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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 4, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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chances came for steve clarke's side. chances went begging for steve clarke's side. quite. this was moldova, ranked 175th in the world, but this wasn't about a thrashing, not with this kind of finishing. it was just the result that scotland needed. the performance, not one to tell the grandkids about. ben croucher, bbc news. last season's runners up in the women's super league manchester city put on an impressive display in the first wsl match to be shown on free—to—air tv. several new signings shone as they beat everton 4—0 at goodison park. but it was captain steph houghton who put the gloss on the result with a brilliant free kick to round off the scoring in what was one of three games today. the champions chelsea begin their season against arsenal tomorrow. british teenager emma raducanu has
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matched her breakout run at wimbledon after reaching the fourth round at the us open in what is her first appearance at flushing meadows. the 18—year—old beat spain's sara sorribes tormo in straight sets, the first she won 6—0, the second 6—1. she's yet to drop a set in the six matches she's played in qualifying and the main draw and could now face the top seed ash barty on monday if the world number one wins her third round match later tonight. it was india's day as bad light ended play with england 171 runs behind on day three of the fourth test at the oval. rohit sharma turned the match in his side's favour, scoring this six to bring up his century in style, his first test hundred outside india, before eventually falling for 127. at the close india 270—3, with the series level at 1—1. max verstappen beat lewis hamilton to pole ahead of tomorrow's dutch grand prix. qualifying was marred by two accidents from both williams drivers, george russell firstly
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and then teammate nicholas latifi crashing heavily. hamilton's team—mate valterri bottas starts from third on the grid. and europe made a brilliant start on the opening day of the solheim cup where they lead the united states in ohio, more on that on the bbc sport website. but for now, that's all from me. that's all from us — goodnight. sunnier, warmer weather is on the way and that means a big change for those parts, especially of england, which have been under the cloud for the best part of a week and have been again today. we'll eventually break out into brighter skies which some have already enjoyed, especially parts of wales and south—west england. as the area of high pressure
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moves away, clearer, warmer weather moving in not quite there yet, but england and wales turning warm on sunday. scotland and northern ireland, the atlantic weather front coming in and there's some rain on the horizon. clear spells overnight across western scotland, wales and southern parts of england. there may be some foggy patches. cloud remaining elsewhere and temperatures into double figures. tomorrow, fine and dry weather to start the day. already some sunny spells more widely across england and wales and southern and eastern scotland. northern ireland, a lot of cloud. north—west scotland too. from that cloud eventually and slowly, outbreaks of rain progressing further east as the day goes on but a freshening breeze. light wind in england and wales. still areas of cloud around eastern england and to the midlands. more will get to see
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the warm sunshine as the warm spots head into the mid 20s. eventually the rain will push across more of scotland and northern ireland on sunday evening. starting to fizzle out on monday but keeps a lot of cloud in northern england, northern ireland and scotland. the rest of england and wales, some warm and son expels and again temperatures around the mid 20s in the warm spots, maybe a bit higher in places. certainly not cold in scotland and northern ireland. some brighter spells. the real warmth and sunshine will arrive as we get into tuesday and wednesday. all of us under the influence of high pressure and a clearer, warmer flow of ayr from the south—east. some rain early on in north—west scotland. for many, a sunny day, warm to very warm and in some places in england and wales, not far away from 30 degrees on tuesday and wednesday. on thursday and friday, low—pressure bringing rain and showers across much the uk. cooler.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejo phillips, political commentator and nigel nelson, political editor for the sunday mirror and the sunday people. we'll talk to them shortly. first, tomorrow's front pages.
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the sunday telegraph reports that ministers and senior conservative mps are preparing to fight a planned national insurance tax rise announced by the prime minister and the chancellor. same story on the sunday express, which looks at warnings for red wall tory mps concerned that proposed tax rises and changes to pensions could cost the conservatives the next election. the sunday times reports a top aide for prince charles — michael fawcett — has stepped down over claims he organised a cbe for a saudi tycoon, who gave 1.5 million pounds to a palace charity. the prince's foundation says it takes the claims very seriously and the matter is under investigation. meanwhile the independent reports that number 10 has been plotting how to cut scotland's nicola sturgeon out of cop26, for fear she'll hijack the climate event to promote independence. and the mirror's front page says 16
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and 17 year olds are facing 5 hour trips to get a jab as many towns don't have walk in centres. thank you forjoining us. he tweeted earlier a quiet news day makes fun more variety on the front pages and a livelier review to look forward to. . , a livelier review to look forward to. ., , ., , , teams to. that is absolutely right. teams face a five-hour _ to. that is absolutely right. teams face a five-hour trip _ to. that is absolutely right. teams face a five-hour trip for _ to. that is absolutely right. teams face a five-hour trip for care - to. that is absolutely right. teams face a five-hour trip for care the i face a five—hour trip for care the job. if face a five-hour trip for care the 'ob. , ., . ' ~ face a five-hour trip for care the 'ob. ,, ., '~., face a five-hour trip for care the 'ob. ., " face a five-hour trip for care the 'ob. ., m' job. if you are 16 or17, you can face u- job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to _ job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to 70 _ job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to 70 miles _ job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to 70 miles to - job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to 70 miles to try - job. if you are 16 or17, you can face up to 70 miles to try and i job. if you are 16 or17, you can i face up to 70 miles to try and get some ad to give you a job so you've got the walk—in centres, the pub in clinics and so on but to try and get public transport most of the mode be driving, that means it is a five—hour round trip. the problems they are facing as they can only get
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they are facing as they can only get the pfizerjab and so, the normal centres only cater for over teens and if you are under 18 you can't even book so that the government is encouraging 16 or 17—year—olds to getjabbed it makes it as difficult as it can for them to do so. this get jabbed it makes it as difficult as it can for them to do so. this is as it can for them to do so. this is a story i've _ as it can for them to do so. this is a story i've heard _ as it can for them to do so. this is a story i've heard several- as it can for them to do so. this is a story i've heard several times i as it can for them to do so. this is a story i've heard several times in | a story i've heard several times in the pandemic. public transport out of city centres and in the smaller towns. that is really a problem. i think most kids of that age are not driving _ think most kids of that age are not driving. many of them will be in school — driving. many of them will be in school or— driving. many of them will be in school or college as well so if they have got _ school or college as well so if they have got to take time out, having already— have got to take time out, having already lost an awful lot of time over— already lost an awful lot of time over the — already lost an awful lot of time over the last 18 months, it adds to the difficulty. if you want people to do _ the difficulty. if you want people to do something you've got to make it easy— to do something you've got to make it easy for— to do something you've got to make it easy for them. and, you know, nobody— it easy for them. and, you know, nobody minds putting a bit of effort a five _ nobody minds putting a bit of effort a five hour— nobody minds putting a bit of effort a five hour round trip on public transport _ a five hour round trip on public transport... particularly if you
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don't — transport... particularly if you don't feel_ transport... particularly if you don't feel that great after you have had a _ don't feel that great after you have had a joh — don't feel that great after you have had a job. that has to be a consideration as well. it is something that needs to be sorted out pretty— something that needs to be sorted out pretty quickly. something that needs to be sorted out pretty quickly-— out pretty quickly. while were on the subject _ out pretty quickly. while were on the subject vaccinations - out pretty quickly. while were on the subject vaccinations we - out pretty quickly. while were on the subject vaccinations we have | the subject vaccinations we have been looking at whether there 12—15 age gap will get the job and that complicates it even further. it could. parents are going to love that. the whole problem here think is other it has been left to ministers to decide i think them saying there is only a marginal benefit for children of that age is a real problem. parents are quite happy to getjobs themselves but not so keen when it comes to their own children if there is a risk to them. and so, i am not sure that 12—15
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jabbing, if it goes ahead, is going to be hugely successful. i can see a lot of parents turning around and saying, actually, i don't fancy it for my child. saying, actually, i don't fancy it for my child-— saying, actually, i don't fancy it for my child. let's switch to the sunday telegraph. _ for my child. let's switch to the sunday telegraph. subdued - for my child. let's switch to the i sunday telegraph. subdued javid, for my child. let's switch to the - sunday telegraph. subdued javid, to sunday telegraph. subdued javid, to make the job sunday telegraph. subdued javid, to make thejob a sunday telegraph. subdued javid, to make the job a condition of employment for nhs staff. the health secreta , employment for nhs staff. the health secretary. who — employment for nhs staff. the health secretary. who is _ employment for nhs staff. the health secretary, who is said _ employment for nhs staff. the health secretary, who is said to _ employment for nhs staff. the health secretary, who is said to be _ employment for nhs staff. the health secretary, who is said to be pushing i secretary, who is said to be pushing ahead _ secretary, who is said to be pushing ahead with — secretary, who is said to be pushing ahead with the idea of making it compulsory for all nhs staff to have the covid _ compulsory for all nhs staff to have the covid jab, as a condition of employment. and figures released in the telegraph show that one in four nhs workers have not taken up the offer of— nhs workers have not taken up the offer of a _ nhs workers have not taken up the offer of a vaccine since it was rotted — offer of a vaccine since it was rotted out _ offer of a vaccine since it was rolled out in april. and we already know _ rolled out in april. and we already know there — rolled out in april. and we already know there is a big crisis in care homes — know there is a big crisis in care homes through the shortage of staff and many, _ homes through the shortage of staff and many, many people who are choosing — and many, many people who are choosing to leave those jobs and go and work _ choosing to leave those jobs and go and work somewhere else rather than
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have a _ and work somewhere else rather than have a job _ and work somewhere else rather than have a job which would be compulsory in november. it is going to be difficult — in november. it is going to be difficult. and there are also questions about it becoming discriminatory because as we know, the low— discriminatory because as we know, the low take—up is much greater, if that is— the low take—up is much greater, if that is hot— the low take—up is much greater, if that is not a — the low take—up is much greater, if that is not a convoluted way of saying — that is not a convoluted way of saying it. _ that is not a convoluted way of saying it, among ethnic minorities. so there _ saying it, among ethnic minorities. so there is— saying it, among ethnic minorities. so there is an argument that it is discriminating against those people who, you _ discriminating against those people who, you know, are the backbone of the health— who, you know, are the backbone of the health service.— the health service. let's flip it, sliuhtl . the health service. let's flip it, slightly- what _ the health service. let's flip it, slightly. what about _ the health service. let's flip it, slightly. what about the - the health service. let's flip it, . slightly. what about the argument from some of those who say they visit a hospital ago to spend time with nhs staff they want to know that they are safe. i with nhs staff they want to know that they are safe.— with nhs staff they want to know that they are safe. i think that the answer there _ that they are safe. i think that the answer there is _ that they are safe. i think that the answer there is to _ that they are safe. i think that the answer there is to find _ that they are safe. i think that the answer there is to find a - that they are safe. i think that the answer there is to find a different| answer there is to find a different way of making them say. i am instinctively against the idea of forcing people to havejobs instinctively against the idea of forcing people to have jobs as part of their conditions of employment. i don't care who they are. whether they are nhs workers or whatever. if
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you are tested every single day you would have to prove to work that you are free of covid. that would actually satisfy public anxiety. without forcing someone. let’s actually satisfy public anxiety. without forcing someone. let's stick with the sunday _ without forcing someone. let's stick with the sunday telegraph. - without forcing someone. let's stick with the sunday telegraph. tories i without forcing someone. let's stickj with the sunday telegraph. tories at war over idiotic tax increase. it is war over idiotic tax increase. it is not one he _ war over idiotic tax increase. it is not one he will— war over idiotic tax increase. it is not one he will be _ war over idiotic tax increase. it is not one he will be looking forward to because — not one he will be looking forward to because he has got a lot on his plate _ to because he has got a lot on his plate and — to because he has got a lot on his plate and we have already heard over the weekend, briefings about the planned — the weekend, briefings about the planned rise in national insurance contributions to pay for social care which _ contributions to pay for social care which we — contributions to pay for social care which we know is facing an absolute crisis _ which we know is facing an absolute crisis it— which we know is facing an absolute crisis it was— which we know is facing an absolute crisis. it was facing a crisis ten years— crisis. it was facing a crisis ten years ago— crisis. it was facing a crisis ten years ago in— crisis. it was facing a crisis ten years ago in david cameron's coalition— years ago in david cameron's coalition government asked for a report _ coalition government asked for a report. borisjohnson stood on the steps _ report. borisjohnson stood on the steps of— report. borisjohnson stood on the steps of downing street and said he had an— steps of downing street and said he had an oven ready plan. to have years _ had an oven ready plan. to have years on. —
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had an oven ready plan. to have years on, the oven hasn't been switched — years on, the oven hasn't been switched on so we have not seen that and this— switched on so we have not seen that and this is— switched on so we have not seen that and this is an — switched on so we have not seen that and this is an argument that, you know, _ and this is an argument that, you know. if— and this is an argument that, you know. if you _ and this is an argument that, you know, if you put national insurance up, know, if you put national insurance up. you _ know, if you put national insurance up. you are — know, if you put national insurance up, you are taxing young working people. _ up, you are taxing young working people, many of them who will be low paid workers, in order to pay for older— paid workers, in order to pay for older people. and the tories, who have _ older people. and the tories, who have complained, including a cabinet minister— have complained, including a cabinet minister who calls this idiotic are very concerned that it is going to cost the — very concerned that it is going to cost the government of the tory party— cost the government of the tory party and — cost the government of the tory party and means the tories are breaking — party and means the tories are breaking manifesto pledges on not raising _ breaking manifesto pledges on not raising taxes and johnson's pledge not raising — raising taxes and johnson's pledge not raising taxes. i admit i was going _ not raising taxes. i admit i was going to — not raising taxes. i admit i was going to pick up on that. the broken manifesto _ going to pick up on that. the broken manifesto promise. how will that play out — manifesto promise. how will that play out at westminster and with with tory — play out at westminster and with with tory mps that will play about the especially those, who only won on the basis of that manifesto. the whole thing is, i agree withjoe totally, national insurance is the
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wrong way to do it. we know we have to pay more tax pose covid and we know we need to spend more money on social care. what you don't do is put a tax on jobs at a time when you especially need to them and i think especially need to them and i think especiallyjeremy hunt's idea of having a special health and care tax is probably the best way forward. i am not normally in favour of this because some people will be happy to pay for a subsidy for cat terms but not nuclear submarines. in this case, especially after the crisis we have just been through, there is a case for height by vacating and not doing it through national insurance. it feels like it is already down the track. is there any chance of it being reversed? i track. is there any chance of it being reversed?— track. is there any chance of it being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what — being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what he _ being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what he wants _ being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what he wants to - being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what he wants to do. -
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being reversed? i don't suppose so if this is what he wants to do. i - if this is what he wants to do. i think— if this is what he wants to do. i think much— if this is what he wants to do. i think much of the comments during the day— think much of the comments during the day has — think much of the comments during the day has been it has been down to the day has been it has been down to the chancellor who is seen as the government's best communicator, to actually— government's best communicator, to actually seit — government's best communicator, to actually sell this. but it is a tax on working _ actually sell this. but it is a tax on working people and it is going to come _ on working people and it is going to come in _ on working people and it is going to come in as— on working people and it is going to come in as the government takes away the £20 _ come in as the government takes away the £20 uplift in universal credit which _ the £20 uplift in universal credit which is — the £20 uplift in universal credit which is for working people on their wages _ which is for working people on their wages it— which is for working people on their wages. it does seem ridiculous. there _ wages. it does seem ridiculous. there is— wages. it does seem ridiculous. there is an _ wages. it does seem ridiculous. there is an interest and i think there — there is an interest and i think there wiii— there is an interest and i think there will be a lot of pressure on kier starmer to come up with what they would — kier starmer to come up with what they would do. and i know the tuc has been _ they would do. and i know the tuc has been talking about, there needs to be has been talking about, there needs to he a _ has been talking about, there needs to he a tax— has been talking about, there needs to be a tax on wealth, not work. and there _ to be a tax on wealth, not work. and there are _ to be a tax on wealth, not work. and there are other ways of raising taxes — there are other ways of raising taxes you _ there are other ways of raising taxes. you can do it through capital grains _ taxes. you can do it through capital grains or— taxes. you can do it through capital grains or second properties. through shares _ grains or second properties. through shares and _ grains or second properties. through shares and dividends and things like that but. _
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shares and dividends and things like that but. or— shares and dividends and things like that but, or as nigel said, you do a straightforward tax increase but make _ straightforward tax increase but make sure it is ring fenced and only goes _ make sure it is ring fenced and only goes to— make sure it is ring fenced and only goes to health and social care. let's _ goes to health and social care. let's bring _ goes to health and social care. let's bring in the sunday express because that touches on the red wall. a good crumble over tax madness. the money needed for social care, tax rises is the only way forward?— care, tax rises is the only way forward? . , , , ., forward? that is probably right on the rise they _ forward? that is probably right on the rise they are _ forward? that is probably right on the rise they are proposing - forward? that is probably right on the rise they are proposing if- forward? that is probably right on the rise they are proposing if they went ahead with national insurance would be average earnings of 29,500. people would be looking at paying more than £200 a year. certainly i think the people who can most afford it would be better placed to do it, asjoe it would be better placed to do it, as joe has just it would be better placed to do it, asjoe has just mentioned. it would be better placed to do it, asjoe hasjust mentioned. and of course, those people who make their money from investments in property don't pay any national insurance at all. tory mps cannot stop this. all they have to do is rebel, vote against the rise. and i can imagine even the loyalists in the red wall
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seat 20 boris johnson the even the loyalists in the red wall seat 20 borisjohnson the mp status, i could see them actually rebelling on this one. and that will be the way to stop it. on this one. and that will be the way to stop it— on this one. and that will be the way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular _ way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular starmer _ way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular starmer and _ way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular starmer and we - way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular starmer and we are i way to stop it. chairman to labour and circular starmer and we are a | and circular starmer and we are a few years out from election to how do you see labour tackling this? they're talking at the moment about doing it through wealth tax. asjoe has been talking about, i think that another way of doing it. you either do a hypothecated tax or you do it by taxing the wealthy and so stay away from areas that would actually cost jobs away from areas that would actually costjobs because obviously employers would then cut back on their workforce so there are ways of doing it. the only question is, is borisjohnson and indeed where she soon act in listening mode at the moment and would actually start considering alternatives? lets leave
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that they are. let's turn to the sunday times. the bottom right of their front page.— their front page. grenfell tower to be torn down _ their front page. grenfell tower to be torn down amid _ their front page. grenfell tower to be torn down amid fears. - their front page. grenfell tower to be torn down amid fears. four - their front page. grenfell tower to i be torn down amid fears. four years on from that — be torn down amid fears. four years on from that dreadful _ be torn down amid fears. four years on from that dreadful fire _ be torn down amid fears. four years on from that dreadful fire that - be torn down amid fears. four years on from that dreadful fire that cost l on from that dreadful fire that cost 70 do— on from that dreadful fire that cost 70 do people their lives and none of us can— 70 do people their lives and none of us can ever— 70 do people their lives and none of us can ever forget that awful awful side of— us can ever forget that awful awful side of that tower block burning. so it is going _ side of that tower block burning. so it is going to be pulled down and there _ it is going to be pulled down and there are — it is going to be pulled down and there are fears there is a nearby school, — there are fears there is a nearby school, that they think is in danger~ _ school, that they think is in danger~ it— school, that they think is in danger. it is a secondary school for 1200 _ danger. it is a secondary school for 1200 pupils — danger. it is a secondary school for 1200 pupils and at the moment the burnt— 1200 pupils and at the moment the burnt out— 1200 pupils and at the moment the burnt out tower, there are many reason _ burnt out tower, there are many reason the — burnt out tower, there are many reason the to bring it down, not least _ reason the to bring it down, not least because it is a dreadful reminder— least because it is a dreadful reminder and least because it is a dreadful reminderand there are least because it is a dreadful reminder and there are better ways of making _ reminder and there are better ways of making a — reminder and there are better ways of making a memorial for the people who lost— of making a memorial for the people who lost their lives. but it does seem _ who lost their lives. but it does seem as — who lost their lives. but it does seem as though this would be a straightforward go—ahead to get rid of it because there are concerns about _ of it because there are concerns about the — of it because there are concerns
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about the safety of the building. the government officials telling bereaved families to expect a decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surrised decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surprised it — decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surprised it is _ decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surprised it is still _ decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surprised it is still standing. - decision very soon on this. yes. i'm surprised it is still standing. they i surprised it is still standing. they found that, i have a sort of shiver every time i walk past it and it seems to be, after an appalling disaster like that i do think that probably should have been dismantled anyway and so if now has to come down for safety reasons i think that probably is actually a good thing. the sunday times featuring afghanistan as many of tomorrow's papers will but the sunday times going for this line. yes. this is by a highly respected foreign _ yes. this is by a highly respected foreign correspondent. they don't make _ foreign correspondent. they don't make it _ foreign correspondent. they don't make it apparently caught out our foreign— make it apparently caught out our foreign secretary undercoat at the taliban— foreign secretary undercoat at the taliban because all of a sudden, they are — taliban because all of a sudden, they are in —
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taliban because all of a sudden, they are in charge of the country. which _ they are in charge of the country. which means things by running the economy, — which means things by running the economy, running the police. running education _ economy, running the police. running education. road transport and all of those _ education. road transport and all of those sorts— education. road transport and all of those sorts of things and apparently, according to christinapiece, they were so surprised _ christinapiece, they were so surprised at the rapid victory they called _ surprised at the rapid victory they called on — surprised at the rapid victory they called on the former president to ask the _ called on the former president to ask the defence secretary to stop police _ ask the defence secretary to stop police and soldiers fleeing so that they could help with an orderly transfer~ — they could help with an orderly transfer. but it was a bit too late and they— transfer. but it was a bit too late and they had already gone. so, you know, _ and they had already gone. so, you know. you — and they had already gone. so, you know, you sort of thing, 0k, and they had already gone. so, you know, you sort of thing, ok, this is going _ know, you sort of thing, ok, this is going to _ know, you sort of thing, ok, this is going to be — know, you sort of thing, ok, this is going to be a — know, you sort of thing, ok, this is going to be a bit of a learning curve — going to be a bit of a learning curve because the country still has to operate — curve because the country still has to operate no matter that might not operate _ to operate no matter that might not operate in _ to operate no matter that might not operate in the way we would like it too. operate in the way we would like it too but _ operate in the way we would like it too. but obviously is, though both the hope — too. but obviously is, though both the hope they did not have any plans, — the hope they did not have any plans, as — the hope they did not have any plans, as are so often the case and people _ plans, as are so often the case and people come to power. the plans, as are so often the case and people come to power.— plans, as are so often the case and people come to power. the head of pakistan's intelligence _ people come to power. the head of pakistan's intelligence agencies - people come to power. the head of pakistan's intelligence agencies in i pakistan's intelligence agencies in kabulfor pakistan's intelligence agencies in kabul for talks with the taliban.
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yes. and there's always been quite a close relationship between sections in pakistan, particularly their intelligence services, and the taliban. i mean, what this actually does is give the west a bit more leverage. what the taliban most need is having the economy sorted out and that means money so, at the moment, there are about £10 million worth of assets frozen in foreign banks. they could do money back and they could also deal with western made which would help them get off the ground. on the way to do that is to allow people to leave to make sure they're not harbouring terrorists and respect human rights. if they do those things they can expect western help. share those things they can expect western hel. �* . those things they can expect western hel. �* , ., ., , ., help. are we seeing an example of 'ust how help. are we seeing an example of just how by — help. are we seeing an example of just how by surprise _ help. are we seeing an example of just how by surprise the _ help. are we seeing an example of just how by surprise the taliban . just how by surprise the taliban have been taking about how quickly they got into kabul with respect to
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they got into kabul with respect to the delay in announcing the government?— the delay in announcing the government? ., , , ., government? probably. i mean, i wouldn't even _ government? probably. i mean, i wouldn't even second-guess - government? probably. i mean, i wouldn't even second-guess at i government? probably. i mean, i. wouldn't even second-guess at the wouldn't even second—guess at the internal— wouldn't even second—guess at the internal machinations of how the taliban— internal machinations of how the taliban work but it does appear that it is all. _ taliban work but it does appear that it is all. you — taliban work but it does appear that it is all, you know, it has an awful lot of— it is all, you know, it has an awful lot of lots — it is all, you know, it has an awful lot of let's go with guns and everything else blazing without much of a plan _ everything else blazing without much of a plan as to what you do when you -ot of a plan as to what you do when you got to— of a plan as to what you do when you got to power~ — of a plan as to what you do when you got to power. you got rid of the people — got to power. you got rid of the people you wanted to but then don't forget _ people you wanted to but then don't forget that if you go back 20 years or more. _ forget that if you go back 20 years or more, the big problems facing afghanistan have not gone away which is economy _ afghanistan have not gone away which is economy. increment is one of the poorest— is economy. increment is one of the poorest countries in the world that is why— poorest countries in the world that is why he — poorest countries in the world that is why he got a very poor country you've _ is why he got a very poor country you've got — is why he got a very poor country you've got an absolute breeding ground — you've got an absolute breeding ground for crime and that crime is the drugs — ground for crime and that crime is the drugs trade, the opium trade and obviously— the drugs trade, the opium trade and obviously the military might or at
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least _ obviously the military might or at least the — obviously the military might or at least the armed struggle that the taliban— least the armed struggle that the taliban would see it as so they've -ot taliban would see it as so they've got an— taliban would see it as so they've got an awful lot to deal with. i'd buy the — got an awful lot to deal with. i'd buy the video. that spark that under final one _ buy the video. that spark that under final one for — buy the video. that spark that under final one for now that of the sunday telegraph — final one for now that of the sunday telegraph. we will pick up a few. the eu _ telegraph. we will pick up a few. the eu military force band would divide _ the eu military force band would divide the — the eu military force band would divide the nato chief, this one. yes _ divide the nato chief, this one. yes they— divide the nato chief, this one. yes. they are saying that the plans of a rapid reaction force would end “p of a rapid reaction force would end up undermining nato and the fact is the nato secretary—general has got a vested interest there because presumably it would undermine his job too. but i can imagine that the eu will press ahead with this now. on the basis that we have just heard joe biden's in afghanistan and there must be a question about whether or not we can carry on relying on american support. oh the rule believe that europe is to start thinking about happens if they have
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to defend themselves without the us to defend themselves without the us to back them. the papers pointing out the nato was at the centre of those efforts to evacuate westerners and afghans from kabul.— and afghans from kabul. absolutely. and niel and afghans from kabul. absolutely. and nigel mentioned _ and afghans from kabul. absolutely. and nigel mentioned pakistan - and afghans from kabul. absolutely. | and nigel mentioned pakistan earlier and the _ and nigel mentioned pakistan earlier and the other thing they talk about is there _ and the other thing they talk about is there are questions about pakistan's role in the resurgence of the taliban— pakistan's role in the resurgence of the taliban and the ability to take over so— the taliban and the ability to take over so quickly but i think this is all about— over so quickly but i think this is all about a — over so quickly but i think this is all about a recalibration of your's relationship with america. i mean, it is absolutely abundantly clear that the — it is absolutely abundantly clear that the special relationship, if indeed — that the special relationship, if indeed it— that the special relationship, if indeed it ever existed, as well and truly— indeed it ever existed, as well and truly over~ — indeed it ever existed, as well and truly over. and europe, ithink, has been _ truly over. and europe, ithink, has been moving — truly over. and europe, ithink, has been moving towards having a much more _ been moving towards having a much more separate military identity without — more separate military identity without relying on a us back—up. so ithink— without relying on a us back—up. so i think this — without relying on a us back—up. so i think this is, you know, one for discussion— i think this is, you know, one for discussion with nato partners. we will discussion with nato partners. will have to discussion with nato partners. - will have to leave it there. thank you for your time, both of you. that
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is ever the papers this hour. we'll be back at 11:30pm for look at tomorrow's front pages. goodbye for now. sunnier, warmer weather is on the way and that means a big change for those parts, especially of england, which have been under the cloud for the best part of a week and have been again today. it is unusual for september to about two august when it comes to the top temperature in the warmth gets under way in england and wales for sunday. helped by a more generous helping of sunshine. betterforsome helped by a more generous helping of sunshine. betterfor some and helped by a more generous helping of sunshine. better for some and that is sunshine and northern ireland. romantic weather fronts coming in. it may be welcome as it has been so dry. mainly dry to begin with. for
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england and wales there is some areas of cloud but isolated showers in central and southern england cannot be ruled out. some areas and light winds. it will feel warm and sunny spells. the wind a strengthening in western scotland are now mist a very moving on. not reaching southern and eastern scotland until late in the day but rain moving into northern ireland two. the east is staying dry until 81. temperatures in england and wales to the low— and mid—20s are no sunny spells. a wet evening in scotland and northern ireland and overnight into monday some rain will push into parts of northern england and it will be a mild start to two monday. this wet weather system was slowly fizzled out as we through monday. lf is patchy rain towards the worst fusco a fair amount of cloud whereas england and wales will still be some sunny spells and it will be misty along the coast. temperatures in the reaching into the upper 20s. the warmth. clearer,
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warmer weather heading into the south—east. there will be mist and fog early on tuesday that will clear away. so what is implied in the far north of scotland. a few spots of rain to clear away but by tuesday afternoon there is a huge amount of sunshine out there and those temperatures are responding. the scotland and northern ireland, in england and wales mid—20s. that continues into wednesday. later in the week temperatures wane as the chance of rain goes up.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. pakistan's spy chief visits kabul. what does it mean for the taliban's yet—to—be—announced government? translation: security is good all over the country _ and the people are happy, but the lack of work and the non—announcement of the government, that's worrying people. meanwhile, the taliban claims its fighters are closing in on the last organised group defying them in the panjshir valley. our other main headlines this hour... the new zealand terror attacker is named amid reports he'd tried tojoin ajihadist group. tuna stocks recover after years of over—fishing, but the future of other species is still on the line. and as naomi osaka takes a breakfrom tennis — we look at sport's mental health challenges — and how she can rebound.

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