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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 4, 2021 11:30pm-11:45pm BST

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to their education. the government's scientific advisors don't support it. doctors unions call for the government to hold an emergency meeting, with gps delaying flu jabs as a shortage of hgv drivers disrupts supplies. the new zealand attacker is named, amid reports he'd tried tojoinajihadist group. tuna stocks recover after years of over— fishing, but the future of other species is still on the line. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejo phillips, political commentator and nigel nelson, political editor for the sunday mirror and the sunday people. we'll talk to them shortly. the sunday telegraph reports that ministers and senior conservative mps are preparing to fight a planned national insurance tax rise
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announced by the prime minister and the chancellor. same story on the sunday express, which looks at warnings for red wall tory mps concerned that proposed tax rises and changes to pensions could cost the conservatives the next election. the sunday times reports a top aide for prince charles — michael fawcett — has stepped down temporarily over claims he organised a cbe for a saudi tycoon, who gave 1.5 million pounds to a palace charity. the prince's foundation says it takes the claims very seriously and the matter is under investigation. the story also features on the front of the mail on sunday. meanwhile the independent reports that number 10 has been plotting how to cut scotland's nicola sturgeon out of cop26, for fear she'll hijack the climate event to promote independence. and the mirror's front page says 16 and 17 year olds are facing 5 hour trips to get a jab as many towns don't have
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walk in centres. good to see you. thank you for joining us. we will start with your paper, nigel. teams facing five—hour trips forjabs. paper, nigel. teams facing five-hour trips forjabs-— paper, nigel. teams facing five-hour trips forjabs— trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation _ trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, _ trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, to _ trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, to try - trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, to try to - trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, to try to get. trips forjabs. years. this is the revelation that, to try to get to | trips forjabs. years. this is the l revelation that, to try to get to a walk—in centre, or sometimes a p°p�*up walk—in centre, or sometimes a pop—up clinic, you could have to travel up to 70 miles. now, that means it is a five hour boat trip and of course, with most 16 and 17—year—olds not striving that means public transport to try to get there. the problem seems to be that most covid job centres do not accept anybody under 18 and that is because the onlyjabs they can be given as the onlyjabs they can be given as the pfizer one and also, that they can't book an appointment either. so unless they can get to their gp and
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get it or something like that they're facing these horrendous journeys. and when were in the business of trying to encourage as many people to getjobs as possible, it does seem that the government ought to be doing more to provide the facilities to do it.— the facilities to do it. turning to ou, this the facilities to do it. turning to you, this problem _ the facilities to do it. turning to you, this problem is _ the facilities to do it. turning to you, this problem is even - the facilities to do it. turning to | you, this problem is even worse outside major cities by public transport links are not may be so good. transport links are not may be so aood. �* , ,., , transport links are not may be so mad, , �* ., transport links are not may be so aood. , ~ ., ., ,�* good. absolutely. anyone who doesn't live in a major— good. absolutely. anyone who doesn't live in a major city, _ good. absolutely. anyone who doesn't live in a major city, which _ good. absolutely. anyone who doesn't live in a major city, which i— good. absolutely. anyone who doesn't live in a major city, which i don't, - live in a major city, which i don't, the last— live in a major city, which i don't, the last buses five o'clock in the evening — the last buses five o'clock in the evening and only if there is an r in the month— evening and only if there is an r in the month and your grannies with you. _ the month and your grannies with you. it _ the month and your grannies with you. it is — the month and your grannies with you, it is harder to get on a marian— you, it is harder to get on a ryanair flight. you, it is harder to get on a ryanairflight. public transport you, it is harder to get on a ryanair flight. public transport is expensive — ryanair flight. public transport is expensive and unreliable and infrequent in many, many places. so five-hour— infrequent in many, many places. so five—hour round trip to just go 20 miles_ five—hour round trip to just go 20 miles or— five—hour round trip to just go 20 miles or something like that, you know, _ miles or something like that, you know, nigel said, people that don't drive, _ know, nigel said, people that don't drive, and — know, nigel said, people that don't drive, and also, it is a timer
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because _ drive, and also, it is a timer because many of these young people will neither be at college are still at school — will neither be at college are still at school so have they got to take out a _ at school so have they got to take out a holiday school or college in order_ out a holiday school or college in order to — out a holiday school or college in order to go — out a holiday school or college in order to go and do this? the story we have been _ order to go and do this? the story we have been talking _ order to go and do this? the story we have been talking about - order to go and do this? the story we have been talking about all- order to go and do this? the story| we have been talking about all day todayis we have been talking about all day today is opening up vaccinations to 12-15 today is opening up vaccinations to 12—15 —year—olds. presumably that willjust 12—15 —year—olds. presumably that will just add 12—15 —year—olds. presumably that willjust add to the issues? yes. 12-15 -year-olds. presumably that willjust add to the issues?- willjust add to the issues? yes. i wonder if the _ willjust add to the issues? yes. i wonder if the government - willjust add to the issues? yes. i wonder if the government should j willjust add to the issues? yes. i i wonder if the government should be concentrating on boosterjabs for those who are most at risk? the bomb at the moment with a 12—15 —year—olds is that they've come out and said there was in their marginal benefit of having the job anyway which means that parents who are quite happy to take the risk of having the job themselves and not feeling the same way about their own children so the issue is going to be with the take—up is actually going to be that high. and of course there is some evidence now that there is a
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better immunity from natural infection than from immunisation. and as most children don't get covid seriously that may be better for them. but i think it will be up to parents to make that decision. i'd make that decision on 12—15 —year—olds with the chief medical officer who is on the front page of the sunday people along with the headline long covid hell for 2000 kids a day. headline long covid hell for 2000 kids a da . . headline long covid hell for 2000 kidsada. , , ., kids a day. this report says that one in seven — kids a day. this report says that one in seven young _ kids a day. this report says that one in seven young people - kids a day. this report says that one in seven young people still| kids a day. this report says that - one in seven young people still may have symptoms after 15 weeks. that's an awfully— have symptoms after 15 weeks. that's an awfully long time and we know from _ an awfully long time and we know from the — an awfully long time and we know from the older adults who have got lon- from the older adults who have got tong covid — from the older adults who have got long covid that it is absolutely debilitating. and so for young people — debilitating. and so for young people it is going to be equally debilitating and of course more time off school— debilitating and of course more time off school when they have already had great — off school when they have already
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had great disruption. this plays into the — had great disruption. this plays into the questions for against vaccinating children. the chief medital— vaccinating children. the chief medical officer will make that decision but i suspect a lot of it will come — decision but i suspect a lot of it will come down to parental choice. the idea _ will come down to parental choice. the idea is— will come down to parental choice. the idea is not that children are particularly vulnerable to covid and are less _ particularly vulnerable to covid and are less likely to become seriously than adults but of course it does help keep — than adults but of course it does help keep schools open open and things— help keep schools open open and things like that so it is about sort of trying — things like that so it is about sort of trying to— things like that so it is about sort of trying to get right back to normal— of trying to get right back to normal and we know that the impact on children— normal and we know that the impact on children has been devastating from _ on children has been devastating from missing notjust school and lessen— from missing notjust school and lessen things but missing the host social— lessen things but missing the host social interaction with their friends _ social interaction with their friends. so it is a big issue and it is going — friends. so it is a big issue and it is going to — friends. so it is a big issue and it is going to be a big decision for people — is going to be a big decision for people to — is going to be a big decision for people to have to take. that social interaction is _ people to have to take. that social interaction is so _ people to have to take. that social interaction is so key. _ people to have to take. that social interaction is so key. with - people to have to take. that social interaction is so key. with the - people to have to take. that socialj interaction is so key. with the long covid it is more time off school for the young children.—
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covid it is more time off school for the young children. yes. this is the difficult balance _ the young children. yes. this is the difficult balance that _ the young children. yes. this is the difficult balance that parents - the young children. yes. this is the difficult balance that parents are i difficult balance that parents are facing. if so many children, as the sunday paper reports, 2000 a day are getting long covid, then the decision must be, much better than to have them vaccinated and take the possible risk that goes with it so i do think this whole thing will become finely balanced but lot of parents i've talked to document my kids are grown up so they make their own decisions but a lot of parents i have been talking to i worried about giving their kids the jab and they don't really trust ministers to end “p don't really trust ministers to end up making that decision. that don't really trust ministers to end up making that decision.- don't really trust ministers to end up making that decision. that is not with our up making that decision. that is not with your kids _ up making that decision. that is not with your kids have _ up making that decision. that is not with your kids have told _ up making that decision. that is not with your kids have told me, - up making that decision. that is not with your kids have told me, nigel. | with your kids have told me, nigel. you'll make us to better communication with them than i do. let's turn to the sunday telegraph because the health secretary, to
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make jam a condition of employment. this will be another controversial one because i think, instinctively many— one because i think, instinctively many people feel that it should not be compulsory but then of course there _ be compulsory but then of course there is— be compulsory but then of course there is the argument that if you're working _ there is the argument that if you're working in— there is the argument that if you're working in the health service where you are _ working in the health service where you are exposed to very poorly people — you are exposed to very poorly people and people who may not at the 'ab people and people who may not at the jab for— people and people who may not at the jab for various reasons have compromised immune systems or other serious _ compromised immune systems or other serious health problems the health secretary— serious health problems the health secretary is said to be pushing ahead — secretary is said to be pushing ahead with making it compulsory. and of course _ ahead with making it compulsory. and of course the fear is that many people — of course the fear is that many people will say, ok, i will go and work— people will say, ok, i will go and work somewhere else then, which will then create _ work somewhere else then, which will then create another set of problems with our— then create another set of problems with our service. we have already seen _ with our service. we have already seen this— with our service. we have already seen this happening to a considerable extent in care homes. and that _ considerable extent in care homes. and that is —
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considerable extent in care homes. and that is coming into force in november— and that is coming into force in november that anyone working in a care home — november that anyone working in a care home has got to be jabbed and they are _ care home has got to be jabbed and they are already seeing people guitting — they are already seeing people quitting and going to work in supermarkets or going to do any other— supermarkets or going to do any otheriob — supermarkets or going to do any otherjob rather than take the compulsory vaccine. according to figures _ compulsory vaccine. according to figures reported in the telegraph only one — figures reported in the telegraph only one in four nhs workers have not had _ only one in four nhs workers have not had the — only one in four nhs workers have not had the jab since it was... and have _ not had the jab since it was... and have chosen — not had the jab since it was... and have chosen to not have the jab since _ have chosen to not have the jab since it — have chosen to not have the jab since it was _ have chosen to not have the jab since it was rolled out in april so there's— since it was rolled out in april so there's quite a large of people who are working in the health service who, _ are working in the health service who, if— are working in the health service who, if they stick to the guns and say, _ who, if they stick to the guns and say, l'rn — who, if they stick to the guns and say, l'rn not— who, if they stick to the guns and say, i'm not having it, there's going — say, i'm not having it, there's going to — say, i'm not having it, there's going to be _ say, i'm not having it, there's going to be a staffing crisis. to add to going to be a staffing crisis. add to the going to be a staffing crisis. trr add to the staffing crisis that already exists, some would argue. is there a way around this? regular testing? there a way around this? regular testin: ? �* ., ., there a way around this? regular testinu? �* ., ., , testing? i'm one of those people auainst testing? i'm one of those people against the _ testing? i'm one of those people against the idea _ testing? i'm one of those people against the idea of _ testing? i'm one of those people against the idea of compulsion. i testing? i'm one of those people i against the idea of compulsion. as testing? i'm one of those people . against the idea of compulsion. as a condition of keeping yourjob. i just think that is going a stage too far. it is the right thing to do to
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get vaccinated and they firmly believe that. however. at the end of the days got to be voluntary and if you want to go to certain countries which demand a yellow feverjab you can decide not to go to those countries if you don't want the job. what you can't do, i don't think is actually say, we will take away your job and your career if you refuse to do it. so in answer to that question i think that if you demand they wore masks at all times, if you demand that they had daily test to prove they are free of the disease, that be a better way forward. the jab is in itself an invasive procedure. when someone sticks a needle in your arm and people are the perfect right to say no to it. said arm and people are the perfect right to say no to it— to say no to it. said will return to other stories _ to say no to it. said will return to other stories that _ to say no to it. said will return to other stories that the _ to say no to it. said will return to other stories that the world - to say no to it. said will return to other stories that the world we i to say no to it. said will return to l other stories that the world we live a now all stories point back to the pandemic. tory is a war ever tax increase. pick up the story on this
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one. . �* . . increase. pick up the story on this one. . �* , ., , one. . burns that the government is widely expected _ one. . burns that the government is widely expected to _ one. . burns that the government is widely expected to announce - one. . burns that the government is widely expected to announce this i widely expected to announce this week _ widely expected to announce this week in— widely expected to announce this week. in order to fund the desperately desperately needed social— desperately desperately needed social care which was promised when boris _ social care which was promised when borisjohnson was social care which was promised when boris johnson was elected and stood on the _ boris johnson was elected and stood on the steps of downing street he said he _ on the steps of downing street he said he had a plan already to go. this goes— said he had a plan already to go. this goes back to ten years ago. david _ this goes back to ten years ago. david cameron and the coalition government commissioned a report about— government commissioned a report about funding for social care. nothing _ about funding for social care. nothing has happened and we've seen the desperate state of care homes. we know— the desperate state of care homes. we know there is a rising ageing population. there is a shortage of staff and — population. there is a shortage of staff and all those things, staff are poorly paid. the government wants— are poorly paid. the government wants lrut— are poorly paid. the government wants but an increase in national insurance — wants but an increase in national insurance but the reason the tories are at— insurance but the reason the tories are at war— insurance but the reason the tories are at war over this is it is breaking _ are at war over this is it is breaking a _ are at war over this is it is
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breaking a manifesto promise about putting _ breaking a manifesto promise about putting tax and national insurance but there — putting tax and national insurance but there is also a feeling that actually— but there is also a feeling that actually you are than taxing young people _ actually you are than taxing young people who have, some would argue, suffer— people who have, some would argue, suffer disproportionately because of cavy than _ suffer disproportionately because of cavy than the effect of the jobs market — cavy than the effect of the jobs market and so on and so forth. so you taxing — market and so on and so forth. so you taxing young people in order to pay for— you taxing young people in order to pay for something that only the majority— pay for something that only the majority of people who benefit will be older— majority of people who benefit will be older people. so there is a huge argument _ be older people. so there is a huge argument going on about this. because. _ argument going on about this. because, you know, you don't pay national— because, you know, you don't pay national insurance if your income comes— national insurance if your income comes from _ national insurance if your income comes from investments and i think their arguments about there are better— their arguments about there are better ways to do this rather than tax work— better ways to do this rather than tax work and particularly people no paid work — tax work and particularly people no aid work. , ., , ., ., paid work. same story on the front ofthe paid work. same story on the front of the sunday _ paid work. same story on the front of the sunday express. _ paid work. same story on the front of the sunday express. tory - paid work. same story on the front of the sunday express. tory mps i paid work. same story on the front l of the sunday express. tory mps and voter revolt. an interesting tweet from a conservative mp already relating to the story saying this evening i will vote for this. a very bad idea. . ., ,
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evening i will vote for this. a very badidea. , ., , evening i will vote for this. a very bad idea. , ., , bad idea. yes. it only takes a certain number— bad idea. yes. it only takes a certain number of _ bad idea. yes. it only takes a certain number of mps - bad idea. yes. it only takes a certain number of mps to - bad idea. yes. it only takes a - certain number of mps to oppose this rate to be dead in the water so i do know that the tories i speak to are extremely angry about this partly because of breaking the manifesto pledge but also because they don't like the idea of a rise in national insurance. and so the way that boris johnson could get out of this is to come up with a different proposal. and something thatjeremy hunt suggested was a special tax purely to pay for this. and that could be the way forward. you could design that takes in a way that doesn't specifically become a tax on jobs, doesn't hit lower earners. doesn't disproportionately hit the young. and it could be attacks whereby, as the tuc want, you could add a bit capital gains and try to make it work. add a bit to second homes. things like that. so everybody is
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paying their fair work towards it. i want to squeeze in another story. eu military force plans would divide europe. this is a warning from the nato chief. europe. this is a warning from the nato chief-— nato chief. yes. the secretary general of _ nato chief. yes. the secretary general of nato. _ nato chief. yes. the secretary general of nato. there - nato chief. yes. the secretary general of nato. there have . nato chief. yes. the secretary i general of nato. there have long been _ general of nato. there have long been discussions about whether europe — been discussions about whether europe should have its own military force _ europe should have its own military force and _ europe should have its own military force and there were talks here about _ force and there were talks here about 20,000 strong military force but i about 20,000 strong military force but i think— about 20,000 strong military force but i think what this really comes down _ but i think what this really comes down to— but i think what this really comes down to is— but i think what this really comes down to is europe's changing relationship with america and the idea that, — relationship with america and the idea that, you know, europe doesn't want always— idea that, you know, europe doesn't want always be in the position where it has— want always be in the position where it has to _ want always be in the position where it has to rely on the us to support any military— it has to rely on the us to support any military action or military intervention and i think, you know, that has— intervention and i think, you know, that has come to the fore very much because _ that has come to the fore very much because of— that has come to the fore very much because of what has happened in afghanistan over the last few weeks
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whereas— afghanistan over the last few weeks whereas nato who were sorting out and evacuating people whilst americans were leaving. but, you know, _ americans were leaving. but, you know. he — americans were leaving. but, you know. he is— americans were leaving. but, you know, he is concerned that it would be very— know, he is concerned that it would be very divisive in europe. who gets to say— be very divisive in europe. who gets to say what— be very divisive in europe. who gets to say what happens. but i think it is one _ to say what happens. but i think it is one that — to say what happens. but i think it is one that is going to be much discussed _ is one that is going to be much discussed within nato and european circles _ discussed within nato and european circles. ~ ., ., circles. were to leave it there. thank you _ circles. were to leave it there. thank you for _ circles. were to leave it there. thank you forjoining - circles. were to leave it there. thank you forjoining us - circles. were to leave it there. thank you forjoining us this i thank you forjoining us this evening. thank you forjoining us this evening. that's it for the papers. from us all goodbye. coming up next it's the film review. hello and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith.

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