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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  September 1, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm BST

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of jabs compulsory. no more e5, it's all about e10 — you're not alone if you're confused about what you'll be putting into your petrol tank. a 30th gold for paralympicsgb — david smith was trailing 2—0 in the boccia final, before a stunning recovery. and coming up on the bbc news channel... scotland resume their world cup qualifying campaign with a tough test in copenhagen as they face the group leaders, denmark. good evening and welcome
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to the bbc news at six. the taliban have mounted a victory parade complete with the us military hardware they've inherited. it was pure theatre but, we're also beginning to see the reality of what a taliban government would look like. in an interview with the bbc a senior leader continued to insist that afghans with the right documents could leave the country — despite concerns they will be prevented from doing so. and whilst the group insists women will be allowed to continue working — it's becoming clear they will not be given top roles. here's our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani. the taliban are in firm control of the country. this, a huge military parade in the southern city of kandahar, along with a captured helicopter. but the group still hasn't established a new government, leaving many afghans in a state of limbo.
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now that the final foreign troops have left, an announcement is expected soon. the last time the group was in power in the 1990s, their regime saw public executions and women banned from working. now they say things are different, though they admit women won't be in senior positions. maybe they will be in the government, because many ministries, almost half of the workers are women. so they can come back to their work and they can continue. but in this new government that has been announced in the top, i mean to say in the cabinet, there may not be a woman. . ., , ., ., a woman. the uncertainty about what the future will _ a woman. the uncertainty about what the future will look _ a woman. the uncertainty about what the future will look like _ a woman. the uncertainty about what the future will look like has _ a woman. the uncertainty about what the future will look like has seen - the future will look like has seen the future will look like has seen the value of the afghani drop and concerns about the economy rise. the
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world bank and imf are holding back on help. he world bank and imf are holding back on hel. ., ., ., , ., , on help. no one has any money right now, on help. no one has any money right now. other — on help. no one has any money right now, other savings _ on help. no one has any money right now, other savings are _ on help. no one has any money right now, other savings are stuck- on help. no one has any money right now, other savings are stuck on - on help. no one has any money right now, other savings are stuck on the l now, other savings are stuck on the banks. people arejust now, other savings are stuck on the banks. people are just bringing small amounts of money had to exchange and pay for everyday living. i exchange and pay for everyday livina. ., , ., living. i needed money for groceries. _ living. i needed money for groceries, but _ living. i needed money for groceries, but the - living. i needed money for i groceries, but the exchange living. i needed money for - groceries, but the exchange rate isn't _ groceries, but the exchange rate isn't good, — groceries, but the exchange rate isn't good, so i'm going home. i pray— isn't good, so i'm going home. i pray god — isn't good, so i'm going home. i pray god brings stability to the government and these problems can be solved _ government and these problems can be solved the _ government and these problems can be solved. �* ., government and these problems can be solved. ~ ., .., ., , government and these problems can be solved. ~ ., ., , , solved. the afghan economy has been heavily dependent _ solved. the afghan economy has been heavily dependent on _ solved. the afghan economy has been heavily dependent on ash _ solved. the afghan economy has been heavily dependent on ash on _ heavily dependent on ash on international aid. whether that continues, at least when it comes to the west, is likely to be dependent on what kind of government the taliban create and what kind of laws. establishing a afghan government is going to be more of a problem for the taliban than taking control. the elusive leader may be
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declared leader of an islamic emirate. these new pictures of some of the final us troops to be withdrawn from afghanistan, the focus now is on what they've left behind. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet joins us from kabul. so much for all those assurances we were hearing about women, no top jobsit were hearing about women, no top jobs it seems?— jobs it seems? everyone asks the ruestion, jobs it seems? everyone asks the question. have — jobs it seems? everyone asks the question, have the _ jobs it seems? everyone asks the question, have the taliban - jobs it seems? everyone asks the . question, have the taliban changed? they have changed their tune in just two years. i remember when they started negotiations with representatives from afghanistan, including female activists. they have this formulations, that women can hold anyjob, they can be ministers, ceos. they couldn't be the president but they could have
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any other job the president but they could have any otherjob in government. they use this expression, which is curious coming from taliban, how women can choose their life partner. now here we are, a totally different scenario, even the taliban did not expect to take power so quickly and to hold so much power. they don't have to share power any more, their overriding objective is to establish an islamic emirate and two governed by islamic sharia law. women will not be the face of afghanistan any more, they will not be in leading roles. same with inclusive, they did have meetings, they are still having meetings with political leaders, including the former president, hamid karzai. but we are told they are courtesies. the taliban it will be in charge. are courtesies. the taliban it will be in charge-— are courtesies. the taliban it will be in charae. ., ~ i. , . in the past two weeks we've run many reports on the desperate attempts of afghans trying to leave the country. but imagine this — a couple who had to leave their baby behind because they didn't
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have the right paperwotk for her. gulrena is being looked after by her grandparents back in afghanistan. our special correspondent lucy manning has been speaking to gulrena's father, a british national, about how he pleaded for the seven month old baby to be put on an evacuation flight. too young to know what has happened, too small to comprehend, she is stuck in kabul without her parents. gulrena, one of the youngest britons left behind. we are missing her a lot. you know how people feel when their child is outside the country, and you know the country where there is a war and you don't know what is going to happen next. her parents, thousands of miles away. this is the closest her dad muhammad in london can get to her. he can only try to keep their bond alive. when kabulfell, gulrena still didn't have her uk passport, five months after her british father applied,
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his identity hidden for the family's safety. she is stuck in afghanistan because of the passport delay. if the passport took less time, she would have been here with us. and she is stuck there with my other part of the family and they are all in danger. i called the consulate whenever thing happened and they said she is not british yet. you have to wait until her passport arrives, then she is british, then we can help you. i told her it is going to be too late. trapped in a bureaucratic nightmare, gulrena was born unexpectedly in kabul injanuary when her mother, an afghan, was unable to return to the uk is planned after visiting relatives, because she had lost her uk id card. she eventually got a temporary visa to return to britain in may to get a replacement, but had to leave her behind with grandparents. then the taliban took over. i want the government to help me find a way to take them out, my daughter and my family out of afghanistan, and the government can do
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anything, if they want to. and they can do it. why not? how do you want the government to help, when they don't have any soldiers on the ground? they can help, they can find a way. they are the government. the government says it has evacuated more than 16,000 people from afghanistan but it knows more must be done to support those at risk. government advice has long been for britain's not to travel to afghanistan. gulrena's mother says she has lost without her by her side, is losing hope, and begs the government to help. finally. at 3pm this afternoon, her passport finally arrived, but with nearly half her short life separated from her parents, there is now no easy way to bring her home. lucy manning, bbc news. here, the government has given more details about its resettlement scheme for afghans.
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those who worked with the british government and military will be able to settle in the uk permanently. the home office said it wanted to ensure afghans here received help to rebuild their lives. but so far fewer than a third of councils have offered to help the refugees. our home editor mark easton reports. 15,000 afghans have been evacuated to the uk in the last few weeks and a further 5000 are
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to the uk in the last few weeks and a further 5000 a in to the uk in the last few weeks and a further 5000 a— soon as you can. in greenwich, the town hall soon as you can. in greenwich, the town ball has _ soon as you can. in greenwich, the town hall has become _ soon as you can. in greenwich, the town hall has become an _ soon as you can. in greenwich, the town hall has become an aid - soon as you can. in greenwich, the | town hall has become an aid centre with staff and volunteers operating a 24—hour shift problem. the council's leaders say support from central government has been almost nonexistent. brute central government has been almost nonexistent-— nonexistent. we have received a lane nonexistent. we have received a large number — nonexistent. we have received a large number of _ nonexistent. we have received a large number of almost - nonexistent. we have received a large number of almost 700 - nonexistent. we have received a l large number of almost 700 newly arrived afghans who are quarantined in one of our local hotels. they arrived, but there has been no support system in place to work with them. in fact, support system in place to work with them. infact, we support system in place to work with them. in fact, we have been stepping in the gap. them. in fact, we have been stepping inthe aa-. them. in fact, we have been stepping in the aa.- ., ., , them. in fact, we have been stepping intheua. ., ., in the gap. local authorities across britain have _ in the gap. local authorities across britain have access _ in the gap. local authorities across britain have access to _ in the gap. local authorities across britain have access to a _ in the gap. local authorities across britain have access to a share - in the gap. local authorities across britain have access to a share of i in the gap. local authorities across| britain have access to a share of £5 million in government funding for supporting and housing afghans. but fewer than a third of the councils
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have offered to find homes for new arrivals. the home office refuses to say who has come forward because they don't want to name and shame councils who may yet open their doors. but experience suggests authorities in east anglia and the fens take very few refugees and asylum seekers, while councils in the north—east and north—west of england take proportionately many more. in huddersfield, there were mixed views about whether local councils should answer the call to offer assistance.— offer assistance. there is not enou:h offer assistance. there is not enough affordable _ offer assistance. there is not enough affordable housing, | offer assistance. there is not i enough affordable housing, but offer assistance. there is not - enough affordable housing, but they can bring them over and they get a house so quick. i can bring them over and they get a house so quick.— house so quick. i 'ust think we are absolutely _ house so quick. ijust think we are absolutely already _ house so quick. ijust think we are absolutely already overrun, - house so quick. ijust think we are absolutely already overrun, full. l house so quick. ijust think we are j absolutely already overrun, full. it absolutely already overrun, full. [it is absolutely already overrun, full. is good for absolutely already overrun, full. it is good for the economy, it is good for our— is good for the economy, it is good for our culture _ is good for the economy, it is good for our culture that _ is good for the economy, it is good for our culture that we _ is good for the economy, it is good for our culture that we open - is good for the economy, it is good for our culture that we open and i for our culture that we open and embrace — for our culture that we open and embrace those _ for our culture that we open and embrace those people _ for our culture that we open and embrace those people who - for our culture that we open and embrace those people who want for our culture that we open and i embrace those people who want to settle _ embrace those people who want to settle in _ embrace those people who want to settle in the — embrace those people who want to settle in the uk. _ embrace those people who want to settle in the uk. the _ embrace those people who want to settle in the uk.— embrace those people who want to settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain _ settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain owes _ settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain owes a _ settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain owes a huge - settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain owes a huge debt i settle in the uk. the prime minister has said britain owes a huge debt of gratitude to those afghans who risk their lives to help our armed forces. but it have thousands to permanently settle in the uk is
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clearly a challenge for the long term. later today foreign secretary dominc raab is heading for talks with the governments of countries around afghanistan. the aim is to get their help to rescue those left behind when the last british evacuation flight took off. but before heading to the region mr raab came under pressure from mps, many suggesting he should have been more active earlier in the crisis. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports.. under pressure today, the foreign secretary. mps believe he has been at the helm during the biggest foreign policy disaster in decades. why did he fail to see the rapid fall of kabul. the why did he fail to see the rapid fall of kabul.— fall of kabul. the central preposition _ fall of kabul. the central proposition was - fall of kabul. the central proposition was that - fall of kabul. the central. proposition was that given fall of kabul. the central - proposition was that given the fall of kabul. the central _ proposition was that given the troop withdrawal by the end of august, you would see a steady deterioration from that point. and that it was unlikely kabul would fall this year. the mps said a foreign office report from july had warned cities could
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fall. y from july had warned cities could fall. , ,., . from july had warned cities could fall, , _, . ., from july had warned cities could fall. , . ., ., it fall. sorry, the source of that? it is our fall. sorry, the source of that? it is your principled _ fall. sorry, the source of that? it is your principled report. - fall. sorry, the source of that? it is your principled report. but - fall. sorry, the source of that? it is your principled report. but he | is your principled report. but he went on holiday. _ is your principled report. but he went on holiday. we _ is your principled report. but he went on holiday. we had - is your principled report. but he went on holiday. we had uk- is your principled report. but he - went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way — went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way and _ went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way and it _ went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way and it is _ went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way and it is important - went on holiday. we had uk civilians in harms way and it is important to l in harms way and it is important to know_ in harms way and it is important to know what— in harms way and it is important to know what you were doing and where you are _ know what you were doing and where you are doing it from? when did you io you are doing it from? when did you go on _ you are doing it from? when did you go on holiday? i don't want to browbeat— go on holiday? i don't want to browbeat you, just want to know when he went _ browbeat you, just want to know when he went he _ browbeat you, 'ust want to know when he went. ,., , ., he went. he said with the luxury of hindsi . ht he went. he said with the luxury of hindsight he _ he went. he said with the luxury of hindsight he wouldn't _ he went. he said with the luxury of hindsight he wouldn't have - he went. he said with the luxury of hindsight he wouldn't have gone. l he went. he said with the luxury of. hindsight he wouldn't have gone. he asked why he didn't call ambassadors in the region of visited since he became foreign secretary? mit? in the region of visited since he became foreign secretary? why did we aet it so became foreign secretary? why did we get it so badly — became foreign secretary? why did we get it so badly wrong? _ became foreign secretary? why did we get it so badly wrong? i _ became foreign secretary? why did we get it so badly wrong? i think— became foreign secretary? why did we get it so badly wrong? i think there - get it so badly wrong? i think there is a sense. — get it so badly wrong? i think there is a sense, desire _ get it so badly wrong? i think there is a sense, desire and _ get it so badly wrong? i think there l is a sense, desire and determination to make it work and make things better and to believe you can complete the task. bud better and to believe you can complete the task. and more questions _ complete the task. and more questions about _ complete the task. and more questions about the - complete the task. and more questions about the effort . complete the task. and more questions about the effort to | complete the task. and more - questions about the effort to save lives. where e—mails by definite afghans went unanswered? brute lives. where e-mails by definite afghans went unanswered? we can answer every _ afghans went unanswered? we can answer every e-mail_ afghans went unanswered? we can answer every e-mail we _ afghans went unanswered? we can answer every e-mail we get - afghans went unanswered? we can answer every e-mail we get all- afghans went unanswered? we can answer every e-mail we get all we | answer every e—mail we get all we can focus and getting as many
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afghans out of kabul. band can focus and getting as many afghans out of kabul. and why he doesnt afghans out of kabul. and why he doesn't know _ afghans out of kabul. and why he doesn't know how _ afghans out of kabul. and why he doesn't know how many - afghans out of kabul. and why he doesn't know how many are - afghans out of kabul. and why he doesn't know how many are still. afghans out of kabul. and why he | doesn't know how many are still at risk. ., doesn't know how many are still at risk. . , ., , doesn't know how many are still at risk. ., , ., , , ., ., risk. can you tell me why you are confident of _ risk. can you tell me why you are confident of your _ risk. can you tell me why you are confident of your numbers - risk. can you tell me why you are confident of your numbers of- confident of your numbers of those remaining — confident of your numbers of those remaining in afghanistan now? we are not confident — remaining in afghanistan now? we are not confident with _ remaining in afghanistan now? we are not confident with any _ remaining in afghanistan now? we are not confident with any precision - remaining in afghanistan now? we are not confident with any precision at - not confident with any precision at all. ., , , ., ., all. finally, it will be uk now deal with the taliban? _ all. finally, it will be uk now deal with the taliban? under- all. finally, it will be uk now deal with the taliban? under what - with the taliban? under what circumstances _ with the taliban? under what circumstances will _ with the taliban? under what circumstances will the - with the taliban? under what circumstances will the uk - with the taliban? under what circumstances will the uk be | circumstances will the uk be recognising the taliban and what recognition do you see? first recognising the taliban and what recognition do you see?- recognising the taliban and what recognition do you see? first of all we don't recognise _ recognition do you see? first of all we don't recognise governments, i we don't recognise governments, generally. but it is important not to confirm legitimacy of the taliban. but we need to send a clear and direct signals.— and direct signals. dominic raab is now heading _ and direct signals. dominic raab is now heading to the _ and direct signals. dominic raab is now heading to the region - and direct signals. dominic raab is now heading to the region seeking| now heading to the region seeking exit for those wanting to leave afghanistan. when he was asked if he considered resigning, he said no. and then in reflection he said the uk would have to learn to live within its means in future and not
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engage in nation—building. our top story this evening: as they parade their new power, the taliban begins to outline the way it will govern afghanistan. it says no women in topjobs. and coming up, the un study that shows the links between climate change and the growing number of weather—related disasters. coming up in sport state on the bbc news channel... we look at the us open tennis wear teenager, emma raducanu, is flying the flag as the only briton left in the women's draw. the group of medical experts which advises the government on vaccines has just announced that up to half a million people across the uk will be offered a third covid jab in the coming months. thejcvi says it will be targeting people with severely weakened immune systems. however, thejcvi has still not decided whether 12 to 15—year—olds
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should be vaccinated. 0ur medical editor, fergus walsh, reports. this daily cocktail of immunosuppressant medication is vital to prevent howell cohen �*s body from rejecting the kidney donated by his father. the transplant medication also blocked his immune system from developing protection from two doses of covid vaccine. the ao—year—old from north london is now eligible for a third dose. �*, london is now eligible for a third dose. �* , ., ., , london is now eligible for a third dose. �*, ., ., , ., , ., dose. it's going to be really great for me to have _ dose. it's going to be really great for me to have a _ dose. it's going to be really great for me to have a booster - dose. it's going to be really great for me to have a booster and - for me to have a booster and hopefully give me some vaccine protection, and the ability to return to normal life, do things other people are doing without thinking about it. but at the same time, it's not clear if the booster is going to work for myself and people like me, so we really do need to carry on looking at other treatments. see if there's any on here. this treatments. see if there's any on here. �* , ., , treatments. see if there's any on here. a ., ,, ., here. as well as transplant patients. _ here. as well as transplant
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patients, those _ here. as well as transplant patients, those with - here. as well as transplant patients, those with blood | here. as well as transplant - patients, those with blood cancers or advanced hiv will also be eligible. they will all receive pfizer or modernityjabs. brute eligible. they will all receive pfizer or modernity jabs. pfizer or modernity “abs. we hope it will to u- pfizer or modernity “abs. we hope it will top up their— pfizer or modernity jabs. we hope it will top up their immunity _ pfizer or modernity jabs. we hope it will top up their immunity levels. i will top up their immunity levels. some _ will top up their immunity levels. some of— will top up their immunity levels. some of these people will not have mounted _ some of these people will not have mounted a — some of these people will not have mounted a good antibody or t cell memory— mounted a good antibody or t cell memory response to two doses of the vaccine, _ memory response to two doses of the vaccine, and _ memory response to two doses of the vaccine, and we are hoping it may help those — vaccine, and we are hoping it may help those individuals.— help those individuals. there are two more big _ help those individuals. there are two more big decisions - help those individuals. there are two more big decisions due - help those individuals. there are two more big decisions due on i two more big decisions due on vaccines, firstly whether the over 80s should get a booster dose to help with waning immunity, and secondly, what aboutjabs help with waning immunity, and secondly, what about jabs for younger teens? with the new school year getting under way, there is mounting urgency for a decision on whether all 12 to 15—year—olds should be offered a covid vaccine. currently, only those with specific health conditions are eligible, but the scientists making the recommendation say they want to see new data on the benefits and risks.
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this is emma, just before she got covid. more than a year later, the 14—year—old often struggles to walk because of persistent nausea and dizziness. a new study has found a significant minority of children do get long covid. significant minority of children do get long covid-— significant minority of children do get long covid. yeah, so i had to be in a wheelchair, _ get long covid. yeah, so i had to be in a wheelchair, because _ get long covid. yeah, so i had to be in a wheelchair, because basically i in a wheelchair, because basically the dizziness is triggered or it gets worse by me walking around. if i start walking around ijust feel like i'm going to pass out, so it was very hard for me to get around school. ., . . ., ., ., ' , school. vaccinating all over 12s would help _ school. vaccinating all over 12s would help suppress _ school. vaccinating all over 12s would help suppress covid - school. vaccinating all over 12s - would help suppress covid outbreaks in schools. the us, france, spain and italy have all taken this approach. a final decision in the uk may come next week. fergus walsh, bbc news. the latest uk coronavirus figures show there were 35,693 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means an average of 33,751; per day in the last week. the latest figures show there were 7,598 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus on friday.
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207 deaths were reported in the latest 24—hour period, that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. that takes the average deaths per day over the last week to 106. 0n vaccinations, 88.5% of people aged 16 and over have now had theirfirstjab, and 78.9% of the population aged 16 and over have had both doses. vaccine passports are set to be introduced for entry to nightclubs and larger live events in scotland later this month. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon is in glasgow. this is going to be quite controversial for some. this is going to be quite controversialfor some. , , ., controversial for some. yes, george. one trade controversial for some. yes, george. 0ne trade body _ controversial for some. yes, george. one trade body has _ controversial for some. yes, george. one trade body has said _ controversial for some. yes, george. one trade body has said the - controversial for some. yes, george. one trade body has said the move i controversial for some. yes, george. one trade body has said the move to | 0ne trade body has said the move to introduce vaccine passports will
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cause dismay amongst businesses like nightclubs, which have only recently been able to open. another industry body has said it is an unwelcome development for the licensed trade. the scottish liberal democrats are the only political party to directly hit out, they called it an illiberal move and a dangerous precedent, while the body representing scotland's top—flight football clubs has also raised concerns, saying they are surprised and they have significant questions for the scottish government about how it will actually work. nicola sturgeon has said this is not a step that has been taken lightly, but she pointed out that case numbers are surging here in scotland. they are five times higher than they were four weeks ago, and she thinks this limited use of vaccine passports could help control the virus as we move into autumn and winter. many thanks. the ministry ofjustice has confirmed that the child killer colin pitchfork has been released from prison. pitchfork was jailed in 1988 for raping and murdering two 15—year—olds, lynda mann and dawn ashworth, in leicestershire.
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the 61—year—old was freed after the parole board decided injune that it was safe for him to serve the rest of his life sentence on a licence in the community. itv has been cleared by media regulator 0fcom over piers morgan's criticism of the duchess of sussex. his comments, that he didn't believe what meghan said in her interview with oprah winfrey in march, led to nearly 58,000 complaints and resulted in him leaving good morning britain. jd wetherspoon says some of its pubs are running out of certain beer brands, because of ongoing problems with supplies. deliveries of carling and coors beers have failed to arrive the number of weather—related disasters around the world has increased five—fold over the past 50 years, according to scientists from the united nations. in the first ever long—term analysis of its kind, they say climate change is causing more intense and more frequent extreme weather. but far fewer people are dying now due to storms, floods and droughts — and that's thanks to better early warning systems. 0ur chief environment correspondent
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justin rowlatt has more floodwaters engulf cars... oh my god! yo, yo! ..roofs are ripped off buildings, as hurricane ida smashes into the us earlier this week. the category four hurricane is just one of a long list of weather—related disasters to hit the world this year. wow. there have been heatwaves and terrible forest fires in the us, south america, europe and siberia. no, no, no, no! and there have been terrible floods, too, including in germany and in china. meanwhile, a drought in madagascar is reckoned to be affecting 400,000 people. it is all part of a pattern of increasing extreme weather, says the un. climate change is boosting this natural variability that we have. that means more rain, it means higher temperatures,
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drought, more forest fires and also more most intense tropical storms. so take a look at this graph. now, the red line is showing us that the number of weather—related disasters has gone up fivefold over the last 50 years. the black line shows that the economic impact of those disasters has also increased, look at it, up eight fold, but the good news is the grey line is showing us the number of people who have died in those disasters has fallen threefold. that falling death rate shows warning people when bad weather is on the way can save lives. so although we are seeing an increase in the number of disastrous events, the mortality rate is actually decreasing over the last five decades, and that's really down to the fact we have improved early warning systems, so we can notify people when an extreme event is about to happen, so they can take contingency plans to save lives. but we need to go on improving those
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systems, because unless the world makes dramatic reductions to greenhouse gas emissions, scientists warn we can expect even more extreme weather events. justin rowlatt, bbc news. a more eco—friendly petrol has been introduced at filling stations across britain today. the fuel, called e—10, contains less carbon than other motor fuels, making it better for environment. but it's not suitable for some older vehicles. 0ur correspondent jon kay is at the ma, leigh delamere services for us. jon. yeah, george, around half the cars on the uk's roads run on petrol, so this move, to a new type of fuel, unleaded fuel, will affect millions and millions of us. but if you've never heard about it, don't worry, you're not alone. according to the
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rac around a quarter of motorists have no idea what e—10 is or whether their car is compatible. what are you going for? unleaded. which one? just the normal one. but what is normal? confusion at the pumps this afternoon, as the new fuel went on sale. that is e—10. what do you mean? e10? what's that? it's what you've got in your hand. oh, no, i don't know. i haven't got a clue. unleaded, that's as far as i know. i don't know, i don't really pay attention, just fill it up and leave. did you know you were filling up with e-io? did you know you were filling up with e40?— did you know you were filling up with e-10? ., ., �* ~ ., ., , with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it with e-10? no, i don't know, what is 540? it is — with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it is unleaded _ with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it is unleaded fuel, _ with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up - with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to - with e-10? no, i don't know, what is e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to 10%| e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to 10% ethanol, which _ e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to 10% ethanol, which means— e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to 10% ethanol, which means lower - e-10? it is unleaded fuel, up to 10% ethanol, which means lower carbon | ethanol, which means lower carbon emissions. 50 ethanol, which means lower carbon emissions. , ., , ., emissions. so they are trying to reduce the _ emissions. so they are trying to reduce the amount _ emissions. so they are trying to reduce the amount of— emissions. so they are trying to reduce the amount of the - emissions. so they are trying to reduce the amount of the nasty| emissions. so they are trying to - reduce the amount of the nasty stuff in the fuel, right?— in the fuel, right? yeah, it is still not great, _ in the fuel, right? yeah, it is still not great, is _ in the fuel, right? yeah, it is still not great, is it, - in the fuel, right? yeah, it is still not great, is it, having l in the fuel, right? yeah, it is still not great, is it, having a can — still not great, is it, having a can we _ still not great, is it, having a car. we want to use the most ecological— car. we want to use the most ecological petrol that we can. drop
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b dro, ecological petrol that we can. drop by drop. £10 _ ecological petrol that we can. drop by drop. 510 goes _ ecological petrol that we can. drop by drop, e10 goes on _ ecological petrol that we can. lira by drop, e10 goes on sale across great britain this month with northern ireland to follow next year. the new fuel isn't great, though, for some older vehicles made before 2011. the though, for some older vehicles made before 2011. , ., ., before 2011. the drivers need to go on to the government _ before 2011. the drivers need to go on to the government online - before 2011. the drivers need to go i on to the government online website today and check to see if their car is e10 compatible or not. if it is not, they should be switching to e5 super unleaded, it is more expensive and unfortunately not available in as many stations either. if and unfortunately not available in as many stations either.— and unfortunately not available in as many stations either. if you put the new 510 _ as many stations either. if you put the new 510 in _ as many stations either. if you put the new e10 in your _ as many stations either. if you put the new e10 in your car _ as many stations either. if you put the new e10 in your car and - as many stations either. if you put the new e10 in your car and it - as many stations either. if you put the new e10 in your car and it is i the new e10 in your car and it is not compatible, how big a problem is it? �* , ., ., ., it? it's not the end of the world, it? it's not the end of the world, it is not the _ it? it's not the end of the world, it is not the same _ it? it's not the end of the world, it is not the same as _ it? it's not the end of the world, it is not the same as putting - it? it's not the end of the world, i it is not the same as putting diesel into a petrol tank of petrol into a diesel tank. into a petrol tank of petrol into a diesel tank-— into a petrol tank of petrol into a diesel tank. , ., . diesel tank. the new fuel should cut uk etrol diesel tank. the new fuel should cut uk petrol carbon _ diesel tank. the new fuel should cut uk petrol carbon emissions - diesel tank. the new fuel should cut uk petrol carbon emissions by - uk petrol carbon emissions by 750,000 tonnes a year and experts say we shouldn't notice too much difference in fuel efficiency or in price. there you go, yourfirst e10. alli thank you very much. jon kay, bbc news on the m4 in wiltshire. it's been another day of success
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for paralympicsgb with david smith winning the team's 30th gold of the tokyo games in the b1 boccia. andy swiss has more. awarning, it a warning, it can train some flashing images. —— it contained some. he is the man with the colourful hair and the golden touch. a third gold medalfor david smith won in the most thrilling fashion. m3 macro is a sport similar to bowls, the aim to get as near to the jack impossible. in the final he was locked at 2—2 against malaysia, but just when he needed it, a moment of magic. that dazzling shot proved the difference, and after a row of victory, soon the tears started to flow. another gold for one of the greatest his sport has ever seen. that gold medal from greatest his sport has ever seen. that gold medalfrom david smith was britain's the 30th of these paralympics, but the hopes of a 31st today proved tantalisingly out of
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reach. in the pool, becky redfearn was chasing the mother of all comebacks. barely a year after the arrival of baby patrick, she was heading for gold in the 100 metres breaststroke before germany's edged her out. but a games she could only compete in because they were postponed, a silver is some feet. there was also an array of british bronze for wheelchair racer sammy king worn in the 100 metres, and for archer victoria woo marie, bang on target on her paralympic debut. in the table tennis meanwhile there were mixed fortunes. two british teams had to settle for bronze after losing their semifinals, but in a different class it was a different story, as they battled back from the brink to make it to their final. it was like a miracle, they said, and fairto was like a miracle, they said, and fair to say, it is one they certainly enjoyed. andy swiss, bbc news, tokyo. time for a look at the weather.
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here's stav da naos. good evening to you. the met office haveissued good evening to you. the met office have issued their summer 2021 stats, and it has certainly been one of unusual contrast, with much of the north and the rest of the country seeing warmer, sunnier and drier than average conditions compared to the south and the east, which has actually been cooler, cloudier and wetter, and in fact scotland and northern ireland have seen one of their warmest summers on record. we have also had that contrast in the last few days and certainly today the best of the sunshine scotland and northern ireland, whereas further south we saw a lot of cloud, particularly across most of england and wales we hold onto that trend for the next few days. clearer skies across parts of scotland and northern ireland tonight, meaning another chilly one, temperatures down to low single digits in one or two spots but where we hold on to the cloud and the breeze, then ten to 13 celsius. we start tomorrow on a rather cloudy note from many of us, but again through the day, increasing sunshine for scotland, northern ireland, perhaps northern england too but for much of the rest of england and wales it was a rather

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