the weekend. no, we have an hour and a half at the weekends.
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we have half an hour and then an hour. 0h. ok, come and have a seat here for me, monty. eight—year—old monty is having his eyes tested for the first time in two years. we're going to do a little check for you today. last time we saw you was september 2019, so it has been a little while. during lockdown, opticians did stay open but, according to the college of optometrists, around 6 million appointments were postponed. i think i was concerned because we had not been to the optician's for a long time. and also, certainly, monty hasjust come out of isolation, so he has spent quite a lot of time playing minecraft with his friends as the only way of sort of chatting to them. and he's been getting closer and closer to the screen as he's been playing. so itjust seemed a bit, for boy whose onlyjust eight, being really close to the screen, seemed a bit odd. oh, so you are a little bit short—sighted. we've got —1.25 on the right and a —1 on the left.
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and as with so many children, monty will need a pair of glasses. we are definitely seeing a huge increase in the myopia for children and at a younger age. we know that patients who spend a lot of time indoors and a lot of time with near work are more at risk of becoming short—sighted. we have had a lot of children who have had to be at home, home—schooling, and they've had to use screens all day. and probably a huge decrease in outdoor time, as well, because, for a time, we were very limited with the amount of time we could be outdoors. so the combination of the two could have a huge impact on the rate of myopia. and so, this summer, the college of optometrists is encouraging children to spend at least two hours a day outside. there is good evidence that shows that the more time you spend outside, particularly between the ages of five and 12, the less likely you are to become short—sighted.
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and that's because that when you are outside, your eyes are more relaxed, you are focusing on objects further away. we also think that the sunlight might affect the way that the eye grows. so actually spending time, not using a device outside, the sunlight's actually encouraging a child's eye to grow into the right shape for adulthood. ok, come and have a seat there, monty. an increasing number of pupils like monty will be heading back to school with glasses next term. pop those on and keep them out, any that you try on. but, in the meantime, his mum says he will be spending much of the summer outdoors. fiona lamdin, bbc news. covid lockdown measures have been extended in sydney for at least another month. from monday, a curfew will be imposed in the worst affected parts of the city after the state of new south wales registered nearly 650 new cases. new zealand has extended its nationwide lockdown forfour more days.
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it had been due to end at midnight on friday local time. all of the country will remain at its highest level of covid restrictions, after recording 11 new cases. on tuesday, new zealand was plunged into a national lockdown when it announced one local case of the delta variant. the total number of cases in the outbreak has now hit 31. our correspondent shaimaa khalil gave us this update. the whole of new zealand is going to remain under the strictest lockdown — that's level four lockdown until tuesday. this is the first time in more than a year that a level four lockdown has been imposed in new zealand. of course, this is a country that's been hailed as a success story in eliminating covid—19 and controlling outbreaks by snap lockdowns. the real concern, of course, is this is the delta variant and they're really, really concerned about
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the spread of the outbreak. now it's concentrated in auckland. there are indications that new zealand's largest city is going to remain under strict lockdown even beyond tuesday, but now there are cases that have travelled into wellington — into the country's capital. three of the new cases reported in wellington now and so contact tracers are saying they need time to get on top of the virus, to find out exactly where the close contacts have been. we know that the first case that was announced this week was of a new zealander that had just come back from sydney, had been in hotel quarantine, tested positive and then was taken to hospital. there is still a missing link of how that ended up with community cases. there are 12 cases as well that are under investigation. jacinda ardern said new zealand is generally in a good position still at this stage of the outbreak but they don't want to draw any conclusions yet and that's why we're seeing new zealand still under lockdown. and, of course, the prime minister
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more than once making a comparison in a reference to what's happening in australia, what's happening here where i am in sydney, where cases continue to grow. that was shaimaa khalil. a record 20 places have applied to be the next uk city of culture. the government awards the title every four years, helping to bring tourism and investment to different areas. this year, groups of towns were encouraged to apply — and there have been bids from every nation in the uk. the winner will be announced next year. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. in the week when a hollywood—style sign appeared on a slagheap overlooking wrexham, it has been confirmed that the town is now aiming to become the uk's city of culture 2025. wrexham county borough's entry is one of 20 that have been put forward. including a bid spanning both sides of the scotland—england border. dumfries and galloway and the scottish borders are joining forces with northumberland, cumbria and the city of carlisle —
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a combined area almost 15 times the size of london. and cornwall�*s bid is very much as a county, rather than its only city, truro. coventry�*s time as the city of culture has not gone to plan. covid meant that the start was delayed five months. but events are now up and running. the 360 allstars start a three—week run there today. and the organisers insist that the city has benefited. the city of culture is really the beginning of a journey, it's not the end of the journey. it's the beginning of thinking about the role that culture can play in cities in bringing people together and creating pride and expressing identity, in supporting regeneration and economic development, in promoting tourism and really putting your city on the map. a long list will be revealed at the end of next month, with the winner announced in may, as coventry�*s year in
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the spotlight comes to an end. colin paterson, bbc news. kenya is conducting a national wildlife census — the first of its kind in the country. it's home to vulnerable and endangered species, including lions, giraffes and the only two surviving northern white rhino species in the world. ferdinand omondi reports from the marine parks and forest reserves of coastal kenya. kenya is undergoing the biggest animal count in its history. from above, researchers record wildlife in the country's open lands and check on them, including human activity close to protected areas. this aerial count is just one method kenya's wildlife service is using to count all of the country's wildlife.
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this is one of kenya's forest reserves. there's lots of wildlife here and that includes hundreds of elephants. i'm told, but it is so difficult to spot them from above even with an extra pair of eyes and as we are tracking them on foot. jamila is one of rangers tasked to count the elephants on foot, but in this forest, the elephants know where to hide. so researchers count by the consistency of their dung. we were taught how to see the age of the dung, to know if it is fresh or its over 24 hours. so when you see like this one, it is over 50 centimetres, no destruction, and also when it's fresh, it smells, it has an odour, it is also smooth in colour. so we've just been driving around the forest reserve looking
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for elephants and then right in front of our path, there is a herd right in front of us. actually, it's a bigger group than what you can see because we've spotted some crisscrossing, we can see some feeding and others playing and the rules here is that the elephants have the right of way so we just have two wait. kenya has carried out wildlife surveys before but this is the first time the country attempts to count all species on kenyan lands and waters. particularly the census has been done on the endangered species. the elephants, the rhinos and a few others. but we don't have proper census for giraffe, for pangolin, we don't have census for zebras. this count is also important for marine conservation. this here is a mangrove forest, a breeding area for fish and so fishing here is regulated and the researchers hope that the results of this census will help show the impact of such
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conservation efforts on marine life. kenya's marine parks alone generate over $1 million annually but the government says they can do more. it wants to use its marine data to accelerate the blue economy and the sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth and jobs. conservation is very central to the blue economy. you need to manage the environment better, so with this type of information, you are going to identify those critical areas that need to be zoned out. this is kenya's biggest ever animal census and its results could encourage better conservation for future generations. ferdinand omondi, bbc news, coastal kenya. a peacock that's proving tricky to catch has been seen strutting itself around a residential street in birmingham, helping itself to food from local vegetable patches and flying onto nearby roofs. the rspca says it would
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like to catch the bird — which has some string caught around his leg — and return him to his owner orfind a suitable home. he looks rather happy, doesn't he? now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. the weather is looking a little bit mixed over the next couple of days. we have got some rain arriving through the weekend, particularly during the day on saturday. but for today, well, a day of sunny spells for much of the uk. rain will arrive in the west later on and that's going to slowly spread its way eastwards over the next 24—48 hours or so. all courtesy of this fairly slow—moving weather front moving its way in from the atlantic. high pressure sitting out to the south—east of the uk. so some fairly settled weather for many areas today. the morning cloud thinning and breaking to leave some sunny spells through the afternoon, particularly for parts of eastern scotland, central and eastern england, wales seeing a bit of brightness breaking through. northern ireland, though, turning increasingly wet with the arrival of this frontal rain. and the breeze picking up around some of these
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irish sea coasts in the west, aw well, whereas for central and eastern areas, most places seeing relatively light winds today. not great in terms of temperature but perhaps a little bit warmer for some of us than recent days with a southerly breeze. 22 degrees or so our top temperature. into this evening and overnight then, this area of rain continues its progress further north and eastwards. so some rain across much of scotland overnight, western parts of england and wales too. for east anglia and the south—east, you should stay dry overnight and still mild with temperatures for most of us 13—16 degrees, with clearer skies and some slightly fresher weather arriving in northern ireland first thing on saturday. so we start saturday with this weather front bringing some outbreaks of rain. one or two heavy bursts in there across some central parts of england and wales as well, edging eastwards, arriving across east anglia during the early afternoon. so some pretty wet weather lingering for southern and eastern scotland. a little bit brighter for the west later on but equally some scattered heavy showers, perhaps the odd rumble of thunder as well. now into saturday night and on into sunday, eventually we're going to push this area of low pressure away towards the east.
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but it could still linger close to eastern england, i think, through the day on sunday. so still the potential for some showery rain, particularly in the east first thing. and then through the spine of the country, we could see one or two heavy showers just building through the afternoon. something a little bit drier working in from the west and temperatures at best around about 17—22 degrees on sunday. and then looking ahead into the new week, well, high pressure builds. we're going to see winds rotating around that area of high pressure, so not coming in from a particularly warm direction. temperatures not great for the time of year but a lot of dry weather with some sunshine around too. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. evacuations from afghanistan gather pace as amnesty international accuses the taliban of torturing and killing nine men last month. more pressure on the foreign secretary, dominic raab, as it emerges that a key call to afghan officials about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made at all. waiting for aid and answers — why is it taking so long for help to reach the victims of haiti's earthquake? new zealand extends its nationwide lockdown for four more days after recording 11 new cases. tracking by air, land and sea — kenya undertakes it's first national wildlife census — counting all the animals in the country.

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