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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 5, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honourfor a major donor taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul, who were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government. heathrow airport has criticised uk border force after passengers complained of "unacceptable queuing times" —— images on social media showed packed queues at the london airport. thousands of chain stores have disappeared from british high streets this year though the rate of closures is now slowing down. and two more medals for great britain on the final day of the paralympics, with bronze wins in the men's
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badminton and men's wheelchair basketball. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the chief executive of one of prince charles�* charities — the prince's foundation — has temporarily stepped down following claims that he helped secure an honourfor a major donor. two british newpapers — the sunday times and the mail on sunday — allege that michael fawcett — seen here this morning returning to his home — used his influence to assist a saudi businessman. the donor named in the story denies any wrongdoing and says he didn't expect anything in return for his donations. here's our royal correspondent, jonny dymond.
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michael fawcett was once one of prince charles�* closest aides, a man whom the prince relied upon to guide and organise his personal life. three years ago, he became chief executive of the prince�*s foundation — an umbrella group for a number of prince charles�* charitable interests. newspaper reports allege that mr fawcett offered to assist a wealthy saudi national and major donor to the prince�*s foundation with citizenship and with an honour. mahfouz marei mubarak bin mahfouz received an honorary cbe in late 2016. one palace source stressed the distance between prince charles�* office and his foundation, but michael fawcett is renowned for his closeness to prince charles and this is an embarrassment for the prince. the foundation said it took the allegations very seriously and that the matter is under investigation. the foundation failed to respond
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to a number of other allegations raised by the newspapers. earlier i spoke to our correspondent, simonjones. he said the allegations are embarrassing for the royal family. as we saw, michael fawcett did not want to respond to allegations put to him by reporters near his home today but i think it will be embarrassing for him. it will be embarrassing for him. it will be embarrassing for him. it will be embarrassing for prince charles and it will be embarrassing for the wider royalfamily. michael it will be embarrassing for the wider royal family. michael fawcett has a long history with the royal family. he�*s actually been associated with them for the past a0 years, getting his firstjob with them as a footman to the queen, that was back in 1981. he then went on to be prince charles�*s valley and that was a job that involved him selecting suits and shirts for prince charles to wear every morning at kensington palace and that gives an id of the closeness between them. now, he stepped down temporarily from the role he had as the head of prince�*s foundation, the overarching
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charity the king after the interests of prince charles�*s charitable concerns. that is why an investigation is being launched. we have not heard from michael fawcett himself about the allegations but in terms of the allegation that he helped to saudi businessmen gain and honour, we have had from the businessman who says he has not done anything wrong and his donations amid the foundations were in no way linked to any sort of a turn off of any sort of charitable or any sort of function like that.— any sort of charitable or any sort of function like that. what are the prince's foundation _ of function like that. what are the prince's foundation saying? - of function like that. what are the prince's foundation saying? i - of function like that. what are the prince's foundation saying? i will| prince's foundation saying? i will take ou prince's foundation saying? i will take you through _ prince's foundation saying? i will take you through the _ prince's foundation saying? iii-0" ll take you through the foundation's take you through the foundation�*s statement. he goes on to say they have around 15,000 people in training to get to
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work or starting up their own businesses. the foundation of also added that michael fawcett said he would cooperate and he is welcoming it. would cooperate and he is welcoming it. earlier, i spoke to the former liberal democrat mp and government minister, norman baker, who has written books on royal finances. he said the allegations had to be independently investigated. it is very serious. the ability to sell and honour in return for cash, thatis sell and honour in return for cash, that is what the allegation is, is a criminal offence under the 1925 honours act which is why we are asking the metropolitan commission to investigate this matter. but i�*m afraid this is not a rogue operation for michael fawcett. this is not a one—off which suddenly been revealed. there is a long history of prince charles receiving cash in return for favours. there prince charles receiving cash in return forfavours. there is generally been sitting next to someone at dinner and that sort of thing but there has been a history of rather dodgy characters, frankly,
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who have given money to the print and that has been quite clear. we will give money to his courses, very worthwhile causes, because they want something in return, not because they are just being altruistic. now they are just being altruistic. now the suggestion that the prince�*s foundation will investigate this matter. but asjudge foundation will investigate this matter. but as judge and jury of its own court. that is a recipe for a cover—up. we need this investigated independently and particularly the investigation that an honour has effectively been sold.— effectively been sold. there is a trustees investigation _ effectively been sold. there is a trustees investigation as - effectively been sold. there is a trustees investigation as we - effectively been sold. there is al trustees investigation as we have been told, being carried out. these allegations at the moment. i do need the police to be involved as well? because selling and honour is a criminal offence under the 1925 act. you also have to bear in mind that michael fawcett very close to prince charles. there is no suggestion that he acted in an independent manner. prince charles and he�*d talk allegedly three or four times a day. pearce�*s most trusted adviser. he has been forced to resign twice
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already and both times, under cover of darkness, he has been reinstated by prince charles. serpents charges very, very closely linked to this man and i am sure that whatever michael fawcett did would been done with the full support of prince charles. prince charles has to answer questions about this, not michael fawcett. fin answer questions about this, not michael fawcett.— answer questions about this, not michael fawcett. on a wider scale, does this bring _ michael fawcett. on a wider scale, does this bring into _ michael fawcett. on a wider scale, does this bring into question - michael fawcett. on a wider scale, does this bring into question the i does this bring into question the whole on a system which been discussed uncontroversial for so many years, decades, even? yes. discussed uncontroversial for so many years, decades, even? yes, it does. many years, decades, even? yes, it does- the — many years, decades, even? yes, it does- the fact _ many years, decades, even? yes, it does. the fact of _ many years, decades, even? yes, it does. the fact of the _ many years, decades, even? yes, it does. the fact of the matter - many years, decades, even? yes, it does. the fact of the matter is - many years, decades, even? yes, it does. the fact of the matter is you i does. the fact of the matter is you can have a lollipop lady stand outside in all weathers for 50 years and gets an mbe if she is lucky the end of it. where someone else gives a donation to the conservative party can end up with a seat in the house of lords of the honour system is one where it is very questionable. 0r knows a good thing and it is right to acknowledge people but the way it works is not always to award the most able and the most generous but perhaps the ones you have given this
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to a political party. that cannot be right. that cannot be right. to afghanistan — where economic and social uncertainty is growing as the country still awaits an announcement of the new taliban government. it had been expected earlier this week — but no reason has been given for the apparent delay. meanwhile taliban fighters have been accused of using pepper spray, tear gas and violence to break up a demonstration in kabul, held by a group of women demanding rights under the new regime. courtney bembridge reports. women in kabul demanding rights and a voice in government say they were met with violence. translation: the taliban hit women . with electric tasers and they used i tear gas against women. they also hit women on the head with guns and the women were bleeding. there was no—one to ask why. it�*s the latest of several protests in kabul and herat from women who fear a return to the way they were treated the last time the taliban was in power. the taliban have said women can be
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involved in government, but not hold ministerial positions. afghans have watched on as remnants of their old lives are erased. the taliban says this is just cleaning and decorating, but as the wait for a new government drags on, there is growing uncertainty. translation: security is good all over the country, _ the people are happy, but the lack of work and the non—announcement of the government is worrying people. everyone is confused and people don�*t know what the future of the homeland will be because, well, everyone�*s confused. long lines have formed outside the banks for weeks now. translation: currently, - there are economic problems. prices have increased in the market. the cost of food and ingredients has rocketed. the people pouring in here don�*t know if their money is in the bank. people think their money has been
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emptied from the banks. afghanistan�*s economy is heavily dependent on cash and this weekend the country�*s largest money exchange market reopened after a 20—day closure. there are other signs of normality too. a cricket match was held in kabul this week with taliban commanders in the stands. a stark contrast to the last time the taliban were in power and most sports were banned. but the taliban doesn�*t yet control the whole country. in the panjshir valley, north of kabul, fighting continues. it�*s the last area holding out against taliban rule and the resistance maintains it won�*t surrender. at least 15 members of iraq�*s security forces have been killed in two separate attacks, by suspected islamic state militants. both attacks happened near major cities in the north of the country — a former stronghold of the group. the biggest took place at a police checkpoint in a village near kirkuk —
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leaving 12 police officers dead. the militants are reported to have used roadside bombs to hold back reinforcements during almost two hours of shooting. the second happened near mosul — at least three soldiers are reported to have been killed. the city had been occupied by the group calling itself islamic before the iraqi military drove it out four years ago. the uk government has accepted that huge queues at immigration desks at heathrow — one of the world�*s biggest airports — are unacceptable. british nationals were among those delayed for several hours on friday. the airport says the lack of border force staff manning the positions was to blame. long queues and fed up passengers — these have been the scenes at heathrow airport this weekend, with waiting times of several hours to get through passport control. travellers took to social media to vent their anger at the situation, describing overcrowding and poor ventilation, even claiming some had fainted.
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the end of the school holidays means extra pressure at airports. this weekend is the busiest of the year for returning passengers, many with young children who can�*t use the electronic passport gates. but heathrow has criticised border force over the unacceptable during times, putting it down to simply not enough staff on duty, particularly due to the extra checks being made due to coronavirus. in a statement, the airport apologised for the delays. it said border force were aware of extra demand and that it was very disappointed that they didn�*t provide sufficient resource. it also said it was drafting in more workers to help manage the queues and provide passenger welfare, but that at peak times, all immigration desks should be manned. the home office has admitted that the long waits are unacceptable and said borderforce was now rapidly reviewing its rosters and deploying more staff across the airport to improve waiting times. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. the uk�*s vaccines minister has hinted the government could introduce vaccine passports for large venues.
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speaking this morning, nadim zaharwi said that checking people�*s vaccination status was "right thing to do" to ensure the whole economy remained open. he said the worst case would be a strategy where a spike in infections at a venue would mean it having to shut — and the only way to avoid that was being able to check the vaccine status of the people entering it. the first few hundred—thousand doses of the pfizer vaccine that the uk agreed to supply to australia have arrived in sydney. australia says it has secured an extra four million doses of the pfizer vaccine from the uk in a swap deal. it is australia�*s most significant overseas vaccine deal and will double the monthly supply of the pfizer drug. australia is in a race to hit inoculation targets as infections from the delta variant continue to surge. about half of australia�*s population is currently in lockdown due to outbreaks in sydney, melbourne and canberra. dr chris moy, who is vice
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president of the australian medical association, says the country needs to increase its vaccination programme fast because delta variant is spreading so quickly. in australia we have been pretty unscathed so far for so long. we have, due to a combination of luck, because we are an island, but also the decision—making so far we have been able to live a very blissful life until recently. delta has changed the game as it has across the world but we now need to get those vaccination levels up to really good levels. we are running at about 38% fully vaccinated and 62% one vaccination across the country and we need to get those up to number is closer to the uk to get to number is closer to the uk to get to safety. to number is closer to the uk to get to safe . ~ ., , to number is closer to the uk to get tosafe . ~ . , to number is closer to the uk to get tosafe .~ . , to safety. what is the reason those numbers are _ to safety. what is the reason those numbers are so _ to safety. what is the reason those numbers are so low _ to safety. what is the reason those numbers are so low compared - to safety. what is the reason those numbers are so low compared not l to safety. what is the reason those - numbers are so low compared not only to the but also to most advanced nations in the world which are much
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higher vaccination rates? abs, nations in the world which are much higher vaccination rates?— higher vaccination rates? a few thin . s. higher vaccination rates? a few thinqs- the _ higher vaccination rates? a few things. the first _ higher vaccination rates? a few things. the first thing - higher vaccination rates? a few things. the first thing was - higher vaccination rates? a few things. the first thing was we l higher vaccination rates? a few - things. the first thing was we were relatively careful compared to the other countries because we were not in an emergency situation earlier this year and there was a combination the fact we relied a lot on astrazeneca which we are making in australia however, there came this hesitancy in australia because of that very, very bad thrombotic condition which unfortunately became disproportionate to really the level of risk particularly in a place where there was not much covid. finally, the thing was, the the vaccines have been diverted to two countries that need it most so vividly come online now. so that combination of those things, being relatively slow in approving them and the combination of hesitancy because of the astrazeneca situation and delays getting them led to the
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situation. . , ., ~ , ., ., situation. critics of the australian authorities have _ situation. critics of the australian authorities have led _ situation. critics of the australian authorities have led to _ situation. critics of the australian authorities have led to the - situation. critics of the australian authorities have led to the them l authorities have led to the them saying the whole vaccine roll—out has been a failure. how much will this help? abs, has been a failure. how much will this hel ? �* ., has been a failure. how much will this hel? �* ., . . ., , this help? a lot. particularly in s dne this help? a lot. particularly in sydney and — this help? a lot. particularly in sydney and new— this help? a lot. particularly in sydney and new south - this help? a lot. particularly in sydney and new south wales, | this help? a lot. particularly in . sydney and new south wales, the means they debated at the moment. unfortunately, that state had got away with not many cases and, as i said must cross a stray that we have a living and blissful no care that for so long but unfortunately, deltas are very humbling strain and it really has got going. we are talking about the sort of death rates that have occurred in other countries but the health system is coming underfair bit of countries but the health system is coming under fair bit of strain at the moment and in sydney we have had about 1500 cases a day moment which is putting the hospitals and intensive care units under a fair bit of strain so really they need to get vaccinated as vaccinated as quickly as possible as does the rest
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of the country because delta is here to in australia after leading a very blissful life until now. the headlines on bbc news. the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down following claims he helped secure an honour for a major donor taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul, who were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government. more than eight thousand chain stores disappeared from high streets, shopping centres and retail parks across britain in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london, but now one of the hardest hit.
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oxford street littered with boarded up shops. city centres have suffered the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot closed down, we have noticed, that is what we have noticed walking along. it is not as crowded as it used to be. it is quite unexpected to come into central london and actually see how effected they are by the pandemic. it's the same in brighton, | loads of shops have gone. new figures show the scale of upheavel. in the first part of this year, 3a88 chain stores opened. these include everything from gyms and cafes to banks and bars. but more than 8700 of them closed, meaning a net loss of more than 5200 outlets. these figures are stark, they are not quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, it�*s retail parks and out—of—town shopping that have fared best. so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months, city centres will start to liven up
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again as people start to go back to work and schools go back and people spend more time in cities. however, i don�*t think you are going to get the same level of footfall in city centres as before. and retail parks, they are just more convenient for us. this bakery chain definitely prefers a high street. it is just opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches. i definitely think people are eating better food, more often and more often at home. opening the extra stores and being able to expand at a time when rents are low and there is opportunity for us to rethink even what a bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now
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for so many of our towns and city centres, which are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic. jackie mulligan is a high street expert and founder of local shopping website, shopappy.com — she says that shops on the high street need a level playing field with large warehouses in terms of business rates it cannot be right that a faceless warehouse pays less as a small family business on your local high street so it is important to level the playing field. none of us want to live in ghost towns. none of us want to feel that high streets are dying so government needs to be reforming the rate system, ensuring that there is more tax on the online giants that are not contributing much to our communities and actually, we need consumers to change behaviour, too. because where you shop matters. it is really important. if we want great high street to the need to use our local businesses. mayor of us care about it makes a difference. 71% say we
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are happy every shopping bill high street shops and a8% they are more interested in destinations where there is a local independent of a. what local authorities and the government should do to back small businesses because small is the new giant. the 2020 tokyo paralympics closes later, after 12 days of extraordinary sporting achievement by disabled athletes from 162 countries — set against the backdrop of the covid pandemic. 0ur correspondent in tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes, gave us his assessment: there is this real division, as with the olympics as well. this division between what is happening inside the stadiums, the sport that people are watching. stadiums, the sport that people are watching. this sport that people are watching, which has been tremendously exciting, there have been incredible performances, we have seen world records broken, we have seen
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individually some amazing performances. a chinese athlete won four gold medals. he set new world record at the paralympic games. a member of team gb who has now become, i think, what americans would call the most winning paralympic athlete of all times. too many to mention. injapan has done much, much better as the host nation, the host team in this paralympics than it has in previous 0lympic paralympics than it has in previous olympic and paralympic games. so in rio and london i don�*t thinkjapan paralympic team on any gold medals at all this time i just looked paralympic team on any gold medals at all this time ijust looked at the new total, 51 medals overall. a great achievement for the japanese team and that raised enthusiasm here for what is going on. on the other hand, covid has been spreading very,
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very fast and there are a lot of people in hospital, a lot of people can�*t get into hospital here in tokyo because of the pandemic and thatis tokyo because of the pandemic and that is really solid things here. the atmosphere here injapan particularly in tokyo but across the country, is one of anxiety about the pandemic and the fact it has got so much worse in the past few weeks and i think that the politicians for not getting this under control. a lot of people think they were focused on the paralympics and 0lympics people think they were focused on the paralympics and olympics are not focused on controlling the pandemic. the perilous state of the planet�*s wildlife is being laid bare at the world�*s largest biodiversity summit. the international union for conservation of nature has released its revised �*red list�* of endangered species... thers�*s some good news for tuna, but the fate of many other animals still hangs in the balance. gail maclellan reports. weighing in at 150kgs, the komodo dragon is the world�*s largest living lizard. they are notorious hunters with deadly venom and no predators, so it is hard to imagine that they are under threat,
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but the reptile has just been added to the endangered species list. they�*re only found in a handful of indonesian islands and their habitat is shrinking rapidly. because of global warming and climate change, rising sea levels, that species will lose 30% of its habitat in the next 30 to a0 years. here�*s another animal that may not conjure up an image of vulnerability, but conservationists. say two in five sharks are at risk of extinction, and rays are facing a similar threat. 0cean species tend to be neglected because they�*re under the water, people don�*t really pay attention to what is happening to them. but there is some good news. scientists say that tuna populations aree starting to recover after years of overfishing. it clearly demonstrates what can be done when regions and fisheries and management teams work together because these are massively wide—ranging species. 0bviously, all the regions have
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to coordinate and it is finally paying off. the report was released at a global conservation summit in france, bringing together thousands of scientists, conservation experts and campaigners, including the actor harrison ford. the conference was officially opened by french president emmanuel macron. translation: the battle - for the climate against climate disruption is twinned with the battle to preserve and restore biodiversity. there was a warning about the economic impacts of inaction. translation: there's no economic i stability and financial stability i without respect for nature and without nature�*s contribution of nature because our economies are dependent on nature, because our economies are dependent on the resilience that biodiversity brings. experts have assessed more than 130,000 species and found that more than a quarter are at risk of extinction. conservationists say it should be
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a clarion call for nature to be placed at the heart of all decision—making at the united nations climate change conference at glasgow later this year. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. hello there. just when you thought summer was over, temperatures are set to climb over the next few days. and certainly for today, it�*s going to be a little warmer than it was yesterday in most places, but with the chance of some rain across the north—west of the uk. so as we head through the afternoon, then, most places england and wales will see some spells of sunshine, stained bit misty and magnificent coasts in the southwest, eastern scotland holding onto some brightness at least for a time, but for western scotland and northern ireland, we see thicker cloud and some outbreaks of rain, with a strengthening breeze. but temperatures are going to be a little higher than they were yesterday, 20 degrees for glasgow, 2a for cardiff and for london, somewhere in the south getting to 26 degrees potentially, with just the chance
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of the odd late shower, but most places remaining dry. not so further north — we have this band of rain, that will sink a little further southwards overnight, getting down into parts of northern england, turning very misty and murky for western coasts of wales, and the south—west of england, and some fog patches developing elsewhere, as well. a very mild and muggy start to monday morning. we will have this band of rain and patchy cloud in place across northern england and northern ireland, the rain will peter out but it will stay quite cloudy for many northern parts of the uk. further south, early mist and fog clearing to give some spells in many places and that sunshine will let temperatures as high as 27 degrees. and even further north, 21 for aberdeen and 22 there in belfast. and there is more warmth to come. high pressure to the east of us bringing a southerly breeze, quite a brisk breeze at times as we head into the middle part of the week. but drawing very warm air up in our direction. you will feel that, particularly given lots of sunshine, and on tuesday, we can expect largely sunny skies after morning mist and fog has cleared. away from the far north of scotland,
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here it will stay quite cloudy. but look at the temperatures. 2a to maybe 28 or 29 degrees down towards the south, and wednesday, very similar weather in most places. some good spells of sunshine around butjust the chance of some showers and thunderstorms starting to creep in from the south—west. but ahead of that, a very warm if not hot day for some of us. however, things do look set to change for the end of the week. it�*s going to turn more unsettled, with some rain at times. temperatures are a little lower by this stage but still quite respectable for this time of year.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honourfor a major donor. taliban officials have broken up a demonstration by dozens of women in kabul, who were calling for the right to work and to be included in the government. heathrow airport has criticised uk border force after passengers complained of "unacceptable queuing times". images on social media showed packed arrival halls at the london airport. thousands of chain stores have disappeared from british high streets this year though the rate of closures is now slowing down. and two more medals for great britain on the final day of the paralympics, with bronze wins in the men�*s badminton and men�*s wheelchair basketball. now on bbc news, it�*s time for click. this week we�*re going back to school, so pay attention class —
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today we have robotics...

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