Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 28, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the us hits back against islamic state in afghanistan with a drone strike — following thursday's deadly attack at kabul airport. meanwhile, the uk's evacuation in afghanistan reaches its final stages — the head of britain's armed forces says it's been a success. we've done an extraordinaryjob to evacuate as many as we have, but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out. a recipe for covid chaos — government plans for schools are criticised by education unions who fear a rise in coronavirus infections.
10:01 am
and british husband and wife not only win gold but break the world record in their respective cycling events. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the us military says it's carried out a drone strike in western afghanistan, targeting what it said was a planner for the islamic state group known as isis—k. the group is thought to have carried out the attack on thursday at kabul airport, in which 170 people were killed, inluding 13 american service personnel. in a statement, us central command said... meanwhile, the last british flights carrying civilian refugees
10:02 am
out of afghanistan have departed from kabul. this report from graham satchell. the final flights leaving kabul airport. the british effort here is all but done. it has been a mammoth logistical operation. injust two weeks, more than 14,000 people airlifted by the raf to safety in the uk. but the ministry of defence ackknowledges as many as 1,000 former interpreters and other staff will left behind. we are so worried about our future. i think it's not fair. it's like a betrayal of their own heroes. the horrifying aftermath of the terror attack at the airport. president biden promised to hunt down is—k, the group responsible. and, overnight, us forces have carried out a drone strike in eastern afghanistan, killing a so—called terrorist planner. among those killed in the suicide bombing, london taxi driver mohammad niazi who travelled to kabul to help his family escaped.
10:03 am
his eldest daughter is missing, his wife also killed. kabul�*s main hospital is full of the injured, like two—year—old mohammed reza, fighting for his life. what chance now that these people, many of whom worked for western forces, will be able to get to safety? they will, sadly, be people who haven't got through, people who might qualify, and what i would say to them is that we will shift heaven and earth to help them get out. we will do whatever we can. immediately outside the airport, the crowds of people have gone, the streets empty. the taliban — in american military vehicles — have set up roadblocks to stop people getting near. some taliban leaders claim to have already taken over parts of the airport, a claim denied by the mod
10:04 am
and the pentagon. they're not in charge of any of the gates. of any of the airport operations. that is still under us military control. the global effort to get people to safety is now ending. these german troops have already returned home. spanish troops are back in madrid. british and american forces will be the last to go. the 20—year western mission in afghanistan ends in a chaotic, bloody withdrawl with the taliban ready to take charge. graham satchell, bbc news. the chief of the british armed forces, general sir nick carter, confirmed today that the uk was reaching the end of its evacuation today, and that flights out of kabul would now have to be used to bring troops home. we've done an extraordinaryjob to evacuate as many as we have, but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out. we've done an extraoridnaryjob to evacuate as many as we have,
10:05 am
but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out, and i think that point�*s been made very strongly, certainly by the defence secretary and others in the last ten days or so. personally, i've probably had over 100 messages from different afghans who i know in my long association with the country, and many of those friends of mine won't make it out. and, for me, not a day passes without me having a bit of a tear in my eye about all of that. i mean, you know, he uk will continue to welcome those sorts of people — we should be pretty clear of that, and i think our government has made that very clear. if they are able to get out post this evacuation, if you like, the, sort of, second phase of it, they will always be welcome if they need to come. and i'm afraid it is an awfulfact of life that difficult decisions have had to be made. some people have not been able to make it across town, across kabul to be able to get to the evacuation. others have kept their head down, for obvious reasons. but the plain fact is that we're there for them into the future if they need us. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is here with me.
10:06 am
he jessica parker is here with me. has been talking, ti what he has been talking, then, about what has been happening with the final stages of the evacuation. what more do you understand about what will be happening today? be more do you understand about what will be happening today?— will be happening today? be very much are still— will be happening today? be very much are still in _ will be happening today? be very much are still in the _ will be happening today? be very much are still in the final - will be happening today? be very much are still in the final stages. i much are still in the final stages. what he has said is there are some civilian flights still to take out but very few and that will happen over the course of today, he suggested, and then they will look to bring out those uk troops we know around 1000 uk troops are basting cannibal airport but it will be the american so far, kind of, last international troops to go who will be doing the, kind of, rearguard action if you like and what general carter has been, i think, emphasising this morning is that this has been a very difficult parts of the operation, a very challenging part of the operation as they tore out of trouble effort for the thousandth time so i think a difficult couple of days to go. it's into the last few civilian flights and of course lots of civilians have been thrown out in a huge elephant operation of the last couple of weeks. we will expect to see the
10:07 am
drawdown of uk troops over the weekend. ~ ., ., ,., .,, ., weekend. what about those who will be left behind? — weekend. what about those who will be left behind? boris _ weekend. what about those who will be left behind? boris johnson - weekend. what about those who will be left behind? boris johnson has i be left behind? borisjohnson has said the government will shift heaven and earth to make that they can get out but what does that mean and what can we do? yes. can get out but what does that mean and what can we do?— and what can we do? yes, very good cuestion, and what can we do? yes, very good question. what _ and what can we do? yes, very good question, what does _ and what can we do? yes, very good question, what does that _ and what can we do? yes, very good question, what does that mean? - and what can we do? yes, very good question, what does that mean? i i question, what does that mean? i think ministers have been trying to be sure some pretty angry and concerned mps who have not only been pretty fearless about how the whole thing has been handled but also are themselves getting messages from people who say they have been left behind. there are a couple of cavity, categories, obviously those who work with british of latisse, those in the high hundreds who haven't made it to cannibal airport for various reasons. —— british authorities. 0bviously for various reasons. —— british authorities. obviously there is the commitment to take 20,000 of the next couple of years. what they seem to be talking about the safe routes of passage particularly through third countries but that does hinge on the details and we didn't really see many details coming out about
10:08 am
what kind of cooperation you are going to get the taliban in terms of people being able to leave afghanistan so still a lot of detail is being able to work out and they will be building pressure on ministers to be clear as to how they are going to do that and of course with parliament set to return in the beginning of september. the uk's shadow defence secretary, john healey, is with us. up up to 1100 eligible afghans and 150 british civilians will be left behind. how does that make you feel? i get the most... i know in particular the troops, the diplomatic staff, the aid workers who have relied on these afghans through recent gears to whom we gave an undertaking that we will protect them. it is devastating that we've not managed to get everyone out and as we give up on the cannibal airport it is essential that we don't also give up on the afghan
10:09 am
people and as many of the gains we have seen over the last 20 years as possible. have seen over the last 20 years as ossible. ~ ., , ., ., possible. what should it mean when boris johnson _ possible. what should it mean when boris johnson says _ possible. what should it mean when boris johnson says we _ possible. what should it mean when boris johnson says we will _ possible. what should it mean when boris johnson says we will shift - borisjohnson says we will shift heaven and earth to get those left behind out? what you want the government to do? what will you do? well, my frustration with the government is that borisjohnson is talking now after kabul has fallen, what he will do. my frustration and the deep criticism that i have anything others have with the government is that they were utterly unprepared for this withdrawal that they know have been coming for 18 months since president trump signed the plan. there hasn't been no evidence they have tried to influence the way the withdrawal was done, no evidence they've tried to rally international support or there was a plan already in place of the refugees, the aid flows, the terrorism, if you like, the problems that will inevitably flow from a post—withdrawal period and what is
10:10 am
critical now should have been done months ago which is to bring in critical countries in the region like russia, china, and so one could influence the taliban to try and safeguard some of the human rights and the social games that our troops and the social games that our troops and many afghans fought and struggled so hard for over the last two decades. the struggled so hard for over the last two decades-_ two decades. the us air strike auainst two decades. the us air strike against is-k — two decades. the us air strike against is-k as _ two decades. the us air strike against is-k as obviously - two decades. the us air strike - against is-k as obviously happened against is—k as obviously happened overnight. what is your view of the military strategy going forward and what part britain should play in that? ~ ., , ., ., . ~ what part britain should play in that? ~ ., , ., ., that? well, the murderous attack on thursda , that? well, the murderous attack on thursday. the _ that? well, the murderous attack on thursday. the f— that? well, the murderous attack on thursday, the f strike _ that? well, the murderous attack on thursday, the f strike overnight - that? well, the murderous attack on thursday, the f strike overnight the | thursday, the f strike overnight the mind is that this was an evacuation in a conflict zone in a conflict on city and the evacuation effort has been heroic. the troops on the ground and other staff have had labour's full support for this from the start. all of us, now, want to
10:11 am
see the remaining british troops back safely in britain. but see the remaining british troops back safely in britain.— back safely in britain. but what about the military _ back safely in britain. but what about the military strategy - back safely in britain. but what i about the military strategy going forward in terms of dealing with the threat from is k. there has already been a strike. do you support that and what you think britain �*s role should be going forward? fiur and what you think britain 's role should be going forward? our number one riori should be going forward? our number one priority and _ should be going forward? our number one priority and we _ should be going forward? our number one priority and we cannot _ should be going forward? our number one priority and we cannot do - should be going forward? our number one priority and we cannot do this - one priority and we cannot do this in our own but we have a leading member of nato and a leading member of the united nations and one of the permanent five members of the un security council. we have to have a plan in place to make sure that afghanistan doesn't become too unstable, wracked with civil war and above all a haven, again, for training terrorist groups and the breeding of terrorist cells that, again, starts to threaten the western other countries. 50 again, starts to threaten the western other countries. so it went u n western other countries. so it went u- to. so western other countries. so it went up t0- so i — western other countries. so it went up t0- so i will— western other countries. so it went up to. so i will ask— western other countries. so it went up to. so i will ask you _ western other countries. so it went up to. so i will ask you again, - western other countries. so it went up to. so i will ask you again, then | up to. so i will ask you again, then do support the strike and what role do support the strike and what role do you think britain should play in any future action like that? the strike overnight _ any future action like that? tue:
10:12 am
strike overnight was any future action like that? tte: strike overnight was part any future action like that? t"tl: strike overnight was part of any future action like that? ttl strike overnight was part of the necessary steps that the us has been taking notjust to try necessary steps that the us has been taking not just to try and necessary steps that the us has been taking notjust to try and keep the airport safe in the us troops and civilians safe but the bits as well. we have only been able to do this evacuation because the us was willing to put in an extra 6000 troops to secure the airport so when we are under attack and our personnel on the ground have been under attack in recent days and it has been dangerous, desperate, desperate mission under the most unimaginable circumstances, where necessary, it was important that they did that strike and i think our thoughts now as those last british military planes and then there was last british us planes leave, these are prime terrorist targets and we all want to see our british troops, every one of them, back home safely same and the us troops back home safely as well. same and the us troops back home safely as well-— same and the us troops back home safely as well. john healey, shadow defence secretary. _ safely as well. john healey, shadow defence secretary. thank— safely as well. john healey, shadow defence secretary. thank you. - let's get more now on the us strike against a member
10:13 am
of the isis—k group. asfandyar mir is from the center for international security and cooperation at stanford university. he told us there was some doubt about the target's status. we really don't know who this person is and at what level this person was involved and i thought that the us government in the last few years has killed hundreds of isis—k fighters, mid—level operatives, sometimes even senior leaders so this is not the first major strike against this particular group so the administration has to, i think, provide a lot more information to convince us that the person they have taken out as someone... there is, my concern, my fear is that in the short term it increases the risk of terrorist attack against the airport, against us personnel, against unarmed civilians who might be at the airport. look, this group is very hard to deter. it has been
10:14 am
targeted a lot notjust by the us but by the... government as well as the forces of the taliban but, you know, this group has proven that it can adapt, it is resilient, it is resolved in its fight, so i think there is a chance that this group, all the leaders of this group, try to help the us once again at the airport. we are not going to our 0ur correspondent rajni vaidyanathan has been in afghanistan — she's now in delhi and we can speak to her now. , q: welljust days before the operation ends — and clearly isis—k a real threat — what the security concerns? as things are drawing to a close there is a heightened sense of security around cannibal airport. we have heard from the us embassy in afghanistan who issued a warning earlier where they said that any us citizen should avoid going to the airport and he also said that any us
10:15 am
citizens who were already at the airport should leave immediately. us officials have been saying that this is, potentially, the most dangerous part of the ongoing evacuation process and, of course, that is unsurprising given the events on thursday. we've also heard that italy is also winding up its operations today in terms of those evacuation flights and last night france is well conducted its last air left in one of the reasons why they've said they stopped yesterday was because of the deteriorating security situation at the airport. now, we've been hearing that they are stricter taliban checkpoints around the airport facility but, of course, that is the main concern now, as foreign forces wrap up their operations before that deadline, of course, on the 31st of august. itnot also worth mentioning that the taliban have been saying that they already control three main parts of the airport on the military side and
10:16 am
yesterday the us said that that wasn't the case and they said that they were still in control of the gates and of operations but we are hearing but that is a transfer to the taliban could happen quite soon, so it really is coming into the endgame, now.— i'm joined now by professorjane falkingham southampton university, part of the council of at—risk academics — a campaigning organisation originally founded in the 1930s to help people fleeing nazi germany. welcome. thank you forjoining us. how much contact if you had with colleagues on the ground in afghanistan and what is the situation in terms of people having left, people staying behind? thank ou ve left, people staying behind? thank you very much _ left, people staying behind? thank you very much and _ left, people staying behind? thank you very much and first _ left, people staying behind? thank you very much and first can - left, people staying behind? thank you very much and first can i - left, people staying behind? thank you very much and first can ijust i you very much and first can ijust clarify that i am an academic at the university of southampton. i am working with the council for at—risk academics which is an ngo, a charity which has been working since the 19305, which has been working since the 1930s, and they actually work with
10:17 am
virtually all of the uk universities, so 124 universities are working with the council, but over the last week i have become particularly involved, primarily because our local mp, julian lewis, contacted me about one of his constituency members who was trapped in afghanistan and then i've been working with them over the last week, really, to get to heightened tension on academics who are particularly at risk so we fed in a list of 12 people to the cdl over the last week including all of their details and why they are a particularly at risk. unfortunately, we have only been able to get one of those out. they have actually been inundated with contacts in afghanistan and are working currently with 80 academics in afghanistan who are at risk,
10:18 am
particularly female academics but also academics are working the area of human rights, security, law, gender, international relations, all areas which actually expose them to particular risk. 50. areas which actually expose them to particular risk-— particular risk. so, you said that ou ut particular risk. so, you said that you put 12 _ particular risk. so, you said that you put 12 names— particular risk. so, you said that you put 12 names to _ particular risk. so, you said that you put 12 names to the - particular risk. so, you said that you put 12 names to the foreignj you put 12 names to the foreign office and only one of those 12 people has got out. what were the difficulties in getting them all out? , , ., ., out? so, basically, first of all, we actually got _ out? so, basically, first of all, we actually got very _ out? so, basically, first of all, we actually got very little _ out? so, basically, first of all, we actually got very little response i actually got very little response from the government, from the commonwealth. the home office did contact kara i think on thursday after stephen wordsworth who is the director of... was interviewed on this channel. the home office did get in touch to check upon the details but since then we've heard nothing. the only one that got out, actually, is in the netherlands, safe and secure in the netherlands, was evacuated by the dutch. i do understand that 12 academics who are working or had been working on a uk
10:19 am
funded research programme, the genderjustice and security research programme at london school of economics, 12 of those academics were evacuated by nato and they are currently with their families in poland. but, out of the 12 means we put forward, all of whom, by the way, had been, had due diligence conducted on their cases. this organisation is very careful to go through the cases and only take on people who really are that risk and who are really bona fides academics, only one of those 12 has managed to get out. tt only one of those 12 has managed to let out. ,:, , ~ only one of those 12 has managed to let out. , ~ i. ., get out. it sounds like you have, obviously. _ get out. it sounds like you have, obviously, not _ get out. it sounds like you have, obviously, not had _ get out. it sounds like you have, obviously, not had any _ get out. it sounds like you have, - obviously, not had any communication with the 11 remaining. no, we have beenin with the 11 remaining. no, we have been in communication with them through e—mail and telephone calls. several of the made attempts to get through the airport and in fact one of them was that the abbey gate at the time of the blast and so was
10:20 am
waiting outside the gate. was unharmed, thankfully, very shaken, went home. all of them, now, i have in hiding. many of them are moving on a daily basis. several of them are very high profile academics, female academics who have been in particular roles with local government over the past 20 years. many of whom have been working with the uk government on various projects, development projects, human rights projects, with the f and other organisations and just very fearful. and other organisations and 'ust very fearfulfi very fearful. clearly, your stop here with _ very fearful. clearly, your stop here with them, _ very fearful. clearly, your stop here with them, jane, - very fearful. clearly, your stop here with them, jane, so - very fearful. clearly, your stop here with them, jane, so do i very fearful. clearly, your stop i here with them, jane, so do stay very fearful. clearly, your stop - here with them, jane, so do stay in touch and keep us updated and we can keep our view is updated as thank you. keep our view is updated as thank ou. . ~' keep our view is updated as thank ou. . ~ , :, let's take a look at what's happening at the paralympics in tokyo. it's day four and 56 medals have been up for grabs, and a british husband and wife have each broken the world record
10:21 am
in their respective cycling events. lora fachie secured her gold—winning achievementjust half an hour after her spouse, neil, seen here, set a new record in the men's b 1000m time trial. china are celebrating after liu cuiqing won the women's 400 metres in the t—eleven category. and, dutch athlete fleurjong broke the world record in the long jump t—64, with a leap of 6.16m. let's go live to tokyo — and speak to the bbc�*s rachael latham. that has and wife story is a brilliant one, isn't it? both getting gold within minutes of each other? ~ , ,:, , , getting gold within minutes of each other? ~ , , , ., :, other? absolutely, they are now the olden other? absolutely, they are now the golden couple _ other? absolutely, they are now the golden couple of— other? absolutely, they are now the golden couple of these _ other? absolutely, they are now the golden couple of these games. - other? absolutely, they are now the golden couple of these games. we l other? absolutely, they are now the i golden couple of these games. we had neil go first and then got the gold medal in record time and then laura
10:22 am
behind him and both of them are going to make gold medal podium to great britain tonight. also the great great britain there was a gold medal in the teams print and that was jacco van medal in the teams print and that wasjacco van gas and... medal in the teams print and that was jacco van gas and... cuts but for the one in his visual event who was scraping gold is to be atop the podium with his team—mates tonight. it is a rundown of how the tables looking after the past few days. well, it has been gold flooding in from everywhere but especially in the aquatic centre. maisie summers—newton went on the 100 metres breaststroke tonight. she had already picked up a gold early on this week in the 200 metres individual medley but she went again today, broke paralympic record, beat her chinese rival and will be on top of the podium again and, five years ago, when i spoke to her and said camino, what you want to get out of your paralympic career she said i just want to compete in tokyo and
10:23 am
now she is going to be going home a two—time time paralympic champion and, of the powerlifting, mickey ewell got a bronze medal and in the table tennis there was a collection of bronze medals from jack hunter spidey, tom mattis and paul kavanagh viaduct. each got a bronze in the main classification. thank you very much, rachel. it means up—to—date with the latest from the pub 0lympics with the latest from the pub olympics in tokyo and if you want more you can go to the website and see everything schedule today full and to see who is on top of the medal table go tbc dot—com forwards last paralympics. ——bbc.com/paralympics to other news now, and hurricane ida has brought heavy rain and winds to western cuba as it heads into the gulf of mexico. the us national hurricane center says ida is likely to be
10:24 am
an extremely dangerous major hurricane when it makes landfall in louisiana. gail maclellan reports. winds at 80 mph and to venture in vain. the western coast cube at the first place maxi makes landfall. flash floods and mudslides also expected in jamaica flash floods and mudslides also expected injamaica in the cayman islands. but this is not ida at her worst. she is expected to become extremely dangerous when she reaches the southern united states this weekend. tt the southern united states this weekend. , :, :, ., :, weekend. it is going to travel over some extraordinarily _ weekend. it is going to travel over some extraordinarily warm - weekend. it is going to travel over some extraordinarily warm water i weekend. it is going to travel over| some extraordinarily warm water in weekend. it is going to travel over i some extraordinarily warm water in a navy recall loop current which basically is a superhighway of incredibly warm water all the way to the shores of louisiana and along the shores of louisiana and along the way that is going to feed energy into this storm and we are expecting the way that is going to feed energy into this storm and we are expecting rapid intensification of the storm the shores of louisiana with winds of 140 mph, making ita the shores of louisiana with winds of 140 mph, making it a category four hurricane. idd of140 mph, making it a category four hurricane.— four hurricane. ida will arrive 16 ears to four hurricane. ida will arrive 16 years to the _ four hurricane. ida will arrive 16 years to the day _ four hurricane. ida will arrive 16 years to the day since _ four hurricane. ida will arrive 16j years to the day since hurricane katrina hit, when 80% of new orleans was flooded and almost 2000 people lost their lives. mccain idea is not expected to call such devastation,
10:25 am
though the winds will be stronger, the wall of water is not expected to be as high as that which took most of the city in 2005 at the authorities in new orleans are not taking any chances. that authorities in new orleans are not taking any chances.— taking any chances. at this time i will be and _ taking any chances. at this time i will be and i _ taking any chances. at this time i will be and i am _ taking any chances. at this time i will be and i am calling _ taking any chances. at this time i will be and i am calling for- will be and i am calling for mandatory evacuation of all areas outside _ mandatory evacuation of all areas outside of — mandatory evacuation of all areas outside of our lead a protection system — outside of our lead a protection system. all areas outside of that lead a _ system. all areas outside of that lead a protection system. definitely mandatory evacuation. —— levee protection — mandatory evacuation. —— levee protection system. some in areas protected — protection system. some in areas protected by levees as staying put. but in _ protected by levees as staying put. but in the — protected by levees as staying put. but in the part of the storm they are preparing for the worst. the us president has accused china of withholding key information on the origins of the coronavirus. mr biden said chinese officials blocked the work of international experts — a claim beijing denies. the comments come after a 3 month investigation by american intelligence agencies failed to agree on whether the virus
10:26 am
is more likely to have stemmed from exposure to an infected animal, or an accident at a laboratory in the chinese city of wuhan. coronavirus plans for schools in england have been described as "a recipe for chaos" by education unions, who say they will not be enough to prevent a rise in the number of infections. the government's scientific advisors have warned it is "extremely likely" cases in schools will be high by late september. the government said it has updated its advice on how to respond to an outbreak with minimum disruption to education. nhs organisations in england have been told to prepare for a possible decision about whether all 12 to 15—year—olds will be offered a vaccination. no decision has officially been made, but thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation is continuing to review data on broadening the roll—out. the government said it is also continuing to prepare for a booster programme to ensure those most vulnerable to covid—19 have their protection against the virus extended ahead of winter.
10:27 am
now it's time for a look at the weather with 0wain wyn evans. hello, hello everyone. i do hope you are doing all right. now, over the next couple of days, we arejoined by an area of high pressure, which for most of us, we'll lead to dry, settled conditions. let's have a quick look at the headline. there we go. i think most of us will see both of these things — the dry weather and the sunny spells. it's not a completely clear—cut story, however, and, of course, for many of us, it's a bank holiday weekend. so all eyes on the weather forecast as far as that goes. you can see this gap in the cloud here on the satellite image. that's because of the high pressure. it's keeping these weather fronts away, keeping areas of low pressure at bay and it will continue to do so over the next couple of days. let's have a look at the finer detail, then — breezy across south—eastern parts of england. we may catch the odd shower here as well.
10:28 am
dry for most of us. any mist and fog patches will continue to lift and clear through this afternoon. the exception, i think, being across parts of northern ireland, western coastal parts of scotland in particular, some low cloud, mist and fog will linger here. there we go — quick look at the winds there. and, you know, we're in a relatively mild air mass at the moment, so temperatures probably getting to around 20 or 21 celsius at best, cooler where we see that cloud, and, of course, breezier along the south—eastern coast in particular. now through this evening we'll see the return of some low cloud, some mist and fog as well, especially across parts of northern ireland, scotland. this will want to, kind of, extend down as well into northern parts of england. not as chilly as last night, however, with our lows tonight 11 or 12 celsius. so let's return to the pressure chart — there's the high, still with us for now and for the next couple of days. it is shifting a little bit further towards the west, however, and that will draw in a bit more of a breeze along those eastern coastal parts. and on that breeze, i think, we'll tend to see a bit more
10:29 am
in the way of cloud cover. so, west is best, i think, as far as any sunny spells are concerned. the south—west, parts of wales, the north—west of england, up towards cumbria as well, potentially seeing more in the way of that brightness and sunshine. but sunny spells elsewhere, i think, and tomorrow's top temperatures, quite similar to today, really, 20, 21 — maybe, at a push, 22 celsius. now the high pressure is in no hurry to leave us. we see the winds swirling around it like this in a clockwise fashion. so that will continue to draw in a bit of cloud over the next couple of days and a feeling of it being cooler along coastal parts, eastern coastal parts in particular, but it is a dry settled story for most of us. we'll keep you posted. stay safe. see you soon.
10:30 am
hello this is bbc news. the headlines...
10:31 am
the us hits back against islamic state in afghanistan with a drone strike — following thursday's deadly

13 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on