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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 1, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. us president biden remains defiant over the us from afghanistan, even though taliban militants are now back in control. discussions between the uk and the taliban are under way to help more british nationals and refugees leave afg ha nista n safely. described as a game changer — the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade. it is soon to be offered on the nhs. according to a new report, climate change over the last 50 years has contributed to an average of a new weather—related disaster every day. fuelling a greener future, a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk.
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e10 fuel could cut emissions by three quarters of a million tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. 007 is back — the final trailerfor the much delayed james bond film, no time to die, has made its debut. so, have you been back to the cinema since the pandemic? if not, will the bond movie be the film that brings you back? let me know on twitter. you can use the hashtag bbc your questions. nearly one in three of the world's tree species are facing extinction in the wild. according to a report published by conservationists, oaks, maples and magnolias are among those at risk.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. president biden has defended his decision to withdraw us troops from afghanistan — calling the evacuation effort an "extraordinary success". in his first speech since the end of the 20—year war in the country, mr biden insisted the united states had achieved everything it set out to do. but his approach has faced criticism. it comes as the uk government says it is in talks with the taliban to secure a way out of afghanistan for british nationals and afghans who worked with allied forces. it's thought up to 250 people eligible for relocation — plus their families — remain in the country. meanwhile, the home office has announced that afghans who worked with the british government and military will be allowed to move to the uk permanently. those eligible will be given indefinite leave to remain, rather than the five years�* residency previously offered.
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in an moment, we'll hear about more about those talks between the uk and the taliban. but first the view from the states with our correspondent peter bowes. the spoils of war. american military hardware in the hands of the taliban. hangars full of us helicopters, decommissioned and dismantled so the enemy can't use them, but a potent symbol of america's defeat and the rise of the taliban. but was it a defeat, or a calculated withdrawal by a us president determined to draw a line under two decades of war? at the white house, joe biden praised the action of us troops in helping to evacuate more than 120,000 people from kabul in recent weeks. the extraordinary success of this mission was due to the incredible skill, bravery and selfless courage of the united states military and our diplomats and intelligence professionals. for weeks, they risked their lives to get american citizens,
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afghans who helped us, citizens of our allies and partners and others on board planes and out of the country. but this was a president on the defensive, widely criticised for the way and apparent haste with which america withdrew from afghanistan, leaving some us citizens behind. mr biden insisted he was right to end the "forever war" and not to extend what he called the "forever exit". he laid the blame in part at donald trump for doing a deal with the taliban, but also with afghan government forces. the assumption was that more than 300,000 afghan national security forces that we had trained over the past two decades and equipped would be a strong adversary in their civil wars with the taliban. that assumption that the afghan government would be able to hold on for a period of time beyond military draw down turned out not to be accurate.
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mr biden insisted america's only interest was making sure afghanistan is never used again to launch an attack like 9/11 on the united states, but he said he refused to send another generation of america's sons and daughters to fight a war. it was, he said, time to look to the future after 20 years of pain and sacrifice. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the deputy head of the taliban political office in qatar spoke last night with bbc pashto about how the taliban intend to govern the country now that they're in power. he was asked if there would be a place for ethnic groups and for women in afghanistan's new government. all ethnic groups which are living in afghanistan, they have the right to be in government, but forfuture government, this government, it would be announced, all these afghans who have been selected for merit, all of those who have the
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ability and capacity and capability to work according to the official law, they will be in the government. those people which we named, maybe they will not be in the future government, especially of the top posts. government, especially of the top osts. �* ,., government, especially of the top osts, �* , ., ., government, especially of the top osts. ~ ,., ., .,, government, especially of the top osts. ~ ., .,, posts. about women in those top positions? _ posts. about women in those top positions? women, _ posts. about women in those top positions? women, i _ posts. about women in those top positions? women, i cannot- posts. about women in those top positions? women, i cannot say, i posts. about women in those top i positions? women, i cannot say, if not at the ton. _ positions? women, i cannot say, if not at the top, maybe, _ positions? women, i cannot say, if not at the top, maybe, they - positions? women, i cannot say, if not at the top, maybe, they will i positions? women, i cannot say, ifi not at the top, maybe, they will be in the government, and in the lower posts because in every department of the government, we can see almost half of the workers are women, so they can come back and they can continue, but with this new government that is announced, in the top posts, in the cabinets, there may not be women. let's turn now to the uk, and those talks between the government and the taliban to secure safe passage out of afghanistan
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for a number of british nationals and afghans who remain there. for the latest, here's our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. very few details about these talks, which are happening quite under the radar. all we know is that it's the prime minister's special envoy for the afghan transition, senior diplomat sir simon gass, who is conducting these discussions with taliban representative. we don't know exactly who and all we know is that they are happening in doha in qatar, where several allow ——eu foreign ministers are therefore the discussion as well. if you look at the statement from downing street confirming these talks last night, they say that sir simon is there to reinforce how the uk once ——wants it rather than to actually pin down logistical details of particular routes with taliban representatives, although let's see. but the fact is, this is quite a delicate piece of diplomacy because the uk obviously wants something from the taliban
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but they don't want to bestow them with too much legitmacyjust yet and the delicacy of the diplomacy was summed up by the home office minister, victoria atkins, who this morning was talking about operation warm welcome, which is the uk's operation to welcome people from afghanistan. this is the great debate for the world, for the western world, and it's got to be handled very carefully. as i say, we want to ensure the safety of people within afghanistan. we are announcing today a launch of operation warm welcome, where we will be helping people who have done amazing things for us over the two decades in afghanistan, we went to repay that debt that we owe them with education for their children, with health care, with housing and so on. but this is part of our new reality and we are having to work with what we have to try to ensure safety for those in afghanistan, but also, making sure
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that we are doing right by people who have been flown into the uk recently. and adam, this afternoon, there will be a big focus on the foreign affairs select committee because the foreign secretary, dominic raab, is appearing before the committee to answer questions about the withdrawal, how that was handled. clearly a lot of questions for him to answer. yes, and one of the people asking the questions will be tom tugendhat, the tory mp who chairs the foreign affairs select committee, who even on the good day is quite critical of the government but he's ——that he's a member of the political party of. he's also a former veteran who served in afghanistan and he gave that very powerful speech when parliament was recalled the week before last which went viral round the entire world, really capturing some of the emotion around the us withdrawal from afghanistan. so, he will be in the chair for that session and there is quite a lot of quite outspoken mps on that committee, who've got quite strong opinions and quite a lot of experience of foreign affairs
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and the labour party have put out a whole list of questions in ten different areas that they want dominic raab to answer, whether it's about the previous mission in afghanistan, whether it's about his own personal conduct and whether he went on holiday at the right time and stayed on holiday for too long and labour's shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandy, did not hold back. the soldiers that flew into danger, the diplomats that stayed behind, the border staff, particularly those young people who flew over having never done anything like this before, making life and death decisions, it's been the most incredible effort but the weak link in what was a very weak chain that led us to this point was the foreign secretary. none of that preparation work we have done, other countries like france were preparing for this months and months ago and pulling their people out and he has got to answer the questions about why it is that in the end hundreds of our troops had to be flown
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into what was an extraordinarily dangerous situation in order to pull people from crowds to get them out of the most chaotic circumstances. thousands of people left behind because of 18 months of failure to get ready for this moment. and i suspect dominic raab, if he was asked that question would give the answer he gave yesterday when he was asked that question when he was in the media and his answer was that the intelligence that the government was working on suggested that the taliban advance would be much slower and that the fall of kabul was several months away. although, intriguingly, when dominic raab was on the airwaves yesterday, he did sort of semi—point the finger at some other government departments for making mistakes, so it'll be interesting to see if he is a bit more of a team player in front of mps today. 0ur correspondent rajini vaidyanathan has been following the latest developments from delhi. we had a few moments ago, that clip of a taliban spokesperson talking about the shape of the new government in afghanistan, whether women would be included, whether
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people from various ethnic groups would be included, so tell us more about what you have been hearing about what you have been hearing about this new government. this all comes after — about this new government. this all comes after the _ about this new government. this all comes after the taliban _ about this new government. this all comes after the taliban leadership i comes after the taliban leadership racked up three days of talks from saturday to monday, and they were in kandahar. this interview has been done according to the bbc pashto service, they spoke to a senior taliban official in qatar. just to recap, those main points, one of the most striking things that came out of the interview was that they said that women will be in government, but they may not be in very high positions as ministers. also saying that anyone who continues in the government in the last 20 years will also not hold a role in the government. that again is a huge thing to note. i think on the women thing, there will be a lot of people who this is hugely disappointing in the last decade or so, it was so much progress made when it came to women's rights in afghanistan, for many more women taking up positions in politics. they now say that women
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can serve in government, but they can't aim as high as they want to. it also raises questions about whether the what ministry for women will even exist any more. of course, it is also worth noting that a lot of the people they say they do not want in a government, certainly those who worked in the previous government 20 years, is of course women taking it to at certain levels, many of those have also fled the country already because they are in fear of the taliban. we keep saying this, but we are looking to see what this will be of the taliban government, and what we're hearing from doha, qatar, what we're hearing from doha, qatar, what we're hearing from kabul, it seems to be different from kabul, it seems to be different from what we're hearing on the ground. there are still stories that women in other parts of afghanistan who say they cannot go to a market without a male escort, that girls at a secondary education and others —— not allowed to go to school, and i'm speaking to one man who is in hiding at the moment, he says the taliban are trying to find him and kill him. there really is a disconnect, but
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you have people who are celebrating the fact that the taliban are about to announce a government, and you have many, many others who are also living in complete fear. find have many, many others who are also living in complete fear.— living in complete fear. and ra'ini, from our living in complete fear. and ra'ini, from your contacts i living in complete fear. and ra'ini, from your contacts there, i living in complete fear. and rajini, from your contacts there, what - living in complete fear. and rajini, l from your contacts there, what more are you hearing about these efforts —— efforts about those who are securing safe passage from nationals from other countries, as well as afghans who want to leave the country? afghans who want to leave the count ? ., , ., afghans who want to leave the count ? . , ., ., afghans who want to leave the count ? . ., . ., country? that is a real challenge still. obviously, _ country? that is a real challenge still. obviously, as _ country? that is a real challenge still. obviously, as adam - country? that is a real challenge still. obviously, as adam was i country? that is a real challenge - still. obviously, as adam was saying still. obviously, as adam was saying just then, questions will be asked of the foreign secretary today, and i will be having conversations with people who had paperwork to fly to the uk, couldn't make it because of all the crowds and are now stuck in afghanistan, living in fear, now what are the options? and in terms of land borders, one of the real issuesis of land borders, one of the real issues is that even if someone tries to get to a land border with pakistan or iran, how would they be able to do that safely? the taliban it will be all that the checkpoints, these people live in fear of their
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lives. and i have believed there has been some talks at the uk, but the foreign secretary to negotiate with the country, to ensure that safe passage by land, but the other thing obviously that could seem quite an obviously that could seem quite an obvious one, if the airport restarts civilian flights, would be to fly these people out of kabul airport, and the other thing that came out of the interview with the bbc pashto service was that the taliban believes and claims that this airport could reopen in the next couple of days. we willjust need to see if it is the case. couple of days. we will 'ust need to see if it is the case.— see if it is the case. ra'ini, thank ou ve see if it is the case. ra'ini, thank you very much. _ see if it is the case. rajini, thank you very much. monitoring - see if it is the case. rajini, thank you very much. monitoring the i you very much. monitoring the situation there from delhi. with me now is bilal sarwary, afghan journalist, who has escaped kabul with his family. bilal, thank you forjoining us. you have written and spoken incredibly movingly about what you and your family and so many other afghans have been through. especially in the last few weeks. i just want to begin with you and your family. you have
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had to leave the life that you built up had to leave the life that you built up in kabul behind. how are you all doing? how are you will coping? thank you. we are still shattered, we are still heartbroken by the fact that we were. to leave our home, our circle of friends, and this was not notjust circle of friends, and this was not not just about my circle of friends, and this was not notjust about my passion to tell people of afghanistan, but as we are grateful, we aren't safe, we are grateful, we aren't safe, we are grateful to the state of qatar with more than hundred 50 people on the plane when we came here, which was pretty much all afghanistan is, and people, several of the anxiety society's banksy, with always with us. —— we have people with us. we are also beginning a new life somewhere in the world and hopefully we will continue to conserve afghan journalism because there has been a
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max exodus. back home, i have been speaking to lots of people, there is still the cash crisis, food commodities that people are worried about because of prices having gone up, with borders of all the neighbouring countries that have close, meaning that we cannot get essentials. afghanistan still does not have a functional government. for the taliban, there is one thing they were fighting, it is something that they make that tradition because they are no more the shadow government and they have to basically provide services to the people. basically provide services to the --eole. ., . , ., basically provide services to the --eole. ., ., , ., , people. that transition, when it is complete. — people. that transition, when it is complete. what — people. that transition, when it is complete, what do _ people. that transition, when it is complete, what do you _ people. that transition, when it is complete, what do you think - people. that transition, when it is complete, what do you think it. people. that transition, when it is i complete, what do you think it would look like? we were talking about thatjust look like? we were talking about that just a look like? we were talking about thatjust a moment ago with a reporter, i hope you are able to hear that, and the clip from the taliban spokesperson, saying that women will be in government, but not in ministerial roles, but what do you think this government is going to look like? the
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you think this government is going to look like?— to look like? the taliban have intense debates _ to look like? the taliban have intense debates and - to look like? the taliban have i intense debates and consultations in the city of kandahar, in the spiritual home, this is where the will train their military fighters in the south of the region, so we will have to see how their political leadership of the taliban can come to terms with the new realities that physical and social transformations that we know that the political leadership has been exposed to the international unity over the last years and in places like cat eye when they travel, even to countries like china and russia, so they understand the importance of international legitimacy and funding coming in. but the military leadership of the taliban, the commanders, the rigid ones, the al-qaeda influenced commanders and leaders. they are the difficult ones for the taliban to basically make them accept certain changes, compromise as one italian official told me. —— metallic —— taliban.
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they come from rural afghanistan, these soldiers, they have lost family members, and i also like to think that some stages, the taliban would be thinking, how can they even pay their own fighters and soldiers? thousands of them. how can they accommodate? what will be the colony looking like? is mining a viable industry, is construction? investments, for example, trade? all of that will oversee depend on what sort of relationship the taliban could have, even notjust with the international community, because countries like tajikistan and russia have had contact with the taliban, in the past, but they remain worried about this, the central asian fighters, from groups like the islamic movement of uzbekistan or the tajik nationals, so we will have to see how the regional dynamics
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will come into play as well. find will come into play as well. and bilal, are _ will come into play as well. and bilal. are you — will come into play as well. and bilal, are you hearing _ will come into play as well. and bilal, are you hearing about any reprisals from the taliban, against people who have worked with international forces, people who have worked with internationalforces, international governments over the last two decades? , ., , , ., ., decades? there is a sense of fear and uncertainty _ decades? there is a sense of fear and uncertainty prevailing - decades? there is a sense of fear and uncertainty prevailing in i decades? there is a sense of fear and uncertainty prevailing in the i and uncertainty prevailing in the hearts and minds of afghans. 0bviously, hearts and minds of afghans. obviously, we are getting a lot of these reports and accounts, you know, afghans have had taliban outside their doors, even the taliban spokesperson has spoken to the pakistani tv, and when they were asked by the anchor, if some think about leaving, they said that, the taliban said that some people had been bothering the press, that they... after their offices, but he did mention this strange word, the afghan culture, in schreiner law,
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which is often seen as a pretext for the taliban's way, and how shall rules, and the mass exodus also means that people of afghanistan will continue to lose their voice and it is great that international colleagues can report on that on the ground, but the reporting is limited. we need to think about afghanistan beyond this. bilal. limited. we need to think about afghanistan beyond this. bilal, we wish ou afghanistan beyond this. bilal, we wish you and _ afghanistan beyond this. bilal, we wish you and your _ afghanistan beyond this. bilal, we wish you and your family - afghanistan beyond this. bilal, we wish you and your family well. i wish you and your family well. thank you so much for talking to us. bilal, a journalist who fled. news coming into us from the media regulator here in the uk, 0fcom, this is in relation to comments made about megan, duchess of sussex, on good morning britain, by its then presenter piers morgan. this is after the duchess of sussex appeared in an interview with 0prah
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after the duchess of sussex appeared in an interview with oprah winfrey, talking about hurt feelings, her mental health, and piers morgan going on to say that he did not believe what she had said and 0fcom have decided and we can show you the education hearfrom 0fcom, that he was not in breach, piers morgan was not in breach of its code. this was a finely balanced decision, you can see the statement there, the summary on the screens, and mr morgan's, swear potentially harmful and offensive to viewers and we recognise the strong public reaction to them, they attracted a record number of a plate —— complaints to 0fcom, his commerce, but the statement goes on, we also took full accounts of the freedom of expression, and under our rules, broadcasters can include controversial opinions as part of adjustment debate in the public interest, and the strong challenge to mr morgan from other contributors provide an important context or for viewers. nonetheless, we have reminded itv to take greater care around content discussing mental
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health and suicide in the future. itv might consider the use of timely warnings or signposting of support services to ensure viewers are properly protected. so the regulator 0fcom has ruled that comments made ijy 0fcom has ruled that comments made by piers morgan about megan, duchess of sussex and her 0prah of sussex and her oprah winfrey interview on good morning in britain were not in breach of its code. —— good morning britain. the number of weather—related disasters has increased five—fold in the past 50 years, according to the world meteorologicalorganisation. it says many of them can be attributed to climate change, but fewer people are being killed. here's our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath. as the slow—moving hurricane ida pummelled louisiana in recent days, it caused catastrophic damage and left millions without power. weather—related disasters like hurricane ida have increased in number in recent decades,
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according to the wmo. the scientists say the rise has been influenced by climate change, as humans have continued to warm the planet through the use of fossil fuels. in germany and belgium earlier this summer, torrential rain saw towns and villages rapidly flooded, sweeping away lives and homes in seconds. in germany and belgium earlier this summer, torrential rain saw towns and villages rapidly flooded, sweeping away lives and homes in seconds. almost half of all the deaths that have the last 50 years have been due to water and climate—related hazards, say experts. the economic impact has also grown far more severe, with damages from weather—related events now costing more than seven times what they did in the 1970s. but despite the increase in hazards and their power, the good news is that the number of people being killed by storms, floods and droughts has decreased significantly. it is down by two thirds over the past five decades. the wmo says this is due
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to improvements in early warning systems, that give people more time to move away from danger. however, much work remains to be done, as only half the world's countries currently have adequate warning networks in place. simon lewis is professor of global change science at university college london. i asked him earlier what the international community can do to support developing nations which have been affected by this. a really important moment is in november in glasgow, the uk is hosting pivotal international climate talks and one of the parts of those climate talks is making sure that there is finance available from the countries that cause the problems of all this carbon pollution and that money from those countries goes to these very poor nations to make sure that they can do two things. one is to adapt, have these early warning systems, build their resilience,
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build their capacity to withstand these increasing climate impacts and seconds to help those countries overcome the fossil fuel age and move straight to renewable power and other sources of energy rather than relying on fossilfuels, but we must remember, in the big picture, that these weather—related events are going to get worse over time and they are going to continue to get worse over time until carbon emissions get down to net zero. on that point, countries and companies are enthusiastically and publicly signing up to net zero goals. what is that really going to entail, though? we have the words but in practice, what is that going to entail and dare we hope that climate change can be brought under control? i mean, i personally believe that climate change can be brought under control because people, if you look at surveys,
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people are really concerned about the issue and the technology exists to move us towards net zero, but there is a problem with all these declarations, that companies and countries are often putting declarations of 2040 or 2050 or 2060 and we need action now to reduce emissions, so the united nations says we need to halve global emissions this decade and to be able to do that, companies and governments need plans in the here and now, over the next few years, to slash emissions and then get them down to zero later on in the decades to come, but this short—term action is really important to put us on the path to net zero. professor simon lewis. every national forest in california is closed because of wildfire risks as firefighters battle multiple blazes in the state. the main threat now is the caldor fire which has charred nearly 200,000 acres and is heading toward the shores of popular tourist destination lake tahoe.
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james clayton reports from california. when fires get this hot, this intense, they're very hard to stop and this fire is headed straight for a beauty spot. over the past few days, residents of south lake tahoe have looked on in horror as the caldor fire got closer and closer to their homes. this is the worst i've seen it for 30 years. the town's crazy. just trying to get out. everyone in this town was ordered to evacuate on monday, leaving their homes at the mercy of the flames. nearly 4,000 firefighters are trying to stop it, or at least divert it. 0ften fighting it by hand, this is dangerous work. the fire has shown us to be unpredictable, rain driven, weather driven, it has been very active, with very rapid
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progression at times. the caldorfire is by no means the biggest fire that california has seen this year. but what makes it so dangerous is its proximity to residential areas. south lake tahoe is a beloved alpine town on the nevada—california border, high up in the mountains. californians spend summer holidays here, you can ski in the winter. it has a special place in people's hearts, a place of fun and adventure. yet the ski slopes have been transformed into an inferno, and the clear air of tahoe has turned to dense smog. much of what happens now depends on wind direction and fire intensity. firefighters say they are now embroiled in a tense fight which will likely take days to save the town. a state of emergency has been announced here, and if the area were to be engulfed, it would represent some of the most large—scale destruction from us forest fires in modern times. the australian state of victoria will stay in lockdown until 70% of the population has had at least
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one dose of a covid—19 vaccine. the premier hopes that will happen by the 23rd of september. most of the state is currently in strict lockdown, with tougher measures including a nightime curfew in place around greater melbourne. victoria recently reported 121 new cases — the highest single day total in the state for more than a year. filling stations across britain will be selling a more environmentally—friendly petrol from today. the new fuel — called e10 — contains more plant—based ethanol, which produces less carbon dioxide. it'll be sold in northern ireland early next year. but there's a warning that more than half a million vehicles are not compatible with it. nina warhurst has more. if you're filling up with petrol today, you will see some changes at the pump. let me just show you, so... the traditional e5 is being phased out, and in its place from today, will be e10. what does that mean? so, it's a move from 5% ethanol content to 10% ethanol content
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and why is that significant? well, ethanol, as you probably know, is like alcohol and it's made of natural waste matter, so coming from food waste for example, so it is carbon neutral. this is part of the government's strive to move towards carbon neutrality. we know that by 2030, we will all be in electric cars, but in the meantime, this is about making fuel more environmentally friendly. there are some problems. it is not compatible with more older cars, so those made from around the time of 2011 going backwards and that is the equivalent, they think, of around 600,000 cars, so it is definitely worth checking. the good thing is that this is the equivalent, the shift to 10%, of taking 300,000 cars off the road, which is the equivalent of every single car in yorkshire. single car in north yorkshire. so, it is an important shift. let's talk to tony, who is from the aa. hello, how are you doing? so, for you guys, do you see this being a problem?
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what if i have got a car from 2005, it isn't compatible with the e10 and i end up accidentally filling it? yeah, there is no need to panic. if you do put the e10 in, there is no need to panic. what you can do is just run the tank down for a while and then top up with super unleaded and that's all you would need to do. you would not need to have the tank drained or anything, it is not going to cause any long—term damage. just don't keep doing it time after time? just don't keep doing it, no. especially vehicles that will be stored because the ethanol contains corrosives and it can damage the petrol tank seal. and how can i check if my vehicle is compatible, it's easy enough isn't it? it's simple, yes. if you go on gov.uk/e10, top it will give you a list of vehicles and you can find your vehicle and it'll tell you yes or no. it is straightforward, isn't it? i tried it myself last night. and finally, this move towards electric vehicles, the clock is ticking, isn't it?
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this countdown to 2030. do you think we are in a good position to make that happen and do you see any issues with electric cars because lots of people worry about energy running out? we are not seeing any problems at the moment. people do have range anxiety, i think, but it's being addressed with increasing numbers of charging stations and more numbers of charging points on service areas etc, so the infrastructure is definitely building. do you think it will be there in place in good time for 2030? i'm putting you on the spot there. well, it will need to be in place, won't it? we don't have much choice. just a warning, as we move to this e10, it won't necessarily take you as far as the old fuel, so it will be a little bit more expensive but the government are saying that's a very small price to pay, literally, for the environmental benefits. for viewers in the uk, if you have
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any questions about this new petrol and how it could affect your vehicle, then do send your questions to us by tweeting bbc your questions or e—mailing your questions at bbc local uk and we will try to answer those through the day. the headlines on bbc news: us president biden remains defiant over the us departure from afghanistan, even though taliban militants are now back in control. discussions between the uk and the taliban are under way to help more british nationals and refugees leave afg ha nista n safely. fuelling a greener future, a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by three quarters of a million tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. according to a new report, climate change over the last 50 years has contributed to an average of a new weather—related disaster every day. 007 is back — the final trailer for the much delayed james bond
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film no time to die, has made its debut. with the crisis in afghanistan continuing to unfold, thousands are still attempting safe passage out of the country. the uk government has promised that up to 5,000 afghans can find refuge in the uk this year, with up to 20,000 in the long term. a former worker at the british embassy in kabul arrived in the uk injuly to seek refuge with his family. ahmed — we're not using his real name — joins us now. we're also not showing his face to protect his identity. ahmed, thank you very much for joining us. you are here with your family, your children ranging in age from three to 1a. how are you all getting on since you have been in the uk? ., ~ _, y .
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getting on since you have been in theuk? ., y . . ., the uk? thank you very much. we are ha - and the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we — the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we are _ the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we are grateful— the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we are grateful to - the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we are grateful to be i the uk? thank you very much. we are happy and we are grateful to be here i happy and we are grateful to be here and we are getting along nicely. the only concern we still have is about the ones we have left behind, so we are seriously worried about them and we hope they are going to be able to move. when it comes to the ones left behind, and also the ones who have worked with the uk in one way or another. flit worked with the uk in one way or another. . ., , ., worked with the uk in one way or another. _, , ., ~ ., another. of course, and i know when ou soke another. of course, and i know when you spoke to — another. of course, and i know when you spoke to my _ another. of course, and i know when you spoke to my colleague _ another. of course, and i know when you spoke to my colleague in - another. of course, and i know when | you spoke to my colleague in advance with this interview, you were saying that although you are here physically in the uk, mentally you are very much in afghanistan. what is your message to the uk government? what do you want the government? what do you want the government to do now to help those people who want to leave but who are still in afghanistan? i people who want to leave but who are still in afghanistan?— still in afghanistan? i think the government — still in afghanistan? i think the government should _ still in afghanistan? i think the government should practice, i
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still in afghanistan? i think the - government should practice, continue its useful and potentially fruitful dialogue with the taliban regarding safe passage and also explore the possibilities of taking out the ones who deserve to be out of the country and then i think it will make life easierfor them and for and then i think it will make life easier for them and for the uk as well to bring them into the uk. from a third country. tell well to bring them into the uk. from a third country-— a third country. tell me a little bit more now— a third country. tell me a little bit more now about _ a third country. tell me a little bit more now about your i a third country. tell me a little i bit more now about your family, ahmed. you are a family of eight and obviously you had to go through quarantine and now you are in another hotel, i believe. what is it like for you all having to live in a hotel? small rooms, i understand, and what are the prospects of moving into a house? what if you been told? so it has been challenging. after the current time, we have been living here for a month now in this
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holding hotel and we have found it challenging and tricky because managing life from a hotel is never easy, especially when you are living in larger groups in hotels, for example, living with your family. in larger groups in hotels, for example, living with yourfamily. so it has been challenging and all the families are waiting for news about their home, so hopefully, the home office and every institution will be able to work on it as a priority because people have been very patiently waiting. find because people have been very patiently waiting.— because people have been very patiently waiting. and in terms of our patiently waiting. and in terms of your children's _ patiently waiting. and in terms of your children's education, - patiently waiting. and in terms of your children's education, do i patiently waiting. and in terms of| your children's education, do they have places at schools and nursery? know, so that is one of the challenges, so the charity organisation working alongside the education department have very recently started some preparation classes for children where they are
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taught basic, basic skills, but they are smart enough, i reckon, so there has to be more improvement on that front because education, are chosen have been out of education for many months now and there is a huge appetite from them to be able to get going and to start school. thea;r appetite from them to be able to get going and to start school.— going and to start school. they must be desperate... _ going and to start school. they must be desperate... most _ going and to start school. they must be desperate... most kids _ going and to start school. they must be desperate... most kids like i going and to start school. they must be desperate... most kids like a i be desperate... most kids like a routine, don't they? they must be desperate to have some kind of routine and to burn off some energy, to meet other children. i do not know how much of that they have been able to do. ., know how much of that they have been able to do. . ., , know how much of that they have been able to do. . .,, _ know how much of that they have been able to do. . , able to do. yeah, as i say, it is all in the _ able to do. yeah, as i say, it is all in the preparation _ able to do. yeah, as i say, it is all in the preparation classes i able to do. yeah, as i say, it is l all in the preparation classes and it is not everyday, so we really need language training for adults, four mothers, because more than 90% of mothers in afghan families do not
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speak english and there is a need to learn that in the uk, so people are waiting for that and also some vocational training for families and also for adults where possible so there is something if the institutions could look into it, that would be very useful. have you been able to — that would be very useful. have you been able to start _ that would be very useful. have you been able to startjob-hunting i that would be very useful. have you been able to startjob-hunting or. been able to startjob—hunting or have you had any support to find a job, ahmed? have you had any support to find a job. ahmed?— have you had any support to find a job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully _ job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i _ job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i will— job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i will be _ job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i will be able - job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i will be able to i job, ahmed? yes, it's on my radar and hopefully i will be able to find | and hopefully i will be able to find one, but the challenge when it comes tojob finding is one, but the challenge when it comes to job finding is we need to know our permanent address to be able to create a bank account and so we also do not have our biometric residence cards, so we really are requesting the home office to work on those issues as a priority and, for example, for my family and some
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otherfamilies, they example, for my family and some other families, they have example, for my family and some otherfamilies, they have been here for months now, so it has been a long time and we need to move from here. to be able to start life smoothly, so we can start to work and i alsojust smoothly, so we can start to work and i also just wanted to very quickly say that the suitability is very important when it comes to housing, for example, we need to be close to a job market, you need to be close to a place where we can find a job because most of the families are among the professional skills and they really need to do something with their lives and to achieve things rather than living... when you have been uprooted and had to leave the life that you had built, i guess most people can understand you are desperate to start building that new life into put down new roots here in the uk.
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you will be aware, you have seen the images of so many people bringing in donations to help families arriving who have had to leave with very little, barely anything at all, have you received a warm welcome what you have been here?— have been here? yes, so we are crateful have been here? yes, so we are grateful for _ have been here? yes, so we are grateful for the _ have been here? yes, so we are grateful for the local _ have been here? yes, so we are grateful for the local charities, i grateful for the local charities, the islamic centre here in milton keynes and also the local population, so they have been brilliant in supporting us with the basic items like warm clothing, pushers for babies and all that, but there is more to be done. == there is more to be done. -- pushchairs- _ there is more to be done. -- pushchairs. so _ there is more to be done. —— pushchairs. so you are obviously waiting, as she explains, on paperwork, on online documentation so you can progress and try to look for a job and you need to get your children into school, beyond that, what are the next steps for you as a family? 0bviously what are the next steps for you as a
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family? obviously you are all relieved to have come to somewhere where you feel safe, but there must be a lot of healing to do because you have been through such a traumatic experience.- you have been through such a traumatic experience. yes, so, first and foremost. _ traumatic experience. yes, so, first and foremost, the _ traumatic experience. yes, so, first and foremost, the priority - traumatic experience. yes, so, first and foremost, the priority in - traumatic experience. yes, so, first and foremost, the priority in our i and foremost, the priority in our mind is to have a suitable housing. we can start our lives smoothly because that is the overarching concern and so many other problems will fall after we have a good enough housing, so hopefully, after having the housing, we will be able to, as you said, start hunting for jobs and also the children's education and explore all other possibilities and add value to the uk's future. possibilities and add value to the uk's future-— possibilities and add value to the uk's future. �* ., ~ , ., uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you ve much uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you very much to _ uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you very much to talking _ uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you very much to talking to _ uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you very much to talking to us - uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you very much to talking to us and i uk's future. ok, ahmed, thank you | very much to talking to us and good luck to you and your family.- luck to you and your family. thank ou ve luck to you and your family. thank
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you very much- — luck to you and your family. thank you very much. ahmed, _ luck to you and your family. thank you very much. ahmed, there, i luck to you and your family. thank| you very much. ahmed, there, not luck to you and your family. thank i you very much. ahmed, there, not his real name. — you very much. ahmed, there, not his real name. who _ you very much. ahmed, there, not his real name, who formerly _ you very much. ahmed, there, not his real name, who formerly worked i you very much. ahmed, there, not his real name, who formerly worked with | real name, who formerly worked with the british embassy in kabul and now in the uk with his family. an expensive but "game—changing" anti—cholesterol drug could soon be offered to hundreds of thousands of people in england and wales on the nhs. it normally costs nearly 2,000 pounds per dose, but the manufacturer has agreed an undisclosed discount for the health service. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. 0ur health correspondent michelle roberts has more. heart attacks and stroke are among the most common causes of death and ill health in the uk and high cholesterol is up one of the main risk factors. too much bad fat in the blood can clog your arteries. while eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise can help keep cholesterol down, some people need medication too. cheap tablets called statins work for many, but not all. people in england and wales could soon be offered a new type
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of treatment on the nhs. it is called inclisiran and it's a cholesterol—busting injection given twice a year. it can lower bad fat in the blood when other drugs like statins have not done enough. there is a huge unmet need, high cholesterol levels and even in some cases, there are people who are just very vulnerable to even modest levels of cholesterol and it's a silent killer. so being able to lower that and bring levels down close to the levels that we are actually born with, conveniently and safely is a complete game—changer. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. the health watchdog nice is recommending it as an option for people who have already had a stroke or heart attack and are not responding to other cholesterol—lowering treatments. nice says a ground—breaking deal has been met with the manufacturer to make it affordable for the nhs. its use is already
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approved in scotland. michelle roberts, bbc news. nearly one in three of the world's tree species are facing extinction in the wild. according to a report published by conservationists , oaks, maples and magnolias are among those at risk. the threatened list includes the menai whitebeam. there are only 30 of them in north wales. earlier i spoke to paul smith secretary general of botanic gardens conservation international, in carmarthenshire. he explained how climate change was just one of the contributing factors some trees face. we are certainly seeing this more and more, for example, in tropical islands, heavy storms, rising sea levels, but mainly it's our other activities, including clearing for agriculture, for forestry, for urban conurbations and so on and, of course, we are displacing trees in doing that. and here in the uk, can you give us a sense of the species most under threat and what is being done to counteract this?
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well, i think the example we have given is the menai whitebeam which is down to about 30 individuals and there are actually around 440 species around the world that we know are down to fewer than 50 individuals left in the wild, so what we do about that in the first case, obviously, is to protect those that remain and make sure no more are cut down or lost and then we can augment those and add to those populations by reintroducing, growing them in nurseries and botanic gardens and so on and reintroducing trees back into the wild. but it is really important that local communities look after their own species, that is the most important thing. if someone was to say to you, how does this impact the average person, what would your response be, paul? one of the things the report shows is that one in five of those tree species is used by people for medicines, food and so on and that is not
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counting firewood, so this is in our interests, but there are also other knock—ons. if you take our english oak here, 2300 other species of mammals, birds, insects and so one live and depend on the oak tree and if the oak tree goes, then they go as well and that will have a knock—on for us in terms of the impacts that those have on the environment, many of them beneficial, species that help us out, so there is really a domino effect here if you lose a single really charismatic and important species like a tree. ok, so we are talking about the impact on biodiversity here and are there more trees in the world than there were 40, 50 years ago? i know we are talking here about the threat to particular species but are there more trees overall or are we seeing the impacts of deforestation
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and so on having a negative impact on numbers overall? no, there are unfortunately many fewer trees in the world. we have been, on average, losing an area of old growth forest to the size of spain every five years and that is over the last few decades, so, you know, that is something we need to do something about. of course, everyone is planting trees at the moment, but those are not the trees we are losing. we tend to plant the easy ones, things like spruce or eucalyptus and so on because they are fast growing and we can get hold of their seeds, so we do see this as an opportunity, the fact that everybody wants to plant trees. let's incorporate and use many of these threatens tree species in these tree—planting programmes and let's help them to recover. and in a line, essentially, you do not want these wonderful species to be confined to botanic gardens. absolutely not.
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we need to get them back into the wild and that means working with broader society and communities to make that happen. the headlines on bbc news: us president biden remains defiant over the us departure from afghanistan, even though taliban militants are now back in control. fuelling a greener future, a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by three quarters of a million tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. 007 is back — the final trailerfor the much delayed james bond film, no time to die, has made its debut. brazilian researchers have found that snake venom could be used as a tool in the fight against coronavirus — after early testing in animals has shown that a molecule in the venom of a deadly south american pit viper — could inhibit
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the reproduction of covid cells. sophia tran—thomson has this report. the jararacussu pit viper is one of the deadliest snakes in south america. the viper�*s venom has enough potency to kill 16 people, but the dangerous snake could potentially help scientists develop a drug to combat coronavirus. researchers have found that the molecule peptide produced by the jararacussu pit viper inhibited the virus's ability to multiply in the cells of monkeys by 75%. translation: we were able to see that the peptides not only inhibited | the development of the virus in vitro, inside the cell, but we were also able to see that it was able to inhibit one of the proteins that is very important for the development of the virus and propagation of new viruses. and the peptides can be synthesised in a lab, making the capture or breeding of the snakes unnecessary.
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translation: we are afraid that people will go hunting _ for the snakes all over brazil, thinking it will save the world, themselves or their family. that is not the case. is this an important discovery? without a doubt, it is. but chasing after the animal is not how it will be resolved. the component that was discovered is just a fraction from inside the venom. it is not the venom itself that will cure coronavirus. researchers will next test the efficiency of different doses of the molecule and whether it is able to prevent the virus from entering cells. but it will be a slow testing process and so far, there is no timeline on when human testing will begin. it's just four weeks until the uk premiere of daniel craig's fifth and final outing as james bond in �*no time to die', which has been repeatedly delayed by the pandemic. the final trailer has just been released and it shows
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all the high—octane action that bond fans have come to expect. mark lobel reports. come on, bond, where the hell are you? indeed — the world's been waiting quite a while. barring another screeching u—turn, we're weeks away from witnessing bond's return out of retirement and into the arms of an old foe. now your enemy's my enemy. how did that happen? well, you live long enough. after a year in which the pandemic sent the box office into a tail spin with billions of dollars lost and after that top gun tom cruise's well publicised summer trip to see tenet proved somewhat of a false start, could no time to die be the blockbuster that really brings us back to the big screen? the release may also help bolster the box office in its battle with the home sofa.
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even though amazon's takeover of mgm, the hollywood studio behind bond, has led some to speculate future releases like this may be fast—tracked to the small screen. that's a sore point for actors who profit from box office bonuses, including black widow actress scarlettjohansson, who's currently in a battle with the walt disney company — unhappy they premiered her film on its streaming service at the same time as in cinemas. well, i understand double—0s have a very short life expectancy. but every actor who has played bond so far has made it safely on to the big screen. all eight of them, in fact — sean connery, roger moore, timothy dalton and pierce brosnan and in the �*60s, george lazenby and david niven, not to forget the first bond in the �*50s, barry nelson, he was in casino royale. so who is odds on to take
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overfrom daniel craig? is it that bloke from bridgerton, marvel�*s kung fu master, or the man who played superman? but this bond has to survive a number of plot twists first. james. you don't know what this is. if he does finally find his way to the big screen, we will all find out. the name's lobel, mark lobel, bbc news. hundreds of capybaras have invaded a wealthy suburb of buenos aires with residents complaining that they're destroying their lawns and gardens. the new homes have been built in an area which was once wetlands. the capybara is the world's largest rodent is a semi—aquatic mammal and the plants in the pristine gardens are too tempting for the veggie eating animals. locals aren't calling for a cull but want the city authorities
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here watching bbc news. rebecca will be here next to take you through to one o'clock. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. high pressure has been dominating our weather for the best part of two weeks now and it will continue to do so for the next few days, so the forecast for the next few days is another often cloudy one, some drizzle or light patchy rain coming out of that cloud toppers of us, some sunshine especially across scotland and some of the western parts of the uk at times. what we have this afternoon is still a fair bit of cloud around, thick can offer patchy light rain or drizzle, breezy down this naughty coastline in the english channel, fleeting glances of sunshine across southern england and also south wales but we should see a bit more sunshine across scotland, northern england and the north and east of northern ireland. these white circles represent average wind speeds, is a not particularly windy, just breezy for most, but in the
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sunshine, we could get temperatures up sunshine, we could get temperatures up to 22 degrees which would feel quite pleasant. through this evening and overnight, once again, return to and overnight, once again, return to a cloudy night, still breezy, across the east of the country and also to the east of the country and also to the english channel, some mist and fog patches forming as well and under clear skies, we could see temperatures fall away to about 12 degrees in sheltered glands which will be a bit of a shock to the system in the morning, but most visible stay in double figures. tomorrow, high pressure very much remains in charge of our weather, drifts a little bit further east but not much, still pulling in a lot of moisture from the north sea. so for thursday and friday, we still are looking at variable amounts of cloud, still thick enough for some spots of drizzle, the best of the sunshine in the north and west and still breezy to the english channel. the weekend forecast may well change. this area of low pressure is giving us a headache. we thought it would come our way later on saturday and through sunday, bringing rain, but it might actually slow down which will have an impact, of course, on when and where we see the
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rain. what we think at the moment is that on saturday it will be largely dry, still variable amounts of cloud around, the best of the sunshine across northern and western areas and that cloud still thick enough for the odd spot or two of patchy light rain or drizzle. temperatures 14 to 20 or 22 degrees in cardiff. and then what happens on saturday, of course, will have an impact on sunday's weather. 0n of course, will have an impact on sunday's weather. on sunday, if the low pressure stays out in the atlantic for longer, it will be drier and warmer, especially so in the south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: discussions between the uk and the taliban are under way to help more british nationals and refugees leave afg ha nista n safely. the taliban tells the bbc its new government will be announced in the next day or two — there will be women, but perhaps not in any senior ministerial roles. in this new government which has been announced, in the top was — been announced, in the top posts — i mean to say, in the cabinet — there may not be a woman. the home office has said that afghans who worked for the british military and the uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently. former good morning britain host
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piers morgan has been cleared by media regulator 0fcom — which has rejected a record 58,000 complaints about his criticism of the duchess of sussex. fuelling a greenerfuture — a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by 750,000 tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. described as a game changer — the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade soon to be offered on the nhs. nearly one in three of the world's tree species are facing extinction in the wild — according to a report published by conservationists, oaks, maples and magnolias are among those at risk. 007 is back — the final trailer for the much—delayed james bond film, no time to die, has made its debut.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, will be questioned today about britain's withdrawal from afghanistan by mps on the commons' foreign affairs committee. both mr raab and the foreign office have faced criticism of their handling of the evacuation. last night in a national address, president biden defended his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan. he also said that the united states will no longer look to "remake other countries." it comes as the uk government says it is in talks with the taliban to secure a way out of afghanistan for british nationals and afghans who worked with allied forces. it's thought up to 250 people eligible for relocation, plus their families,
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remain in the country. meanwhile, the home office has announced that afghans who worked with the british government and military will be allowed to move to the uk permanently. those eligible will be given indefinite leave to remain, rather than the five year residency previously offered. 0ur correspondent, ione wells, is at westminster. these talks first of all between the uk and the taliban, a delicate piece of diplomacy i should imagine, what more do we know about them? by, of diplomacy i should imagine, what more do we know about them? a very delicate piece — more do we know about them? a very delicate piece of _ more do we know about them? a very delicate piece of diplomacy _ more do we know about them? a very delicate piece of diplomacy going i delicate piece of diplomacy going on. we know the uk is now in conversations with senior officials from the taliban to try and work out what the plan will be for further evacuations from afghanistan. that is because we obviously know there are still british citizens but also
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afghans are eligible for resettlement in the uk who did not make it out of afghanistan and that first wave of evacuations from kabul airport. we know that we have the primary minister's special representative who has gone two down hard to speak with senior members from the taliban. they have pledged that they will allow for further departures, but there is a question about how, through third countries, across a land corridors, departures from the international airport scale? these are all questions that still need to be worked out. in terms of relationships, the prime minister and other ministers have been keen to stress that one of the ways they are hoping to cooperate with the taliban is through the leather is that they believe the uk and other g7 nations have. the prime minister has pointy particularly to financial incentives, saying that if the taliban wants to unlock key
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financial assets they have, if they won't access to things like foreign developmental aid for afghanistan, then as a condition to that, they need to ensure safe passage for people who still want to leave the country. a question that will feature in these diplomatic conversations is what about all those people who want to flee afghanistan who are eligible for resettlement year because they feel they are at risk from the taliban are at risk from the taliban themselves? very delicate conversations. these are the start of an ongoing process of working out, something which was earlier described to the bbc as working out exactly what the relationship will be worth taliban officials and what sort of government they will be wanting to have. this is the great debate for the world, for the western world, and it's got to be handled very carefully. as i say, we want to ensure the safety of people within afghanistan. we are announcing today the launch of operation warm welcome,
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whereby we will be helping those who have done amazing things for us over two decades in afghanistan. we want to repay that debt that we owe them — with education for their children, with health care, with housing and so on. but this is part of our new reality, and we're having to work with what we have, as i say, to try to ensure safety for those in afghanistan, but also, importantly, making sure we're doing right by people who have been flown into the uk in recent weeks. that is going to be a big focus this afternoon on the foreign affairs select committee. we are expecting some awkward questions for the foreign secretary, dominic raab, and a lot of them, i can't imagine? mp5 a lot of them, i can't imagine? mps are really only _ a lot of them, i can't imagine? mps are really only have _ a lot of them, i can't imagine? i" are really only have about an hour to grill the foreign secretary, but there are certainly going to be lots of questions for him. this is a chance for a group of cross—party
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mps, chaired by tom hooperand chance for a group of cross—party mps, chaired by tom hooper and tat, who has been very critical of the government was not handling of this crisis. he himself served in helmand province, he gave a very emotional speech when the house of commons returned briefly, talking about his feelings around the handling of the withdrawal of troops from afghanistan. certainly lots of questions from him as well as a number of mps on that committee. i think they kind of questions we will hear will focus on a number of things. firstly, how prepared the uk government was for this crisis and were wear those failures of intelligence? why was it that the uk did not anticipate there is going to be a big focus this afternoon on the foreign affairs select committee. we are expecting some awkward questions for the foreign secretary, dominic raab, and a lot of them, i can imagine? mps really only have about an hour to imagine? mps really only have about an hourto grill imagine? mps really only have about an hour to grill the foreign secretary, but there are certainly going to be lots of questions for him. this is a chance for a group of cross—party mps, chaired by tom who intact, who has been very critical of the government was not handling of the government was not handling of this crisis. he himself served in helmand province, he gave a very
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emotional speech when the house of commons returned briefly, talking about his feelings around the handling of the withdrawal of troops from afghanistan. certainly lots of questions from him as well as a number of mps on that committee. i think the kind of questions we will hear will focus on a number of things. firstly, how prepared the uk government was for this crisis and whether those failures of intelligence? why was it that the uk did not anticipate of how the taliban was going to take over afghanistan. also, in the midst of this crisis there are still lots of evacuations to be made. i think mps will settlement to be holding dominic that you can about what the plan is next. how they are planning to get these people still eligible for resettlement out of the have returned from his safely. how they are planning to prevent any kind of terror threats now existing in the country as well. these i think are big questions dominic raab face. there has been a lot of criticism in the press recently about dominic raab as my own personal responsibility in this as well, things like should he have returned from his questions that labour will be putting two ministers next week when parliament returns. also she did not hold back when it came to the personal questions she thinks should exist for dominic raab we
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might hear some questions about his personal role in that crisis as well. certainly, mps will be wanting to push government ministers today, but also what the plan is next to help those people still vulnerable. this is something obviously the opposition have been raising a lot today, with lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary, early laying out some of the questions labour will be putting two ministers next week when parliament returns. also she did not hold back when it came to the personal questions he thinks should exist for dominic raab too. the soldiers that flew into danger, the diplomats that stayed behind, the border staff, you know, particularly those young people who flew over who have never done anything like this before, making life and death decisions. it's been the most incredible effort. but the weak link in what was a very weak chain that led us to this point was the foreign secretary. none of that preparation work was done. other countries, like france, were preparing for this months and months ago and pulling their people out. and he has got to answer the question about why it is that, in the end, hundreds of our troops had to be flown into what was an extraordinarily dangerous situation in order to pull people through crowds, to get them out in the most chaotic circumstances. thousands of people left behind because of 18 months of failure to get ready for this moment. as we headed there, obviously the opposition that there are much going hard on dominic raab himself and
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asking him to take some personal responsibility for the life events are played out over the last couple of weeks. it will be interesting to see what kind of turn he strikes when it comes to that, whether he has got any kind of specifics about things like numbers that are left still to be evacuated in the country, but also whether he does accept some responsibility over what has happened over the last couple of weeks, given they have been some interesting reports in at the press but also interesting interviews he has given it lately where he has seen to perhaps shift the blame slightly, exciting things like a filly of military intelligence, which is reported to have not please his colleagues in the ministry of defence. with reports of this kind blame game is going on between government departments, it will be interesting to see what kind of town he dished back and it mps will be pushing him for some personal possibility later as well. absolutely, wee wee watching along with you well. meanwhile, the deputy head of the taliban political office in qatar spoke last night with bbc pashto about how the taliban intend to govern the country now that they're in power. he was asked if there would be a place for ethnic groups and for women in afghanistan's new government. all ethnic groups which are living in afghanistan, they are afghans,
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they have the right to be in the government. but future government, the next government will be announced, all these afghans will be selected as for their merit. all those afghans who have the ability and capacity and capability to work according to their profession also they will be in the government. government, especially at the top posts. what about women in the top post positions? are you considering... women also i cannot say that they will be at the top. if they are not at the top, maybe they will be in the government in the lower... because in every department of the government and ministries, you can say almost half of the civil workers are women. so they can come back to their work
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and the can continue. but maybe in this new government which has been announced, in the top — i mean to say, in the cabinet — there may not be women. joining me now from doha is my colleague from bbc pashto, inayatulhaq yasini, who conducted that interview. good to have you with us. please tell us more about what was said to you. he tell us more about what was said to 0“. ., ., ., tell us more about what was said to ou. ., ,., ., ., ., tell us more about what was said to ou. ., ., ., ., ., you. he elaborated a lot about the future a set _ you. he elaborated a lot about the future a set of _ you. he elaborated a lot about the future a set of of _ you. he elaborated a lot about the future a set of of the _ you. he elaborated a lot about the future a set of of the taliban i future a set of of the taliban government, saying that there will be a role for everyone. but i asked him specifically about x top leaders, such as the ex—president. he was explicit that they will accommodate all others, but not the top leadership, those who are according to him in powerfor the last 20 years and there was no one to remove them. also on the women's rights and women workers, he was think that the afghanistan population is more than half women
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and they will be what a loving to work but not in top positions. i asked him if he would return to the ban which was previously in the 90s on the work of women. he categorically said they will not. a engagement with the western countries, particularly in the light of those left behind, he was saying that they are working on this. but he was stressing that they want will be allowed to go abroad without proper documentation. —— that they want will be allowed. behind the scenes in doha, i have gathered information on the different western countries, including britain, have beenin countries, including britain, have been in touch with the political office of the taliban. according to some sources, we may see some progress in terms of the evacuation.
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did you get any sense of where authority really resides? i suppose what i'm asking is, who really has the final word? fine what i'm asking is, who really has the final word?— the final word? one thing the taliban has, _ the final word? one thing the taliban has, from _ the final word? one thing the taliban has, from the - the final word? one thing the i taliban has, from the beginning the final word? one thing the - taliban has, from the beginning back in 1994 that started out movement, they were listening to their leaders, who was at the top. who has been consulting taliban leaders in kandahar. he has not appeared in public yet. the final decision lies with him, who is not in kind a heart with him, who is not in kind a heart with all his deputies.— with all his deputies. thank you so much forjoining _ with all his deputies. thank you so much forjoining us. _
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meanwhile, the bbc understands that uk officials instructed afghans to go to the abbey gate entrance of kabul airport — just hours before thursday's suicide bombing there. emails seen by newsnight show that the british embassy told people to "use the abbey gate entrance, near to the baron hotel", even though the uk and us deemed a threat to the airport to be imminent. almost 200 people were killed in the explosion, including two uk citizens. the uk government said it was investigating the emails. and the foreign secretary dominic raab is due to face questions this afternoon from the foreign affairs select committee on his handling of the situation in afghanistan. you can watch that live on the bbc news channel at 2pm. the headlines on bbc news: the home office has said that afghans who worked for the british military and the uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently. former good morning britain host piers morgan has been cleared by media regulator 0fcom, which has rejected a record 58,000
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complaints about his criticism of the duchess of sussex. described as a game—changer, the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade — soon to be offered on the nhs. an expensive but "game—changing" anti—cholesterol drug could soon be offered to hundreds of thousands of people in england and wales on the nhs. it normally costs nearly £2000 per dose, but the manufacturer has agreed an undisclosed discount for the health service. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. 0ur health correspondent, michelle roberts, has more. heart attacks and stroke are among the most common causes of death and ill health in the uk
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and high cholesterol is one of the main risk factors. too much had fat in the blood can clog your arteries. while eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise can help keep cholesterol down, some people need medication too. cheap tablets called statins work for many, but not all. people in england and wales could soon be offered a new type of treatment on the nhs. it is called inclisiran and it's a cholesterol—busting injection given twice a year. it can lower bad fat in the blood when other drugs like statins have not done enough. there is a huge unmet need, high cholesterol levels and even in some cases there are people who are just very vulnerable to even modest levels of cholesterol and it's a silent killer. so being able to lower that and bring levels down close to the levels that we are actually born with conveniently and safely is a complete game—changer. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade.
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the health watchdog nice is recommending it as an option for people who have already had a stroke or heart attack and are not responding to other cholesterol—lowering treatments. nice says a ground—breaking deal has been met with the manufacturer to make it affordable for the nhs. its use is already approved in scotland. michelle roberts, bbc news. the media watchdog 0fcom has ruled that piers morgan did not breach the broadcasting code during comments he made about the duchess of sussex on itv�*s good morning britain. 0fcom said its decision was "finely balanced" and that itv should take "greater care" around content to do with mental health. morgan has tweeted that he's delighted and that the ruling is a victory for free speech. during the interview, morgan was criticised for his comments by colleague alex bereford, which led to him storming off set whilst live on air.
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because if they need doesn't promote the monarchy, the monarchy slowly dies out. i'll come to alex and a sect. would you mind waiting? 140. sect. would you mind waiting? no, car on. sect. would you mind waiting? no, carry on- the _ sect. would you mind waiting? no, carry on. the element up to you, night _ carry on. the element up to you, night has — carry on. the element up to you, night. has she said anything about you since — night. has she said anything about you since she cut you off? i don't think_ you since she cut you off? i don't think she — you since she cut you off? i don't think she has but you continue to treasure~ — think she has but you continue to treasure. �* ., , treasure. ok, i'm done with this. this herb is _ treasure. ok, i'm done with this. this herb is absolutely _ treasure. ok, i'm done with this. this herb is absolutely diabolical| this herb is absolutely diabolical behaviour. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin patersonjoins me. this does seem to be a story that we can't discuss properly without you filling us in on the background. this goes back to march, the morning after the famous interview with prince harry, meghan markle and oprah winfrey had run in the us. piers morgan was giving his thoughts
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on it, he said he did not believe a word that meghan markle had said. the following day he walked off and it became the most complained about tv moment in tv history. 0fcom have given us the relevant now, it is 91 pages long. the crucial parts are aware that 0fcom says "the restrictions of such views that piers morgan had would be an hour you are unwarranted and chilling restriction on freedom of expression, both of the broadcaster and the audience.". 0fcom says it was a finely balanced decision and itv had provided adequate protection to viewers about potential harm about the comments about mental health. interestingly, they say one of the reasons they have ruled it was ok because because of the way that piers morgan's co—presenters managed to come out and put their point of view up against piers
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morgan. very briefly, piers morgan has given a response. he said in a tweet of columns decision is a resounding victory for freedom of speech. we also know piers morgan is watching the news channel because he has just tweeted the 11 o'clock headline. no pressure, then, colin! piers morgan, do get in touch if you're watching. i'm joined now by stewart purvis, former 0fcom board member and a former chief executive of itn. he's in north london.(0s) picking up on what colin was saying, that this was the most complained about moment in television history. how surprised are you about what 0fcom has decided? how surprised are you about what ofcom has decided?— how surprised are you about what ofcom has decided? reading between the lines i can — ofcom has decided? reading between the lines i can see _ ofcom has decided? reading between the lines i can see just _ ofcom has decided? reading between the lines i can see just how _ the lines i can see just how difficult _ the lines i can see just how difficult this was for 0fcom. just
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explain — difficult this was for 0fcom. just explain that there are two sets of rules_ explain that there are two sets of rules that — explain that there are two sets of rules that 0fcom is trying to balance, _ rules that 0fcom is trying to balance, one is a european convention which tries to guarantee freedom _ convention which tries to guarantee freedom of— convention which tries to guarantee freedom of expression, the other is ofcome— freedom of expression, the other is 0fcom's own rules, which basically say you _ 0fcom's own rules, which basically say you shouldn't be too offensive to people. — say you shouldn't be too offensive to people, or you shouldn't offend against _ to people, or you shouldn't offend against generally accepted standards. you have got to fight your— standards. you have got to fight your way— standards. you have got to fight your way through the middle of that. they way— your way through the middle of that. they way they have done it is a pretty— they way they have done it is a pretty clear—cut conclusion, i can see why — pretty clear—cut conclusion, i can see why pearce morgan is celebrating the way— see why pearce morgan is celebrating the way he _ see why pearce morgan is celebrating the way he is. within the body of the way he is. within the body of the document of over 91 pages there are some _ the document of over 91 pages there are some really quite awkward moments, though for piers morgan and for 0hour's— moments, though for piers morgan and for 0fcom's decision making process. tell us— for 0fcom's decision making process. tell us more — for 0fcom's decision making process. tell us more about those. one for ofcom's decision making process. tell us more about those.— tell us more about those. one i would point _ tell us more about those. one i would point to _ tell us more about those. one i would point to is _ tell us more about those. one i would point to is that _ tell us more about those. one i would point to is that it - tell us more about those. one i would point to is that it goes . tell us more about those. one i would point to is that it goes to | would point to is that it goes to this issue — would point to is that it goes to this issue that meghan markle said that she _ this issue that meghan markle said that she had suicidal thoughts, was inappropriate for a presenter to believe — inappropriate for a presenter to believe say that he didn't believe
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that? _ believe say that he didn't believe that? audience members may have been discouraged _ that? audience members may have been discouraged from seeking help about their mental health. that is a pretty— their mental health. that is a pretty serious statement to make. they recently actually learn do not decide _ they recently actually learn do not decide it _ they recently actually learn do not decide it is — they recently actually learn do not decide it is the morgan is, we took account— decide it is the morgan is, we took account of— decide it is the morgan is, we took account of the fact that the co—presenters to challenge mr morgan has nry— co—presenters to challenge mr morgan has my comments. really, i think piers— has my comments. really, i think piers morgan has his colleagues to thank, _ piers morgan has his colleagues to thank, particularly at the weatherman we saw that clip there. is weatherman we saw that clip there. is pretty _ weatherman we saw that clip there. is pretty clear from reading the documentation that itv are invited him to— documentation that itv are invited him to do— documentation that itv are invited him to do that, to try to try to challenge _ him to do that, to try to try to challenge pearce morgan on screen. there _ challenge pearce morgan on screen. there witt— challenge pearce morgan on screen. there will be some of those who complained he will frankly be staggered by this. is there anything else they can now do or is this not the end of the matter? it is else they can now do or is this not the end of the matter?— the end of the matter? it is pretty much the end _ the end of the matter? it is pretty much the end of— the end of the matter? it is pretty much the end of the _ the end of the matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. - the end of the matter? it is pretty| much the end of the matter. when
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the end of the matter? it is pretty l much the end of the matter. when i was at _ much the end of the matter. when i was at 0fcom, we were involved in a case where — was at 0fcom, we were involved in a case where a — was at 0fcom, we were involved in a case where a brooke astor took us to the high— case where a brooke astor took us to the high court saintly had restricted his freedom of expression and the _ restricted his freedom of expression and the ruling made. —— a broadcaster. we want that case, but it has— broadcaster. we want that case, but it has always been clear to me that 0fcom _ it has always been clear to me that 0fcom and — it has always been clear to me that 0fcom and its lawyers have always been _ 0fcom and its lawyers have always been concerned that the if they are seen to— been concerned that the if they are seen to he — been concerned that the if they are seen to be restricting freedom of expression, they will be in trouble in the _ expression, they will be in trouble in the high— expression, they will be in trouble in the high court. that might be a background factor. if in the high court. that might be a background factor.— in the high court. that might be a background factor. if you wanted to return to good _ background factor. if you wanted to return to good morning _ background factor. if you wanted to return to good morning britain, - background factor. if you wanted to l return to good morning britain, does this now clear the way for piers morgan's return? i this now clear the way for piers morgan's return?— this now clear the way for piers morgan's return? i suppose it does in some way- _ morgan's return? i suppose it does in some way- i _ morgan's return? i suppose it does in some way. i understand - morgan's return? i suppose it does in some way. i understand he - morgan's return? i suppose it does in some way. i understand he has. in some way. i understand he has been _ in some way. i understand he has been in _ in some way. i understand he has been in negotiations with other broadcasters since then. it is entirely— broadcasters since then. it is entirety a _ broadcasters since then. it is entirely a matter for itv whether they would want to have him back. i think— they would want to have him back. i think from _ they would want to have him back. i think from his personal point of view, _ think from his personal point of view, as— think from his personal point of view, as you can tell from his tweets — view, as you can tell from his tweets today, he is celebrating the fact that _ tweets today, he is celebrating the fact that 0fcom has said that piers morgan _ fact that 0fcom has said that piers morgan is —
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fact that 0fcom has said that piers morgan is entitled to say he disbelieved the duchess's allegations about suicidal thoughts. we must _ allegations about suicidal thoughts. we must leave it there. really good to have you with us, thanks for your thoughts. iamjustfinding i am just finding the next ree for a year. —— next story for you. the uk government says it is in talks with the taliban to secure a way out of afghanistan for british nationals and afghans who worked with allied forces. it's thought up to 250 people eligible for relocation — plus their families — remain in the country. we now know from the government that afghans who worked for the british military and uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently, rather than the five years' residency previously offered. the uk evacuated more than 8,000
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people eligible for the resettelment scheme from august 13. joining me now is councillor abi brown, leader of the stoke—on trent city council. thank you forjoining us. i wonder, first of all, how many families are you planning to take? haste first of all, how many families are you planning to take?— first of all, how many families are you planning to take? we have been workin: in you planning to take? we have been working in conjunction _ you planning to take? we have been working in conjunction with - you planning to take? we have been working in conjunction with our - working in conjunction with our neighbouring authorities of staffordshire. across the whole of the stoke—on—trent and staffordshire region i think we are looking to take approximately 25 families altogether. take approximately 25 families altogether-— take approximately 25 families altoaether. ., m ., altogether. have you taking macro taken any yet? _ altogether. have you taking macro taken any yet? element _ altogether. have you taking macro taken any yet? element we - altogether. have you taking macro taken any yet? element we are - taken any yet? element we are working through the detail at the moment, we are waiting for them to arrive. haste moment, we are waiting for them to arrive. ~ ., ., ~ , arrive. we are working behind the scenes to make _ arrive. we are working behind the scenes to make sure _ arrive. we are working behind the scenes to make sure that - arrive. we are working behind the scenes to make sure that as - arrive. we are working behind the scenes to make sure that as soon | arrive. we are working behind the i scenes to make sure that as soon as they are able to come forward we are able to provide of the right facility straightaway. haifa able to provide of the right facility straightaway. how long the rocess facility straightaway. how long the process take? _ facility straightaway. how long the process take? for _
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facility straightaway. how long the process take? for stoke-on-trent j facility straightaway. how long the i process take? for stoke-on-trent we have been in — process take? for stoke-on-trent we have been in thailand _ process take? for stoke-on-trent we have been in thailand a _ process take? for stoke-on-trent we have been in thailand a special- process take? for stoke-on-trent we have been in thailand a special area l have been in thailand a special area for a number of years. this is something we are fairly used to in terms of preparing homes. generally, once things are in order and allocating appropriate property happens fairly quickly. let’s allocating appropriate property happens fairly quickly. let's talk about appropriate _ happens fairly quickly. let's talk about appropriate property. - happens fairly quickly. let's talk| about appropriate property. have happens fairly quickly. let's talk - about appropriate property. have you got it? some of these families have sizeable families, five or six children perhaps. have you got the right kind of accommodation? i think that's a challenge _ right kind of accommodation? i think that's a challenge for _ right kind of accommodation? i think that's a challenge for every - right kind of accommodation? i think that's a challenge for every local- that's a challenge for every local authority in terms of making sure they have got the right size of property. clearly we need to take a very good look so that we can find them coming forward. i suspect some alterations will have to take place. of course the government has unveiled guidance and support around that. ~ .
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unveiled guidance and support around that. . ., ., unveiled guidance and support around that. ., ,. that. what about schools? the term is about to begin. _ that. what about schools? the term is about to begin. if— that. what about schools? the term is about to begin. if you _ that. what about schools? the term is about to begin. if you haven't - is about to begin. if you haven't been able to put families into permanent accommodation, they are perhaps still in hotels or hostels, what will happen to those children? again, as i say, this is a situation we are quick quite used to within stoke—on—trent. other schools and absolutely fantastic, they absolutely fantastic, they absolutely go out of their way to support on instances like this. we have quite a well ordered machine which is used to dealing with these kind of request. it is unbelievable that anybody could have possibly watched the last four footage of the last few months and not feel for those families fleeing for their lives. i knew that it is a sentiment i will be echoed right across the country, certainly in stoke—on—trent in terms of how we support. people do want to make sure they can provide the very best warm welcome that they can. provide the very best warm welcome that they can-— that they can. your council has been at the forefront _ that they can. your council has been at the forefront of _ that they can. your council has been at the forefront of this _ that they can. your council has been at the forefront of this and - that they can. your council has been at the forefront of this and has - that they can. your council has been at the forefront of this and has a - at the forefront of this and has a track record of welcoming refugees.
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not other four all other councils do. am i right that only about a third of local authorities have offered to help so far? if i am right, why is that numbers out loud? i think that is the number quoted, one in three councils have apparently offered support. i am proud that stoke—on—trent is one of those authorities, along with our neighbours in the wider staffordshire area. i think to be on as a national debate is needed on this. we are a city with a long history around this, we have been an asylum dispersal area for the last 20 years, approximately one in a 250 people in my city is an asylum seeker. that is a huge toll in two on our city. we are proud to be a very kind place, but clearly it is a very kind place, but clearly it is a very challenging. having a number that hyde really does make things very difficult. that is why i think we need to have a national debate. i
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am not surprised that any local authority would have a look at the situation that i face every day i'd willingly put themselves forward in that place. equally, it is important that place. equally, it is important that everybody takes its fair share. my that everybody takes its fair share. my city has been taking its fair share for 20 years. it's time now for other people to step up and take theirfair share too. some breaking news into us here at the bbc. colin pitchfork has walked free from prison after bids to keep him behind bars for longerfailed. let me tell you a little more about colin pitchfork. he was jailed for life after strangling 215—year—old girls in it lest i shout in 1983 and then in 1986. he became the first
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man convicted for two for the basis of dna evidence in a 9088 as he admitted to the notice, due two indecent and conspiracy to pervert the course ofjustice. his 30 year minimum term in prison was cut by two years in 2009. he was moved to an open prison for eight years ago but he has now been released on wednesday. that is after bids to keep him behind bars for longer failed. no doubt we will have more on this breaking news as we get it and we will bring it to you. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. what we've had weather—wise in the last couple of days is what we are going to hang on to for the next few days as well. and that there will be a lot
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of clutter down and still thick enough for some drizzle as you can see in some eastern and south—eastern areas. but across scotland are eventually northern england, parts of northern and eastern northern ireland, we will see some sunshine. it's still breezy down the north sea coastline and the english channel, and it's a chilly breeze at that. in that the sunshine we could see highs of 22 degrees. now, as we head on through the evening and overnight, we hang onto a lot of cloud and also the breeze coming in from the north sea and across the english channel. there will be some clear skies and in sheltered glens we could see temperatures fall away to about 5 degrees, but for most we'll stay in double figures. there'll also be some hill fog and a little bit of mist around as well. tomorrow sees again a lot of cloud, they breeze perhaps a little lighter coming down the north sea coastline. still breezy through the english channel. the best of the brightness across parts of the north and also the west. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... discussions between the uk and the taliban are under way
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to help more british nationals and refugees leave afg ha nista n safely. the taliban tells the bbc its new government will be announced in the next day or two. there will be women, but perhaps not in any senior ministerial roles. the former good morning britain host piers morgan has been cleared by the media regulator 0fcom, which has rejected a record 58,000 complaints about his criticism of the duchess of sussex. fuelling a greener future, a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by three quarters of a million tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. described as a game—changer, the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade. soon to be offered on the nhs. 007 is back — the final trailerfor the much delayed james bond film — �*no time to die',
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has made its debut. we'll be speaking to the james bond interantionalfan club a little later. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. fairto fair to say, it was a slightly quieter day fair to say, it was a slightly quieter day at fair to say, it was a slightly quieter day at the fair to say, it was a slightly quieter day at the paralympics, wasn't it? yes, it was but there is a goal venue on the eighth games of the paralympic games in tokyo and it is david smith who has brought it home. this man is really the main champion this event. he is the double olympic, paralympic i should say champion, successfully defending his title. 4-2, i champion, successfully defending his title. 4—2, i love his hair. really is something that makes him stand out, isn't it? he beat him into a second successive goal in the event. he won in rio 2016 and just look at
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the celebrations there. it means so much to him so fantastic news and eight goals in paralympic butcher. —— a gold in the paralympic boccia. so both are becky redford and also bronzes on the table tennis and actually as well. you can catch it with more info on that in the bbc sport website and paralympic news in one gold so far. emma raducanu's fairy tale year continues as she booked her place in the second round of the us open with a straight sets victory over switzerland's stefanie vogele. this was raducanu's debut at flushing meadows and she showed her talent and maturity throughout, just as she did at wimbledon earlier in the summer. the 18—year—old won 6—2, 6—3 against her experienced opponent and will face china's zhang shuai in the next round. but katie boulter is out. she was beaten in straight sets 6—3, 6—2 by russia's ludmilla samsonova. it was was also her first appearance in the main draw of a us open
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after making it through qualifying. novak djokovic�*s bid to win all four grand slams in a calendar year continues. but it wasn't completely plain sailing for the world number one , he lost the second set tie breaker against holger rune before the danish teenager suffered cramp and djokovic comfortably won the next two sets to advance to the second round. it's tough, you know, to play in my first match, even though i had, you know, till tonight tonnes of experience playing in the squad, for him it was a first one. still you get nervous, still, you know, you are feeling a little bit rusty at the beginning so, yeah, i mean, obviously i'm pleased with the way i finished the match but camino, again, it was not a fair battle so to see him on the court with his unfortunate injury.
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joe root is back at the top of the international test batting rankings — for the first time in 6 years. he's enjoyed a stunning series so faragainst india. root has scored centuries in all three test matches — and is the series' top run—scorer with 507 runs ahead of tomorrow's 4th test at the oval. the england captain — who began the year 9th in the charts — jumps above new zealand's kane williamson to become the no1 test batsman. antoine griezmann has left barcelona to rejoin atletico madrid on a season—long loan deal. atletico will take on the france forward's salary, and there is a compulsory clause to make the transfer permanent. he returns to atletico two years after he joined barca for £107 million. that is just about it for us now. more from the wrap—up of transfer deadline day and all the updates on the paralympics angling as we speak. lovely, see you later gavin. thanks.
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an expensive but "game—changing" anti—cholesterol drug could soon be offered to hundreds of thousands of people in england and wales on the nhs. it normally costs nearly £2,000 per dose, but the manufacturer has agreed an undisclosed discount for the health service. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. joining us now is professor sir nilesh samani, medical director at the british heart foundation and also i'm joined by zena forster who has high cholesterol and has used statins, which are a group of medicines that help lower cholesterol. welcome to both. if i might start with you professor, is this in your view a game changer? it is with you professor, is this in your view a game changer?— view a game changer? it is very important _ view a game changer? it is very important as — view a game changer? it is very important as we _ view a game changer? it is very important as we got _ view a game changer? it is very important as we got patients i view a game changer? it is very l important as we got patients with heart and circulatory diseases so it is quite a very important development.— is quite a very important development. is quite a very important develoment. , ., ., , ., development. tells more about your situation. development. tells more about your situation- so. _ development. tells more about your situation. so, about _ development. tells more about your situation. so, about four— development. tells more about your situation. so, about four or - development. tells more about your situation. so, about four or five - situation. so, about four or five ears situation. so, about four or five years ago _ situation. so, about four or five years ago i _ situation. so, about four or five years ago i had _ situation. so, about four or five years ago i had a _ situation. so, about four or five years ago i had a mini - situation. so, about four or five years ago i had a mini stroke i situation. so, about four or five l years ago i had a mini stroke and then— years ago i had a mini stroke and then a _ years ago i had a mini stroke and then a year— years ago i had a mini stroke and then a year after i had a heart attack— then a year after i had a heart attack and _ then a year after i had a heart attack and then they discovered that
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i had something called for hypercholesterolaemia which is, as it says. _ hypercholesterolaemia which is, as it says, familiarly genetic predisposition to high cholesterol and they— predisposition to high cholesterol and they discovered that my cholesterol was very quite high so i have been— cholesterol was very quite high so i have been taking statins for a number— have been taking statins for a number of years but three previous statins _ number of years but three previous statins didn't work as effectively as the _ statins didn't work as effectively as the one that i'm currently on, so i have _ as the one that i'm currently on, so i have now— as the one that i'm currently on, so i have now managed to bring down my cholesterol _ i have now managed to bring down my cholesterol levels but, unfortunately, i had covid—19 last year and — unfortunately, i had covid—19 last year and theyjust started slightly to rise _ year and theyjust started slightly to rise again so i'm having to increase _ to rise again so i'm having to increase my dosage of my current starting _ increase my dosage of my current starting and it's... it is about waiting — starting and it's... it is about waiting and saying if this works, so this is— waiting and saying if this works, so this is a _ waiting and saying if this works, so this is a brilliant fifth extra treatment option which will be welcome news to many patients with
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heart disease. no, welcome news to many patients with heart disease-— heart disease. no, absolutely. professor. _ heart disease. no, absolutely. professor, tells _ heart disease. no, absolutely. professor, tells a _ heart disease. no, absolutely. professor, tells a little - heart disease. no, absolutely. professor, tells a little bit - heart disease. no, absolutely. | professor, tells a little bit more about how it will work, because am i right that it is the way it is delivered rather than the jab itself thatis delivered rather than the jab itself that is key to this? delivered rather than the “ab itself that is key to thigh that is key to this? yes, it is a new class _ that is key to this? yes, it is a new class of— that is key to this? yes, it is a new class of drugs _ that is key to this? yes, it is a new class of drugs that - that is key to this? yes, it is a new class of drugs that partly | new class of drugs that partly lowers cholesterol in a way that is different from the way statins work so as xena has just said many of those who take a statin may be so as xena has just said many of those who take a statin may he can't get their cholesterol low enough to make a big difference to their risk and some people are intolerant of statins so this new drug will help to create, help those people whose cholesterol is not well controlled or cannot take statins. it's aided game changer in a different way because as patients no need to take a statin everyday weather is what
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you do with this drug if you give a subcutaneous injection just under your skin like you do with the vaccines we have been seen recently. covid—19 and you need to give it twice a year and it changes a reduction of 50% on your cholesterol level so people don't have to remember to take a pill every day. their cholesterol will be lowered by just having this injection twice a year. obviously, with a general practitioner, and so it is really a game changer in a number of different ways. it is a very powerful drug. it works in a way thatis powerful drug. it works in a way that is different from the way statins work. it is in a new armoury to us with the way we deal with cholesterol and it can be taken in a different way for some patients who will take a pill every day. just different way for some patients who will take a pill every day.— will take a pill every day. just to be absolutely _ will take a pill every day. just to be absolutely clear _ will take a pill every day. just to be absolutely clear in _ will take a pill every day. just to be absolutely clear in my - will take a pill every day. just to be absolutely clear in my mind, | be absolutely clear in my mind, could someone on a daily statin now replace it, then, with one of these injections once every six months? has it as simple as that? $5 injections once every six months? has it as simple as that?- has it as simple as that? as you know in the _ has it as simple as that? as you know in the nhs, _ has it as simple as that? as you
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know in the nhs, nothing - has it as simple as that? as you know in the nhs, nothing is - has it as simple as that? as you | know in the nhs, nothing is that simple because this is an expensive drug. and what knives have currently recommended as they want to use it step—by—step and at first it is going to be restricted to those people who have already had heart problems, eight whether a heart attack of a stroke or some other cardiovascular disease, whose cholesterol is not well controlled with statin so i don't want to give the mistaken impression that many people's cholesterol is controlled by statins very well and those people take statins regularly and are protected by it but there is a group of people in which cholesterol is not controlled or they are intolerant of statins for a number of reasons and that is where the focus would be initially because this provides an alternative treatment for them. the advantage of having it twice a year is the change criteria will be simple for some people that the main benefit at the moment is that those people who currently are not protected as they should because statins aren't sufficient for them. so that is why
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the government want to introduce this into the nhs, introduce this verse to a restricted number of people. it won't be available for everybody but as time goes on and as the drug hopefully becomes cheaper and we have more information on it, we hope it will maybe become more widely used. we hope it will maybe become more widely used-— we hope it will maybe become more widely used. zena, from what you've heard, widely used. zena, from what you've heard. then. — widely used. zena, from what you've heard, then, what _ widely used. zena, from what you've heard, then, what difference - widely used. zena, from what you've heard, then, what difference do - widely used. zena, from what you've heard, then, what difference do you| heard, then, what difference do you think this injection might make to your life? if you were to be offered a? , , , ., . ., a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically — a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically and _ a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically and my _ a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically and my lai _ a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically and my lai pit - a? oh, if my numbers have changed dramatically and my lai pit clinic - dramatically and my lai pit clinic consultant— dramatically and my lai pit clinic consultant agrees then i would have no hesitation in taking it —— lipid clinic— no hesitation in taking it —— lipid clinic consultant. because having heart _ clinic consultant. because having heart disease is relentless. i cannot— heart disease is relentless. i cannot explain. there is no respite from _ cannot explain. there is no respite from it _ cannot explain. there is no respite from it. there is no cure. all i can hope _ from it. there is no cure. all i can hope to— from it. there is no cure. all i can hope to do— from it. there is no cure. all i can hope to do is— from it. there is no cure. all i can hope to do is hope to slow down progression of it and so to have
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something this as a adjunct therapy, something _ something this as a adjunct therapy, something that could, as the doctor has said. _ something that could, as the doctor has said, could reduce my cholesterol even further would the media _ cholesterol even further would the media like changer should i need to change _ media like changer should i need to change it. _ media like changer should i need to change it, but it also comes in many patients, _ change it, but it also comes in many patients, this is about giving hope. hope _ patients, this is about giving hope. hope is— patients, this is about giving hope. hope is a _ patients, this is about giving hope. hope is a precious commodity when you've _ hope is a precious commodity when you've got _ hope is a precious commodity when you've got heart disease. you know, you've got heart disease. you know, you wake _ you've got heart disease. you know, you wake up — you've got heart disease. you know, you wake up hoping that camino, the pill is _ you wake up hoping that camino, the pill is going _ you wake up hoping that camino, the pill is going to work, you hope you're — pill is going to work, you hope you're not— pill is going to work, you hope you're not going to another heart attack, _ you're not going to another heart attack, you — you're not going to another heart attack, you hope you're not going to have a _ attack, you hope you're not going to have a stroke, you hope today is not the day _ have a stroke, you hope today is not the day you — have a stroke, you hope today is not the day you are going to die, i really— the day you are going to die, i really hope not! so this, as i said is a precious _ really hope not! so this, as i said is a precious commodity, having that hope and _ is a precious commodity, having that hope and camino, the treatment is an added _ hope and camino, the treatment is an added extra _ hope and camino, the treatment is an added extra treatment that —— and, you know. — added extra treatment that —— and, you know, the treatment is an added extra _ you know, the treatment is an added extra treatment that is potentially a game _ extra treatment that is potentially a game changerand extra treatment that is potentially a game changer and a life—saver. a
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doctor a game changer and a life—saver. doctor from the british heart doctorfrom the british heart foundation and a patient who currently takes anti—cholesterol medication. we have to leave it there. thanks. new research suggests one in seven children who catch covid may still have a range of symptoms linked to the virus three months after infection. the most common were unusual tiredness, headaches and breathing difficulties. our health reporter jim reed is here. jim, tellsa jim, tells a little bit more about this research. are these the symptoms of what we have been calling in a short hand long covid? it is significant for a number of reasons. we have been waiting for this research for a good few months now. it is the well�*s largest study of so—called long covid symptoms in children. it took place in the uk. i say children, they looked at 11—17 —year—olds, so young people as well as children and, interestingly, with the study, they looked at the beach ball 3000 children in that age group who tested positive for the virus
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and another 3000 who tested negative and another 3000 who tested negative and compared their symptoms are the self—reported symptoms they were asked to fill in the surveys themselves after 15 weeks to see if they still had continuing health problems so, they weren't asked, you know, do you suffer from long problems so, they weren't asked, you know, do you sufferfrom long covid, they were just to report the symptoms themselves. an interesting thing is they looked at the difference between those groups and they found roughly a 14% difference open that you can kind of come to the conclusion that after 15 weeks around one in seven children who caught the virus still had these continuing symptoms, multiple symptoms at that point and that includes things like unusual tiredness, so fatigue, headaches, some problems reading, some losses of smell in that group, so that was after 15 weeks. they're now going to continue this research to see if that continues up to six months of a year afterwards. that continues up to six months of a year afterwards-— year afterwards. these are significant _ year afterwards. these are significant symptoms. - year afterwards. these are | significant symptoms. how year afterwards. these are - significant symptoms. how worried should parents be? it significant symptoms. how worried should parents be?—
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significant symptoms. how worried should parents be? it depends how ou look should parents be? it depends how you look at — should parents be? it depends how you look at it- _ should parents be? it depends how you look at it. the _ should parents be? it depends how you look at it. the most _ should parents be? it depends how you look at it. the most children i you look at it. the most children and young people you do the cover from covid—19 very quickly. actually the author is speaking this morning actually describe this as being pretty promising because early research back in december last year talked about perhaps 50% of children having these continuing symptoms. now, this was 14% so that is considerably below what some people fear but nevertheless that is not to minimise the problem is that some people could go through here. i mean, the authors were talking about some children, and young people were still bedridden after that time. some children do have problems breathing but across the whole population looking at thousands of children who have got this virus the numbers are probably still rarer than maybe we thought back at the end of last year.— end of last year. understood. how does this play _ end of last year. understood. how does this play into _ end of last year. understood. how does this play into the _ end of last year. understood. how does this play into the ongoing - does this play into the ongoing debate about vaccinating children? where we are at the moment is you have this independent lymphocytosis is on thejcvi, this group, and they have recommended that all 16 and 17—year—olds should receive the vaccine and that is now going on
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across the uk or they should be offered it at least. now we're going to this moment when they have to decide they are going to decide on a younger age group, so the 12 to 15 and certainly this research could play internet to a certain extent. the authors of this research from ucl, public health england, big universities have said they're going to forward this research onto the gc vi to help them inform that decision but i think fundamentally that decision on whether young children can get this is wobbly going to be based more on safety concerns and safety worries about the virus and in particular myocarditis and pericardial cysts which are very rural can inflame the heart muscle and some younger males in particular. that is what they were looking in particular that this evidence in this research about the longer—term effects, so—called long covid was also persistent symptoms of long covid certainly pay into that. . , , of long covid certainly pay into that. ., , , ., that. really interesting. thanks very much- _
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the number of weather—related disasters has increased five—fold in the past 50 years, according to the world meteorological organisation. it says many of them can be attributed to climate change, but fewer people are being killed. as the slow—moving hurricane ida pummelled louisiana in recent days it caused catastrophic damage and left millions without power. whether related disasters like i do have increasing numbers in recent decades according to this agency. the science say this is related to climate change as continues to warm the planet to the use of fossil fuels. in germany and belgium earlier this summer potential rain, it rains or villages flooded, sweeping away lives and homes in seconds. almost half of all the deaths that have occurred in disasters over the last 50 years have been due to the water and
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climate —related hazards, say experts. an economic impact is also growing far more severe, with damages from weather related events now costing more than seven times what they did in the 19705. but if in their power, the good news is that the number of people being helped by storms and droughts has decreased significantly, down by two thirds over the past five decades. the wmo says this is due to improvements in early warning systems that give people more time to move away from danger. however, much work remains to be done is only half the world's countries currently have adequate warning networks in place. pat mcgrath, bbc news. a new type of petrol is being rolled out across forecourts in britain today. it's called e10. the government says it'll be more environmentally friendly, but it won't be compatible with over half a million older vehicles. it'll be sold in northern
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ireland early next year. guy lachlan is the director of the historic and classic vehicle alliance. hejoins us now. good to have he joins us now. good to have you weather us and i suppose the question is what is this going to meet for classic car owners and presumably those owners of cars which may not be compatible with this new petrol? it is which may not be compatible with this new petrol?— this new petrol? it is a good question _ this new petrol? it is a good question and _ this new petrol? it is a good question and of— this new petrol? it is a good question and of course - this new petrol? it is a good question and of course that l this new petrol? it is a good - question and of course that there are leaving her flat abilities across the range of cars that are affected. our message to people is don't panic. it is still a perfectly good fuel it is just that we will have to do things perhaps differently in future, maybe some modifications to cars and so on as time goes on as people get used to this new fuel. just time goes on as people get used to this new fuel.— this new fuel. just explain to me, if ou this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have _ this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have got — this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have got a _ this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have got a car _ this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have got a car that - this new fuel. just explain to me, if you have got a car that is - if you have got a car that is incompatible with a new petrol, classic car, what you do? it incompatible with a new petrol, classic car, what you do? it depends on what the — classic car, what you do? it depends on what the incompatibilities. - classic car, what you do? it depends on what the incompatibilities. there | on what the incompatibilities. there are some materials that you find in cars and motorbikes which just don't like ethanol and so they have to be
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replaced with materials that are, so some fuel pipes for example just don't like it. storage a problem, so a lot of these vehicles spend the winter in storage and ethanol has an affinity for water so there range of things you can do for that. you can add something to the petrol to deter corrosion inside the petrol tank, you can modify the car in some ways to make air, you know, more difficult to get fuel or could even in extreme cases new specialist storage petrol to lengthen the life of the petrol. and then the third and most difficult problem is actual running problems which varies from car to car. and for those, really, the car will have to be modified in some way to make the fuel system more compatible with ethanol. might, 0k. more compatible with ethanol. might, ok. from more compatible with ethanol. might, 0k- from what _ more compatible with ethanol. might, ok. from what you _ more compatible with ethanol. might, ok. from what you say, _ more compatible with ethanol. might, ok. from what you say, whatever- 0k. from what you say, whatever happens it sounds quite costly but also i have met people who own classic cars and they tend to be very proud of them and look after
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them very well. what might happen if they put this petrol in by mistake? i mean, could it cause immediate and lasting damage to the car? hie. lasting damage to the car? no, really not- _ lasting damage to the car? no, really not. the _ lasting damage to the car? iifr, really not. the biggest worry is if you accidentally put ten and then left it in storage i think that would be the most difficult thing to deal with —— accidentally put e10 petrol. i think you would find it won't start in spring and then you would have to take things apart to get to the bottom of what the problems are. but i think in fact what we are suggesting to people is if they are in this grey area of not really knowing how badly their vehicle could be affected, try half a tank of each ten on a day that you know you're going to use all the petrol up and find out what the issues are with running it. —— have a tank of ten. —— e10 petrol. it 5 just four weeks until the uk
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premiere of daniel craig's fifth and final outing as james bond in �*no time to die', which has been repeatedly delayed by the pandemic. the final trailer has just been released and it shows all the high—octane action that bond fans have come to expect. ajay chowdhury is the spokesperson for the james bond international fan club. what did you make of this trailer? more of the same?— what did you make of this trailer? more of the same? more of the same but bond more of the same? more of the same but itond fans — more of the same? more of the same but bond fans devour _ more of the same? more of the same but bond fans devour every _ more of the same? more of the same but bond fans devour every new- but bond fans devour every new mortal and this had a lot to offer. there was actually an american trailer and an international uk trailer and an international uk trailer which was slightly different. but, you know, what it means is we have had a long walk in the desert and finally this film when it survives in the uk cinemas on the 30th of september, finally we are going to have a long iced pint of champagne and look it down. it has been very exciting. the thing about james bond has been very exciting. the thing aboutjames bond and has been very exciting. the thing about james bond and the return to
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the cinema is this. they are going back to work, we're going back to school. james bond represents wonderful entertainment and an escapist escape from what we have been two and a clarion call of return to normality. it appeals to all generations, all genders, completely international and i think it's just the tonic, a cinematic tonic we're going want. i do it'sjust the tonic, a cinematic tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't — tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't mean _ tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't mean to _ tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't mean to be _ tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't mean to be a _ tonic we're going want. i do wonder and i don't mean to be a damp - tonic we're going want. i do wonder| and i don't mean to be a damp squib because i'm looking forward to it probably almost as much as you are but there is such a level of anticipation around it, it has been heralded as the film that is going to rescue cinema and get us all going back, isn't it? it is daniel craig's last outing. i wonder how good the film is actually going to be. what are your thoughts on that? there is nojoke. how may bond fans does it take to change a light bulb? ten but wants to complain how much better the original was.— better the original was. there are alwa s better the original was. there are always going _ better the original was. there are always going to —
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better the original was. there are always going to be _ better the original was. there are always going to be critics - better the original was. there are always going to be critics of - better the original was. there are always going to be critics of any l always going to be critics of any new franchise beat star was a marvel of james new franchise beat star was a marvel ofjames bond. daniel craig this is his fifth film. his films have been enjoyed by audiences and critics worldwide and i think this film promises to be the culmination of everything that has happened in daniel craig since casino royale and also it is thus an exciting new director who has really grabbed this film by the lapels. i mean, is controversies in the past are not unknown and it is thus a wonderful new cast headed by a person who won an oscar for new cast headed by a person who won an oscarfor bohemian new cast headed by a person who won an oscar for bohemian rhapsody and another giving up a new angle on a double agent and the bond field is very much everything we have come to expect but also innovates and gives us something brand—new. and also we have got the script, haven't we? 1 have got the script, haven't we? i remember when have got the script, haven't we? i rememberwhen i have got the script, haven't we? i remember when i interviewed have got the script, haven't we? i remember when i interviewed phoebe waller bridge who has been brought on board, hasn't she, too as she said as a of spice oscilloscope so i wonder what we can expect from her.
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phoebe waller bridge is in a long line of interesting female writers to write bond scripts. but of a bond film doctor no was written by a warm and called barbara and... is one of the most accomplished films producers right now and produces the pictures with her stepbrother michael g wilson so i'm pretty sure this film is going to appeal to all sorts of demographics and phoebe waller bridge is another wonderful piece of the puzzle that is going to be added to. i was at an aston martin launch yesterday on the river thames. it was wonderful. we had all these jaded journalists but when the trailers drop to tpn everyone was like a school kid again. it really is all of our youth are notjust in the uk but all around the world and i think there is a frisson of excitement. yes, people have seen it all before but in away bond is a modern myth. it is the only contemporary british cultural pop icon in the world and i think everyone appreciates that in the excitement of no time to die after its long arduous journey is great.
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remember, the cinemas in the movie industry employ a lot of people so i think we should do our bit to help cinemas and all those people who have had a very tough time of covid—19. i think that is what bond represents, some sort of hope, some kind of hope for, you know, in the industry that has been hit located that i think it's notjust a james bond film, it is representative of the bigger picture that has been largely impacted by covid—19. spokesperson for the james bond international fan spokesperson for the james bond internationalfan club, billy spokesperson for the james bond international fan club, billy had to talk to you and i am looking forward to it as much as you are. thanks so much. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol hello again. what we've had weather—wise in the last couple of days is what we are going to hang on to for the next few days as well.
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and that there will be a lot of clutter down and still thick enough for some drizzle as you can see in some eastern and south—eastern areas. but across scotland are eventually northern england, parts of northern and eastern northern ireland, we'll see some sunshine. it's still breezy down the north sea coastline and the english channel, and it's a chilly breeze at that. in that the sunshine we could see highs of 22 degrees. now, as we head on through the evening and overnight, we hang onto a lot of cloud and also the breeze coming in from the north sea and across the english channel. there will be some clear skies and in sheltered glens we could see temperatures fall away to about 5 degrees, but for most we'll stay in double figures. there'll also be some hill fog and a little bit of mist around as well. tomorrow sees again a lot of cloud, they breeze perhaps a little lighter coming down the north sea coastline. still breezy through the english channel. the best of the brightness across parts of the north and also the west.
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on this breaking news as we get it and we will bring it to you. this is bbc news, the headlines: the home office has said that afghans who worked for the british military and the uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently. the taliban tells the bbc its new government will be announced in the next day or two. there will be women, but perhaps not in any senior ministerial roles. in this new government which has been announced, in the top posts — i mean to say, in the cabinet — there may not be women. colin pitchfork, who raped and murdered two school girls in the 19805, has been released from prison. former good morning britain host piers morgan has been cleared by media regulator 0fcom, which has rejected a record 58,000 complaints about his criticism of the duchess of sussex. fuelling a greenerfuture — a new type of petrol has been
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introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by 750,000 tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. described as a game changer, the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade — soon to be offered on the nhs. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, will be questioned today about britain's withdrawal from afghanistan by mp5 on the commons' foreign affairs committee. both mr raab and the foreign office have faced criticism
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of their handling of the evacuation. last night in a national address, president biden defended his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan. he also said that the united states will no longer look to " remake other countries. " it comes as the uk government says it is in talks with the taliban to secure a way out of afghanistan for british nationals and afghans who worked with allied forces. it's thought up to 250 people eligible for relocation, plus their families, remain in the country. meanwhile, the home office has announced that afghans who worked with the british government and military will be allowed to move to the uk permanently. those eligible will be given indefinite leave to remain, rather than the five year residency previously offered. our correspondent lone wells
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is at westminster. let's is at westminster. start with those talks between the let's start with those talks between the taliban and the british government. i should the taliban and the british government. ishould imagine the taliban and the british government. i should imagine a delicate piece of diplomacy and shrouded in secrecy. what do we know about them?— about them? these talks have been described as — about them? these talks have been described as very _ about them? these talks have been described as very sensitive. - about them? these talks have been described as very sensitive. we - described as very sensitive. we don't know much about the detail of some of these talks at the moment, but we do know that the prime minister's chapter that are a number of talks going on between senior officials he had in the uk but also senior representatives, including the prime minister's special representative for afghan transition, who has gone to doha to talk to senior taliban officials. we note that a british citizens but also afghans who are eligible for resettlement in the uk who were not evacuated under that first phase of evacuations from kabul airport which wound down at the weekend as both british and us troops left the
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country. the vacation is certainly going to be a key focus of these discussions. they tell and has pledged it will allow further departures for those authorised to leave the country but there are questions what this will look like. will they announce some kind of third country route for people to leave safely over land? will they allow any access or departures from the international airport? there was also a question of they would allow safe passage for some of those people who are of course trying to flee from the taliban themselves. the prime minister and other ministers over the last couple of days has been pretty clear that any engagement with the taliban is dependent on them allowing sea passage for people who want to leave afghanistan. the prime minister along with other g7 leaders have cited some of the leverage they hope to use, things like the fact that if they tell about want to unlock key financial assets that they have any overseas reserves and banks, if they want access to things like foreign aid
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from western countries, then they need to ensure this kind of safe passage for people who want to leave the country. something highlighted by home office minister victor atkins earlier is that these talks at the start of a complex working out of what kind of relationship and engagement that is going to be with this new administration in afghanistan. —— victoria atkins. this is the great debate for the world, for the western world, and it's got to be handled very carefully. as i say, we want to ensure the safety of people within afghanistan. we are announcing today the launch of operation warm welcome, whereby we will be helping those who have done amazing things for us over two decades in afghanistan. we want to repay that debt that we owe them — with education for their children, with health care, with housing and so on. but this is part of our new reality, and we're having to work with what we have, as i say, to try to ensure safety for those in afghanistan, but also, importantly, making sure we're doing right by people who have been flown into the uk in recent weeks.
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i think it's this afternoon of course, two o'clock, dominic raab will appear in front of the foreign affairs select committee. i think you said earlier it will only last an hour but i imagine there will still be a lot of tough question for the foreign secretary? mi still be a lot of tough question for the foreign secretary?— still be a lot of tough question for the foreign secretary? all eyes on westminster— the foreign secretary? all eyes on westminster today _ the foreign secretary? all eyes on westminster today on _ the foreign secretary? all eyes on westminster today on this - westminster today on this opportunity for mp5 to get out the foreign secretary on what has been obviously one of the biggest foreign policy crisis in the last decade. this is something which we are expecting lots of kinds of questioning from the cross—party group of mps questioning from the cross—party group of mp5 on this committee, which is led by the conservative mp tom who he spoke passionately about what he perceived to be some of the failings of the uk government in the handling of the uk government in the handling of this crisis so far.—
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of this crisis so far. including a very emotional _ of this crisis so far. including a very emotional speech - of this crisis so far. including a very emotional speech he - of this crisis so far. including a | very emotional speech he gave of this crisis so far. including a i very emotional speech he gave to house of comments when it returned from recess briefly to discuss afghanistan. i think there will be some reflection on the handling so far. what went wrong, what kind of failures of intelligence their word, which meant that the uk along with other countries say they were taken by surprise at the speed by which the taliban advance in afghanistan. there will be questions about preparations made given that we knew us troops would be withdrawing from the country months ago. i think the fact that this crisis is still ongoing and there are still people to be evacuated, there are still the question is what how the uk will engage with the afghanistan going forward, i think mps will be keen to hold dominic raab to account about the next steps. how they plan to process the people to be evacuated. what kind of processing hubs that are going to be in countries across the border is to try and process some of those refugees and afghans
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eligible for resettlement i want to get out of the country. also security concerns and what the uk government is doing to try to alleviate ongoing terror threats coming out of afghanistan now. i think these are other questions dominic raab is going to face. there has also been a lot of pressure in the last week on dominic raab himself on his own personal responsibility, not least after reports about him being on holiday and whether or not he should have returned from that holiday sooner. this is something labour have been going on strongly on today. they have gone up a list of questions they want to see dominic raab to answer as well. earlier shadows they could to lisa nandy do not hold back on dominic raab either. the soldiers that flew into danger, the diplomats that stayed behind, the border staff, you know, particularly those young people who flew over who have never done anything like this before, making life and death decisions. it's been the most incredible effort. but the weak link in what was a very weak chain that led us to this point was the foreign secretary.
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none of that preparation work was done. other countries, like france, were preparing for this months and months ago and pulling their people out. and he has got to answer the question about why it is that, in the end, hundreds of our troops had to be flown into what was an extraordinarily dangerous situation in order to pull people through crowds, to get them out in the most chaotic circumstances. thousands of people left behind because of 18 months of failure to get ready for this moment. obviously lisa nandy going in hard not doubling rather himself to take a bit of personal responsibility. it a bit of personal responsibility. it will be interesting to see how much a guess of that. that has been some concern from other departments were in the last couple of days that he has not necessarily taking that, with him saying in interviews that they were failures of military intelligence, something that has not necessarily please his colleagues in at the ministry of defence. interesting to see how far he will go in accepting some kind of responsibility for what has played out over the last couple of weeks. this is a short period of time for
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mp5 to hold him to come and ask mps to hold him to come and ask these key questions which will be defining the response going forward over the next couple of weeks. haste over the next couple of weeks. we will be watching and listening alongside you. thank you so much for that. meanwhile, the deputy head of the taliban political office in qatar spoke last night with bbc pashto about how the taliban intend to govern the country now that they're in power. he was asked if there would be a place for ethnic groups and for women in afghanistan's new government. all ethnic groups which are living in afghanistan, they are afghans, they have the right to be in the government. but future government, the next government will be announced, all these afghans will be selected as for their merit. all those afghans who have the ability and capacity and capability to work according to their profession also they will be in the government. those people which you named then, it not be there in the future government, especially
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at the top posts. what about women in the top post positions? are you considering... women also i cannot say that they will be at the top. if they are not at the top, maybe they will be in the government in the lower... because in every department of the government and ministries, you can say almost half of the civil workers are women. so they can come back to their work and the can continue. and they can continue. but maybe in this new government which has been announced, in the top — i mean to say, in the cabinet — there may not be women. my colleague from bbc pashto, inayatulhaq yasini, conducted that interview. i asked him more about what the deputy head of the taliban political office in qatar told him. i asked him specifically about ex top leaders, such dr.
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i asked him specifically about ex top leaders, such dr abdullah and hamid karzai, ex—president. he was explicit that they will accommodate all others, but not the top leadership, those who were, according to him, in power for the last 20 years and there was no one to remove them. also on the women's rights, or women work, he was saying that the afghanistan population is more than half women and they will be allowing women to work but not in top positions. iasked him, will you return to the ban which was previously, in the 905, on the work of women. and they will be allowing women to work but not in top positions. iasked him, will you return to the ban which was previously, in the 905, on the work of women. he categorically said they will not. about engagement with the western countries, particularly in the light of those left behind, he was saying that they are working on this. but he was stressing that no—one will be allowed to go abroad without proper documentation.
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behind the scenes here in doha, i have gathered information that different western countries, including britain, have been in touch with the political office of the taliban. according to some sources, we may see some progress in terms of the evacuation. did you get any sense of where authority really resides? i suppose what i'm asking is, who really has the final word? one thing the taliban has, from the beginning back in 1994 that started their movement, they were listening to their leaders who was at the top, first mohammed omar, now hibatullah akhundzada, who has been consulting taliban leaders in kandahar in the last three, four days. he has not appeared in public yet.
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but taliban sources are saying he will appear soon. the final decision lies with hibatullah akhundzada, the decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan has received wide criticism. the final flight left on saturday, bringing an end to the uk's military conservative mp, tobias ellwood, a former army officer, and chair of defence committee, has been critical of the decision to pull out from afghanistan, saying the uk has "very little" to show for 20 years in the country. hejoins us now. what do you make, broadly speaking, of the manner of our departure from afghanistan? it of the manner of our departure from afghanistan?— afghanistan? it isn't 'ust our departure. * afghanistan? it isn't 'ust our departure. uh afghanistan? it isn't 'ust our departure, it is h afghanistan? it isn't 'ust our departure, it is not _ afghanistan? it isn'tjust our departure, it is not this - afghanistan? it isn'tjust our departure, it is not this new| departure, it is not this new statement by president biden. this is a significant change in us foreign policy, signalling america's
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retreat from global affairs to a more isolationist approach. it is confirmation ofjust how weak more isolationist approach. it is confirmation of just how weak the west has become in shaping our world for the better. we should not underestimate the geopolitical significance of what we are witnessing. this effectively means we have passed the high water mark for western liberalism that began after the second world war. this will be music to the ears of terrorist groups around the world and authoritarian states, in particular russia, china and iran. our world has turned a corner i believe into a new era of greater instability. that begs a very big questions of what great britain is now going to do. flan questions of what great britain is now going to do— questions of what great britain is now going to do. can you provide is any answers — now going to do. can you provide is any answers to _ now going to do. can you provide is any answers to those _ now going to do. can you provide is any answers to those questions? i now going to do. can you provide is i any answers to those questions? no, i ho re any answers to those questions? no, i hoe m any answers to those questions? irifr, i hope my colleague tom who intact will pursue some of these. britain traditionally steps forwards when the us hesitates. but do we have the means to fill the leadership vacuum
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once again? it would require a far more throughout the foreign policy, rekindling better relationships with our continental allies, for example. energising native function occasionally without the us. now is not the time to be cutting troop numbers. we are to look at the intelligence failing that happened intelligence failing that happened in afghanistan, but also the wider picture. where the world is going on at the next couple of years and who will be stepping forward to do the heavy lifting to allow lewis to be group? ithink heavy lifting to allow lewis to be group? i think is the foreign office up group? i think is the foreign office up to thejob? group? i think is the foreign office up to the job? 15 dominic group? i think is the foreign office up to thejob? is dominic raab group? i think is the foreign office up to the job? 15 dominic raab the right man to do that? i worked in the foreign office, i know how hard ministers work there. but at the moment the foreign office isn't up to thejob that moment the foreign office isn't up to the job that we now face, given that the us is pulling back. it is an opportunity for great britain to
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regroup in that spirit of global britain, which i think hasn't really got out of the starting gate yet. we need to embrace a more proactive role on the international stage. the world is going to get more dangerous over the next 5—10 years, and if we don't grasp that change and if it will sit out the town for the next few years. watching this very carefully is russia and china, there will be in jointly western demise and the growth of global of volunteerism.— and the growth of global of volunteerism. . ., ., , ., ., volunteerism. what do you mean when ou sa the volunteerism. what do you mean when you say the foreign _ volunteerism. what do you mean when you say the foreign office _ volunteerism. what do you mean when you say the foreign office isn't - volunteerism. what do you mean when you say the foreign office isn't up - you say the foreign office isn't up to thejob and you say the foreign office isn't up to the job and given that dominic raabis to the job and given that dominic raab is the man at the top? are you think he should go? i’m raab is the man at the top? are you think he should go?— think he should go? i'm saying that britain has become _ think he should go? i'm saying that britain has become to _ think he should go? i'm saying that britain has become to his _ think he should go? i'm saying that britain has become to his intent i think he should go? i'm saying that britain has become to his intent in | britain has become to his intent in ourforeign policy. we have been strengthened our relationship with the united states. its weakest moment for decades. we don't have the bond that we need with our
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continental allies as well. this doesn't mean we have to do all the heavy lifting, but we do have the shore that leadership, that statecraft, that once traditionally we were very proud of. if we don't do it, which nations will? in order to do that, whitehall itself has to recognise the absence of a band cater for international crises. it came about dealing with the care of a crisis for example. we have been distracted by brexit, other matters, and the world is changing fast. this is the moment to regroup, an opportunity to recognise the strengths we have in this country, our agencies, strengths we have in this country, ouragencies, our strengths we have in this country, our agencies, our intelligence gathering, our hard and soft power remains there for us to step forward. but we require an appetite which i don't see at the moment.
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and the foreign secretary dominic raab is due to face questions this afternoon from the foreign affairs select committee on his handling of the situation in afghanistan. you can watch that live on the bbc news channel at 2pm. the headlines on bbc news: the home office has said that afghans who worked for the british military and the uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently. colin pitchfork, who raped and murdered two school girls in the 19805, has been released from prison. 007 is back — the final trailerfor the much delayed james bond film, no time to die, has made its debut. the number of weather—related disasters has increased five—fold in the past 50 years, according to the world meteorological organisation. it says many of them can be attributed to climate change, but fewer people are being killed. here's our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath.
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as the slow—moving hurricane ida pummelled louisiana in recent days, it caused catastrophic damage and left millions without power. weather—related disasters like hurricane ida have increased in number in recent decades, according to the wmo. the scientists say the rise has been influenced by climate change, as humans have continued to warm the planet through the use of fossil fuels. in germany and belgium earlier this summer, torrential rain saw towns and villages rapidly flooded, sweeping away lives and homes in seconds. in germany and belgium earlier this summer, torrential rain saw towns and villages rapidly flooded, sweeping away lives and homes in seconds. almost half of all the deaths that have the last 50 years have been due to water and climate—related hazards, say experts. the economic impact has also grown far more severe, with damages from weather—related events now costing more than seven times what they did in the 19705. but despite the increase in hazards and their power,
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the good news is that the number of people being killed by storms, floods and droughts has decreased significantly. it is down by two thirds over the past five decades. the wmo says this is due to improvements in early warning systems, that give people more time to move away from danger. however, much work remains to be done, as only half the world's countries currently have adequate warning networks in place. the media watchdog 0fcom has ruled that piers morgan did not breach the broadcasting code during comments he made about the duchess of sussex on itv�*s good morning britain. 0fcom said its decision was "finely balanced" and that itv should take "greater care" around content to do with mental health. morgan has tweeted that he's delighted and that the ruling is a victory for free speech. during the interview, morgan was criticised for his comments by colleague alex bereford, which led to him storming off set whilst live on air.
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because if the media doesn't remake the monarchy, the monarchy slowly dies out. i'll come to alex and a sikh. �* ., dies out. i'll come to alex and a sikh-_ would - dies out. i'll come to alex and a sikh._ would you i dies out. i'll come to alex and a i sikh._ would you mind sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waitinr ? sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up _ sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up to _ sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up to you, _ sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up to you, mate. - sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up to you, mate. has- sikh. ok, i'll wait. would you mind waiting? up to you, mate. has she said anything _ waiting? up to you, mate. has she said anything about _ waiting? up to you, mate. has she said anything about you _ waiting? up to you, mate. has she said anything about you since - waiting? up to you, mate. has she said anything about you since she i said anything about you since she cut you _ said anything about you since she cut you off? i don't think she has, but you _ cut you off? i don't think she has, but you continue to trash her. gk, but you continue to trash her. ok, i'm done with _ but you continue to trash her. ok, i'm done with this. _ but you continue to trash her. ok i'm done with this. sorry, can't do this. , , ., i'm done with this. sorry, can't do this. ,, , ., ., earlier i spoke to stewart purvis, former 0fcom board member and a former chief executive of itn, in north london. he gave me his reaction to the ruling. reading between the lines, i can see just how difficult this was for 0fcom. just to explain that there are two sets of rules that 0fcom is
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trying to balance— one is a european convention which tries to guarantee freedom of expression, and the other is 0fcom's own rules which basically say you should not be too offensive to people all you should not offend against generally accepted standards. we have got to find your way through the middle of that. they way through the middle of that. they way they have done is a pretty clear—cut conclusion. i think see yp as morgan is celebrating the way he is. within the body of the document, over 90 pages, there are some really quite awkward moments, though for my mic and four of com's decision making process.— mic and four of com's decision making process. tell us a bit more about those- _ making process. tell us a bit more about those. they _ making process. tell us a bit more about those. they won _ making process. tell us a bit more about those. they won i.2, - making process. tell us a bit more about those. they won 1.2, it - making process. tell us a bit more about those. they won 1.2, it goes j about those. they won 1.2, it goes to this issue _ about those. they won 1.2, it goes to this issue that _ about those. they won 1.2, it goes to this issue that when _ about those. they won 1.2, it goes to this issue that when meghan i to this issue that when meghan markle said she had a suicidal thoughts, was it appropriate for a presenter to say that he didn't believe that she had suicidal thoughts? what they say that is, "we consider the statements made by mr morgan had the potential to cause harm to viewers, we are concerned at the potential to cause harm to viewers, we are concerned
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protection, audience members may have been discouraged from seeking help about the mental health." that is a pretty serious statement to make. the reason they do not then decide against piers morgan, "we took account of the fact that ms reid did challenge mr morgan's comment." so, really, ithink reid did challenge mr morgan's comment." so, really, i think piers morgan has his colleagues to think, particularly alex bereford, the weatherman in that clip there. most resolutely to him. it is clear reading at the document that itv actually invited him to do that, to challenge piers morgan on screen. they will be some of those who complained he will frankly be staggered by this. is there anything else, out of interest, that they can now do? or is this the end of the matter? it now do? or is this the end of the matter? , , , . ., matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter- — matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. when _ matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. when i _ matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. when i was _ matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. when i was at _ matter? it is pretty much the end of the matter. when i was at have i matter? it is pretty much the end of. the matter. when i was at have come, we were involved in a case where a broadcaster took us to the high
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court saying we had restricted his freedom of expression and the ruling we made upholding generally accepted standards. we won that case, but it's always been clear to me that 0fcom and its lawyers have always been concerned that if they are seen to restrict freedom of expression, they will end up in trouble in at they will end up in trouble in at the high court, and that mightjust be a background factor, not the deciding factor, but a background factor. 171 deciding factor, but a background factor. ., ., ., factor. if he wanted to return to good morning _ factor. if he wanted to return to good morning britain, - factor. if he wanted to return to good morning britain, this i factor. if he wanted to return to good morning britain, this is i factor. if he wanted to return to good morning britain, this is no clue that we fought piers morgan's return? i clue that we fought piers morgan's return? , , ,.,, ., , clue that we fought piers morgan's return? , , ., , return? i suppose it does in some wa s. i return? i suppose it does in some ways. i understand _ return? i suppose it does in some ways. i understand he _ return? i suppose it does in some ways. i understand he has- return? i suppose it does in some ways. i understand he has been i return? i suppose it does in some j ways. i understand he has been in negotiations with other broadcasters since then. it's entirely a matter for itv whether they would want to have him back. i think from his personal point of view, as you can tell from his tweets today, he is to celebrating the fact that 0fcom has said that piers morgan is entitled to say he disbelieve the dutch as 's
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allegations about suicidal thoughts. —— duchess's allegations about suicidal thoughts. an expensive but "game—changing" anti—cholesterol drug could soon be offered to hundreds of thousands of people in england and wales on the nhs. it normally costs nearly 2,000 pounds per dose, but the manufacturer has agreed an undisclosed discount for the health service. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. heart attacks and stroke are among the most common causes of death and ill health in the uk and high cholesterol is one of the main risk factors. too much had fat in the blood can clog your arteries. while eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise can help keep cholesterol down, some people need medication too. cheap tablets called statins work for many, but not all. people in england and wales could soon be offered a new type of treatment on the nhs. it is called inclisiran and it's a cholesterol—busting injection given twice a year. it can lower bad fat in the blood
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when other drugs like statins have not done enough. there is a huge unmet need, high cholesterol levels and even in some cases there are people who are just very vulnerable to even modest levels of cholesterol and it's a silent killer. so being able to lower that and bring levels down close to the levels that we are actually born with conveniently and safely is a complete game—changer. nhs england says the treatment could save about 30,000 lives within a decade. the health watchdog nice is recommending it as an option for people who have already had a stroke or heart attack and are not responding to other cholesterol—lowering treatments. nice says a ground—breaking deal has been met with the manufacturer to make it affordable for the nhs. its use is already approved in scotland. michelle roberts, bbc news. with me now is
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malcolm robinson from birmingham who had a cardiac arrest four years ago. i'm delighted to say he is here to tell the tale. what did happen to you? tell the tale. what did happen to ou? �* ., . .. tell the tale. what did happen to ou? �* ., . ~ ., , tell the tale. what did happen to ou? ., ~ tell the tale. what did happen to ou? z, . ~' .,, ., ~' ., you? back then i was walking through a street in birmingham _ you? back then i was walking through a street in birmingham and _ you? back then i was walking through a street in birmingham and suddenly| a street in birmingham and suddenly without warning fell onto the pavement and i had a cardiac arrest. it was shortly followed a heart attack, which i knew nothing about, i went into cardiac arrest and was basically dead. i was safe or choose fortuitously by a passing motorist who happened to be a nurse to stop —— | who happened to be a nurse to stop —— i was saved. fantastic for me. did you have high cholesterol, and were you aware that you did? i were you aware that you did? i wasn't aware that i did. i did were you aware that you did? i wasn't aware that i did. i did have slightly raised cholesterol if you use before but i didn't know any more about it. it was absolutely
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harrowing, what happened to me. since then, what sort of education have you been prescribed. i since then, what sort of education have you been prescribed.- have you been prescribed. i have been on the _ have you been prescribed. i have been on the statins _ have you been prescribed. i have been on the statins since - have you been prescribed. i have been on the statins since 2017. l have you been prescribed. i have i been on the statins since 2017. last year, the dose., i was getting more side—effects than i wanted. another drug was added. i am basically on to statin lowering drugs at the moment. might levels very good. what statin lowering drugs at the moment. might levels very good.— might levels very good. what is your reaction? what _ might levels very good. what is your reaction? what are _ might levels very good. what is your reaction? what are your _ might levels very good. what is your reaction? what are your thoughts i reaction? what are your thoughts about this anti—cholesterol drug described as a game changer? if you are eligible, what difference do you think that might make to you? it think that might make to you? it would be nice to have two injections a year instead of tablets every day. that would be a lot less intrusive on one of�*s lie. ijust hope it works. i —— i'm not sure ifi
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on one of�*s lie. ijust hope it works. i —— i'm not sure if i am a candidate at the moment because my cholesterol is controlled by diet and medication, but certainly in the future. 171 and medication, but certainly in the future. , ., ., ., ., ., future. if you were to move to a situation. _ future. if you were to move to a situation, we _ future. if you were to move to a situation, we are _ future. if you were to move to a situation, we are talking - future. if you were to move to a situation, we are talking to i future. if you were to move to a situation, we are talking to a i situation, we are talking to a medical professor early to say they might not be as straightforward that you would stop taking the plug tos and start taking an injection twice and start taking an injection twice a year, but if you were to move to a situation like that, what difference do you think that would make to your life? i do you think that would make to your life? , , , ., , do you think that would make to your life? , . life? i suppose the convenience would make _ life? i suppose the convenience would make a _ life? i suppose the convenience would make a bit— life? i suppose the convenience would make a bit of— life? i suppose the convenience would make a bit of difference. | would make a bit of difference. sometimes you forget if you have taking your pill or not, i wouldn't have to remember that. i would like to know more about it before i decided if i would go on it. it's a little bit new at the moment, i don't know what the side effects might be from the injections. it's an unknown quantity at the moment for me. certainly, it would be
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acceptable to many patients who are not successful in the statin therapy. not successful in the statin thera . ~ , not successful in the statin thera . . , ., , therapy. we must leave it there but thank ou therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for— therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for coming _ therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for coming on _ therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for coming on to - therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for coming on to tell- therapy. we must leave it there but thank you for coming on to tell us i thank you for coming on to tell us your story. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. i know it is bake them in london but thatis i know it is bake them in london but that is not the story across the country, isn't? no, it is certainly a story of mixed fortunes if you are stock and a cloud around there. there are certainly some glorious blue skies to be seen. this picture was takenjust blue skies to be seen. this picture was taken just recently by one of our weather watchers and impact across much of scotland and northern ireland in north—west england we are seeing some of that blue sky and sunshine to the opening and in the sunshine to the opening and in the sunshine and light winds and temperatures getting up to 2222, 23 degrees on the one responsible for much of the uk particularly further south across england and wales you got the grey cloud around so
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particularly around this east coast if you're stuck in the cloud they could be the odd spot of drizzle, quite breezy self east anglia, the south—east,. just about single figures across parts of scotland under those clear skies. more of the same tomorrow, more cloud most was drifting a little bit further northwards and westwards. the odd spot of drizzle, best of the sunshine, again, to be found further north. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... the home office has said that afghans who worked for the british military and the uk government will be able to move to the uk permanently. the taliban tells the bbc its new government will be announced in the next day or two. there will be women, but perhaps not in any senior ministerial roles. in this new government which has been announced, in the top posts —
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i mean to say, in the cabinet — there may not be women. colin pitchfork, who raped and murdered two school girls in the 19805, has been released from prison. former good morning britain host piers morgan has been cleared by media regulator 0fcom, which has rejected a record 58,000 complaints about his criticism of the duchess of sussex. fuelling a greener future, a new type of petrol has been introduced in the uk. e10 fuel could cut emissions by three quarters of a million tonnes a year, bringing the uk in line with france and germany. described as a game—changer, the new anti—cholesterol drug which could save up to 30,000 lives within a decade — soon to be offered on the nhs. 007 is back — the final trailerfor the much—delayed james bond film, 'no time to die', has made its debut. filling stations across britain will be selling a more
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environmentally—friendly petrol from today. the double child killer colin pitchfork has walked free from prison after bids to keep there's a longerfor sale. prison after bids to keep there's a longerforsale. let prison after bids to keep there's a longerfor sale. let us prison after bids to keep there's a longer for sale. let us talk to our home affairs correspondent. dominic matteo is a little bit more about the background to this case. yes. the background to this case. yes, well, the background to this case. yes, well. colin _ the background to this case. yes, well, colin pitchfork _ the background to this case. yes, well, colin pitchfork was - the background to this case. i'eis well, colin pitchfork wasjailed the background to this case. isis well, colin pitchfork wasjailed for well, colin pitchfork was jailed for life in 1988 after ultimately admitting to the murders of the two leicestershire schoolgirls over a period in the 19805 and he was given a minimum life term at the time of 30 years. he served a lot longer than that, about 33 years in the end and earlier this year injune the parole board ruled that he was now safe to serve his continuing life sentence in the community under a special license available for life offenders. that decision was
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challenged by the ministry of justice, the justice challenged by the ministry of justice, thejustice secretary robert buckland, but there was found to be no legal flow with the decision making because the parole board, which is a judge led process, effectively found that pitchfork has gone through an enormous series of reoffending courses, courses to look at his mindset, and he passed all of these. there was no other work that could be done with him in relation to his offending and he'd also taken part in daily schemes and spent time in eight local prison so, in effect, he was the type of person who could be moved as a prisoner into a life inside the community. now, clearly thatis inside the community. now, clearly that is a very controversial decision. one of the most notorious cases of the 19805. but his restrictions, the restrictions that colin pitchfork now faces are quite odourless. he is subject and not just the standard restrictions that any life prisoner has when they leave jail, such as a requirement to
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live in the bail hostel, but also 36 additional restrictions. now, there's include a polygraph test, he has to regularly, basically, take part in an exercise where he has to be tested to see if he is lying because of concerns that he could be a devious liar which is, obviously, something that happens quite regularly in these kinds of cases. he is subject to geographic bands, he is subject to geographic hands, he basically can't go near the families of his victims of the area where his crimes took place and he is also subject to a gps tagged monitoring his movements. now, those 36 restrictions in total leave the ministry ofjustice to conclude that he is going to be one of the most closely monitored lifers out in the community for many, many years to come and they say today, a spokesman for the ministry ofjustice said their heartfelt sympathies remained with the families of pitchfork was victims but they are taking all steps to make sure that his behaviour is monitored and, of
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course, if he steps out of line he can be recalled back to prison at literally the drop of a hat. has can be recalled back to prison at literally the drop of a hat. as you sa , literally the drop of a hat. as you say. though. _ literally the drop of a hat. as you say, though, dominic, _ literally the drop of a hat. as you say, though, dominic, he - literally the drop of a hat. as you say, though, dominic, he has i literally the drop of a hat. as you i say, though, dominic, he has been released with, from prison and i just wonder what the action has been especially bouts from these two girls families. 1 especially bouts from these two girls families.— especially bouts from these two girls families. i don't know what the reaction _ girls families. i don't know what the reaction is _ girls families. i don't know what the reaction is yet _ girls families. i don't know what the reaction is yet from - girls families. i don't know what the reaction is yet from the i the reaction is yet from the families. they have tried to keep things quite quiet in the last few months and state of social media so we watch out for that during the day. we have heard from alberto costa, the constituency mp and leicestershire where colin pitchfork carried out his appalling crimes. he effectively says he fundamentally disagrees with this decision. he thinks a's appalling that a life killer, sorry, a life sentence prisoner such as pitchfork should be released given the gravity of his crimes. life should mean life in his view. but the fact is, though, his sentence is a reflection of what the law was at the time. when to dumb it
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pitchfork was jailed the judge at the time couldn't set a minimum term. he had to refer the case to a home secretary, in this case a conservative home secretary who set the minimum term of 30 years so it was inevitable that a day would come when the parole board would have this legal duty to assess whether or not pitchfork are safe to be released. at the time of his jailing in 1988 the home secretary could have set it as a whole life tariff. that hasn't happened. now, all things the government says it is doing is changing the law, tweaking it, so the starting point for sentencing a future killers like colin pitchfork would be a whole life tariff, but that would be effectively a more readily available sentence for a judge to consider, but, obviously, a very difficult day but, obviously, a very difficult day but the ministry ofjustice, they seem pretty confident that pitchfork will be closely monitored in the community. will be closely monitored in the community-— will be closely monitored in the community. will be closely monitored in the communi . . ., ., , community. dominic, our home affairs correspondent. — community. dominic, our home affairs correspondent, thank— community. dominic, our home affairs correspondent, thank you. _
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filling stations across britain will be selling a more environmentally—friendly petrol from today. the new fuel — called e10 — contains more plant—based ethanol, which produces less carbon dioxide. it'll be sold in northern ireland early next year. but there's a warning that more than half a million vehicles are not compatible with it. nina warhurst has more. if you're filling up with petrol today you will see some changes at the pump. let me just show you. so, the traditional e5 is being phased out, and in its place from today will be e10. what does that mean? so, it is a move from 5% ethanol content to 10% ethanol content, and why is that significant? well, ethanol as you probably know is like alcohol, and it is made from natural waste matter, so it could be from food waste, for example, and so it is carbon neutral.
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this is part of the government's drive to move us towards carbon neutrality. we know that by 2030 we will all be in electric cars but in the meantime this is about making fuel more environmentally friendly. there are some problems, though. it's not compatible with all older cars, so those made from around the time of 2011 going backwards, and that's the equivalent, they think, of around 600,000 cars, so it's definitely worth checking. the good thing, though, is this is the equivalent, this shift to 10%, of taking 300,000 cars of the road. that's the equivalent of every single car in north yorkshire, so it is an important shift. let's talk to tony, who is from the aa. hello. hi. how are you doing? for you guys, then, do you see this being a problem? you know, what if i've got a car from 2005, it isn't compatible with the e10 and i end up accidentally filling it? yeah, there's no need to panic. if you do put the e10 in, there's no need to panic. what you can do is just run the tank down for a while and then just top up with super unleaded. and that's all you'd need to do.
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you wouldn't need to have the tank drained or anything. it's not going to cause any long—term damage. just don't keep doing it time after time? just don't keep doing it, no, and especially if the vehicle is going to be stored because the ethanol contains corrosives and it can quite damage the petrol tank and damage the seals you know. and how can i check of my vehicle is compatible? it is easy enough, isn't it? yes, it's simple. if you want to gov.uk and then forward slash e10 it will ask you to, sort of, there is a list of vehicles, find your vehicle, and it will tell you yes or no. it is very straightforward, isn't it? really simple, yet. i tried it myself last night and finally, tony, this move towards electric vehicles, we are, you know, the clock is ticking, this countdown to 2030. do you think we are in a good position to make that happen
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are you seeing any issues on the road with electric cars, because lots of people who are worrying about the matter of energy running out? yes, we're not seeing any problems at the moment. people do have range anxiety, i think, but you know, that has been addressed by increasing numbers of charging stations, more numbers of charging points in service areas, etc. yeah, so, the infrastructure is definitely building. and do you think it will be in there, in place in time for 2030? putting you on the spot, there. well, it will need to be in place, won't it? quite literally, it will have to. we don't have much choice. just a point, as you move to this e10, it won't facilitate you as far as the old fuel so it will be a little bit more expensive but the government are saying that's in very small price to pay, literally, for the environmental benefits.
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if you have any questions about how e10 petrol could affect your vehicle, then get in touch with us by tweeting #bbcyourquestions or by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. we'll try to answer them at 4:30 this afternoon here on bbc news. charity estimates up to 40% of the world's tree species are likely to go extinct in wild. logging, and climate change are also threats. it 5 just four weeks until the uk premiere of daniel craig's fifth and final outing as james bond in 'no time to die', which has been repeatedly delayed by the pandemic. the final trailer has just been released and it shows all the high—octane action that bond fans have come to expect. mark lobel reports. come on, bond, where the hell are you? indeed — the world's been waiting quite a while. barring another screeching u—turn, we're weeks away from witnessing bond's return out of retirement and into the arms of an old foe.
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now your enemy's my enemy. how did that happen? well, you live long enough. after a year in which the pandemic sent the box office into a tail spin with billions of dollars lost, and after that top gun tom cruise's well—publicised summer trip to see tenet proved somewhat of a false start, could no time to die be the blockbuster that really brings us back to the big screen? i have to finish this. the release may also help bolster the box office in its battle with the home sofa. even though amazon's takeover of mgm, the hollywood studio behind bond, has led some to speculate future releases like this may be fast—tracked to the small screen. that's a sore point for actors who profit from box office bonuses, including black widow actress scarlettjohansson, who's currently in a battle with the walt disney company — unhappy they premiered her film on its streaming service at the same time as in cinemas.
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well, i understand double—os have a very short life expectancy. but every actor who's played bond so far has made it safely on to the big screen. all eight of them, in fact — sean connery, roger moore, timothy dalton and pierce brosnan and in the '605, george lazenby and david niven, not to forget the first bond in the '505, barry nelson — he was in casino royale. so, who's odds—on to take overfrom daniel craig? is it that bloke from bridgerton, marvel�*s kung fu master, or the man who played superman? but this bond has to survive a number of plot twists first. james. you don't know what this is. if he does finally find his way to the big screen, we will all find out. the name's lobel, mark lobel, bbc news.
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tim richards is the founder and chief executive of vue cinemas and joins us now. but are happy with us. what will it mean for cinemas having a blockbuster like bond back on the big screen, do you think? welcome it is four weeks — big screen, do you think? welcome it is four weeks tonight _ big screen, do you think? welcome it is four weeks tonight and _ big screen, do you think? welcome it is four weeks tonight and we're i is four weeks tonight and we're really excited but i think what is really excited but i think what is really important is we are back. we are back as an industry and the fact that same movie as big as bond is going to be, has waited this long speaks volumes for important the industry years and we need each other. i mean, the studios need us and we need a studious, but can you imagine, just having seen that pv that we just saw, can you imagine watching that and a 65 inch tv? i mean, ouraudiences watching that and a 65 inch tv? i mean, our audiences are desperate to get out of their homes and flats where everyone has globally been locked up for the last 18 months.
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people want to go out and enjoy a film like that socially with others and with family without being interrupted by the latest amazon delivery. interrupted by the latest amazon delive . ., .., interrupted by the latest amazon delive . ., _, ., interrupted by the latest amazon delive . ., ., ., delivery. how confident are you that the will delivery. how confident are you that they will go — delivery. how confident are you that they will go back — delivery. how confident are you that they will go back and _ delivery. how confident are you that they will go back and that _ delivery. how confident are you that they will go back and that they i they will go back and that they won't be a degree of nervousness around returning to cinemas? because the pandemic is still with us, let's be honest. i the pandemic is still with us, let's be honest-— the pandemic is still with us, let's be honest. ~' ., be honest. i think the one thing we have demonstrated _ be honest. i think the one thing we have demonstrated as _ be honest. i think the one thing we have demonstrated as an _ be honest. i think the one thing we have demonstrated as an industry. be honest. i think the one thing we | have demonstrated as an industry is how safe we are. there is not a known case globally that is attributed to a cinema and our audiences know that and we are already seeing the response right now. in the uk we are seeing, we are doing business right now around 75, even as high as 80% of pre—covid—19 levels. in markets like germany, we are actually above covid—19 levels, or pre—covid—19 levels, so we are actually pretty bullish that our audiences want to come out and we are already seeing evidence of that. what impact has the pandemic had an
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cinemas? have you had to close any which won't reopen? i mean, the epidemic has been vocal. i mean, it has been very, very difficult. i'm not sure you can actually get worse than being physically closed for the best part of 18 months but we've survived. i mean, we have raised, we are hurt, but we have surprise comic survived and we are back and we haven't closed one cinema and i think it was really important to us as a company, is our staff. and we managed to keep all of our staff and a large part of that is thanks to the uk government's furlough programme and other initiatives they put together but, you know, our 5000 staff are back to help serve our customers. staff are back to help serve our customers-— staff are back to help serve our customers. . ., , customers. tim richard, we must leave it there. _ customers. tim richard, we must leave it there. founder _ customers. tim richard, we must leave it there. founder and i customers. tim richard, we must leave it there. founder and chiefl leave it there. founder and chief executive. now we just need the film to be good, don't we? thanks for joining us. thank you very much. thank you.
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australian state of victoria will stay knocked lockdown until at least one ball 70% of the population has at least one dose of the covid—19 vaccine. there currently tough measures including a night—time curfew in place in greater melbourne. they reported 121 new cases which is the highest single day total in the state for more than a year. the bbc has been speaking to a football fan that says he used to be racist until his daughter helped him change his behaviour a few years ago. neil said he used to go along with racist chants at football matches but is ashamed of his former behaviour and now describes himself as "anti—racist". our reporter manish pandey has been speaking to neil and his daughter. i think it was probably seen the look of disgust on millie's face
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when i made comments. i think i don't really want to be that sort of role model for her. being a racist, sexist, homophobic, basicallya bigot isn't what i want to show merely as i am going up. this is neil. he says is a younger man he was racist in the football culture he was involved in played a big part in that. he is with his daughter millie at the grounds of a nearby club which has done work on tackling racism. i wasn't overtly racist but i was casually racist, casual sexist, casually racist, casual sexist, casual homophobic. in conversation, i'd say the n word, the p word. i wasn't a very nice person. i'm not ashamed to admit it. i'm ashamed of what i was because it was who i was and it's not who i am any more. other things used to say was things like you _ other things used to say was things like you can't have a black boyfriend, don't bring up that boy home _ boyfriend, don't bring up that boy home we — boyfriend, don't bring up that boy home we would walk past people who were selling the big issue and it would _ were selling the big issue and it would be. — were selling the big issue and it would be, oh, we only buy them from english _ would be, oh, we only buy them from english people because it wasjust they can _ english people because it wasjust they can go home and be homeless there _ they can go home and be homeless
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there it _ they can go home and be homeless there. it wasn't necessarily outward thinking _ there. it wasn't necessarily outward thinking oh — there. it wasn't necessarily outward thinking oh my god i hate this kind of people — thinking oh my god i hate this kind of people but it was kind of in the little _ of people but it was kind of in the little things. and of people but it was kind of in the little things-— of people but it was kind of in the little thins. �* , ~' little things. and why did you think it was ok to _ little things. and why did you think it was ok to use _ little things. and why did you think it was ok to use language - little things. and why did you think it was ok to use language like i little things. and why did you think it was ok to use language like that at that time is? i it was ok to use language like that at that time is?— at that time is? i think it was rartl at that time is? i think it was partly my _ at that time is? i think it was partly my upbringing, - at that time is? i think it was| partly my upbringing, learned behaviour. i was from a small town with, i think, behaviour. i was from a small town with, ithink, one behaviour. i was from a small town with, i think, one black family in the whole village and then i moved when i was 16, 17, to a town with a large minority population and that was a shock to the system. i wasn't used to it and i didn't know how to deal with it so ijust used to it and i didn't know how to deal with it so i just followed deal with it so ijust followed what everybody else was doing. haifa deal with it so i just followed what everybody else was doing. how much of an impact — everybody else was doing. how much of an impact you _ everybody else was doing. how much of an impact you think— everybody else was doing. how much of an impact you think football i everybody else was doing. how much of an impact you think football has i of an impact you think football has had a new, neil, in your previous behaviour?— had a new, neil, in your previous behaviour? probably in my earlier life he would _ behaviour? probably in my earlier life he would go _ behaviour? probably in my earlier life he would go along _ behaviour? probably in my earlier life he would go along with i behaviour? probably in my earlier life he would go along with a i life he would go along with a chance, the racist chants, the homophobic chance. looking back now, i'm thinking, it is not good, that's not the person i am now.- i'm thinking, it is not good, that's not the person i am now. having it
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normalised — not the person i am now. having it normalised it. _ not the person i am now. having it normalised it. i— not the person i am now. having it normalised it. i did, _ not the person i am now. having it normalised it. i did, normalise i not the person i am now. having it normalised it. i did, normalise it. | normalised it. i did, normalise it. it made everybody _ normalised it. i did, normalise it. it made everybody else _ normalised it. i did, normalise it. it made everybody else is - normalised it. i did, normalise it. it made everybody else is doing l normalised it. i did, normalise it. j it made everybody else is doing it so that is great so i'm joining in, same as everybody else. something i'd object to know. oh, yeah, i think if you are singing horrible chance at football games and you are doing us in public so why would you not say similar things like that in private home your family? not say similar things like that in private home yourfamily? it is nice to know that he can change and other people can change as well. if i can, anybody can. you know, i'm notjust not racist, i'm antiracist. and what is your relationship like and compare to before?— and what is your relationship like and compare to before? we're a lot closer now- — and compare to before? we're a lot closer now- big _ and compare to before? we're a lot closer now. big benevolent - and compare to before? we're a lot closer now. big benevolent for i and compare to before? we're a lot| closer now. big benevolent for many that what _ closer now. big benevolent for many that what i_ closer now. big benevolent for many that what i was was unacceptable. now we _ that what i was was unacceptable. now we look back and i try to teach other— now we look back and i try to teach other people the way that millie has taught— other people the way that millie has taught me. you know, i've got a lot of respect _ taught me. you know, i've got a lot of respect for millie because she stood _ of respect for millie because she stood up — of respect for millie because she stood up to me and showed me what i was. manesh pandy, bbc news. do running prostheses, also known as blades, give sprinters an unfair advantage over biological legs? well, scientists have
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remained at odds over whether runners wearing blades have a serious competitive advantage over other athletes. before the paralympic games kicked off in tokyo, the paralympian silver medalist and world record holder blake leeper challenged the rules in court. claire press from bbc world service investigates. me being a disabled man born without legs, i just want a fair chance and a fair shot to compete at my highest level against the fastest competitors in the world. and theyjust would not allow that to happen. paralympian and world record—holder blake leeper dreams of running in the olympics, but he has been banned from both the olympics and the paralympics after being deemed unnaturally tall in court. tall" in court.
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the paralympics and the olympic committee telling me that i was too tall in my running prosthetic legs and that i should be 58.5", even though my wingspan is roughly about 6'1", 62", that is the cards and the hands that i've been dealt with, so i'm training at 58.5" to try and become as fast as i possibly can at this height. blake questions the formula which has been used to determine his hypothetical height. it's called mash, maximum allowable standing height. the mash was originally based on studies of caucasians and asians, but blake argues it needs to be tested on black populations too. even the scientists involved in blake's case remain deeply polarised. they disagree on the use of mash. so, it's very good. is it perfect? perhaps, you know, there's always going to be some variability. could mash incorrectly assign his lower leg length to be 15 centimetres shorter than it is? and, no. absolutely not. could it mis—assign by ten centimetres? no chance. now, if you get down to the level
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of two centimetres, that's possible. i believe if you're going i to have a rule that's meant to govern a wide range of different races, it's extremely important i to include those races _ in the establishment of that rule in the formula. they disagree on whether height even matters. if everything else is equal, the longer your legs are, the faster you're going to run. we found that there was no effect of height. i we found that there was i no effect of height. no effect of height on maximum speed. growing up, in, you know, east tennessee, being disabled, being a black man with a disability, you know, i've faced discrimination. as hard as those moments are, i'm a true believer that your adversity is your advantage. to qualify for the next olympics and paralympic games, blake is now retraining at a shorter height. being born without legs and having to deal with my disability my whole life, i learned a long time ago that life is tough and that i had the characteristics
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and i have the tools to overcome another hurdle in my life to become one day the fastest man in the world again — regardless of the height. claire press, bbc news. hundreds of capybaras have invaded a wealthy suburb of buenos aires with residents complaining that they're destroying their lawns and gardens. the new homes have been built in an area which was once wetlands. the capybara is the world's largest rodent and it's a semi—aquatic mammal and the plants in the pristine gardens are too tempting for the veggie eating animals. locals aren't calling for a cull but want the city authorities to manage the capybara population. ina in a moment martin will be here with the news that one. that is all for me. now i look at the news, weather. most of us have got very overcast
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conditions out there. this is the picture in books and in devon, so quite a lot of grey cloud out there. solutions sign up bonus specially across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—west england but over the next few days it is looking particularly cloudy. some fizzled was these come a bit of sunshine around towards north—western parts of the uk and for the rest of the day in northern ireland and northern england longer spells of sunshine here, cloudy conditions by south across england and wales in that breeze coming in of breeze coming enough and not in that breeze coming in of the north sea so making things a little bit the english channel, too, but temperatures into the evening hours for most of us in the mid to high teens. and then later this evening and overnight will continue to see that cloud across most areas filtering its way a little bit further westwards across parts of scotland, perhaps whingeing into northern ireland. select few spells are just about dripping down into single figures for a few spots into single figures for a few spots in the north—west but this was overnight sting into double figures. tomorrow similar to today once again with high pressure still in charge. a loss of cloud around. little bit
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more extensive cloud i think northern ireland and southern scotland but it will put in and breaks are some holes in the cloud, i think a myth during the afternoon. lifting damages on the one the spots towards the west up to about 2023 degrees, a little bit cooler in the east coast where we have just got these coming in of the north sea. here is the envy of high pressure that has been with us for quite a while. it is sticking around as we had was in the week. was cloud trapped underneath that area of high purchase of a little bit gloomy as we had to the day on friday. similar to those really, again, it is a cloud around the most areas. some sunshine breaking through, perhaps a little bit more salt over southern england and again for southern and western scotland, north—west england and northern ireland toe. still about ill—18 down the east coast again. the warmest weather out was the west with highs around 2122 degrees. into the 22 degrees. into the weekend now and high pressure still not far away, just starting to slip off towards these. so we'll start to see low pressure perching on the west but it looks like the high pressure in the east wind out
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so perhaps a few showers particularly on sunday for some western parts of the uk but most of us staying dry and things turning a little bit warmer too. for now.
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the taliban tell the bbc their new government could be announced in the next 48 hours. they claim it will be inclusive, and that women will be involved, this is going to take time, i do not want to pretend we will do this over days or weeks because, as you say, there are very large families and alsojust the number of there are very large families and also just the number of people. we'll be live in kabul and washington. also this lunchtime: new research suggests up to one in seven children who catch
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coronavirus may still suffer symptoms months after infection.

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