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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 5, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. our headlines today: the future funding of social care. talks have been taking place this weekend ahead of a major announcement but some conservative mps are warning against tax rises. prince charles�*s former aide steps down from his charity role after allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. almost 50 shops a day have disappeared from our high streets — but the rate of closures has begun to slow. scotland edge closer to world cup qualification. a first half goal from lyndon dykes was enough to clinch all three
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points against moldova, in what was a must—win match. yet. warm weather on their way over the next few days but rain for some of us. all the details here on breakfast. it's sunday september 5. our main story. the future of social care in england is being discussed by the government this weekend ahead of a major announcement expected later this week. boris johnson pledged to fix social care when he became prime minister, but he's facing growing pressure from within his party not to increase national insurance contributions to pay for the plans. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, there's no easy answers on this one.
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the is a huge question. how, or should, the government intervened to prevent people in england having to sell their homes in order to fund social care. let's look at the promises sell their homes in order to fund social care. let's look at the promises that sell their homes in order to fund social care. let's look at the promises that the sell their homes in order to fund social care. let's look at the promises that the -overnment sell their homes in order to fund social care. let's look at the promises that the -overnment has promises that the government has made. borisjohnson has repeatedly said that he will sort out social care. secondly he said he would get a political consensus in order to do it and thirdly he said he would not raise income tax, vat or national insurance. that is a tax on earnings not paid above state pension age or investment income. sophie does put up investment income. sophie does put up national insurance tangos that promise around raising taxes is the idea of a consensus because labour and others think that raising national insurance is a mistake but he may get a plan on social care which was the first promise. but he must persuade his own side as well. sojohn major, the former conservative prime minister saying that usually national insurance is a
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regrettable mistake where the poor end up playing it —— paying a disproportionate amount and labour are making a similar argument. as you say, the meetings are going on throughout the weekend to try and work it out. also to work out additional funding work it out. also to work out additionalfunding packages for the additional funding packages for the nhs additionalfunding packages for the nhs to deal with the backlog caused by covid as mps return this week and we will move straight back into the cut and thrust of argument with this being front and centre. for cut and thrust of argument with this being front and centre.— being front and centre. for now, thank you _ being front and centre. for now, thank you very — being front and centre. for now, thank you very much. _ the chief executive of one of prince charles�* charities has temporarily stepped down, following newspaper allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. michael fawcett is a former aide to the prince. here's more from our royal correspondent, jonny dymond. michael fawcett was once of prince charles �*s closest aides, a man whom the prince relied upon to guide and organise his personal life. three years ago he became chief executive
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of the princes foundation, a number of the princes foundation, a number of the princes foundation, a number of the group for a number of prince charles �*s charitable interests. newspaper reports allege that mr fawcett offered to assist a wealthy saudi national and major donor to the foundation with citizenship and with an honour. he received an honorary cbe in late 2016. one palace source stressed the distance between prince charles �*s office and his foundation but michael fawcett is renowned for his closeness to prince charles and this is an embarrassment for the prince. foundation it took the allegations seriously on the matter is under investigation. the foundation failed to respond to a number of other allegations raised by the newspapers. taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul. the group say the taliban targeted them with tear gas and pepper spray as they tried to walk from a bridge to the presidential palace. the women were calling for the right
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to work and to be included in the government. but the taliban say the protest got out of control. the government is facing increasing pressure ahead of a decision on whether to offer covid jabs to all children aged 12—15. labour has called on borisjohnson to clarify the situation as soon as possible. helena wilkinson reports. in america they have been vaccinating children against covid for months. 0ther vaccinating children against covid for months. other countries, like france and germany, are also immunising12—15 —year—olds. but in the uk, a decision still has not been made and pressure is growing on the prime minister to make a decision. labourwants the prime minister to make a decision. labour wants clarity so that children do not face further disruption to their education. earlier this week the uk's vaccine advisory body said it could not
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recommend vaccinating healthy 12—15 —year—olds on health grounds alone. they said the vaccine offered only marginal benefit. parents will be eager for marginal benefit. parents will be eagerfor ministers to marginal benefit. parents will be eager for ministers to make their final decision. it eager for ministers to make their final decision.— final decision. it will free up our world and _ final decision. it will free up our world and country _ final decision. it will free up our world and country more - final decision. it will free up our world and country more to - final decision. it will free up our world and country more to have| final decision. it will free up our - world and country more to have the freedom to protect our children and in schools absolutely no objection. we just don't know that much about it so at_ we just don't know that much about it so at the — we just don't know that much about it so at the moment i think anybody at 16 onwards, that is their choice and at16 onwards, that is their choice and they— at 16 onwards, that is their choice and they can make that choice. a child _ and they can make that choice. a child of— and they can make that choice. a child of that age cannot make that choico _ child of that age cannot make that choice. ., . ., child of that age cannot make that choice. ., _, ., choice. the 'oint committee on vaccination— choice. the joint committee on vaccination and _ choice. the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation i choice. the joint committee on - vaccination and immunisation looked at possible health benefits and rare side effects in children. the uk's chief medical officers have now been asked to consider wider issues such asked to consider wider issues such as disruption to schools. we asked to consider wider issues such as disruption to schools.— asked to consider wider issues such as disruption to schools. we are not the medical— as disruption to schools. we are not the medical scientists. _ as disruption to schools. we are not the medical scientists. we - as disruption to schools. we are not the medical scientists. we don't - the medical scientists. we don't want to enter into that territory. but we do think the question of disruption in schools and the
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measures that we can take to avoid that disruption should be front and centre for the government at the moment to think but 15 conservative mps have signed a letter to england's chief medical officer, chris whitty, saying the risk of school closure should not be considered.— school closure should not be considered. , ., , considered. they urge him to focus onl on considered. they urge him to focus only on the — considered. they urge him to focus only on the health _ considered. they urge him to focus only on the health benefits - considered. they urge him to focus only on the health benefits and - only on the health benefits and downsides of the vaccine. but parents remain in limbo. they would want clarity on whether their children will be offered the vaccine or not. a final decision is expected within days. we will talk about that much more throughout the day. home office officials have admitted that long immigration queues at heathrow airport on friday were unacceptable. passengers had to wait several hours and some were reported to have fainted. the airport has blamed the uk border force for not providing enough staff. kathryn stanczyszyn reports.
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long queues and set up passengers. these have been the scenes at heathrow airport this weekend with waiting times of several hours to get through passport control. travellers took to social media to vent their anger at the situation. even claiming some had fainted. the end of the school holidays means extra pressure at airports and this weekend is the busiest of the year for returning passengers. many with young children who cannot use the electronic passport gates. but heathrow has criticised border force over the unacceptable queueing times, putting it down to simply not enough staff on duty particularly with the extra checks being made due to coronavirus. in a statement, the airport apologised for delays and said that border force were aware of extra demand and was very disappointed that they did not provide sufficient resource. it also said it was drafting more workers they'll manage the queues and provide passenger welfare but at
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peak times, all immigration desks should be manned. the home office has admitted that the long wait is unacceptable and said that order force was now rapidly reviewing its rosters and deploying more staff across the airport to improve waiting times. an investigation is under way after a plane crashed at the bournemouth air festival, leaving two people injured. images shared on social media show the small wing—walker aircraft partially submerged in poole harbour after plunging into the sea. police say the two people rescued from the water suffered only minor injuries. more than 8,000 chain stores disappeared from high streets, shopping centres and retail parks across britain in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london but now one of the
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hardest hit. 0xford street in london but now one of the hardest hit. oxford street littered with boarded—up shops. city centres have suffered the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot close down with no—one coming along. it is there is quite a lot close down with no-one coming along.— no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as _ no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as it _ no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as it used _ no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as it used to _ no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as it used to be. - no-one coming along. it is not as crowded as it used to be. comingj no-one coming along. it is not as i crowded as it used to be. coming to central london _ crowded as it used to be. coming to central london it _ crowded as it used to be. coming to central london it is _ crowded as it used to be. coming to central london it is unexpected - crowded as it used to be. coming to central london it is unexpected to i central london it is unexpected to see how— central london it is unexpected to see how x — central london it is unexpected to see how x -- _ central london it is unexpected to see how x —— affected _ central london it is unexpected to see how x —— affected there. - central london it is unexpected to see how x —— affected there. new see how x -- affected there. new firures see how x -- affected there. new figures show _ see how x -- affected there. new figures show the _ see how x -- affected there. new figures show the scale _ see how x -- affected there. new figures show the scale of - see how x —— affected there.- figures show the scale of upheaval. in the first half of this year, 31188 chain stores opened. these include everything from gyms and cafe's to banks and bars. but more than 8700 of them closed, making a net loss of more than 5200 outlets. these figures are stark but they are not quite as bad as this time last year. 0ut quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, retail parks and out—of—town shopping has fed best. so is this a permanent shift? {lister
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so is this a permanent shift? over the next few _ so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months _ so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months city - so is this a permanent shift? or the next few months city centres will start to liven up again as people begin to return to work in schools go back and people spend more time in the cities. however, i don't think you will get the same level of footfall in city centres as before and in retail parks they are just more convenient for many of us. this bakery chain definitely prefers the high street. it is opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches. i suburb of kew, one of four new branches-— suburb of kew, one of four new branches. ~ ., , ., , ., branches. i think that people are readin: branches. i think that people are reading better _ branches. i think that people are reading better food _ branches. i think that people are reading better food more - branches. i think that people are reading better food more often l branches. i think that people are i reading better food more often and more often at home. 0pening an extra store and being able to expand at a time where rent is low and there is opportunity for us to rethink what a bakery is. opportunity for us to rethink what a bake is. , , ., , opportunity for us to rethink what a bake is. , , .,, ,., . ~ bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge _ bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now— bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for - bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for so - bakery is. tempting people back in i is the big challenge now for so many towns and city centres. they are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic.
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it is 12 minute plastics, good morning to you. —— 12 minutes past six. now how about this for camping with a difference? �*champing' — that's staying overnight in historic churches — has become one of the surprise holiday hits of the summer. so why is it proving so popular? phil chapman has been finding out. if, like you and fiona, your idea of a peaceful getaway is to settle down between altar and pews then champing could be for you. after a huge creep increase in popularity, the conservation trust of churches would welcome more places to add to its champing network. we welcome more places to add to its champing network.— welcome more places to add to its champing network. we could not find an here champing network. we could not find anywhere that _ champing network. we could not find anywhere that would _ champing network. we could not find anywhere that would take _ champing network. we could not find anywhere that would take the - champing network. we could not find anywhere that would take the dog . champing network. we could not find| anywhere that would take the dog and we found it almost by chance. we did a word search and it seemed perfect as we only needed three or four days of peace and quiet and wi—fi and yes, time to stop and think. we of peace and quiet and wi-fi and
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yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that — yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it _ yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it was _ yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it was going _ yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it was going to - yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it was going to be - yes, time to stop and think. we had worried that it was going to be a - worried that it was going to be a bit scary— worried that it was going to be a bit scary but it isjust a very small— bit scary but it isjust a very small church and itjust bit scary but it isjust a very small church and it just feels really— small church and it just feels really comfortable and cosy. we had one individual— really comfortable and cosy. we had one individual the _ really comfortable and cosy. we had one individual the year _ really comfortable and cosy. we had one individual the year before - really comfortable and cosy. we had one individual the year before last . one individual the year before last to successfully proposed to his girlfriend in the church so all sorts of people, all sorts of reasons. just for a short holiday people normally stay for one night but some stay as long as five and enjoy this wonderful picturesque place. with covid—19 it has been more popular than ever. we have people permanently in the church. the conservation interest to a good job in advertising this and taking and the like. i'm just surprised that more and more churches in the area do not take on the opportunity. we are up 40% on average year—on—year, sorry, on the last season_ year—on—year, sorry, on the last season we — year—on—year, sorry, on the last season we had in 2019 so the demand really— season we had in 2019 so the demand really is _ season we had in 2019 so the demand really is coming from domestic audiences, people who want a steak asian _ audiences, people who want a steak asian and _ audiences, people who want a steak asian and who want something a bit different _ asian and who want something a bit different. we cannot really keep up with demand so we are always looking
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for new _ with demand so we are always looking for new churches. it is with demand so we are always looking for new churches.— for new churches. it is great to know that _ for new churches. it is great to know that we _ for new churches. it is great to know that we can _ for new churches. it is great to know that we can contribute i for new churches. it is great to know that we can contribute in | for new churches. it is great to - know that we can contribute in this way towards keeping this church alive. churches about the whole community and being part of it. hot community and being part of it. not onl does community and being part of it. not only does it open up the church to a whole _ only does it open up the church to a whole host— only does it open up the church to a whole host of— only does it open up the church to a whole host of people _ only does it open up the church to a whole host of people who _ only does it open up the church to a whole host of people who would - only does it open up the church to a j whole host of people who would not otherwise _ whole host of people who would not otherwise come _ whole host of people who would not otherwise come into _ whole host of people who would not otherwise come into the _ whole host of people who would not otherwise come into the church- whole host of people who would not otherwise come into the church it i otherwise come into the church it also provides— otherwise come into the church it also provides a _ otherwise come into the church it also provides a very _ otherwise come into the church it also provides a very good - otherwise come into the church it also provides a very good income j otherwise come into the church it. also provides a very good income for this community _ also provides a very good income for this community and _ also provides a very good income for this community and helps _ also provides a very good income for this community and helps to - also provides a very good income for this community and helps to keep i also provides a very good income forl this community and helps to keep the church— this community and helps to keep the church in_ this community and helps to keep the church in the — this community and helps to keep the church in the village _ this community and helps to keep the church in the village hall— this community and helps to keep the church in the village hall open. - this community and helps to keep the church in the village hall open. find i church in the village hall open. and after the church in the village hall open. after the busiest season church in the village hall open. aim} after the busiest season here church in the village hall open. after the busiest season here yet, visitors have until the end of september to get there champing reservation in. that is chap man going champing. let's have a look at the papers now this morning. that sunday telegraph reports the borisjohnson this morning. that sunday telegraph reports the boris johnson faces rebellion within the ranks over those reports we have been discussing that he wants to raise national insurance to pay for social care. 0n the front of the paper as well, a photograph of the queen's gambit actor at the venice film festival. �* , ., ., .,
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gambit actor at the venice film festival. ~ , ., ., ., , festival. also leading on the unrest within the conservative _ festival. also leading on the unrest within the conservative party, - festival. also leading on the unrest within the conservative party, the l within the conservative party, the sunday expresses the prime minister is facing pressure from mps over tax rises, pensions, social care and other policies. and express also has a photo of anya, she is everywhere, photograph there with matt smith. in other news, the sunday mirror says teenagers are facing five—hour trips to get the coronavirus vaccine. the paper claims many towns do not have the correct walk—in centres, and the alternatives are sometimes as far as 70 miles away. and the mail on sunday leads with the story that the chief executive of one of prince charles' charities has temporarily stepped down following allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. taking a look inside the papers. you might remember last week the reports of michael gove pictured, videoed, in fact, in aberdeen, having a dance in fact, in aberdeen, having a dance in a nightclub. the picture in the
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son this morning show michael gove reading about his exploits in the paper on the flight back. trying to make what anyone had made of his dance moves or otherwise. reading all about what he got up to the night before. if you have seen the video, it might have been quite usefulfor him to remember some of that stuff, reading about himself on the way back. it is that stuff, reading about himself on the way back-— the way back. it is all about -- a bit metta- _ the way back. it is all about -- a bit metta. michael— the way back. it is all about -- a bit metta. michael gove - the way back. it is all about -- a bit metta. michael gove looking| the way back. it is all about -- a l bit metta. michael gove looking at the way back. it is all about -- a - bit metta. michael gove looking at a picture of michael gove.... this is a father and son transplant. we have a father and son transplant. we have a little kid matthew has gone through a life—saving heart transplant at the age of four and his father had been through the same thing as well. look at that. a nice positive outcome for father and son who had both gone through experiencing a heart transplant. indie
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experiencing a heart transplant. we have heard a bit about shortages, some shortages in supermarkets, restaurants was not we were talking this week about in collections. new —— new year fireworks are going this week about in collections. new —— new yearfireworks are going up in smoke that is saying that they won't be enough fireworks for not only bonfire night but new year's stop it is raising a shortage and thatis stop it is raising a shortage and that is because most of that stuff comes from china and we know the shipping costs of containers coming from the far east has soared in price. they could be one of the latest shortages as a result of the number of hdv drivers that are not available for various different reasons including brexit and the pandemic. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, both of you. and good morning to both of you at home as
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well. —— morning to you at home. i have good news for you because it feels summer is not done with us. temperatures are set to climb a little over the next few days. today will be warmer than yesterday but across the north and west of the uk there is a bit of rain in the forecast and on the satellite picture you can see the reason why — this stripe of cloud heading in our direction. cloud already starting to thicken up. for many parts of england and wales, things should brighten up. you can see the cloud and rain spreading across northern ireland, northern and western parts of scotland through the afternoon with a strengthening wind. eastern and southern scotland likely to stay dry. somewhere in the south you are likely to get to 26 degrees this afternoon. a small chance forjust
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the odd shower in some southern parts. and then into tonight, the cloud and rain will push further south and clear spells with mist and fog pack is developing further south on what will be quite a warm night. much of the rain will fizzle but generally across the northern half of the uk we can expect a lot of cloud tomorrow. staying misty and murky for some of the western coast but elsewhere, the mist and fog will peer —— clear and some parts could get to 27 or 28 degrees. some of the temperatures for south wales as well. heading to the middle part of the week, high pressured to the east, a southerly wind and that will aid us all in some relatively warm and quite humid air stop you can see the high temperatures for many. tuesday bringing plenty of sunshine with more cloud across northern scotland. during august, temperatures never got above 27.2
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but i tuesday we could be looking at highs of 28 or 29 in the south so september may well turn out warmer than august was and for wednesday, similar weather for many with again some high temperatures. 28—29. 26 in glasgow butjust increasing chance of thunders and showers spreading in from the south and the west. it sets us up from what will be as a unsettled and to the week. some of the rain could be on the heavy side. still for many, not doing badly for the time of year. yes, we are heading deeper into september but there is some warmth on the way. i don't want to sound ungrateful but is it only two days? you don't want to sound ungrateful but is it only two days?— is it only two days? you do the maths.
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is it only two days? you do the maths- we _ is it only two days? you do the maths. we haven't _ is it only two days? you do the maths. we haven't had - is it only two days? you do the maths. we haven't had a - is it only two days? you do the - maths. we haven't had a summer. let's no maths. we haven't had a summer. let's go with _ maths. we haven't had a summer. let's go with summer _ maths. we haven't had a summer. let's go with summer is _ maths. we haven't had a summer. let's go with summer is on - maths. we haven't had a summer. l let's go with summer is on tuesday. go away and give us another day. they were once a familiar sight but the number of hedgehogs across the uk has plummeted in recent years. now a new study carried out in south london has some encouraging news about our prickly pals. here's nicola ford to explain. they are one of the uk's best loved mammals but for years they have been in decline, something wildlife experts are worried about. indie in decline, something wildlife experts are worried about. we have been monitoring _ experts are worried about. we have been monitoring the _ experts are worried about. we have been monitoring the numbers - experts are worried about. we have been monitoring the numbers since j been monitoring the numbers since 2000 and the numbers have plummeted ljy 2000 and the numbers have plummeted by 50% in rural areas and 20% in suburban areas since that time. so a stud has suburban areas since that time. so a study has been _ suburban areas since that time. so a study has been set _ suburban areas since that time. so a study has been set up where the zoological society of london use cameras to detect their movements. we set them up in groups of about 30 and we will set them up on something
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like this, a tree or a poll, relatively low to the ground so that they can capture any movement of hedgehogs, facing a large, open space and the idea is to put enough cameras out across the site that you want to study are that you get cover over the whole area over a series of weeks and then we get a really good idea ofjust how many hedgehogs there are. , , ., ., there are. their study revealed a relatively high — there are. their study revealed a relatively high number— there are. their study revealed a relatively high number of- there are. their study revealed a relatively high number of them l there are. their study revealed a - relatively high number of them here. there are some wide open spaces where they can forage readily at nighttime. is also the pond which provides them plenty of drinking water. these are scrubby areas with a whole variety of plants providing lots of invertebrates for them to feed on. ., .,, , feed on. one of the most interesting findinus is feed on. one of the most interesting findings is they _ feed on. one of the most interesting findings is they like _ feed on. one of the most interesting findings is they like areas _ feed on. one of the most interesting findings is they like areas are - findings is they like areas are surrounded by plenty of open green spaces. but in other places like parks surrounded by roads there were hardly any hedgehogs recorded at all. we put 22 cameras up in
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brockwell park. we all. we put 22 cameras up in brockwell park.— all. we put 22 cameras up in brockwell park. ~ �* ., , brockwell park. we didn't find any evidence of— brockwell park. we didn't find any evidence of them _ brockwell park. we didn't find any evidence of them in _ brockwell park. we didn't find any evidence of them in brockwell- brockwell park. we didn't find any | evidence of them in brockwell park which is alarming and we think at the moment that is probably because the moment that is probably because the roads around there are just too busy for hedgehogs to cross safely. so how do we develop spaces where our hedgehogs can roam safely? anything like these long, scrubby husky areas are ideal for them to make their nests in, piles of dead leaves are ideal to provide them somewhere secure and safe. it leaves are ideal to provide them somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden _ somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden at _ somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden at home, _ somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden at home, you - somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden at home, you can i somewhere secure and safe. if you have a garden at home, you can help create the ideal habitat. what other top tips? create the ideal habitat. what other to ti s? . create the ideal habitat. what other to--tis? ., ., create the ideal habitat. what other to--tis? . ., ., create the ideal habitat. what other to a ti s? ., ., ., an top tips? create a hedgehog highway in our top tips? create a hedgehog highway in your garden- _ top tips? create a hedgehog highway in your garden. that _ top tips? create a hedgehog highway in your garden. that is _ top tips? create a hedgehog highway in your garden. that is important - top tips? create a hedgehog highway in your garden. that is important sol in your garden. that is important so hedgehogs can get in and out. you also need to divide them great food. they need a safe supply of water, nesting sites and also please take care of hazards and be careful when you are trimming. don't use slug pellets and also check bonfires before lighting them.
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there such a cute little faces. i'm glad it is a good news story for hedgehogs. and we have some good news about scotland? yes and nice to see you. a pivotal match. no premier league game so the international matches are coming to the fore. scotland have given their hopes of qualifying for next years world cup a much needed boost with a 1—0 victory over moldova at hampden park. it leaves them third in group f with their next match to come against austria on tuesday. ben croucher was watching. singh scotland at a world cup final, ask your parents. for this generation, though, there is hope and expectation especially over lowly moldova. voices suitably warmed up, now for to cheer about. the goal to kick—start scotland's stuttering qualifying campaign?
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well, not really. chances came for steve clarke's side, chances went begging for steve clarke's side, quite. this was moldova, ranked 175th in the world but this was not about a thrashing, not with this kind of finishing. just the result that scotland needed. the performance not want to tell the grandkids about. then croucher, bbc news. —— ben. britain's emma raducanu is through to the fourth round of the us open after a superb display in new york. the 18—year—old swept aside spain's sara sorribes tormo, who is ranked 41 in the world, in straight sets, 6—0, 6—1. raducanu, who also reached the last 16 at wimbledon this summer, said she feels she's getting better with each match. in the next round raducanu will play american shelby rogers who stunned top seed ash barty. rogers, the world number 43, beat the australian in three sets. the paralympics closing ceremony takes place later today in tokyo.
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0vernight great britain beat spain to win the men's wheelchair basketball bronze medal match. rachael latham is in tokyo for us — another successful game for paralympics gb draws to a close. yes. the bronze medal went to great britain but this morning all eyes in tokyo would have been on the gold medal match. it was usa versus japan and it was a nail—biting fourth—quarter. the lead literally bounced between the countries in the final few minutes, bounced between the countries in the finalfew minutes, usa bounced between the countries in the final few minutes, usa took that lead. they won the gold medal and they have continued to rain dominance here in the wheelchair basketball, defending their title from rio. in the marathon, david weir pushed, came for. he said he was very happy with his time. it is the fastest he has gone in years but the fastest he has gone in years but the final medal of these games in tokyo for great britain went to kristin combs in the men's edmonton.
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just to reflect on the last 12 days of competition, rate britain has 124 medals —— great britain has won 120 four medals. the pan american games is notjust about four medals. the pan american games is not just about sport, four medals. the pan american games is notjust about sport, it is also about sparking change. it is about empowerment, it is about inspiring the next generation and we have seen all of that from the paralympics gb team here in tokyo and to close the games for great written, david smith will be carrying the flag at the closing ceremony tonight and paralympics gb said he was selected because he showed the resilience, coming back from behind to win his gold medal and that is what the paralympics is about and he did that for great britain and i am sure he will do that again tonight at the closing ceremony here in tokyo. make
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ou ve closing ceremony here in tokyo. make you very much. _ closing ceremony here in tokyo. make you very much, rachel— closing ceremony here in tokyo. make you very much, rachel latham. exactly, that is exactly what it is all about. europe take a three point lead over the usa, into the second day of the solheim cup in ohio. the usa went into the competition as favourites, but europe dominated the opening foursomes, winning three of the four matches. the scandinavian pairing of anna nordqvist and matilda castren then went on to win their afternoon four—balls as well. europe are 5.5—2.5 points ahead. rohit sharma's century helped india seize the advantage on day three of the fourth test at the 0val. sharma brought up his ton with this huge six as india started to take control of the match. but, england fought back with the new ball, 0llie robinson's two late wickets have given them hope. bad light brought play to an early finish with india on 270 for three, that's a lead of 171 runs. all to play for today. england's women lost the second of their t20 internationals against new zealand at hove which means the sides will battle it out in a decider on thursday. new zealand captain sophie devine hit a quick half century as her side
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eventually won with four wickets and ten balls to spare. max verstappen and lewis hamilton are back on the front row together for today's dutch grand prix for the first time since they collided at the british grand prix injuly. verstappen delighted the 70,000 fans who packed into the zandvoort circuit on the netherlands coast by claiming his sixth pole in seven races. but hamilton, who leads the championship byjust three points, was less than four hundredths of a second behind the dutchman. the dutch grand prix, the fans for verstappen, just unreal. the same with belgium. there are companies set up specifically to serve verstappen fans to go to the races. i can't believe we are already at the closing ceremony for the paralympics. brute
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the closing ceremony for the paralympics-— the closing ceremony for the paralympics. the closing ceremony for the paral mics. ~ , , paralympics. we will be back in 'ust a second. paralympics. we will be back in 'ust a gem stay fl paralympics. we will be back in 'ust a second. stay with i paralympics. we will be back in 'ust a second. stay with us. i
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the future of social care in england is being discussed by the government this weekend ahead of a major announcement expected later this week. boris johnson pledged to fix social care when he became prime minister, but he's facing growing pressure from within his party not to increase national insurance contributions to pay for the plans. the chief executive of one of prince charles' charities — the prince's foundation — has temporarily stepped down, following newspaper allegations that he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. michael fawcett was — until 2003 — the prince's valet. the prince's foundation said that it took the allegations very seriously — and that the matter is under investigation.
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taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul. the group say the taliban targeted them with tear gas and pepper spray as they tried to walk from a bridge to the presidential palace. the women were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government. but the taliban say the protest got out of control. the government's face whether to offer covid jabs toward children. labour has asked boris to clarify the situation as soon as possible. 15 conservative mps have written to the chief medical officer in england asking him to focus only on the health benefits of the job. he asking him to focus only on the health benefits of thejob. he is due to advise ministers later this week. home office officials have admitted that long immigration queues on friday at heathrow airport were unacceptable. passengers had to wait several hours and some were reported to have fainted. the airport has blamed the uk border force for not providing enough staff. an investigation is under way
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after a plane crashed at the bournemouth air festival, leaving two people injured. images shared on social media show the small wing—walker aircraft partially submerged in poole harbour after plunging into the sea. police say the two people rescued from the water suffered only minor injuries. more than 8,000 chain stores disappeared from high streets, shopping centres and retail parks across britain in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. the figures, from the local data company, show there are nearly 50 outlets closing every day. lenjohnson — that's the name of the greatest boxer you've probably never heard of, all because of the colour of his skin. he now a new campaign has been launched to commemorate his achievements inside — and outside — the ring. ian haslam has been finding out more.
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born in clayton in manchester in 1902 to a father from sierra leone and an irish mother, lenjohnson would go on to become the great underground champion of boxing, prevented from competing in total belts because of his skin colour. his is an important story which many want people to know. to his is an important story which many want people to know.— want people to know. to think that i had never heard _ want people to know. to think that i had never heard of— want people to know. to think that i had never heard of this _ want people to know. to think that i had never heard of this story - had never heard of this story infuriated me and then inspired me. lenjohnson had 135 fights, 93 wins. that record is unbelievable. but to think he was never allowed to be champion because of his skin colour was outrageous. he was not allowed to compete for it because he was not allowed. ., ,., allowed. hearing the boxing community _ allowed. hearing the boxing community he _ allowed. hearing the boxing community he is _ allowed. hearing the boxing community he is revered i allowed. hearing the boxing community he is revered as| allowed. hearing the boxing | community he is revered as a allowed. hearing the boxing - community he is revered as a boxing hero, a feeling by his family. the thins he hero, a feeling by his family. the things he has _ hero, a feeling by his family. iia: things he has done hero, a feeling by his family. tia: things he has done in hero, a feeling by his family. ti2 things he has done in his boxing career plus what he did politically, getting people aware of the rights
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that they have, immensely proud. immensely. len was also forced into many battles outside the ring, not least here at the old abbey tap house pub in manchester, the scene of an infamous incident in the early 19505 by which point len had long retired as a boxer and was working as a buster over. he arrived there with his best friend who was white. wolf encouraged len to come down here and bought him a drink even though len did not drink in the landlady refused to serve them. they went to the mayor and complained and got a group of people, i think 200, and they returned here and the landlady, the second time served len johnson and that became a national news item and it overcame the colour bar. , ., news item and it overcame the colour bar. , , news item and it overcame the colour bar. , ., bar. his local community came out and they were _ bar. his local community came out and they were aware _ bar. his local community came out and they were aware of _ bar. his local community came out and they were aware of it - bar. his local community came out i and they were aware of it themselves and they were aware of it themselves and they— and they were aware of it themselves and they were aware of it themselves and they were shocked and horrified by it _ and they were shocked and horrified by it sow — and they were shocked and horrified by it. so... len and they were shocked and horrified b it. so... , .,
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and they were shocked and horrified by it- so- - -— by it. so... len became a political campaigner— by it. so... len became a political campaigner after— by it. so... len became a political campaigner after intervening - by it. so... len became a political campaigner after intervening in i campaigner after intervening in racial discrimination cases. he was a representative at the influential pan— african congress of 1945, posted in his home city. pan- african congress of 1945, posted in his home city.- pan- african congress of 1945, posted in his home city. when i was ounrer posted in his home city. when i was ounuerl posted in his home city. when i was younger i just _ posted in his home city. when i was younger i just heard _ posted in his home city. when i was younger i just heard that _ posted in his home city. when i was younger i just heard that my - posted in his home city. when i was younger i just heard that my gran i younger ijust heard that my gran great _ younger ijust heard that my gran great grandad was an amazing fighter and as— great grandad was an amazing fighter and as he _ great grandad was an amazing fighter and as he got older and it was more age—appropriate we heard about the injustices _ age—appropriate we heard about the injustices in the work he did and especially— injustices in the work he did and especially now that i have my own son it _ especially now that i have my own son it is _ especially now that i have my own son it is more important. that especially now that i have my own son it is more important.- son it is more important. that is why there _ son it is more important. that is why there is _ son it is more important. that is why there is a — son it is more important. that is why there is a big _ son it is more important. that is why there is a big push - son it is more important. that is why there is a big push for- son it is more important. that is why there is a big push for a - son it is more important. that is why there is a big push for a len johnson statue.— why there is a big push for a len johnson statue. literally last night i did a workaround _ johnson statue. literally last night i did a workaround -- _ johnson statue. literally last night i did a workaround -- walk - johnson statue. literally last night i did a workaround -- walk around j i did a workaround —— walk around town to look at possible locations. he is a hero and a manchester legend and everyone should know about him. he should _ and everyone should know about him. he should be a household name. more thanjust a statue he should be a household name. more than just a statue he is an inspiration. it's what he deserved when he was here but hopefully now we can feel like he has been appreciated and recognised. great that there will be a little
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more recognition of his life. that is someone i had not heard of until now. as we suggested at the start, the greatest boxer we had never heard of. we will be back at seven o'clock with the headlines but now it is time for the travel show. this week on the show, could ships like this be the future of more sustainable cruise holidays? it can be saving, on the energy, up to eight tonnes per day. we get a new view of an iconic skyscraper that celebrates its 90th birthday this year... welcome to new york city. ..why they can't wait to get the party started again in the bahamas... you are caught up in the rapture. ..and we share the secret to making the perfect paella in spain. mm! the golden age of sail, where tall ships ruled the seas and followed the prevailing trade
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winds around the world. the golden age of sail, where tall ships ruled the seas and followed the prevailing trade winds around the world. it ended with the advent of steam and diesel power in the mid 19th and early 20th century. but now, could we be about to enter another age of sail? this is the golden horizon, the largest tall ship in the world and the biggest of its kind ever made, today is its maiden voyage. you can see them loading on the equipment and the provisions as i talk. now, it's a journey that begins here in dover, and sees it sail on the high seas around the world for
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the next few years. in that distant pre—covid world of 2019, a record 30 million passengers worldwide took a cruise. and that figure was projected to grow — and with it, a fear of a negative impact on the environment. well, we all know what happened next. and with cruises starting to resume, we're here to see if things can be done a little differently. horn bellows so, this is the moment. the sails are coming up. well, of course, there's a grand unveiling of what is 42 sails on a five—mast boat. it's pretty incredible, actually.
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and the music, which they've composed specially, is the background to this. and i've got to be honest, it's a lovely, lovely scenario. you've got all this going on around you in the most amazing vessel. the golden horizon weighs a whopping 8,770 tonnes and took five years to be built in croatia. it's taking me on a 160—mile journey to the isle of wight, off the south coast of england, before heading to the mediterranean and croatian coast. captain, permission to come on the bridge? yes, permission granted, please. now, look at this. this is really high—tech. and yet, you're the captain of a sailing ship which has got five masts and 42 sails — it's like a combination of the old and new, right?
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yes, it is. it's not only the sails, what we need. we need the steering, we need that engine for the operation in the port. we need all this equipment to make the safe navigation of the seas. by using the sails, how much fuel are you saving? if we utilise the sails in their full power, then we are only using the generators to produce the energy we need for the, let's say, cooking, erm, lights, and so on. so, it can be even up to eight tonnes per day, saving on the energy. there are 136 cabins and suites over the ship's four decks. this won't be a cheap holiday, but what's on offer here is very different from one of your regular mass—market traditional cruises. it's obvious that this is a very complex ship to operate, and making things run smoothly takes a lot of skill and teamwork. it's all hands on deck, just to set the sails without any problems. right.
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i know it's really skilful, but is there any way that i can learn the ropes? i mean, can i have a go at doing this? well, i think it's not a problem. i think the guys are still setting the sails, so let's go! great, brilliant. ok, so that's for you. yeah. you're holding this rope. yeah. right now, are you ready? so, this guy over there is on the left side of the same sail. yes. he's pulling the left corner of the sail. and we've got to co—ordinate between the two of them? yes. you'll have to keep the same tension on both sides. 0k, we're ready. slowly, slowly — you see how slowly the sails is coming out of the yard. that's the speed that we have to give, like, very slowly. very careful. is this good? yes. god, you feel the responsibility! yes. this is the most critical bit now, is it? yes. you have to be really careful that this corner is not going to get
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into and out of lock. 0k, stop. secure! now you can be a part of the sail station. they laugh. thank you. brilliant! the wonderful thing on the small ship, and especially on a sailing ship, is that when we have a lot of wind, when we have a storm, we all need to work together and rely on each other. because sometimes, we also have to go up in the rig on these yards up there, and furl in the sail, if the semi—automatic system doesn't work. so, that creates a lot of bonding. but the only thing that counts here is your skill. so, do you think this is the future? this is true sustainability. and it's also time—proven sustainability, because sailing ships have been around for hundreds of years, and now we are coming back to something that we know already and develop it a little bit further. now, i've got one more thing to try before i head back to land... just come here. yeah.
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so, here we... 0ne leg. yeah. the other leg... ..and that is to check out the view from the top. so you're going to climb? ok, i'm going to keep this tensioned. 0k. step... step on this, all the way up. ..and then...step... ..and then... ..step. look ahead. they laugh and then, step... 0h... it's actually a lot higher than i thought. all right. i'll be honest with you... it's scary — and also gets narrower. 0k. and this is the worst bit, for sure. hold on to where, this? this one, and this one.
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this is also good to hold, because it's not slippery. and this... you might have to pull me. 0k, 0k, 0k, 0k. oh, yes! all right. victory! you got it. that... i've got to be honest with you. that was a little bit frightening. phew! well, the view was well worth it. this has been such a different experience to being on board a much bigger, more conventional modern cruise ship. and it's really hard to compare the two experiences. clearly, nobody is suggesting that sail power will take the place of engines throughout the entire cruise industry. but the golden horizon and ships like her will open up more sustainable options — and that could encourage more traditional cruise lines to up their game when it comes to things like emissions and waste, which, hopefully, could be a win for everyone. next up, we're off to spain to meet a global gourmet who claims that he has the secret to preparing the perfect paella. mm!
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a little... mm! por favor... mm! well, stay with us, because still to come on the travel show... ..the caribbean island that's determined that the party will go on... we've had dorian, and now we have covid.
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and, as we have done with every other crisis before this, we will survive. ..and the empire strikes back in time to celebrate a landmark birthday in new york. the steel is a big part of the history of the building, the fact that it was erected at a rate of four—and—a—half storeys per week. for two days every winter in nassau, the capital of the bahamas, the city's main street is traditionally transformed into a river of sound and colour. this is the festival ofjunkanoo. it has been documented in the bahamas for over 200 years. but, of course, we believe it started long before that in secret places in dark of night. the story ofjunkanoo dates back to the island's links with the transatlantic slave trade. junkanoo takes place on boxing day and the 1st of january, traditionally the only days that enslaved africans were given off during the year.
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i think of our ancestors who were in the crisis of slavery. and you are no longer owned by you. you are owned by somebody. you are classified as an animal. and in the midst of the horror and the degradation of slavery, you say to yourself, "i cannot be an animal. because when we were back home in the mother country, we had rituals and ceremonies. animals don't have those things." arlene was just four years old when she first danced in the parades, and has even transformed her childhood home into a museum devoted tojunkanoo. these are all my costumes in here from different parades. i have the hard part, because i get to dance in them and look pretty and have people
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admire me all morning. she chuckles ah, the good old days! 0ur costumes have really evolved over the years. in the old days, the costumes were made from indigenous materials — sponge, leaves, feathers, palm branches, whatever we could find. i tell the children this is sponge—bahama—bob. sponge made its way to bay street, indigenous materials on the parade. and eventually, paper came to be the main medium of costuming, which, for me, is very significant, because africans were not permitted to learn to read and write. the parade begins at the corner of george street and bay street. whenjunkanoos say, "let's go to bay!", it's a rallying cry to go to the parade. when those drums start,
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and they start to penetrate right into your chest, you are caught up in the rapture of the moment. so, you are going to hear the pounding of those drums, the shaking of the bells, and you are going to hear a variety of horns. it is the richest experience of the people of the bahamas. and i think our visitors become immersed in that same feeling of expression when they witness it. in 2019, the bahamas was struck by hurricane dorian. and the country's tourist industry has also been dealt another massive blow by the covid pandemic, forcing manyjunkanoo festivities online for the time being.
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junkanoo itself is the story of resilience. it really is a symbol of how strong and determined we are as a people. we have had dorian, and now we have covid. and, as we have done with every other crisis before this, we will survive. as we say in the bahamas, "we will bounce back." and that is just a part of "who we is", to put it in bahamian english. to end this week, we're off across the atlantic to one of america's — if not the world's — most famous skyscrapers. the empire state building in new york is celebrating its 90th birthday this year. and although it stopped being the world's tallest building back in the early 19705, there's still something iconic and powerful about this wonder of art deco design and engineering.
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well, travel to the united states is still restricted for us here in the uk, so we asked the bbc�*s laura jones, who's based in the big apple, to head to manhattan to wish the empire state a very happy birthday. of the top five tallest buildings in new york, the empire state building is by far the oldest. construction began in 1930 and was finished in just 410 days. the building really captured the imagination of hollywood and ended up playing a pretty big part in the movies itself, like in king kong...
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..the rom—com sleepless in seattle, and one of my absolute favourites, the musical on the town. even today, it's still one of the most visited attractions in new york city, usually welcoming about 4 million people every year who get to come up here and take in those beautiful views. it is amazing to witness their reaction when they step out into any of our observatories, whether it be the 86th floor or the 102nd floor. you can hear them gasp. he oversaw renovations for the brand—new observation deck on the 102nd floor, which opened a few months before the pandemic. we went into the design phase and started thinking about, "how do we get out of the way of the views?" we're able to reveal the beams. you know, the steel is a big part of the history of the building, the fact that it was erected
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at a rate of four—and—a—half storeys per week. and even though the empire state is one of the world's most recognisable buildings, it still has its fair share of secrets. this is exciting! just one floor up from the 102nd public observation deck, there's another floor that only vip guests and celebrities get to visit. wow! this is absolutely incredible. welcome to new york city! a tiny viewing balcony on the 103rd floor forms a ring around the building spire. hi there. is it good to go? yes. thank you so much. back down on the ground, there are a few other closely—guarded secrets. siobhan macshane runs an exclusive access—all—areas tour. something you may not know that we have here in the empire state building is an old, abandoned bank vault. i most enjoy bringing guests
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down here and seeing the expression of surprise. you would never imagine there being a bank vault in the empire state building. but if you can't afford the $460 price tag that comes with that tour, here's a little teaser of what you would learn. the vault is made of pure, solid steel and weighs so much that it would be almost impossible to remove it, at this point, from the basement. this actually belonged to one of our original tenants from 1931 that was on the second floor. and the bank knew that they had a lot of leverage with the building, being it the great depression, so they demanded that the building put in a bank vault for them. it looks like i'm planning how to break into it! she laughs. thousands of workers, who were known as sky boys at the time, raced to finish the construction of the building injust over a year.
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but today, there's a much smaller team on the ground keeping things running. tim dailey has worked at the building for six years. he's an engineer who keeps everything safe and running smoothly, even in its underground wind tunnel. my dad grew up in the depression, 1922. i have relatives that actually worked on this building during the construction. the wind tunnel itself is the lowest level of the empire state building, and this represents technology and workmanship in 1930. the air conditioning was just fresh air and fans. this iconic feature of the new york skyline has been thrilling tourists for 90 years. it's reopened thanks to the hard work of its staff behind the scenes during the pandemic, and it's stilljust as captivating as when it was first built.
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happy birthday to the empire state building — still looking good after 90 years. well, that's all we've got time for today. but catch us next week, if you can, when... ..mike's in kenya to meet the young performers who are limbering up to get back on stage again... cheering. ..and we're discovering some of the dark history behind one of america's biggest psychiatric hospitals, which has become a tourist attraction in its own right. so, hopefully, you can join us for that. in the meantime, don't forget, if you want to check us out online, just search for bbc travel. but for now, from me, rajan datar, and the rest of the travel show team here on the south coast of england, it's goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. 0ur headlines today: the future funding of social care — talks have been taking place this weekend ahead of a major announcement but some conservative mps are warning against tax rises . prince charles's former aide steps down from his charity role after allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. almost 50 shops a day have disappeared from our high streets — but the rate of closures has begun to slow. emma raducanu's fairytale in new york continues. the british teenager seals a place in the last 16 of the us 0pen — after a superb in her victory over sara sorribes tormo.
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it over sara sorribes tormo. seems that summer is r with it seems that summer is not finished with us yet. warm weather is on the way but there is rain to content with for some of us. all the details here on breakfast. it's sunday september 5. our main story. the future of social care in england is being discussed by the government this weekend ahead of a major announcement expected later this week. borisjohnson pledged to fix social care when he became prime minister, but he's facing growing pressure from within his party not to increase national insurance contributions to pay for the plans. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, there's no easy answers on this one. good morning. how or should the government intervened to stop people in england having to sell their own
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homes, potentially, in orderto in england having to sell their own homes, potentially, in order to fund social care. there should be some sort of cap, a maximum amount over a lifetime that we would have to pay towards our social care and if that is put in place, how is it funded? it will be expensive. this morning i have been looking at some of the promises that borisjohnson has made. he said he would try to sort out social care and in the coming days we may get some sort of plan on that. he also said that he wanted a cross—party consensus and that he would not put up income to, vat or national insurance and it is thought that national insurance could be put up that national insurance could be put up to pay for it. national insurance is a tax on earning not paid above the state pension age or state earnings or on investment income and it means that some critics are saying that, well, is this fair? is it fair that younger people and also relatively poorer people will bear a
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bigger burden? the former conservative prime ministerjohn major says no, it is regressive and it will lean on the poor disproportionately. labour are saying something similar as well. an almighty row to kick off the new political season as mp5 return here to westminster in the next day or two. . ~' , ., to westminster in the next day or two. ., ,, i. to westminster in the next day or two. ., ,, . to westminster in the next day or two. ., . ,. two. thank you so much, chris. we will hear more _ two. thank you so much, chris. we will hear more on _ two. thank you so much, chris. we will hear more on that _ two. thank you so much, chris. we will hear more on that from - two. thank you so much, chris. we will hear more on that from the - will hear more on that from the national care association in a few minutes. the chief executive of one of prince charles' charities has temporarily stepped down following newspapers allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. michael fawcett is a fomer aide to the prince. here's more from our royal correspondent, jonny dymond. michael fawcett was once of prince charles's closest aides, a man whom the prince relied upon to guide and organise his personal life. three years ago he became chief executive of the prince's foundation, an umbrella group for a number of prince charles's charitable interests. newspaper reports allege that mr fawcett offered to assist
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a wealthy saudi national and major donor to the foundation with citizenship and with an honour. he received an honorary cbe in late 2016. 0ne palace source stressed the distance between prince charles's office and his foundation but michael fawcett is renowned for his closeness to prince charles and this is an embarrassment for the prince. the foundation said it took the allegations seriously and the matter is under investigation. the foundation failed to respond to a number of other allegations raised by the newspapers. taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul. the group say the taliban targeted them with tear gas and pepper spray as they tried to walk from a bridge to the presidential palace. the women were calling for the right to work
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and to be included in the government. but the taliban say the protest got out of control. an investigation is under way after a plane crashed at the bournemouth air festival, leaving two people injured. images shared on social media show the small wing—walker aircraft partially submerged in poole harbour after plunging into the sea. police say the two people rescued from the water suffered only minor injuries. home office officials have admitted that long immigration queues on friday at heathrow airport were unacceptable. passengers had to wait several hours and some were reported to have fainted. the airport has blamed the uk border force for not providing enough staff. more than 8,000 chain stores disappeared from high streets, shopping centres and retail parks across britain in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent,
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emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london but now one of the hardest hit. oxford street littered with boarded—up shops. city centres have suffered the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot closed down that's what we've noticed. it is not as crowded as it used to be. coming to central london it is unexpected to - see how affected they aree. new figures show the scale of upheaval. in the first half of this year, 3488 chain stores opened. these include everything from gyms and cafe's to banks and bars. but more than 8700 of them closed, making a net loss of more than 5200 outlets. these figures are stark but they are not quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, retail parks and out—of—town shopping has fed best.
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so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months, city centres will start to liven up again as people begin to return to work as schools go back and people spend more time in the cities. however, i don't think you will get the same level of footfall in city centres as before and in retail parks they arejust more convenient for many of us. this bakery chain definitely prefers the high street. it is opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches. i think that people are eating better food more often and more often at home. 0pening an extra store and being able to expand at a time where rent is low and there is opportunity for us to rethink what a bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for so many towns and city centres. they are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic.
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after 11 days of extraordinary sporting achievement by disabled athletes from 162 countries, the 2020 tokyo paralympics come to a close later today. 0ur correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, is in tokyo for us this morning. what's the feeling there now about the olympic and paralympic experience? is it being judged as a success? i think there are mixed feelings here about all of the olympics and the paralympics. 0n the field, in the paralympics. 0n the field, in the arenas, in the main national stadium behind me we have all seen and experienced these tremendous sporting achievements. too many to mention. i saw the chinese swimmer who lost his arms as a child, he won four gold medals and
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several new records. dame sarah story has now become the greatest paralympian of all time with 17 gold medals and 27 overall, what an amazing hall. and there have been so many more. inside the arena it has been a huge success and sports fans all over the world have enjoyed it. out here, as you may see, i am 0ut here, as you may see, i am across the street from the main stadium and there is an enormous fence around it and that symbolises how everybody has been out. no spectator in any stadium during the olympics all the paralympics and 0lympics all the paralympics and because of that and because of the situation with covid here in tokyo and across japan there has been a sense of separateness. that this has been completely separate from the ordinary people who, in the end, have paid for it and have not been able to take part in it in the way they would have hoped. it is able to take part in it in the way they would have hoped. it is fair to sa that they would have hoped. it is fair to say that there _ they would have hoped. it is fair to say that there was _ they would have hoped. it is fair to say that there was a _ they would have hoped. it is fair to say that there was a sense - they would have hoped. it is fair to say that there was a sense of - say that there was a sense of cynicism, a little bit off, you
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know, not necessarily resentment but just a bit of, you know, a negative attitude of people locally there towards it, at least initially. has that changed? have the people in japan warmed to it? then;r that changed? have the people in japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the _ japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the sport _ japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the sport and _ japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the sport and i _ japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the sport and i think - japan warmed to it? they certainly warm to the sport and i think we i japan warmed to it? they certainly i warm to the sport and i think we saw that beginning during the olympics at the end ofjuly and the beginning of august. that as, especially seeing japan do well in the olympics and then do very well in the paralympics as well, in previous 0lympics paralympics as well, in previous olympics and the paralympics at rio and london, japan did not win a single gold medal. if i check my notes here, japan has won 12 gold medals and 47 overall in the paralympic games, coming 11 overall. that has really, you know, it has caused an uplift in enthusiasm for these games with the local crowds. 0n the other hand at the same time we saw this astonishing explosion of
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covid with the delta variant arriving here injapan injuly and, cases growing very rapidly over the last few weeks. to a stage now where hospitals here in tokyo are under tremendous pressure. there are thousands of sick people who cannot get a hospital bed and that is resentment not at the games, resentment not at the games, resentment at the government and resentment at the government and resentment at the prime minister his popularity is really rock bottom and on friday he announced he will step down. so that is the political cost of how the government he has handled covid—19 while pushing ahead with the olympics and paralympics. so from highflying athletes in tokyo, have a look at these pictures. a low—flying pilot in an italian pilot has proved he's got nerves of steel, afterflying his plane through two tunnels — and breaking a world record in the process. after a year of planning, dario costa finally managed to put his training to the test in turkey yesterday — reaching a top speed of 150 miles per hour while remaining just one metre above the ground.
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that is not a single tunnel, it was two, all the way through. i think most people would probably not want to get around like that anywhere. but... a great achievement. you would certainly beat the traffic. he looks pleased with himself as well. as you would be.— as you would be. now, it is 12 minutes past _ as you would be. now, it is 12 minutes past seven _ as you would be. now, it is 12 minutes past seven and - as you would be. now, it is 12 minutes past seven and we i as you would be. now, it is 12| minutes past seven and we are promised that things are looking a little brighter. if you think summer is over, it is not, right? good morning. that is exactly what we are looking out over the next few days. during august, temperatures never reach higher than 27.2 degrees and we are expected to see a temperature higher than that during the next few
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days of september. it is a fairly promising start for many of us this morning with a little sunshine around. a warmer day for many today but there is some range of content with across the north—west of the uk thanks to this stripe of cloud here on our earlier sunlight picture. that is already starting to bring the odd spot of drizzle across the west of scotland. mist mccann low cloud elsewhere, much of which will clear from across england and wales to leave sunny spells through the afternoon although we will stay murky off some of these coasts of south—west england. the northern ireland and scotland, that thick cloud will bring an outbreak of rain and the wind will also start to strengthen. for many of us, a warmer day than we saw yesterday. 20 degrees for glasgow, for newcastle, 44 in cardiff, somewhere in the south could get to 26 degrees this afternoon. we could see the odd shower across southern areas in the majority here will stay dry. where we have rained further north it will
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push southwards across northern ireland and scotland into northern england overnight. please spells to the south but with mist and fog developing, some of which will be quite dense on a warm night and a mild and muggy start to tomorrow morning. this band of cloud and rain will fizzle as we go through the day but northern areas will be left with a lot of cloud whereas further south we should see sunshine, murky still for western coasts of south—west england and south wales. highest temperatures in the south at this stage reaching 27, 20 eight degrees, potentially in a little warmer than it has been in the northern parts as well. and it is certainly the trend for the middle of the week. i pressured to the east of us bringing a southerly wind and that will bathe us all in this relatively warm air. you can see that orange colour spreading right across the chart and we really will feel the effects of that through tuesday and wednesday. tuesday will bring sunshine for the vast majority, a little cloudy because the far north of scotland but the temperatures, 24 in glasgow, 28 maybe 29 down towards the south.
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so, yes, warmer weather than we saw at any point during august. a similar day for many on wednesday, hinting that by this stage we could start to see showers and thunderstorms pushing from the south—west. again, temperatures reaching 29 degrees potentially. the showers and storms in the south—west do show the first signs of bringing us something a little more unsettled for the end of the week so you can see that there will be rain in the picture at this stage in the temperature lower than it would have been around mid week, still, not doing badly for this time of year. considering that we now move deeper into september, there is some surprising warmth on the way for the next few days. that is all from me for now. . , �* next few days. that is all from me for now. ., , �* ., , for now. earlier, my ben was bull in: for now. earlier, my ben was bullying you _ for now. earlier, my ben was bullying you about _ for now. earlier, my ben was bullying you about the - for now. earlier, my ben was bullying you about the fact i for now. earlier, my ben was i bullying you about the fact that for now. earlier, my ben was - bullying you about the fact that it was only one or two days of summer and thenjust before was only one or two days of summer and then just before this forecast he was stealing your weather lines. if you want to make a formal complaint, iam happy if you want to make a formal complaint, i am happy to be a witness. one ban against the other.
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i know which ben im siding with. you can contribute rather than me stealing your lines. all of this is because the wind direction has changed? because the wind direction has chanced? , , , , because the wind direction has chanced? , , ,, changed? yes, high pressure was sittin: to changed? yes, high pressure was sitting to the _ changed? yes, high pressure was sitting to the west _ changed? yes, high pressure was sitting to the west and _ changed? yes, high pressure was sitting to the west and that - changed? yes, high pressure was| sitting to the west and that brings us a northerly wind so it is never going to get particularly warm but now the hype has shifted to the east it is a southerly wind. you think where it is coming from? spain, portugal, africa if you trace it back. those are all very warm places. no surprise that is bringing warm air in our direction. it places. no surprise that is bringing warm air in our direction.— warm air in our direction. it proves i do warm air in our direction. it proves ido -a warm air in our direction. it proves i do pay attention, _ warm air in our direction. it proves i do pay attention, ben. _ warm air in our direction. it proves i do pay attention, ben. i- warm air in our direction. it proves i do pay attention, ben. i would i i do pay attention, ben. i would 'oin ou i do pay attention, ben. i would join you later — i do pay attention, ben. i would join you later for _ i do pay attention, ben. i would join you later for more - i do pay attention, ben. i would join you later for more fun - i do pay attention, ben. i would join you later for more fun and l join you later for more fun and bullying. join you later for more fun and bull inc. ., .,, , returning to our main story now. the government's expected to reveal this week its plans to bridge the gap in funding for social care. there are reports it's
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looking at increasing national insurance contributions to pay for it — but there's been strong criticism from some to that proposal. we'rejoined byjoyce pinfield who's the vice—chair of the national care association. i wonderfirst of i wonder first of all you mightjust outline some of the challenges you as an industry face and perhaps if this extra money, if it is forthcoming, where it will be spent. social care has indeed been waiting a very, very long time for social care reform. we have had a crisis for many years now. this is well documented prior to the pandemic and so during the pandemic, we did feel that we were left. we accepted people from hospital who then tested positive for covid which then brought covid into our services. and then, of course, we could not get any ppe. ppe was being sent purely to the nhs. no battling through this
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pandemic has been a real challenge on top of what we were already facing within the industry. the industry, we were already facing over 112,000 vacancies. that has just exacerbated. the staff we have got, they have been working tirelessly through this pandemic. and our staff are greatly undervalued. we need to really value our staff and be able to pay them a proper living wage. and so we do need a sensual care reform. we need funding. not only for the future, we need funding now. you funding. not only for the future, we need funding now.— need funding now. you say it is a long-awaited _ need funding now. you say it is a long-awaited funding _ need funding now. you say it is a long-awaited funding and - need funding now. you say it is a long-awaited funding and a - long—awaited funding and a long—awaited funding and a long—awaited reform. how confident are you that this time the money will be forthcoming? brute are you that this time the money will be forthcoming?— are you that this time the money will be forthcoming? we have been there before _ will be forthcoming? we have been there before hoping _ will be forthcoming? we have been there before hoping that _ will be forthcoming? we have been there before hoping that various i there before hoping that various things have been coming from
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government and policies that would help to reform social care because of all the problems that we are facing. we need properfunding because we have to remember that social care looks after everyone. it is notjust one section of society. we never know when we're going to need social care ourselves so we do need social care ourselves so we do need to have a good sustainable service that can cope with everybody that has their needs of social care so we do need to be able to recruit people, value our certain workers. brexit also hasn't helped. we need to put social care workers on the shortage occupation list. there has been a movement so that we can bring in senior carers however that does not help the carers who are on the ground doing the work, at the lower levels. we need those carers and to
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be paying them a proper wage. and so however the government policy comes, if we have a social care reform suggestions coming out this week, i dare say that will not be immediate but what we need is immediate help as well as long, sustained help. about! as well as long, sustained help. and clearl the as well as long, sustained help. and clearly the money needs to come from somewhere. the government is suggesting it could come from national insurance contributions, raising the contribution, a tax on our earnings. this is that not enough? you think that is where the money should be coming from? it depends where the government believes they should have the money from to pay for the social care however it is notjust about money. it is about the way that social care is perceived as well. so where that money comes, i don't know. but we need money into the sector to be able to look into our most —— look
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after our most vulnerable people in the society as well as we can. is extra funding enough? maybe we need is a more appropriate —— appreciation of the work that is being done by people in the social sector. what else would you like to see? ~ ., ~' sector. what else would you like to see? ~ ., ~ ., , ., ., ~' see? we would like to see our work courses valued. _ see? we would like to see our work courses valued. at _ see? we would like to see our work courses valued. at the _ see? we would like to see our work courses valued. at the moment - courses valued. at the moment throughout the pandemic we have been paying and having short—term grants help pay our staff while they are isolating but if you have staff who are isolating, we still have to look after our most vulnerable people and so we still need lots of carers to help do that and then we are faced with so many bits of regulation. i think there is well over 500 pieces of regulation that we have to comply
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with so we do need a look at how we cut having to sell their homes to pay for their care that we have any who are funded by local authorities and this is where the greatest problem is. localauthorities this is where the greatest problem is. local authorities have not got
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the cash to be able to pay a proper level of care. they are bound by legislation to give care but, unfortunately, at present, local authorities do not have enough money to give that care to the providers to give that care to the providers to be able to be a good quality service. , ., , service. need help it would be interesting — service. need help it would be interesting to _ service. need help it would be interesting to have _ service. need help it would be interesting to have a - service. need help it would be interesting to have a cat - service. need help it would be| interesting to have a cat which service. need help it would be - interesting to have a cat which was introduced affair —— a few years ago. introduced affair -- a few years aro. . introduced affair -- a few years ao. ., ., , ., introduced affair -- a few years aro. . ., .,, introduced affair -- a few years ago. that was owing to be on the care -- stop _ ago. that was owing to be on the care -- stop it— ago. that was owing to be on the care -- stop it -- _ ago. that was owing to be on the care -- stop it -- a _ ago. that was owing to be on the care -- stop it -- a cap. - ago. that was owing to be on the | care -- stop it -- a cap. hopefully care —— stop it —— a cap. hopefully people will not have to sell their
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homes to pay for their care but also this is what is needed. a direct price being for care, for local authority funded residencies. brute price being for care, for local authority funded residencies. we are crateful for authority funded residencies. we are grateful for your— authority funded residencies. we are grateful for your time _ authority funded residencies. we are grateful for your time this _ authority funded residencies. we are grateful for your time this morning. | grateful for your time this morning. inks for speaking with us. there is nothing quite like a warm and cosy local pub. but what if that snug leather chair, roaring fire and — of course — perfectly poured pint were available any time in your own garden? that dream is now a reality for enda devlin and his family — whose lockdown project of converting a disused farm shed into a traditional irish pub has produced some incredible results. just take a look.
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that looks amazing and we can now go live to the pub itself where enda joins us. you have pretty much single—handedly built yourself a pub, haven't you stop what gave you the idea? what made you decide this is something you are going to do? (audio breaks up). during the
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pandemic we decided to do it. we said a pub, we do things very quickly here. (audio breaks up). crosstalk. talk quickly here. (audio breaks up). crosstalk. ., ~ , ., , , crosstalk. talk us through the pub. this is not a — crosstalk. talk us through the pub. this is not a half-hearted _ this is not a half—hearted recreation. you have gone in on the details. �* , �* ~ , recreation. you have gone in on the details. �* a ~ , �* ~,, details. inaudible. (audio breaks up). we details. inaudible. (audio breaks up)- we decided — details. inaudible. (audio breaks up). we decided to _ details. inaudible. (audio breaks up). we decided to incorporate - details. inaudible. (audio breaksl up). we decided to incorporate them into the bar. it wasn't an easy
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task. (audio breaks up). we will ersevere task. (audio breaks up). we will persevere with — task. (audio breaks up). we will persevere with one more _ task. (audio breaks up). we will persevere with one more because l task. (audio breaks up). we will. persevere with one more because the line is a bit dodgy to you, enda. one of the thing that strikes me is you want to be there with your mates, and atmosphere and other people. this is not open to the public yet but have you got any plans to change that?— public yet but have you got any plans to change that? certainly not. we will see- — plans to change that? certainly not. we will see. it _ plans to change that? certainly not. we will see. it is _ plans to change that? certainly not. we will see. it is for _ plans to change that? certainly not. we will see. it is for friends - plans to change that? certainly not. we will see. it is for friends and - we will see. it is for friends and family only. we will see... inaudible.— family only. we will see... inaudible. ., , ., inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy. — inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy. i'm _ inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy, i'm afraid - inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy, i'm afraid so - inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy, i'm afraid so it i inaudible. enda, the line is a little dodgy, i'm afraid so it is| inaudible. enda, the line is a| little dodgy, i'm afraid so it is a bit difficult to hear from you but we are looking at the amazing pictures and that is quite an achievement so congratulations and dank you. sorry, the technical got in the way. i dank you. sorry, the technical got in the way-— dank you. sorry, the technical got inthewa. ,. in the way. i was expecting it to be 'ust a in the way. i was expecting it to be just a man — in the way. i was expecting it to be just a man cave — in the way. i was expecting it to be just a man cave with _ in the way. i was expecting it to be
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just a man cave with a _ in the way. i was expecting it to be just a man cave with a drinks - just a man cave with a drinks cabinet in no, this is the whole hog, isn't it? still to come on request... the bulldog is back. —— breakfast. we will be speaking to the two men responsible for restoring it to its former glory. lode responsible for restoring it to its former glory-— responsible for restoring it to its former glory. we will speak about that a little _ former glory. we will speak about that a little later. _ stay with us, headlines coming up.
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are hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. doctors are calling on the government to tackle delays to the delivery of the winter flu jab, believed to be caused by a shortage of lorry drivers. some gp surgeries in england and wales are cancelling appointments after one of the uk's largest suppliers warned of a possible two—week delay. but the government has insisted the delays should have no impact on the flu vaccination programme overall. we're joined now by dr steve mowle from the royal college of general practitioners. thank you so much forjoining us
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this morning. first of all, just to get a sense of how significant this is, what we need to address is the fact that this year, this winter, the flu vaccination programme is particularly important, isn't it? it is critical this year. we know that after 18 months of pandemic immunity levels will be low, not only for flu but for other viruses as well and our vulnerable patients need the vaccine more than ever. so our vulnerable patients need the vaccine more than ever.- vaccine more than ever. so what im act vaccine more than ever. so what impact then _ vaccine more than ever. so what impact then will _ vaccine more than ever. so what impact then will this _ vaccine more than ever. so what impact then will this delay - vaccine more than ever. so what impact then will this delay have | impact then will this delay have both on the workload for gps and on patients themselves?— patients themselves? firstly, for man of patients themselves? firstly, for many of us. _ patients themselves? firstly, for many of us. my _ patients themselves? firstly, for many of us, my surgery, - patients themselves? firstly, for many of us, my surgery, we - patients themselves? firstly, for - many of us, my surgery, we received an e—mail on friday saying that the vaccine will be delayed for one week or two weeks and the e—mail said either do not book patients until it has been confirmed when they will deliver. for many practices they may say, well, we are waiting until the
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vaccine is physically in our building before we book patients and that can lead to a further 1— two week delay. it could as much as a four—week delay getting many surgeries will have booked in hundreds and thousands of patients already for a clinic, expecting the supply chain to just work. and for those practices that are actually cancelling patients and their not being able to rearrange them straightaway because we do not know for sure when the vaccine will arrive is chaos. it is an emotional thing not only for the practice staff but for the patients as well because they do not know what is going on and many of these patients will be dependent on neighbours, relatives, friends, volunteers to bring them in for their flu relatives, friends, volunteers to bring them in for theirflu jab. it is not as easy as just snapping your fingers and saying, have yourjob tomorrow. i fingers and saying, have your 'ob tomorrow. , , fingers and saying, have your 'ob tomorrow.— fingers and saying, have your 'ob tomorrow. , , ., , ., ., tomorrow. i suppose what you are sa in: is tomorrow. i suppose what you are saying is that. — tomorrow. i suppose what you are saying is that, actually, _ tomorrow. i suppose what you are saying is that, actually, the - tomorrow. i suppose what you are saying is that, actually, the wider| saying is that, actually, the wider impact of this delay is far greater
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thanit impact of this delay is far greater than it would appear from the fact that it than it would appear from the fact thatitis than it would appear from the fact that it is just one or two weeks. for sure. that it is just one or two weeks. forsure. it that it is just one or two weeks. for sure. it could end up being even three orfour week delay for sure. it could end up being even three or four week delay and that is quite significant.— quite significant. another department _ quite significant. another department of _ quite significant. another department of health - quite significant. another| department of health and quite significant. another - department of health and social quite significant. another _ department of health and social care says that it is just a delay by one or two weeks and they say it should not have an impact the flu vaccination programme overall. what do you make of the of the department?— do you make of the of the department? do you make of the of the deartment? , , ., , ., department? gps will always do their ve best department? gps will always do their very best for — department? gps will always do their very best for their _ department? gps will always do their very best for their patients _ department? gps will always do their very best for their patients and - department? gps will always do their very best for their patients and we i very best for their patients and we will do everything we can do to get the programme back on track. but ministers do need to realise how important this is an pull out all the stops to get the disruption sorted out quickly so that we definitely know when supplies will arrive, so that we can get on with thejob. we do need their arrive, so that we can get on with the job. we do need their help and we understand that transport networks are under strain but we do not have that i do not know of
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anything else more important to deliver than flu vaccine so we wonder whether priority is. surely we can get the lorries and the drivers to deliver these vaccines on time. i literally cannot think of anything else that could be more important to be delivered at this time. ~ . ., ., important to be delivered at this time. ~ .., ., ., , time. we will come to the transport issues in a — time. we will come to the transport issues in a moment _ time. we will come to the transport issues in a moment but, _ time. we will come to the transport issues in a moment but, briefly, i issues in a moment but, briefly, what is the advice to any patient out there who has an appointment already booked or is worried about getting one booked in for the flu jab? getting one booked in for the flu “ab? , getting one booked in for the flu 'ab?g , ., ., 4' getting one booked in for the flu “ab? , ., ., jab? just look out for communications - jab? just look out for| communications from jab? just look out for - communications from your jab? just look out for _ communications from your practice. we generally use mass text. we will phone patients if they do not have a mobile phone with text. we will be in touch. do not panic. this will happen. as i say there is nothing more important than doctors and nurses and our teams, that they could be doing than preventing a serious illness like the flu. we will get these jobs out as soon as we possibly can and please be a
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little patient with us. we may need to rearrange some appointments. some appointments may be able to go ahead some suppliers may be fine. if you have an appointment, go to it. thank ou, have an appointment, go to it. thank you. steve- — the flu vaccine isn't the only item delayed by a shortage of lorry drivers. in recent weeks, supermarket shelves have also borne the brunt of the supply issues. so how are retailers coping? karl mercer has been finding out. they are not perhaps the images we have become used to. the shelves at the supermarket in west london were being topped up this morning. is this he was brisk. but things are getting trickier. the boss has started to no changes. suppliers unable to provide a definite date for delivery. is a small chain they cope at the moment. the lack of delivery drivers is just the latest issue. delivery drivers is 'ust the latest issue. ~ ., ., , ., �* issue. we thought we only had brexit to contend with _ issue. we thought we only had brexit to contend with and _ issue. we thought we only had brexit to contend with and then _ issue. we thought we only had brexit to contend with and then we - issue. we thought we only had brexit to contend with and then we had - to contend with and then we had covid to contend with and now we
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have to navigate brexit and covid. and, yes, with some of the topical challenges of the day, things like the labour shortages and driver shortages it does have an impact on business. ~ ,., , shortages it does have an impact on business. ~ , ., business. about ten miles away in izteckenham _ business. about ten miles away in beckenham there _ business. about ten miles away in beckenham there is _ business. about ten miles away in beckenham there is a _ business. about ten miles away in beckenham there is a similar- business. about ten miles away in | beckenham there is a similar story with a different product. the driver shortage adding to general supply problems here, as well.— shortage adding to general supply problems here, as well. normally we have a lot of — problems here, as well. normally we have a lot of spider-man _ problems here, as well. normally we have a lot of spider-man but - problems here, as well. normally we have a lot of spider-man but this - problems here, as well. normally we have a lot of spider-man but this is l have a lot of spider—man but this is all we have and we cannot get any more. don't know why we cannot get any more spider—man at the moment. there is a new film being released and this is a new character and we're still waiting for the product. brown has to chase the players all, calls she would not necessarily have made before. calls she would not necessarily have made before-— calls she would not necessarily have made before. ,, ~ , , .., ., made before. stocking is becoming an issue for us- — made before. stocking is becoming an issue for us. everyday _ made before. stocking is becoming an issue for us. everyday items _ made before. stocking is becoming an issue for us. everyday items from - issue for us. everyday items from dolls figures to dolls houses is
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becoming a problem, getting the stocking or getting adecco —— guarantee that we would get it for christmas. we are having to plan a bit more and get stock in as and when we can. we bit more and get stock in as and when we can-— bit more and get stock in as and when we can. we deserve a huge christmas — when we can. we deserve a huge christmas this _ when we can. we deserve a huge christmas this year _ when we can. we deserve a huge christmas this year and _ when we can. we deserve a huge christmas this year and our - when we can. we deserve a huge i christmas this year and our concerns are that _ christmas this year and our concerns are that unless we solve the short term driver— are that unless we solve the short term driver crisis we will have a reat— term driver crisis we will have a real challenge with logistics at christmas. real challenge with logistics at christmas-— real challenge with logistics at christmas. ., christmas. more urgent action has been called _ christmas. more urgent action has been called for _ christmas. more urgent action has been called for to _ christmas. more urgent action has been called for to help. _ christmas. more urgent action has been called for to help. we - christmas. more urgent action has been called for to help. we have i been called for to help. we have nearly 100,000 _ been called for to help. we have nearly 100,000 shortages - been called for to help. we have nearly 100,000 shortages of. been called for to help. we have i nearly 100,000 shortages of lorry drivers. food is not getting on shelves, mcdonald's can no longer serve their milkshake because they cannot get the ingredients and this isjust cannot get the ingredients and this is just the start unless we see serious action. for isjust the start unless we see serious action.— isjust the start unless we see serious action. for now, terry and his team in _ serious action. for now, terry and his team in chelsea _ serious action. for now, terry and his team in chelsea and _ serious action. for now, terry and his team in chelsea and vicki - serious action. for now, terry and his team in chelsea and vicki and | his team in chelsea and vicki and her is beckenham are coping. both have to work harder to keep their shelves stacked. that was karl mercer reporting. and we are joined now by alex veitch from the trade association
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logistics uk. good morning to you and good to see you. can you clarify for us once and for all, what is causing this shortage of drivers? i’m for all, what is causing this shortage of drivers? i'm sorry to hear of the _ shortage of drivers? i'm sorry to hear of the disruption _ shortage of drivers? i'm sorry to hear of the disruption being - shortage of drivers? i'm sorry to i hear of the disruption being caused to pharmaceutical providers and to business in your report this morning. the reason is twofold. mainly it is covid so, in a given year about 70,000 people take a test to become a hdv driver. so there have been 45,000 fewer tests for people to become hgv drivers and we need that because on an annual basis there is always those who leave and join the industry. and this is because under understandable and correct covid safe rules it has not been possible to sit an examiner with somebody in the cab of the truck to take the test. so that is
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the short—term issue and that is why we asked government to bump up the testing and temporarily allow trained safe and highly competent eu nationals to work in the uk for a period of time to help cover the disruption we see at the moment. bind disruption we see at the moment. and what is involved in taking that test? i wonder how long it takes to clear some of the backlog. talk me through the process of getting a license and how long it can take to get people we need through the system. in get people we need through the s stem. . , get people we need through the s stem. ., , ., «i , system. in a nutshell it takes an hint system. in a nutshell it takes anything from _ system. in a nutshell it takes anything from a _ system. in a nutshell it takes anything from a few- system. in a nutshell it takes anything from a few weeks, i system. in a nutshell it takes| anything from a few weeks, if system. in a nutshell it takes - anything from a few weeks, if you have an intensive course to a few months when you combine that with on—the—job training, ideally with somebody until you are absolutely competent and confident in the person taking the wheel. our members talk about sex— nine—month period in total to take somebody from a car to all kinds of hgv vehicles. on average costs around £3500 but we
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know that employers and driver agencies are willing to cover those costs for the most part but also, some people self fund and we have apprenticeship schemes that help to cover those costs as well. to answer your question, we calculate that it will take until around spring 2022 to clear through the backlog of all the missed tests and get the new candidates through the system. i spoke to many drivers over the last few weeks, covering this on the business desk and they tell me there is also a reputational, an image problem for the industry and there are also problems with terms and conditions, things have changed the make it less attractive to enter the business bed tax rules or how they are treated by retailers. some of them are not paid if they are not driving or they are held in a queue. how do you start to address some of those fundamental issues that mean that people just do not want to be a driver? that people 'ust do not want to be a driver? ~ ., . . , that people 'ust do not want to be a driver? ~ ., .. , ., driver? well, we accept that the reputation _ driver? well, we accept that the reputation of — driver? well, we accept that the
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reputation of the _ driver? well, we accept that the reputation of the industry - driver? well, we accept that the| reputation of the industry should driver? well, we accept that the - reputation of the industry should be better. our members are working extremely hard to ensure that their teeth and sees are as good as they can be and working with customers, whether they are retailers or other customers to improve driver facilities as well but we do accept that there is a reputational challenge here that we are working on. what i would say is that we do see wages rise so the average wage of a class one driver is £36,000, comfortably above the national average but, of course, it is not all about money and we do need to see drivers treated with the respect that they deserve and we saw in the first covid lockdown that hgv drivers worked throughout that most tricky and difficult part of the whole pandemic, delivering for everybody and we want to see drivers valued and treated with respect by everybody in society and, thankfully, that may well mean
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paying them more money, of course, treating them better as well. inevitably whenever we hear of problems with staffing, whatever the industry or whatever the job we start away look at linking automation. how far away from driverless trucks are we?- automation. how far away from driverless trucks are we? some way awa from driverless trucks are we? some way away from driverless _ driverless trucks are we? some way away from driverless trucks, - driverless trucks are we? some way away from driverless trucks, i - driverless trucks are we? some way| away from driverless trucks, i would say. there are trials of what is called platooning where you can run trucks together up and down trunk roads but you have to remember that these are very high—tech pieces of kit and the trucks are very expensive, the stuff inside is expensive, the stuff inside is expensive, safety is paramount and thatis expensive, safety is paramount and that is why there are strict limits on the number of hours that somebody can drive on a given day, for example. it is very difficult to match the technology to the safety regulation but this may well be something for the future. great to talk to you. _ something for the future. great to talk to you, alex, _ something for the future. great to talk to you, alex, thank _ something for the future. great to talk to you, alex, thank you - something for the future. great to talk to you, alex, thank you for i talk to you, alex, thank you for talking to us this morning. let's
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have a look now at sports with gavin. gavin, the headlines earlier, i love your pronunciation of sara's name. you said it like an authentic native enrolled dors. ijust heard the commentary do that so i thought i would try to do it and imitated as best i could. she was defeated by emma, the golden girl of british tennis at the moment. three months ago, not many people would have heard of her. she was below 300 in the rankings and now she could be the next hour of the future, that is what many people are saying. —— next star of the future. britain's emma raducanu is through to the fourth round of the us open after a superb display in new york. she swept aside spain's sara sorribes tormo in straight sets to reached the last 16 in new york as stuart pollitt reports. in her run to the fourth round at wimbledon, emma showed promise, showed potential. but this was on another level. this was about power.
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the spanish competitor is raking to number 41 in the spanish competitor is raking to number41 in the the spanish competitor is raking to number 41 in the world but she struggled to win a point, let alone a game against the british teenager. emma, ranked 150 in the world, took the first set 6—0. s, emma, ranked150 in the world, took the first set 6-0.— emma, ranked 150 in the world, took the first set 6-0._ she i the first set 6-0. a demolition. she had a matchpoint _ the first set 6-0. a demolition. she had a matchpoint for _ the first set 6-0. a demolition. she had a matchpoint for a _ the first set 6-0. a demolition. she had a matchpoint for a faultless - had a matchpoint for a faultless double bagel victory. she did not take that but responded the next game to close out a 6—0, 6—1win. she was expecting the excitement of the last 16 match with top seed — barty but the australian lost to america's shelby rogers who could barely believe what she had achieved. something that emma can relate to. a new star is shining in new york. what a run so far. scotland managed to hang on for all three points — they beat moldova 1—0 in their world cup qualifier. a first half goal from lyndon dykes was just enough to clinch the win,
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but with multiple chances wasted it made for a tense second half. scotland are now up to third in group f, ahead of tuesday's match against austria. the paralympics closing ceremony takes place later today in tokyo. paralympics gb have had a really successful games, ending second on the medal table with 41 golds and 124 medals in total. the final of which was won by krysten coombs as he took bronze in the men's sh6 badminton singles. coombs is ranked 5th in the world says he is "shocked and overwhelmed" to be taking home a medal. there was also a bronze for the great britain wheelchair basketball team who beat spain. following the disappointment of losing to japan in friday's semi—final gb had to raise their game one more time when they trailed at half time but they came back to win by 68 points to 58. europe take a 3 point lead over the usa, into the second day of the solheim cup in ohio. the usa went into the competition as favourites, but europe dominated the opening foursomes,
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winning three of the four matches. the scandinavian pairing of anna nordqvist and matilda castren then went on to win their afternoon four—balls as well. europe are 5.5—2.5 points ahead. rohit sharma's century helped india seize the advantage on day three of the fourth test at the oval. sharma brought up his ton with this huge six as india started to take control of the match. but england fought back with the new ball, ollie robinson's two late wickets have given them hope. bad light brought play to an early finish with india on 270 for 3, that's a lead of 171 runs. all to play for today. england's women lost the second of their t20 internationals against new zealand at hove which means the sides will battle it out in a decider on thursday. new zealand captain sophie devine hit a quick half century as her side eventually won with 4 wickets and 10 balls to spare. max verstappen and lewis hamilton are back on the front row together for today's dutch grand prix for the first time since they collided at the british grand prix injuly.
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verstappen delighted the seventy thousand fans who packed into the zandvoort circuit on the netherlands coast by claiming his sixth pole in seven races. but hamilton, who leads the championship byjust three points, was less than four hundredths of a second behind the dutchman. max did an amazing lap and i was so close. i was trying to catch him. obviously we yesterday's session, missed. they did a little bit difficult but i gave absolutely everything and he did a fantastic lap and deserves a pole position. there was an incredible finish to the big game in super league last night, with top—of—the—table catalans dragons beating st helens 31—30 in newcastle. the french side had been trailing by 18 points with less than 5 minutes remaining, before scored three times in the dying moments to level the scores. james maloney then kicked a long range drop goal to win
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the game in overtime. the victory secures catalans the league leaders shield for the first time. josh warrington's rematch with mauricio lara ended in a technical draw after the mexican suffered a huge cut above his left eye following a clash of heads in the second round. the ringside doctor waved off the bout as lara's corner were unable to stem the bleeding from his gaping wound. it was a major disappointment for both fighters after a pulsating start in front of a partisan crowd in leeds. lara won theirfight in february to take the ibf world featherweight title. can't show you too much detail because it is a nasty little gash. also, you didn't have the same authenticity of pronunciation with lara. i authenticity of pronunciation with lara. ., ., ., lara. i thought i would go with the or anglicised _ lara. i thought i would go with the or anglicised version _ lara. i thought i would go with the or anglicised version of _ lara. i thought i would go with the or anglicised version of it - lara. i thought i would go with the or anglicised version of it and - or anglicised version of it and wanted to sound a bit more authentic with our little package there. not doing myself any favours. someone has been to spanish school. i don't know any spanish. time for this week's edition of click.
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we will be back at 8:00am at the headlights. —— with the headlines. hey, welcome to click! we are back after a summer of silliness. i hope you managed to have some kind of break yourself. i tell you, the best thing about being back on this sofa for me is i get to see my good mate, back in her box! it's been weeks since we've done it like this, isn't it? how's your summer been, how are you? oh, it's good to be back and it's lovely to see you too. and my summer has been good, thank you. i've spent two hours a day working out, which is my idea of a break. i know, i've seen your instagram, you've been
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hitting it hard! hmm. what have you been up to? i've been exercising my brain, i've been trying these, um, interactive puzzle books which i've become a bit of a fan of. on each page there's some sort of weird puzzle here and once you've worked out what's going on, you scan the qr code and it takes you to a website and tells you whether you're right or not. and that, ladies and gentlemen, is my idea of fun. goodness, and you must be cleverer than ever now? dangerously intelligent, that's me. but anyway, it's back to business now, and september means back to school. and hopefully the kids are going to get a whole year in the classroom. yeah, but because the last 18 months have been so disrupted, schools and kids now face a big challenge — and that's the fact that every child has had a different level of schooling and has different gaps in their education. but, it looks like machine learning might be able to help with the children's learning. four years ago we visited a school which had started using century al to bolster their teaching. this is software that assesses students as they learn, finding where the gaps are, and prompting them
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with teaching materials that suit their needs. what it will do is we track all your behaviours, and your mouse movements and how you learn. have they paused, are they scrolling up or down, what words are they looking at, how long are the words, has the child been guessing, have they been skipping, are they hesitating, have they taken longer to answer this question versus another one? well, you know if you know how long it takes for them to read across different subjects. so it's trying to analyse and learn how the student is behaving across the content. and the really clever part is that it tracks learning across subjects, so it can differentiate between a student who is struggling with a mathematical equation, and one who's struggling with how the maths question is posed. in that case it may suggest more literacy tasks. when the pandemic hit, software like this became increasingly important as students were forced
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to learn from home. and during the first lockdown, united learning, one of the largest groups of schools in england, introduced another adaptive learning platform to 46 of their secondary schools. sparx maths has thousands and thousands of questions and thousands and thousands of hours of exemplification as well — videos explaining how to do certain operations. now, that means that no teacher ever has to sit down and work out a specific set of questions for specific children to do, �*cause the software understands at what point of learning those children are at. and also it marks those questions so the teacher doesn't have to sit for hours marking them in a book and correcting them as well, which i know from personal experience, can consume your entire life. over the past 18 months we've all needed as much help as we could get as our kids have flipped between school and home learning and we've flopped into bed each night exhausted after being parents, teachers and workers. for some children, learning at home has helped them to blossom — but for many, tech will never beat the teacher. earlier in the year, i met andria zafirakou, the best teacher in
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the universe — and that's not just according to her pupils, mind, she won the global teacher prize in 2018. the one thing that we have to bear in mind is that you know, by using technology in assessing young people, it's not as good as that 1—to—1 teacher experience, and having that 1—to—1 knowledge with a teacher willjust open up their mind a little bit more, and push them a little bit more to thinking about things which they've never thought about.
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there is no doubt that technology can be extremely beneficial in the classroom, but choices made by ai could set a direction for the rest of a child's life. and ultimately tech can only augment teachers and free up time so that they can do what they do best — teach. of course, nothing can beat physically being in the classroom, but even pre—pandemic, some students weren't able to be at school — for example, those with serious illnesses. but now, thanks to the help of some robots, some of these children might able to attend classes remotely. jen copestake's been finding out more. and can you blink your eyes? yeah, you can. that's so cool. qasim is a student at seven kings school in east london. he has a serious medical condition which means he hasn't been able to go out since the beginning of the covid pandemic, but comes to class
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instead in a robot avatar. how long have you been going to school like this, qasim? well originally, it was to do with the lockdown and everything. also i had a surgery so that was also one reason. are you recovering from the surgery now? yeah. i have the impression qasim is a brave person. you come across very well qasim. oh, thank you. laughs. is this your first time working with a robot in this way or have you done it before? oh, it has been several months already, isn't it qasim? so did theyjust say you're going to be working with a robot instead of a child? everybody was excited. there are 500 av1 robots going to school in this way across the uk and more than 1,500 in europe. it's controlled from a child's home via an app. where are you talking to us from? like, from my ipad at home. oh wow. they can control the movement of the robot on the table, it moves, it talks. it's almost like qasim is embodied in the robot do you ever put that on in the class?
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no. laughter. qasim, i'm just going to carry you to the next classroom. sure. at the end of the day, qasim is put away to charge. he's occasionally had to call his teachers to remind them to switch him on for class. there's something real about it — it's got a head, it moves, it talks. it's almost like qasim is embodied in the robot so it's brilliant! it feels absolutely fine actually. so we get quite used to it and we call the robots actually by the child's name, and because the child's voice is coming out of the robot, and they're quite often laughing and joking with us, it feels like a perfectly natural relationship — it's normal. so it's the first time i'd seen a robot interacting in this way in a classroom and it was quite unexpected. it really did feel like qasim's presence was coming through that robot, and the children in the classroom seemed to enjoy it too. the first prototype av1, 3d print, first prototype comp, which is a computer screen with a robot body. the idea of interacting with robots as avatars rather than video screens came from karen dolva and her team at no isolation in oslo.
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raspberry pi in there. camera, microphone. so if a child raises a hand, these lights will light up. these are tiny led lights. then you have the antenna for good reception. you have the 4g module in here, you have the camera board so this is what will sit in the forehead of the robot and let you actually stream. karen found her experience at university to be isolating, and difficult to make new friends. this led to a period of loneliness and depression. i at least isolated myself. i don't think i realised how much i'd pulled away from everyone else until people started literally trying to get me back, which i'm very gratefulfor today. karen started looking
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at isolation and loneliness in pensioners before redirecting attention to children in hospitals who couldn't get to class. they were using videoconferencing to get lessons, but she wanted to make a more private way. we were out observing and actually saw a reaction where a kid logged on and everyone in class is saying, like, "you're looking ill", then the kid logs off again which is heartbreaking, like, you don't want that to be the experience you have when you show up in class. qasim is now looking forward to getting back to class in person, and should be able to start again this autumn. how long have you been away from school, qasim? i left some time in february, i think. january, february sometime. then i stopped again. i haven't been in quite a long time. what's that been like to shield for such a long time? eventually, just, it's like, quite annoying i guess �*cause you can�*t do anything.
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since the pandemic, we've really been amazed by the broad range of use cases we've seen, but also we've seen an extreme rise in the level of anxiety amongst students. and just by having that window into the classroom, they gain more confidence, they're able to speak with their peers and their teachers, and the idea of returning to school becomes less daunting. what do you guys think, having qasim interacting like this? i think that it�*s good from his point of view. he's able to ask the teacher for questions if he needs help. if we didn't have this robot. then i don't think he would be getting the same education that he's getting now. - bell rings. ooh, that�*s bell which means school�*s out! that�*s it for the short version of this week�*s click. more on the full—length version of course which is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever you can find the team on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks very much for watching. class dismissed! bye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. our headlines today: the future funding of social care — talks have been taking place this weekend ahead of a major announcement, but some conservative mps are warning against tax rises. prince charles�*s former aide steps down from his charity role after allegations he used his influence to help secure an honour for a major donor. almost 50 shops a day have disappeared from our high streets, but the rate of closures has begun to slow. emma raducanu�*s fairytale
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in new york continues. the british teenager seals a place in the last 16 of the us open after a superb in her victory over sara sorribes tormo. it would seem summer is not quite done with us yet. some warmer weather on the way over the next few days, but some rain to contend with for some of us. all the on the way here on breakfast. it�*s sunday, 5th september. our main story: the future of social care in england is being discussed by the government this weekend ahead of a major announcement expected later this week. borisjohnson pledged to "fix" social care when he became prime minister, but he�*s facing growing pressure from within his party not to increase national insurance contributions to pay for the plans. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, there�*s no easy answers on this one. morning. there really aren�*t. the
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big question at the heart of this is who should pay for our care as we get older if it is going to cost us a lot of money. should we sell our houses in order to pay for it, or can actively do we pay for it through some sort of tax. the government in england is toying with this idea putting up national insurance. it is not paid on investments in order to fund social care. it was a promise from boris johnson that he would sort out social care. he also promised he would not put up national insurance so maybe he is going to break one promise in order to fulfil another. what is really interesting here, ben was having a conversation in the last hour with the national care association, and the argument was made that the sector is in crisis with more than 100,000 vacancies.
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she said brexit has not helped. she said yes, more money is needed, but it is about raising the profile of the sector and making it seem more important for people to be willing to commit to working within it. there needs to be more money now than just our longer term solution. local authorities do not have the cash _ local authorities do not have the cash to— local authorities do not have the cash to be — local authorities do not have the cash to be able to pay a proper level— cash to be able to pay a proper level of— cash to be able to pay a proper level of care. they are bound by legislation to .ive they are bound by legislation to give care. — they are bound by legislation to give care, but unfortunately, at present. — give care, but unfortunately, at present, the local authorities do not have — present, the local authorities do not have enough money to be able to .ive not have enough money to be able to give that _ not have enough money to be able to give that care to the providers to be able — give that care to the providers to be able to— give that care to the providers to be able to give a good quality service — be able to give a good quality service. then we have the people who are paying _ service. then we have the people who are paying privately and it would be interesting to have a cap.
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that idea about having a cap has been floated for a while, an upper limit on how much we as individuals have to pay for our own care over our lifetime. £50,000, £80,000, both of those figures floated. something of those figures floated. something of a backlash from conservative mps about the idea putting up national insurance, many saying it is not fair with the burden falling on younger people, those in work and it is regressive, that is the word used by sirjohn major, in other words a disproportionate amount of the burden is faced by poorer people. the new political term starting this week is already a big row rumbling on one of the biggest questions of our time. . ., on one of the biggest questions of our time. ., «i i. , . our time. thank you, chris. we will see what comes _ our time. thank you, chris. we will see what comes with _ our time. thank you, chris. we will see what comes with the _ our time. thank you, chris. we will - see what comes with the announcement expected in a few days. the chief executive of one of prince charles charities has temporarily stepped down following newspapers allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor.
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michael fawcett is a fomer aide to the prince. here is more from our royal correspondent, jonny dymond. michael fawcett was once one of prince charles because my closest aides, a man who the prince relied on to guide and organise his personal life. three years ago he became chief executive of the prince was my foundation, an umbrella group for a number of prince charles was my charitable interests. newspaper reports allege that mr fossett offered to assist a wealthy saudi national and major donor to the principles mac foundation with citizenship and with an honour. he received an honorary cbe in late 2016. one palace source stressed the distance between prince charles? office and his foundation, but michael fawcett is renowned for his closeness to prince charles and this is an embarrassment for the prince. the foundation said it took the
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allegations very seriously and that the matter is under investigation. the foundation failed to respond to a number of other allegations raised by the newspapers. taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul. the group say the taliban targeted them with tear gas and pepper spray as they tried to walk from a bridge to the presidential palace. the women were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government, but the taliban say the protest got out of control. home office officials have admitted that long immigration queues on friday at heathrow airport were unacceptable. passengers had to wait several hours and some were reported to have fainted. the airport has blamed the uk border force for not providing enough staff. an investigation is underway after a plane crashed at the bournemouth air festival leaving two people injured. images shared on social media show the small wing—walker aircraft partially submerged in poole harbour after plunging into the sea. police say the two people rescued
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from the water suffered only minor injuries. more than 8,000 chain stores disappeared from high streets, shopping centres and retail parks across britain in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london, but now one of the hardest hit. oxford street littered with boarded up shops. city centres have suffered the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot closed down, we have noticed, that is what we have noticed walking along. it is not as crowded as it used to be. it is quite unexpected to come into central london and actually see how effected they are by the pandemic. it's the same in brighton, | loads of shops have gone. new figures show the scale of upheavel. in the first part of this year, 3,488 chain stores opened.
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these include everything from gyms and cafes to banks and bars. but more than 8,700 of them closed, meaning a net loss of more than 5,200 outlets. these figures are stark, but they are not quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, it�*s retail parks and out—of—town shopping that have fared best. so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months, city centres will start to liven up again as people start to go back to work and schools go back and people spend more time in cities. however, i don�*t think you are going to get the same level of footfall in city centres as before. and retail parks, they are just more convenient for us. this bakery chain definitely prefers a high street. it is just opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches.
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i definitely think people are eating better food, more often and more often at home. opening the extra stores and being able to expand at a time when rents are low and there is opportunity for us to rethink even what a bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for so many of our towns and city centres, which are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic. emma simpson, bbc news, central london. after 11 days of extraordinary sporting achievement by disabled athletes from 162 countries, the 2020 tokyo paralympics come to a close later today. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has this assessment of how the games have gone down injapan. i think there are very mixed feelings here about the whole of the olympics and paralympics. on the field, in the arenas, in the main national stadium behind me here, we have all experienced and seen these tremendous
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sporting achievements. too many to mention, really. the ones that i have seen, i saw zheng tao, the chinese swimmer who lost his arms when he was a child, he has won four gold medals and won several new records. if dame sarah storey has now become the greatest paralympian of all time with 17 gold medals and i think i�*m right in saying 27 overall now. what an amazing haul. and there has been loads and loads more. so i think inside the arenas, it has been a huge success, and sports fans all over the world have got to enjoy that, but out here, as you may be able to see, i�*m standing across the street from the main stadium and there is an enormous fence around it, and that sort of symbolises how everybody has been kept out. no spectators in any of the stadiums during the olympics and also the paralympics. and because of the situation with covid here in tokyo and across japan in the last few weeks, there has been a real sense of separateness, that this has been completely separate from the ordinary
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people who, in the end, had paid for it and haven�*t been able to take part in it in the way they would have hoped. an italian pilot has proved he�*s got nerves of steel after flying his plane through two tunnels and breaking a world record in the process. after a year of planning, dario costa finally managed to put his training to the test in turkey yesterday, reaching a top speed of 150mph while remaining just one metre above the ground. it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a random world record. i think it is incredible. one metre off the ground. the two channels, flying at an average speed of 245 kilometres an hour. it took
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43 seconds to do two tunnels, then as loop the loop to celebrate. amazing. he looks chuffed, it is safe to say. he looks chuffed, it is safe to say. should all children aged between 12 and 15 be offered a covid vaccine? that�*s a question that�*s divided opinion in recent days. boris johnson is facing pressure from labour and his own backbenches over the issue. ahead of an expected decision next week, we asked two parents whether their kids should get a jab. the children aren�*t getting diseased severely, it seems, and vaccination in that age group hasn�*t had enough testing yet, in my opinion. i was very happy myself to have the vaccination, i am double—vaxxed myself, so i have got no problem with that. so the information that we received, i felt, was quite sound and i felt
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confident going ahead and doing that. but for children, i�*m just not convinced the benefits are there. i think given the chaos that coronavirus has caused to this country and how quickly it spreads and how dangerous it can be to people, i have had a relative that died of coronavirus back in february, i think anything we can do to stop it spreading and get it under control should be done. let�*s talk more about this with professor peter openshaw, who�*s a member of the government�*s advisory group on emerging viruses, but is speaking to us today in a personal capacity. good morning, peter. good morning. if we could just start first of all by summing up the basis of what the
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jcvi, the organisation advising the government on this, it is balancing the risks of covid with the risks of side—effects. the the risks of covid with the risks of side-effects— side-effects. the jcvi have a very secific side-effects. the jcvi have a very specific brief _ side-effects. the jcvi have a very specific brief of _ side-effects. the jcvi have a very specific brief ofjust _ side-effects. the jcvi have a very specific brief ofjust looking - side-effects. the jcvi have a very specific brief ofjust looking at - specific brief ofjust looking at the individual risk for the population that they are considering. it is not within their remit to consider the wider implications, and they make that very clear. they also make it very clear that they are constantly reviewing data and that�*s although at the moment is they didn�*t want to extends to the younger teenager group, they are looking at the evidence as it emerges and will continue to do so. i don�*t think they have completely closed the door on this one, at all.— on this one, at all. what do you make of your — on this one, at all. what do you make of your decision _ on this one, at all. what do you make of your decision -- - on this one, at all. what do you make of your decision -- their i make of your decision —— their decision then not to recommend this
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for all 12—15 —year—olds? it is happening elsewhere in the world. the us, israel, the netherlands, italy, they are vaccinating 12—15 —year—olds there. italy, they are vaccinating 12-15 -year-olds there.— italy, they are vaccinating 12-15 -year-olds there. yes, and i think that will bring _ -year-olds there. yes, and i think that will bring a _ -year-olds there. yes, and i think that will bring a lot _ -year-olds there. yes, and i think that will bring a lot of _ -year-olds there. yes, and i think that will bring a lot of new - that will bring a lot of new evidence that theyjcvi can continue to look at, which may well help with swinging the advice the other way. i do think it is very clear that although there are few side effects of these vaccines, the risk of getting myocarditis if you have covid is about six times greater. there�*s something about the spike protein which inflames the lines of the blood vessels and heart and the best to get exposed to its is through the vaccine, rather than
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waiting to get infected. there is a lot of reason for thinking that the vaccine will be safer once the evidence accumulates, just on that individual basis, as well as the wider population benefits of getting vaccines. ~ , ., , , , wider population benefits of getting vaccines. ~ , , , _ vaccines. were you surprised by the decision not — vaccines. were you surprised by the decision not to _ vaccines. were you surprised by the decision not to recommend - vaccines. were you surprised by the decision not to recommend the - decision not to recommend the vaccine? i decision not to recommend the vaccine? . , . decision not to recommend the vaccine? ., , ., , , , vaccine? i was a little surprised. i thou~ht vaccine? i was a little surprised. i thought they _ vaccine? i was a little surprised. i thought they probably _ vaccine? i was a little surprised. i thought they probably would - vaccine? i was a little surprised. i thought they probably would be i vaccine? i was a little surprised. i | thought they probably would be in favour of vaccination, but they have access to a lot of very detailed analysis and a lot of very detailed data which they need to weigh up. as i say, their remit is a narrow one. they are not looking at public health implications. we know that the virus is circulating very widely amongst this age group and if we are going to be able to get the rates down, and also prevent further surges of infection later in the winter, then this is the group that needs to become immune and the best
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way to get immunities through vaccination. there has never been as much information as this in the past. to think that there has not been enough research is completely wrong. because the disease is so common you can accumulate results very fast. common you can accumulate results ve fast. ., ., very fast. you mentioned there the more focused _ very fast. you mentioned there the more focused narrow _ very fast. you mentioned there the more focused narrow remit - very fast. you mentioned there the more focused narrow remit of - very fast. you mentioned there the more focused narrow remit of the i more focused narrow remit of the jcvi. labourwants more focused narrow remit of the jcvi. labour wants clarity, they say on looking at how further disruption on looking at how further disruption on education can be prevented. the jcvi were not asked to look at that wider issue and last night a group of tory mps wrote to the chief medical officer asking him to base his advice solely on the health grounds rather than wider impact, but how important do you think it is to look at the effect on wider society of school closures potentially, and notjust the benefits to children, in terms of
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looking further ahead? i benefits to children, in terms of looking further ahead?- benefits to children, in terms of looking further ahead? i think the most important _ looking further ahead? i think the most important thing _ looking further ahead? i think the most important thing from - looking further ahead? i think the most important thing from my i looking further ahead? i think the i most important thing from my point of view is that this doesn�*t become a political polarised debate with people slinging arguments on both sides of the political spectrum. that is so unhelpful. to my mind, the public health benefit is very important and we have to take the wider view that unless we do get infection rates down amongst this particular part of the population it will be very, very hard to prevent further large recurrences. i would say teenagers are often amongst the most altruistic and most generous people in society. they often think very deeply about these moral and ethical issues and they want to protect others as well. i would think that a lot of teenagers actually, if they see the evidence in the round, would prefer to be vaccinated. lode in the round, would prefer to be vaccinated-— vaccinated. we will be hearing a decision from _
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vaccinated. we will be hearing a decision from the _ vaccinated. we will be hearing a decision from the government i vaccinated. we will be hearing a| decision from the government in vaccinated. we will be hearing a - decision from the government in the coming days or weeks or so. if they do go along with a recommendation by thejcvi, what is your fear for what that could do to the spread of covid and the impact on our children? health? i and the impact on our children? health? ., ~i and the impact on our children? health? ., «i ., ., , health? i do think that to my mind it is likely that _ health? i do think that to my mind it is likely that there _ health? i do think that to my mind it is likely that there will _ health? i do think that to my mind it is likely that there will be - health? i do think that to my mind it is likely that there will be an - it is likely that there will be an overall benefit in terms of children�*s health in terms of being vaccinated, but i do quite agree that jcvi vaccinated, but i do quite agree thatjcvi needs to be cautious and weigh the evidence very carefully, including new evidence that is coming from the parts of the world where the state group is being vaccinated widely and there is a lot of information that is starting to come in. , , , ., , come in. this news is potentially concerning _ come in. this news is potentially concerning of— come in. this news is potentially concerning of parents _ come in. this news is potentially concerning of parents of- come in. this news is potentially concerning of parents of 12-15 i concerning of parents of 12—15 —year—olds who may be expecting that they would be the next to get universal vaccination roll—outs. doesn�*t this recommendation by the jcvi endorsed the idea that they
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shouldn�*t be getting vaccinated? i shouldn't be getting vaccinated? i think that is an unfortunate effect of the hesitation is that it will feed the idea that may be the vaccines are not safe or that there is some sort of problem with the vaccines and it may even have wider implications in terms of the acceptance of other well proven vaccines, which have massive benefits in terms of public health and reducing the frequency of other infectious diseases. i think it is very important that the credibility that the jcvi has very important that the credibility that thejcvi has is maintained and we don�*t lose sight of the huge benefits that vaccines have, they are the most coast —— cost effective public health measure that we have to control disease in the world, short of water sanitation. peter, thank you _ short of water sanitation. peter, thank you for — short of water sanitation. peter, thank you for your _ short of water sanitation. peter, thank you for your time - short of water sanitation. peter, thank you for your time this - thank you for your time this
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morning. here�*s ben with a look at this morning�*s weather. sunshine and warmth is certainly under way. just when you thought summer was over, temperatures are set to rise. it is a bit misty and murky in places at the moment, but for the majority today we will see warmer weather with some dragon places. in the north—west of the uk, a chance of outbreaks of rain. the satellite picture looks like a bit of a mess, some areas of cloud, mist and fog, some of this cloud in western scotland has been producing spots of drizzle. for most, the cloud will clear and we will see spells of sunshine. it could stay quite murky in the coast of devon and cornrow. this afternoon, the title taken from northern ireland in western scotland and here we will
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see some outbreaks of heavy rain through the latter part of the afternoon, with brisk winds in the far north—west. temperatures higher than they were yesterday, 24 glasgow, 24 for cardiff. just a small chance of a shower here later in the day. heading through tonight, the rain will sink further south across scotland into northern england, affecting northern ireland. to the south of that, clear spells, with mist and fog patches that could be quite dense for wales and the south—west. a very mild started tomorrow morning with this band of pride and patchy rain in place for northern england. for the northern half of the uk, expect a lot of cloud. furthersouth half of the uk, expect a lot of cloud. further south the cloud will lift, revealing spells of sunshine. maybe 28 degrees. belfast a 22. there is more warm weather to come. high pressure to the east of us will
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be feeding a southerly breeze in our direction, at times quite a brisk breeze, but baiting us in these orange colours, in some warm and quite humid air. in the sunshine, the temperatures will respond. on tuesday, cloud in the far north of scotland, otherwise largely sunny skies. in london, 2829 degrees. the highest temperature we have seen in the all —— in whole of august was 27 degrees. forwednesday, the all —— in whole of august was 27 degrees. for wednesday, a similar sort of day for many but with the addition of some showers are perhaps the odd thunderstorm down in the south—west. that sets us up for a slightly more unsettled end to the week and was temperatures will tip away a little, but still quite respectable for this time of year. between now and then, a late burst of summer perhaps, with house for some of us of 29. it will feel hot in places through the coming days.
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when can you start making predictions for slightly longer, indian summer type stuff? we can only predict with any great certainty the next seven up to ten days, beyond that you�*re looking at patterns. it will be warmer, then slightly cooler and more unsettled for next weekend. any longer than that we will just for next weekend. any longer than that we willjust have to wait and see. you are trying to steal his job, aren�*t you? i think ben would be too tall for thisjob. there is not space for him. thanks, ben. thanks, ben. lenjohnson — that�*s the name of the greatest boxer you�*ve probably never heard of,
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all because of the colour of his skin. now a new campaign has been launched to commemorate his achievements inside and outside the ring. ian haslam has been finding out more. born in clayton in manchester in 1902 to a father from sierra leone and a mother from ireland, lenjohnson would go on to become boxing�*s great uncrowned champion, prevented from competing in title bouts because of his skin colour. his is a hugely important story which many, including actor lamin touray, want people to know. to think that i had never heard of this story, it infuriated me and then it kind of inspired me. lenjohnson had 130 fights, 93 wins. that record is unbelievable. to think that he was never allowed to be british champion because of his skin colour is, obviously, outrageous. he wasn�*t allowed to compete for it because he wasn�*t born to two white parents, and that was an actual rule and law that was in place at that time. here in moss side�*s boxing community, lenjohnson is revered as a hero,
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a feeling shared by his family. the things that he�*s done, obviously, in his boxing career, plus what he did politically and getting people aware of the rights that they�*ve got, oh, immensely proud, immensely. len was also forced into many battles outside the ring, not least here at the old abbey tap house pub in manchester, the scene of an infamous incident in the early 19505, by which point len had long retired as a boxer and was working as a bus driver. he�*d arrived there with his best friend, wilf charles, who was white. wilf encouraged len to come down here and order a drink, even though len didn�*t drink. the landlady refused to serve len. they went to the mayor and complained and they got a group of people, i think 200, and they came back here and the landlady the second time served lenjohnson. that became a national news item and it overturned the colour bar in most of the pubs in manchester. his local community actually came out and then they were aware of it
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themselves and they were shocked and horrified by it, so, in an adverse way, i'm glad it happened. len became a political campaigner, often intervening in racial discrimination cases. he was a representative at the influential pan—african congress of 1945, hosted in his home city. when i was younger ijust heard that my great—grandad was this amazing boxer. he had loads of fights all over the world. then, as i got older and it was more age appropriate, i learnt about the injustices and the extra work that he did. now, especially that i�*ve got my own son, i think it isjust more important. which is why there is now a big push, backed by boxers including anthonyjoshua and ricky hatton, for a lenjohnson statue. literally last night we did the walk around town to look at possible locations with a number of different counsellors and people involved in the campaign. he�*s a hero and he�*s a manchester legend and everyone should know about him. for us, we want him to become a household name. it's more thanjust a statue, it's an inspiration, isn't it? it's recognition. it's what he deserved
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when he was here, but hopefully if it happens now he can look down and he can feel like he is being appreciated, recognised, and he will feel proud. the andrew marr show follows breakfast on bbc one at 9:00am this morning. andrew, what do you have on the programme today? it has been a fairly busy summers since we have been away. lots of questions about vaccines, children being vaccinated and booster vaccines. also how to pay for social care, will there be new taxes? to talk about all of those things but also the humiliation of the west in afghanistan, the shadow foreign secretary will be here, and general sir nick carter. i will also be talking to hilary mantell of the great career of thomas cromwell and what it has to teach us now.
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great career of thomas cromwell and what it has to teach us now. stay with us, more news and sport coming up. football was going nowhere in the '80s. from the back pages... after the game, it was all punch ups, you know? ..to making headlines. football became glamorous. jack warner meant business. all the drama on the pitch... when you receive the ball, it�*s like a dance. you had somebody who went completely off script. ..and off it. i don�*t think anything prepares you for media attention. how our beautiful game became billion pound business. great television, isn't it? fever pitch: the rise of the premier league starts tomorrow at 9pm on bbc two and iplayer. will she get her money back? every minute helps _ will she get her money back? every minute helps us _ will she get her money back? every minute helps us with _ will she get her money back? every minute helps us with our— will she get her money back? every minute helps us with our enquiries.
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justice _ minute helps us with our enquiries. justice can— minute helps us with our enquiries. justice can finally be delivered. it is the house that just justice can finally be delivered. it is the house thatjust keeps giving. always _ is the house thatjust keeps giving. always biocide _ is the house thatjust keeps giving. always biocide every— is the house thatjust keeps giving. always biocide every weekday- is the house thatjust keeps giving. - always biocide every weekday morning on bbc one and iplayer. —— always by your side. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and luxmy gopal. good morning, it is exactly 8:30am. a football club set up in the wake of the grenfell tower fire in 2017 is playing a very special game later today. grenfell athletic fc will face the london fire brigade club, in a match that brings together survivors, those bereaved by the tragedy and firefighters who helped on the night. let�*s speak now to the founder of grenfell fc, rupert taylor, who joins us from west london, along with playersjosephjohn who survived the fire and zane turner, who lost a close friend in the tragedy. thank you all forjoining us this morning, really good to have you with us. if i start first with
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rupert, just to say, tell me what it was that made you decide to create this team. it was that made you decide to create this team. . , was that made you decide to create this team. ., , ., _ ., this team. it was quite easy for me. the community _ this team. it was quite easy for me. the community needed _ this team. it was quite easy for me. the community needed support - this team. it was quite easy for me. the community needed support and j this team. it was quite easy for me. | the community needed support and i felt that i was in a good position to help. felt that i was in a good position to hel. �* felt that i was in a good position tohel.�* ,, felt that i was in a good position to hel. �* ,, ., felt that i was in a good position tohel.�* ,, .,, to help. and it was inspired a bit b the to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact _ to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact that _ to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact that you _ to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact that you felt - to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact that you felt like - to help. and it was inspired a bit by the fact that you felt like this | by the fact that you felt like this would be a way of providing solace. how important do you think it is to have something like this to help people who have gone through this? following such a tragedy, losing 72 individuals, it was important to create a space for individuals to be able to express themselves. it made sense, ifelt able to express themselves. it made sense, i felt that i was in the right position to do it, i would
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support the lads, the backroom staff and everyone alongside me could support the lads, but we had to create it, we had to create a safety net for our players.— net for our players. joseph, let me brin: ou net for our players. joseph, let me bring you in _ net for our players. joseph, let me bring you in at _ net for our players. joseph, let me bring you in at this _ net for our players. joseph, let me bring you in at this point, - net for our players. joseph, let me bring you in at this point, good - bring you in at this point, good morning to you too, ua in the tower that night and you managed to escape with your family, you wear one of the lucky ones, but talk to me about the lucky ones, but talk to me about the impact, what you saw and experienced. —— you were in the tower. experienced. -- you were in the tower. �* ., , ., , experienced. -- you were in the tower. �* ., , ., tower. after the tragedy, it was a ni . htmare tower. after the tragedy, it was a nightmare for— tower. after the tragedy, it was a nightmare for everyone. - tower. after the tragedy, it was a nightmare for everyone. moving i nightmare for everyone. moving forward. — nightmare for everyone. moving forward, football was ideal, it was the key— forward, football was ideal, it was the key to— forward, football was ideal, it was the key to recovery, it was the key to build _ the key to recovery, it was the key to build back the community and it was the _ to build back the community and it was the respect and the love from everyone — was the respect and the love from eve one. �* ,., was the respect and the love from eve one. ~ ,., ,~« everyone. and, the same, you lost someone close _ everyone. and, the same, you lost someone close to _ everyone. and, the same, you lost someone close to you, _ everyone. and, the same, you lost someone close to you, didn't - everyone. and, the same, you lost someone close to you, didn't you? |
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someone close to you, didn�*t you? how does it still feel all this time on? . , �* how does it still feel all this time on? ., , �* ., how does it still feel all this time on? �* ., how does it still feel all this time on? ., ., ., ., on? life hasn't got back to normal around here _ on? life hasn't got back to normal around here yet, _ on? life hasn't got back to normal around here yet, it _ on? life hasn't got back to normal around here yet, it is _ on? life hasn't got back to normal around here yet, it is still - around here yet, it is still ongoing. _ around here yet, it is still ongoing. so— around here yet, it is still ongoing. so it _ around here yet, it is still ongoing, so it has - around here yet, it is still ongoing, so it has been i around here yet, it is still- ongoing, so it has been tough, very tough _ ongoing, so it has been tough, very tou~h. �* , ., ., ongoing, so it has been tough, very tou~h. �* ,., ., tough. and in terms of how you feel about what — tough. and in terms of how you feel about what happened _ tough. and in terms of how you feel about what happened that _ tough. and in terms of how you feel about what happened that night, i tough. and in terms of how you feel about what happened that night, it| about what happened that night, it must obviously be really difficult to talk about, but what stays with you from what you remember of the time? i you from what you remember of the time? . �* you from what you remember of the time? ., �* ., , , you from what you remember of the time? ., �* ., , . time? i haven't really spoken much about what — time? i haven't really spoken much about what happened _ time? i haven't really spoken much about what happened to _ time? i haven't really spoken much about what happened to anyone, i about what happened to anyone, really. _ about what happened to anyone, really. so — about what happened to anyone, really. so this— about what happened to anyone, really, so this is _ about what happened to anyone, really, so this is probably- about what happened to anyone, really, so this is probably one . about what happened to anyone, really, so this is probably one of| really, so this is probably one of the first— really, so this is probably one of the first times _ really, so this is probably one of the first times i _ really, so this is probably one of the first times i have _ really, so this is probably one of the first times i have spoken - the first times i have spoken about it, the first times i have spoken about it. but— the first times i have spoken about it. but that — the first times i have spoken about it, but that night, _ the first times i have spoken about it, but that night, if— the first times i have spoken about it, but that night, if i _ the first times i have spoken about it, but that night, if i was - the first times i have spoken about it, but that night, if i was to- it, but that night, if i was to close — it, but that night, if i was to close my— it, but that night, if i was to close my eyes. _ it, but that night, if i was to close my eyes, i— it, but that night, if i was to close my eyes, i could - it, but that night, if i was to- close my eyes, i could probably see most _ close my eyes, i could probably see most of— close my eyes, i could probably see most of it— close my eyes, i could probably see most of it agaih _ close my eyes, i could probably see most of it again. bind _ close my eyes, i could probably see most of it again.— most of it again. and today's particularly _ most of it again. and today's particularly poignant, - most of it again. and today's particularly poignant, isn't i most of it again. and today's| particularly poignant, isn't it, particularly poignant, isn�*t it, rupert? because grenfell athletic fc, they will play the london fire
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brigade club this afternoon, talk to me about that fixture if you will and its importance and what that might do in terms of helping people come to terms with that night and a shared experience that everybody bear will have. == shared experience that everybody bear will have.— bear will have. -- everybody bear will have- — bear will have. -- everybody bear will have. we _ bear will have. -- everybody bear will have. we toured _ bear will have. -- everybody bear will have. we toured around - bear will have. -- everybody bear will have. we toured around the i bear will have. -- everybody bear i will have. we toured around the uk, ipswich, newcastle, manchesterand ipswich, newcastle, manchester and liverpool and ipswich, newcastle, manchesterand liverpool and played different fire services in those cities. this one is going to be close to our hearts because it is going to reunite the firefighters that were in grenfell on the 14th ofjune 2017 with the ex residents. what they will go through will be something that we will never
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understand. . will be something that we will never understand-— understand. zane turner, what is so im ortant understand. zane turner, what is so important about _ understand. zane turner, what is so important about this? _ understand. zane turner, what is so important about this? coming - important about this? coming together as a team to talk about your experiences, and we might say traditionally men are bad about talking —— bad as talking about their emotions. how important has their emotions. how important has the team been being able to share those experiences with people who know exactly what happened that night? i know exactly what happened that ni . ht? ., , know exactly what happened that niuht? «i , ., know exactly what happened that niuht? ~i , ., ., night? i think it is a learning curve for— night? i think it is a learning curve for everyone - night? i think it is a learning curve for everyone and - night? i think it is a learning - curve for everyone and everyone should _ curve for everyone and everyone should be — curve for everyone and everyone should be able _ curve for everyone and everyone should be able to _ curve for everyone and everyone should be able to talk _ curve for everyone and everyone should be able to talk and - curve for everyone and everyone should be able to talk and get i curve for everyone and everyone should be able to talk and get it| should be able to talk and get it off your— should be able to talk and get it off your chest. _ should be able to talk and get it off your chest, get _ should be able to talk and get it off your chest, get emotions - should be able to talk and get it i off your chest, get emotions away from _ off your chest, get emotions away from it _ off your chest, get emotions away from it. football— off your chest, get emotions away from it. football is— off your chest, get emotions away from it. football is a _ off your chest, get emotions away from it. football is a good - from it. football is a good distraction, _ from it. football is a good distraction, so _ from it. football is a good distraction, so i _ from it. football is a good distraction, so i think- from it. football is a good distraction, so i think that from it. football is a good i distraction, so i think that is important _ distraction, so i think that is important-— distraction, so i think that is imortant. ~ ., ., ., distraction, so i think that is imortant. ., ., ., important. we are grateful for you talkin: to important. we are grateful for you talking to us _ important. we are grateful for you talking to us this _ important. we are grateful for you talking to us this morning - important. we are grateful for you talking to us this morning and - important. we are grateful for you talking to us this morning and i i talking to us this morning and i really hope everything goes well today. a really important day today, but thank you all for being with us this morning, we wish you all the
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best for later today. we will stick with the sports theme. and now the rest of the round from gavin. we start with tennis. britain�*s emma raducanu is through to the fourth round of the us open after a superb display in new york. she swept aside spain�*s sara sorribes tormo in straight sets to reached the last 16 in new york, as stuart pollitt reports. —— to reach the last 16. when she went to the fourth round of wimbledon, emma raducanu showed promise, showed potential. but this was on another level. this was about power. spain�*s sara sorribes tormo is ranked 41 in the world but she struggled to win a point, let alone a game, against the british teenager. emma raducanu, ranked 150 in the world, taking the first set 6—0. it is a demolition. she had a match point for a faultless double bagel victory.
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she didn�*t take that, but responded the very next game to close out a 6—0, 6—1win. she was expecting the excitement of a last 16 match with top seed ash barty, but the australian lost to america�*s shelby rogers, who could barely believe what she had achieved, something emma raducanu can relate to. a new star is shining in new york. stuart pollitt, bbc news. scotland have given their hopes of qualifying for next year�*s world cup a much needed boost with a 1—0 victory over moldova at hampden park. it leaves them third in group f, with their next match to come against austria on tuesday. ben croucher was watching. seeing scotland at a world cup finals, well, ask your parents. for this generation, though, there is hope and expectation, especially against lowly moldova. voices suitably warmed up, now something to cheer about.
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and lyndon dykes is there! the goal to kick—start scotland�*s stuttering qualifying campaign? well, not really — chances came for steve clarke�*s side, chances went begging for steve clarke�*s side. quite. this was moldova, ranked 175th in the world, but this wasn�*t about a thrashing, not with this kind of finishing. ryan christie! it was just the result scotland needed, the performance not one to tell the grandkids about. ben croucher, bbc news. more international football later as well. the parlympics closing ceremony takes place later today in toyko. paralympics gb have had a really successful games, ending second on the medal table with 41 golds and 124 medals in total. the final of which was won by krysten coombs as he took bronze in the men�*s sh6 badminton singles. coombs is ranked fifth in the world says he is "shocked and overwhelmed"
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to be taking home a medal. there was also a bronze for the great britain wheelchair basketball team who beat spain. following the disappointment of losing to japan in friday�*s semifinal, gb had to raise their game one more time when they trailed at half time but they came back to win by 68—58. europe take a three point lead over the usa into the second day of the solheim cup in ohio. the usa went into the competiton as favourites, but europe dominated the opening foursomes, winning three of the four matches. the scandinavian pairing of anna nordqvist and matilda castren then went on to win their afternoon fourballs as well. europe are five and half to two and half points ahead. rohit sharma�*s century helped india seize the advantage on day three of the fourth test at the oval. sharma brought up his tonne with this huge six, as india started to take control of the match. but england fought back with the new ball, ollie robinson�*s two late wickets have given them hope. bad light brought play to an early
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finish with india on 270—3, that�*s a lead of 171 runs. all to play for today. england�*s women lost the second of their t20 internationals against new zealand at hove, which means the sides will battle it out in a decider on thursday. new zealand captain sophie devine hit a quick half century as her side eventually won with four wickets and ten balls to spare. max verstappen and lewis hamilton are back on the front row together for today�*s dutch grand prix for the first time since they collided at the british grand prix injuly. verstappen delighted the 70,000 fans who packed into the zandvoort circuit on the netherlands coast by claiming his sixth pole in seven races. but hamilton, who leads the championship byjust three points, was less than four hundredths of a second behind the dutchman. max did an amazing lap and i was so close, i was trying to catch him, obviously with yesterday�*s session missed. it made it a little bit difficult of a day, but i gave it absolutely everything
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and he did a fantastic lap and deserves a pole. there was an incredible finish to the big game in super league last night, with top—of—the—table catalans dragons beating st helens 31—30 in newcastle. the french side had been trailing by 18 points with less than five minutes remaining, before scoring three times in the dying moments to level the scores. james maloney then kicked a long range drop goal to win the game in overtime. the victory secures catalans the league leaders shield for the first time. i love a comeback story like that, phenomenal and great to see last—minute stuff like that happening, the drama of sport. it is the stuff that keeps you on the edge of your seats! so much more than just a score. but what a performance from paralympics gb this tournament. such a gold rush, and some of us got complacent, another goal, nothing less! and in terms of the number of sports, they come top of our range,
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so it has been a really good games for them and they have done so well. absolutely, brilliant achievements from the team. thank you, gavin. it was once described as �*the supercar of its generation�* and now, 40 years after the unveiling of the aston martin bulldog, the one—of—a—kind motor is ready to hit the roads and hopefully the record books again. we can speak now to two of the people responsible for restoring it to its former glory — nigel woodward and richard gauntlettjoin us from hampton court in london, where the car is on display. good morning to you both. now, first of all, i have to say, despite me not being much of a car person, that looks amazing! it really looks a bit like the delorean from back to the future. . , like the delorean from back to the future. ., , ., ., . . future. that is not a coincidence, the person _ future. that is not a coincidence, the person who _ future. that is not a coincidence, the person who started _ future. that is not a coincidence, the person who started it - future. that is not a coincidence, the person who started it went i future. that is not a coincidence, | the person who started it went on to work for delorean before the project
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was finished. work for delorean before the pro'ect was finished.— was finished. explained to us why it is such a mythical _ was finished. explained to us why it is such a mythical car, _ was finished. explained to us why it is such a mythical car, only - was finished. explained to us why it is such a mythical car, only one - is such a mythical car, only one ever built, it had an attempt at a 200 mph record and it didn�*t happen and it�*s disappeared and it became a thing of myth, so explain the back story. it thing of myth, so explain the back sto . ., , thing of myth, so explain the back sto , ., , , ., thing of myth, so explain the back sto. .,. thing of myth, so explain the back sto . ., . ., story. it was sold once it had finished its _ story. it was sold once it had finished its time _ story. it was sold once it had finished its time as - story. it was sold once it had finished its time as a - story. it was sold once it had| finished its time as a concept story. it was sold once it had - finished its time as a concept car, it was aston martin�*s idea of the ultimate concept car and once it was dealt and sold to a saudi prince who did very high speeds on disused highways in arizona, he wore the engine out and so it was taken apart and moved around the world for years and moved around the world for years and years and never seen or ran again. here it is, 35 years after it last ran and 40 years after it was built. , , ., , ., built. nigel, this must have been a labour of built. nigel, this must have been a labour of love _ built. nigel, this must have been a labour of love to _ built. nigel, this must have been a labour of love to keep _ built. nigel, this must have been a labour of love to keep it _ labour of love to keep it as authentic as possible.- authentic as possible. yes, absolutely. _ authentic as possible. yes, absolutely. richard - authentic as possible. yes, | absolutely. richard brought authentic as possible. yes, absolutely. richard brought the
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project — absolutely. richard brought the project to us at cmc and he was very clear from _ project to us at cmc and he was very clear from the beginning that we were _ clear from the beginning that we were to — clear from the beginning that we were to return the car exactly as possible — were to return the car exactly as possible to — were to return the car exactly as possible to its appearance both externally and internally and that is exactly — externally and internally and that is exactly what we have done. i was iuoin to is exactly what we have done. i was going to ask — is exactly what we have done. i was going to ask if— is exactly what we have done. i was going to ask if your _ is exactly what we have done. i —" going to ask if your cameraman would do exactly that and show us around the car, so explain what we are looking at here and looks amazing, but why was there so revolutionary at the time?— at the time? you can see from the look of it, — at the time? you can see from the look of it, this _ at the time? you can see from the look of it, this is _ at the time? you can see from the look of it, this is purely _ at the time? you can see from the look of it, this is purely a - look of it, this is purely a wonderful designer being allowed to roam free through his own visions. and it was to make it as futuristic as possible and what might the future look like, and you can certainly see more than a bit of science—fiction built in. certainly see more than a bit of science-fiction built in.- science-fiction built in. nigel, could you _ science-fiction built in. nigel, could you us _ science-fiction built in. nigel, could you us through - science-fiction built in. nigel, could you us through and - science-fiction built in. nigel, could you us through and sort| science-fiction built in. nigel, i could you us through and sort of show us around the car a little bit to see a closer look?—
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to see a closer look? yes, absolutely _ to see a closer look? yes, absolutely i _ to see a closer look? yes, absolutely i can. - to see a closer look? yes, absolutely i can. so, - to see a closer look? yes, i absolutely i can. so, without to see a closer look? yes, _ absolutely i can. so, without moving absolutely i can. 50, without moving too far— absolutely i can. 50, without moving too far from — absolutely i can. 50, without moving too far from the microphone, as you can see. _ too far from the microphone, as you can see. we — too far from the microphone, as you can see, we have got that very 70s, early— can see, we have got that very 70s, early 80s— can see, we have got that very 70s, early 80s classic wedge design, so many— early 80s classic wedge design, so many cars— early 80s classic wedge design, so many cars that period is that sort of desigh — many cars that period is that sort of design. the doors are quite a unique — of design. the doors are quite a unique feature of the car and quite a challenge to get those working again— a challenge to get those working again properly. the headlights hidden — again properly. the headlights hidden behind a flap at the front of the car— hidden behind a flap at the front of the car to— hidden behind a flap at the front of the car to preserve the car's aerodynamics and this car, until very— aerodynamics and this car, until very recently, was one of the only mid engine — very recently, was one of the only mid engine aston road cars, so it is unique _ mid engine aston road cars, so it is unique on _ mid engine aston road cars, so it is unique on a — mid engine aston road cars, so it is unique on a number of standpoints. richard. _ unique on a number of standpoints. richard, talk to is about the speed test because it tried for the 200
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mph record and reached 192 mph, so what are your hopes to getting this car in good condition, will it get to the new speed record? yes. car in good condition, will it get to the new speed record? yes, i have absolutely every _ to the new speed record? yes, i have absolutely every faith _ to the new speed record? yes, i have absolutely every faith in _ to the new speed record? yes, i have absolutely every faith in what - to the new speed record? yes, i have absolutely every faith in what they i absolutely every faith in what they have done. 6000 man hours have gone into this car during the pandemic and they did their 18 month target, and they did their 18 month target, and it did 192 in period but it was still accelerating but they ran out of space and driver bravery. if we can find big enough straight, we will do it in november. we have darren turner driving... will do it in november. we have darren turner driving. . .- will do it in november. we have darren turner driving... sorry to interrupt. _ darren turner driving. .. sorry to interrupt. i— darren turner driving... sorry to interrupt, i was _ darren turner driving... sorry to interrupt, i was going _ darren turner driving... sorry to interrupt, i was going to - darren turner driving... sorry to interrupt, i was going to say, i darren turner driving... sorry to i interrupt, i was going to say, this is important to you on a personal level as well, isn�*t it, richard? very much so, my father took over aston martin towards the end of this project and it was him who sold it to the saudi prince when it�*s
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disappeared and i have had poster from his office in my house ever since and have been staring at it everyday, so to see it come to life is a dream come true and when i get to driver, i will be even happier. —— drive it. to driver, i will be even happier. -- drive it— to driver, i will be even happier. -- drive it. ., , , -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? _ -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? nigel, _ -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? nigel, tell— -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? nigel, tell us - -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? nigel, tell us a - -- drive it. can we see those doors once again? nigel, tell us a little i once again? nigel, tell us a little bit about whether we will see anything like this on the road ever again. i anything like this on the road ever aaain. , . ., , again. i very much doubt it. although — again. i very much doubt it. although i _ again. i very much doubt it. although i think— again. i very much doubt it. although i think it - again. i very much doubt it. although i think it probably| again. i very much doubt it. - although i think it probably works as a cue _ although i think it probably works as a cue for many modern supercars and a _ as a cue for many modern supercars and a lot— as a cue for many modern supercars and a lot of— as a cue for many modern supercars and a lot of the features you see on modern _ and a lot of the features you see on modern supercars when modelled on it. . , ., , , , ., it. incredible to see, we wish you all the best- _ it. incredible to see, we wish you all the best. what _ it. incredible to see, we wish you all the best. what an _ it. incredible to see, we wish you all the best. what an amazing i all the best. what an amazing renovation job, all the best. what an amazing renovationjob, but all the best. what an amazing renovation job, but that speed record, if you can get it, us posted and we will follow closely to see
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how you get on. to both of you, thank you so much for showing us around this car. it is very knight riders desk as well. i would drive that. save up a bit more! dig around for loose change. time for the weather forecast out with our actual forecaster, ben. actualforecaster, ben. good morning to you and to you at home as well, and if you thought someone was done with, the next few days may prove that idea wrong because temperatures are set to climb, and for some of us, we are already enjoying sunshine this morning, warmer today than yesterday, but across the north—west of the uk, some outbreaks of rain. this is the satellite picture, as well as sunny spells, areas cloud, mist and fog at the moment. much of
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apple clear, it will stay murky in —— much of that will clear. we will see club clicking through the day with outbreaks of rain arriving during the afternoon. with that, a strengthening breeze as well. for the majority, temperatures not too bad, up a few degrees on yesterday, 20 degrees in glasgow, 23 for cardiff and some in the south likely to get to 26 degrees this afternoon, it could spawn the art isolated shower but most places will stay dry. not so. in northern ireland, rain pushing southwards and into england. this and fog patches developing and especially for coast of wales and south—west of england. mild and muggy start tomorrow morning, patchy cloud in place for northern england and the cloud will
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fizzle. in the north, quite a lot of cloud tomorrow, further south, after morning mist and fog clears, good spells of sunshine and look at those temperatures for september, 27 or maybe 28 degrees towards the south. more warmth to come, high—pressure to the east is driving a southerly wind, a brisk wind at times heading towards the middle of the week, but during some quite warm air right across the uk, all of us feeling the effects of that, particularly where you see sunshine. tuesday were there will be plenty. good spells of sunshine by the afternoon and look at the temperatures. 28, maybe 29 degrees at best. that is quite impressive considering during august we did not get above 27. similar on wednesday, showers and thunderstorms creeping in from the south—west, temperatures again up to 28 or 29 degrees, but things turning cooler as we head towards the end of the week. enjoy a sunday, i will hand
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back to you. enjoy a sunday, i will hand back to you. top class. coming up before the news, we have the andrew marr show. how, how about this for turning a childhood dream into a reality? nigel moon was just a boy when he discovered a windmill in rutland and decided there and then to make it his own one day. he�*s spent the decades since restoring and running the 19th—century mill, but worries about the future of the profession. alex thorp went to meet him. it means a hell of a lot, really, i suppose. it took half a lifetime to get here and no intention of budging. get here and no intention of buduuin. ., , get here and no intention of buduuin. , budging. nigel has dedicated his life to restoring _ budging. nigel has dedicated his life to restoring and _ budging. nigel has dedicated his life to restoring and running - budging. nigel has dedicated his life to restoring and running this| life to restoring and running this mill. despite a surging demand for flower during the first lockdown, the 69—year—old is worried about the future of traditional windmills. people seem to think there is only
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two things to do, knock it down and build on it turn it into a house. you always fighting battles to save what is left. i developed an interest in windmills when i was about six, seven, eight, and dad found this windmill marked on a map and i sort of remember climbing right up to the top. it was all dark. i had this funny feeling that what i ought to do, fate in my favour and i ended up in. in later life, mumjoined me and favour and i ended up in. in later life, mum joined me and she was always very good at talking to visitors and doing various jobs around the place, even when she was her 905. but she eventually passed away, it was a great loss.
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her 90s. but she eventually passed away, it was a great loss.— away, it was a great loss. nigel's mill became _ away, it was a great loss. nigel's mill became vital _ away, it was a great loss. nigel's mill became vital for _ away, it was a great loss. nigel's mill became vital for many - away, it was a great loss. nigel's| mill became vital for many during the first lockdown, but demand has since fallen and he believes the future is uncertain. i since fallen and he believes the future is uncertain.— since fallen and he believes the future is uncertain. i delivered to a shop and _ future is uncertain. i delivered to a shop and had — future is uncertain. i delivered to a shop and had to _ future is uncertain. i delivered to a shop and had to fight _ future is uncertain. i delivered to a shop and had to fight people i future is uncertain. i delivered to i a shop and had to fight people off. suddenly i was not the tweeting on the hill, i was actually quite useful. when they opened things up injune, it went right down again. the society for the protection of ancient buildings says the decline in people with skills to run a windmill is concerned. during covid we had a big _ windmill is concerned. during covid we had a big surge _ windmill is concerned. during covid we had a big surge of— windmill is concerned. during covid we had a big surge of mills - we had a big surge of mills producing flower that had not done for years and that was absolutely great. at this year, the lockdown was not as good for them. the future, ijust worry was not as good for them. the future, i just worry about it, because i think there aren�*t that many people coming forward to learning milling and mill writing, so it is a worry.
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learning milling and millwriting, so it is a worry.— so it is a worry. people have 'ust not to be so it is a worry. people have 'ust got to be educated i so it is a worry. people have 'ust got to be educated as i so it is a worry. people have 'ust got to be educated as to i so it is a worry. people have just got to be educated as to what i so it is a worry. people have just got to be educated as to what it| so it is a worry. people have just i got to be educated as to what it is, because _ got to be educated as to what it is, because it — got to be educated as to what it is, because it is — got to be educated as to what it is, because it is so far removed from most _ because it is so far removed from most people's lives that they have never _ most people's lives that they have never been in one, we have got to change _ never been in one, we have got to change that. do never been in one, we have got to change that-— change that. do you have anyone fine-u- change that. do you have anyone line-up to _ change that. do you have anyone line-up to potentially _ change that. do you have anyone line-up to potentially take - change that. do you have anyone line-up to potentially take over? | line—up to potentially take over? the trouble is, they want to earn a living _ the trouble is, they want to earn a living it _ the trouble is, they want to earn a living it with — the trouble is, they want to earn a living. it will. it eventually but i tend _ living. it will. it eventually but i tend to — living. it will. it eventually but i tend to go _ living. it will. it eventually but i tend to go on as long as i can because — tend to go on as long as i can because i— tend to go on as long as i can because i like doing it. i curse and grumble _ because i like doing it. i curse and grumble some days, but i delete mac on balance. _ grumble some days, but i delete mac on balance, i wouldn't do anything else _ on balance, i wouldn't do anything else. , ., ., . ., �* else. -- but on balance i wouldn't do anything _ else. -- but on balance i wouldn't do anything else. _ else. -- but on balance i wouldn't do anything else. something - else. -- but on balance i wouldn't do anything else. something very| do anything else. something very soothing about watching him at work. good news for conservationists — after decades of overfishing, tuna stocks around the world have started to recover. but according to the latest �*red list�* of endangered species, pressures on marine life continue to grow. fi lamdin is at bristol aquarium for us this morning.
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fi, what more have we learned from this survey? well, good morning. first of all, let me introduce you to a few of the fish living here is bristol aquarium. we have the moire also, we have crunchy on the left and bite—size on the right. they are 30 and took centre stage here, this is sheila, she is a group and about three years old. josh works here at the aquarium, we have sharks just above your head. tell us about the sharks here. indie above your head. tell us about the sharks here-— above your head. tell us about the sharks here. . ., ,., , sharks here. we have some swimming about there. — sharks here. we have some swimming about there, the _ sharks here. we have some swimming about there, the sharks _ sharks here. we have some swimming about there, the sharks are _ sharks here. we have some swimming about there, the sharks are in - sharks here. we have some swimming about there, the sharks are in the - about there, the sharks are in the dark— about there, the sharks are in the dark comer. — about there, the sharks are in the dark corner, it is nocturnal and sleepy — dark corner, it is nocturnal and slee . , dark corner, it is nocturnal and slee. _ ., dark corner, it is nocturnal and slee. ., ,., ., sleepy. rays and sharks are in decline, emma _ sleepy. rays and sharks are in decline, emma is _ sleepy. rays and sharks are in
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decline, emma is a _ sleepy. rays and sharks are in decline, emma is a marine - sleepy. rays and sharks are in - decline, emma is a marine biologist. is that that sharks and rays are so decline? , ., ., i ., ., decline? yes, around 3996 of all secies decline? yes, around 3996 of all species of _ decline? yes, around 3996 of all species of sharks _ decline? yes, around 3996 of all species of sharks and _ decline? yes, around 3996 of all species of sharks and m3 - decline? yes, around 3996 of all i species of sharks and m3 macabre threatened — species of sharks and m3 macabre threatened with— species of sharks and m3 macabre threatened with extinction, - species of sharks and m3 macabre threatened with extinction, and i species of sharks and m3 macabre i threatened with extinction, and this is -- _ threatened with extinction, and this is -- and _ threatened with extinction, and this is -- and rays— threatened with extinction, and this is -- and rays are— threatened with extinction, and this is —— and rays are threatened - threatened with extinction, and this is —— and rays are threatened with i is —— and rays are threatened with extinctioh — is —— and rays are threatened with extinction. the _ is —— and rays are threatened with extinction. the biggest— is —— and rays are threatened with extinction. the biggest reason- is —— and rays are threatened with extinction. the biggest reason is. extinction. the biggest reason is overfishing _ extinction. the biggest reason is overfishing. that _ extinction. the biggest reason is overfishing. that can _ extinction. the biggest reason is overfishing. that can mostly - extinction. the biggest reason is overfishing. that can mostly be i overfishing. that can mostly be through— overfishing. that can mostly be through being _ overfishing. that can mostly be through being caught— overfishing. that can mostly be i through being caught accidentally because _ through being caught accidentally because they _ through being caught accidentally because they are _ through being caught accidentally because they are not _ through being caught accidentally because they are not a _ through being caught accidentally. because they are not a commercial fish species. — because they are not a commercial fish species. and _ because they are not a commercial fish species, and when _ because they are not a commercial fish species, and when they- because they are not a commercial fish species, and when they are . fish species, and when they are caught. — fish species, and when they are caught. they— fish species, and when they are caught, they will— fish species, and when they are caught, they will thrash - fish species, and when they are caught, they will thrash in - fish species, and when they are caught, they will thrash in the i fish species, and when they are . caught, they will thrash in the nets before _ caught, they will thrash in the nets before they— caught, they will thrash in the nets before they are _ caught, they will thrash in the nets before they are brought _ caught, they will thrash in the nets before they are brought up - caught, they will thrash in the nets before they are brought up to - caught, they will thrash in the nets before they are brought up to the i before they are brought up to the surface _ before they are brought up to the surface and — before they are brought up to the surface and then _ before they are brought up to the surface and then it _ before they are brought up to the surface and then it is _ before they are brought up to the surface and then it is too - before they are brought up to the surface and then it is too late - before they are brought up to the surface and then it is too late to. surface and then it is too late to release — surface and then it is too late to release them _ surface and then it is too late to release them. the _ surface and then it is too late to release them. the other- surface and then it is too late to release them. the other thing i surface and then it is too late to| release them. the other thing is shark— release them. the other thing is shark fin— release them. the other thing is shark fin trade, _ release them. the other thing is shark fin trade, and _ release them. the other thing is shark fin trade, and other - release them. the other thing is shark fin trade, and other things like habitat— shark fin trade, and other things like habitat degradation, - shark fin trade, and other things like habitat degradation, lots . shark fin trade, and other things like habitat degradation, lots of| like habitat degradation, lots of sharks— like habitat degradation, lots of sharks grow— like habitat degradation, lots of sharks grow up _ like habitat degradation, lots of sharks grow up nurseries, - like habitat degradation, lots of - sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove and and _ sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove and and these — sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove and and these are _ sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove and and these are being _ sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove and and these are being removed i sharks grow up nurseries, mangrove i and and these are being removed due to coastal— and and these are being removed due to coastal elements. _
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and and these are being removed due to coastal elements. do _ and and these are being removed due to coastal elements.— to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? — to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? have _ to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? have you _ to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? have you lost _ to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? have you lost hope - to coastal elements. do you think it is too late? have you lost hope ori is too late? have you lost hope or is too late? have you lost hope or is there something that can be done? i really don�*t like to think of i really don't like to think of giving — i really don't like to think of giving up _ i really don't like to think of giving up in _ i really don't like to think of giving up in any— i really don't like to think of giving up in any sense - i really don't like to think of giving up in any sense and i i really don't like to think of - giving up in any sense and anything to do— giving up in any sense and anything to do a _ giving up in any sense and anything to do a conservation, _ giving up in any sense and anything to do a conservation, ecosystems i giving up in any sense and anything i to do a conservation, ecosystems are e>
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increasing in abundance and certain i increasing in abundance and certain species. _ increasing in abundance and certain species. the — increasing in abundance and certain species, the atlantic— increasing in abundance and certain species, the atlantic bluefin - increasing in abundance and certain species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, i species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, has gone — species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, has gone from _ species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, has gone from endangered - species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, has gone from endangered to - species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, has gone from endangered to at i species, the atlantic bluefin tuna, - has gone from endangered to at least concern. _ has gone from endangered to at least concern. which — has gone from endangered to at least concern, which is _ has gone from endangered to at least concern, which is really— has gone from endangered to at least concern, which is really exciting - concern, which is really exciting and this— concern, which is really exciting and this is— concern, which is really exciting and this is all— concern, which is really exciting and this is all thanks _ concern, which is really exciting and this is all thanks to - concern, which is really exciting and this is all thanks to their. and this is all thanks to their being — and this is all thanks to their being various _ and this is all thanks to their being various different - and this is all thanks to theirj being various different quota restrictions— being various different quota restrictions that _ being various different quota restrictions that have - being various different quota restrictions that have been i being various different quota | restrictions that have been in being various different quota - restrictions that have been in force and put _ restrictions that have been in force and put in — restrictions that have been in force and put in place _ restrictions that have been in force and put in place and _ restrictions that have been in force and put in place and a _ restrictions that have been in force and put in place and a big - and put in place and a big clampdown on illegal— and put in place and a big clampdown on illegal fishing _ and put in place and a big clampdown on illegal fishing practices _ and put in place and a big clampdown on illegal fishing practices as - on illegal fishing practices as well. — on illegal fishing practices as well. and _ on illegal fishing practices as well, and allowing _ on illegal fishing practices as well, and allowing for- on illegal fishing practices as well, and allowing for that i on illegal fishing practices asj well, and allowing for that to happen— well, and allowing for that to happen has— well, and allowing for that to happen has meant— well, and allowing for that to happen has meant that - well, and allowing for that to i happen has meant that different species — happen has meant that different species of— happen has meant that different species of tuna _ happen has meant that different species of tuna around - happen has meant that different species of tuna around the - happen has meant that differentj species of tuna around the world happen has meant that different - species of tuna around the world are having _ species of tuna around the world are having a _ species of tuna around the world are having a fighting _ species of tuna around the world are having a fighting chance. _ species of tuna around the world are having a fighting chance. find - species of tuna around the world are having a fighting chance.— having a fighting chance. and that is within the _ having a fighting chance. and that is within the last _ having a fighting chance. and that is within the last decade, - having a fighting chance. and that is within the last decade, so - having a fighting chance. and that is within the last decade, so does| is within the last decade, so does that give you hope for the real ishant? , ., , ., ., , ishant? yes, and it is great to see that -- for— ishant? yes, and it is great to see that -- for the _ ishant? yes, and it is great to see that -- for the rays _ ishant? yes, and it is great to see that -- for the rays and _ ishant? yes, and it is great to see that -- for the rays and the - ishant? yes, and it is great to see i that -- for the rays and the sharks? that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great _ that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to — that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to see _ that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to see that _ that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to see that when - that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to see that when we - that —— for the rays and the sharks? it's great to see that when we make a quick— it's great to see that when we make a quick change. _ it's great to see that when we make a quick change, these _ it's great to see that when we make a quick change, these threatened i a quick change, these threatened species _ a quick change, these threatened species can— a quick change, these threatened species can be _ a quick change, these threatened species can be protected - a quick change, these threatened species can be protected and - a quick change, these threatenedl species can be protected and fried once again — species can be protected and fried once again-— species can be protected and fried once aaain. a, , once again. good to finish with some ho e. once again. good to finish with some hoe. -- once again. good to finish with some hope- -- and — once again. good to finish with some hope. -- and thrive _ once again. good to finish with some hope. -- and thrive once _ once again. good to finish with some hope. -- and thrive once again. - once again. good to finish with some hope. -- and thrive once again. if. hope. —— and thrive once again. if we finish and she let there, a full—grown tuna would be for a five times the size of hair. back to you. they look a lot bigger than i
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thought. that is its front us for today, the breakfast team will be back tomorrow from 6am. but for now, enjoy your sunday.
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this is bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm ben brown. our top stories: the prince of wales' former aide steps down temporarily from his charity role after allegations he used his influence to help secure an honourfor a major donor. taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul who were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government. heathrow airport has criticised uk border force after passengers faced "unacceptable queuing times", as images on social media showed packed queues at the london airport. reports that ministers in the uk are to announce the demolition of grenfell tower due to safety concerns. one survivors' group says fewer than ten of them were consulted.
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two more medals for great britain on the final day of the paralympics,

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