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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 5, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honourfor a major donor plans to overhaul england's social care system are likely to be unveiled this week, amidst warnings that a rise in national insurance could provoke a "very significant backlash". sources have told the bbc that the taliban have killed a female police officer in th. sources have told the bbc that the taliban have killed a female police officer in a province of afghanistan. and as the paralympics draws to a close, it's two more medals for great britain, with bronze wins in the men's badminton and men's
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wheelchair basketball. good afternoon. if you've just joined if you'vejustjoined us, welcome if you've justjoined us, welcome to bbc news. the chief executive of one of prince charles�* charities — the prince's foundation — has temporarily stepped down following claims that he helped secure an honourfor a major donor. the sunday times and the mail on sunday allege that michael fawcett used his influence to assist a saudi businessman. mr fawcett was — until 2003 — the prince's valet. here's our correspondent simonjones.. and a warning his report does contain some flashing images... he was once one of prince charles�* closest aides, but now michael fawcett is facing questions about his conduct. good morning, mr fawcett. did you secure honours for cash? any comment on the allegations in the newspapers today? three years ago, he became chief executive of the prince�*s foundation, an umbrella group for a number of prince charles�*s
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charitable interests. newspaper reports allege that mr fawcett offered to assist a wealthy saudi national and major donor to the prince�*s foundation with citizenship and with an honour. mahfouz marei mubarak bin mahfouz received an honorary cbe in late 2016. 0ne former government minister who�*s written books on royal finances wants a police investigation into the allegations. in 2013, mr fawcett resigned from a previous job with the royal family after an internal report criticised the running of the royal household. now, michael fawcett�*s been forced to resign twice already, and both times, under cover of darkness, almost, he was reinstated by prince charles when the hoo—hah died down. so, prince charles is very, very closely linked with this man, and i�*m sure that whatever michael fawcett did would have been done with the full support of prince charles. prince charles needs to answer questions about this, not michael fawcett. the met has not commented. the prince�*s foundation, based at dumfries house,
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offers education and training programmes to more than 15,000 people each year, helping them to find work or start their own businesses. it added that mr fawcett will assist the investigation in every way. a spokesman for dr bin mahfouz said that he had not expected any reward for his charitable donations. simon jones, bbc news. 0ur royal correspondent jonny dymond is with me. johnny, some of those statements don�*t seem to square with some of the allegations that the newspapers made. how serious are they? the allegations _ made. how serious are they? the allegations are _ made. how serious are they? tue: allegations are very made. how serious are they? tte: allegations are very serious. they are effectively suggesting that owners are up for sale and that the prince or the prince�*s organisation,
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the prince�*s foundation, was going to support an application for citizenship in exchange for donations. the critical person in the midst of this is michael fawcett because, you know, you introduced him, he said he is the former valet to the pinch. that is absolutely true, he left in 2003, but this is a man who was at the prince�*s side literally and metaphorically for decades. he laid out his clothes, organises private life, sorted out who sat next to him at the big dinners and things like that. this is a right—hand man in every sense of the world. it is notjust someone who used to work for him. the palace stresses he no longer works directly for the prince and that is the case and we know he has also step down while this investigation happen but it is the proximity and the friendship with the prince that is so damaging and makes this rather different from other allegations of what is called cash for access this
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to be made in the past. tn a what is called cash for access this to be made in the past. in a sense, if this were — to be made in the past. in a sense, if this were a _ to be made in the past. in a sense, if this were a political _ to be made in the past. in a sense, if this were a political party - to be made in the past. in a sense, if this were a political party we - if this were a political party we were talking about this would be a major constitutional row brewing and a big political scandal. this major constitutional row brewing and a big political scandal.— a big political scandal. this is a difficul . a big political scandal. this is a difficulty- it — a big political scandal. this is a difficulty. it is _ a big political scandal. this is a difficulty. it is difficult - a big political scandal. this is a difficulty. it is difficult to - a big political scandal. this is a difficulty. it is difficult to say i difficulty. it is difficult to say where it sits on the embarrassment scale but this is a real difficulty. this is not what people expect of the royal family. this is not what people expect of the royalfamily. 0bviously this is not what people expect of the royalfamily. obviously the allegations are being investigated in the palace, as i say, says, look, michael fawcett doesn�*t work for the prince. michael fawcett doesn't work for the prince. �* . michael fawcett doesn't work for the prince. �* , ., , , ., prince. and there is no suggestion in the story _ prince. and there is no suggestion in the story that _ prince. and there is no suggestion in the story that the _ prince. and there is no suggestion in the story that the prince - prince. and there is no suggestion in the story that the prince was . in the story that the prince was aware of a transactional relationship and if you give the money you get the honour. absolutely not. in that sense, _ money you get the honour. absolutely not. in that sense, this _ money you get the honour. absolutely not. in that sense, this is _ money you get the honour. absolutely not. in that sense, this is about - not. in that sense, this is about somebody _ not. in that sense, this is about somebody who _ not. in that sense, this is about somebody who has _ not. in that sense, this is about somebody who has worked - not. in that sense, this is about somebody who has worked for i not. in that sense, this is about i somebody who has worked for him not. in that sense, this is about - somebody who has worked for him and been closed in for a long time and not about the man himself. yes. been closed in for a long time and not about the man himself. yes, but it is obviously _ not about the man himself. yes, but it is obviously what _ not about the man himself. yes, but it is obviously what also _ not about the man himself. yes, but it is obviously what also worth - it is obviously what also worth pointing out that for several decades there have been allegations and criticisms as local cash for
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access it in return for large donations people got access to prince charles. that is part of the world of royal charities. people said that prince charles skated too close to the edge. this is another allegation that that kind of thing has been going on and it is an embarrassment. mr has been going on and it is an embarrassment.— has been going on and it is an embarrassment. ~ ., , ., , , embarrassment. mr a corset to step down. embarrassment. mr a corset to step down- what — embarrassment. mr a corset to step down. what sort _ embarrassment. mr a corset to step down. what sort of _ embarrassment. mr a corset to step down. what sort of investigation - down. what sort of investigation follow from this? at the edge. this is another allegation that that kind of thing has been going on and it is an embarrassment. mr course to step down. what sort of investigations follow from this? additives is involved looking at a legal relationship with him? —— are the charities involved looking at a legal... charities involved looking at a leial... ., «a,_ charities involved looking at a leial... ., _ ,, legal... remarkably tight-lipped about what _ legal... remarkably tight-lipped about what is _ legal... remarkably tight-lipped about what is going _ legal... remarkably tight-lipped about what is going on, - legal... remarkably tight-lipped about what is going on, number| legal... remarkably tight-lipped i about what is going on, number of allegations late last night and one single response after michael fawcett because there were allegations in this door is about about other people connect to investigations too. this about other people connect to investigations too.— about other people connect to investigations too. this is the kind of sub'ect investigations too. this is the kind of subject some _ investigations too. this is the kind of subject some mps _ investigations too. this is the kind of subject some mps take - investigations too. this is the kind of subject some mps take a - of subject some mps take a particular interest in, isn�*t it, what the royal family�*s role is particular interest in, isn�*t it, what the royalfamily�*s role is in public life and whether that has
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influence beyond strictly ceremonial.— influence beyond strictly ceremonial. . . influence beyond strictly ceremonial. , , ., ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne. ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne- this _ ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne. this is _ ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne. this is not _ ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne. this is not a _ ceremonial. this is the heir to the throne. this is not a so-called - throne. this is not a so—called minor royal going off on doing in advertisement for something or sitting in on something in exchange for something, this is prince charles so this is a political issue, a constitutional issue, a difficult issue simply to sane look, nothing to do with us.— nothing to do with us. johnny diamond. _ nothing to do with us. johnny diamond, thank— nothing to do with us. johnny diamond, thank you - nothing to do with us. johnny diamond, thank you very - nothing to do with us. johnny i diamond, thank you very much. ——johnny dymond, thank you very much. plans to introduce vaccines passports in nightclubs and other indoor venues in england will go ahead this month, the vaccines minister has confirmed. nadhim zahawi said it was the right time to introduce the certificates, as all over—18s will have been offered two jabs by the end of september. the scheme requiring people to show covid vaccination proof has been criticised by venues and some mps. the former conservative chancellor, lord hammond, has warned that the suggestion the government might increase national insurance to fund social care in england could provoke a "very significant backlash". borisjohnson and senior ministers
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have been discussing details this weekend on how to overhaul the care system, before an announcement this week. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. it is probably the biggest domestic social policy challenge borisjohnson inherited when he became prime minister. sorting out social care in england. in the next few days, it looks like he�*ll set out his plan. the government�*s not denying national insurance, a tax on earnings, will go up to pay for it. today, the former chancellor, lord hammond, said that was a bad idea. the issue is, an increase in national insurance contributions is asking young working people, some of whom will never inherit a property, to subsidise older people who have accumulated wealth during their lifetime and have a property and on any basis, that has got to be wrong. this morning, this minister refused to elaborate on the government�*s plans, but did say...
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we'll work with national partners, with local partners and those with lived experience of the social care sector to get this right and get it right as we are determined to do. currently in england, people have to meet some of their care costs if they have assets over £14,250, and above the level of £23,250, they have to pay the care bill in full. many want to see a lifetime cap on how much people have to pay but that comes with a big cost to the taxpayer. labour wants a new system, too, but don�*t think raising national insurance is the solution. we are sceptical about the idea of loading the entire burden of the social care crisis onto the supermarket workers and delivery drivers who are already dealing with really high housing costs, childcare costs and others. the government had hoped to find a consensus on this issue. that doesn�*t look likely.
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they also promised not to put up national insurance — a policy, it appears, they�*re willing to shred, too. chris mason, bbc news. and chris mason is now here to discuss this with me. we can go back to after borisjohnson won the 2019 election and i may be misquoting but wasn�*t as one of his other than very plans? it has been going cool for a while. he plans? it has been going cool for a while. ., ., , ., ., while. he said he had a plan and it has been a — while. he said he had a plan and it has been a few— while. he said he had a plan and it has been a few years _ while. he said he had a plan and it has been a few years since - while. he said he had a plan and it has been a few years since they i while. he said he had a plan and it| has been a few years since they are to be fair there has been a lot going on since, brexit and a pandemic. clearly forany going on since, brexit and a pandemic. clearly for any government this is not easy because if you decide the state should have a much greater role, there are some who think it shouldn�*t, but if you decide that it showed, which the conservatives and indeed labor day thing, then you have got the big question of who pays for it and how. the easiest way, economically if not politically, to raise money is to
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raise income tax, national insurance, the big three, vat. slight problem for the conservatives that they said they wouldn�*t look at any of them or you look at some of the other taxes but it is those three that weighs about two thirds of the tax income. some conservatives say would be potentially appropriate to break one promise in order to fulfil another... promise in order to fulfil another. . ._ promise in order to fulfil another... �* , ., ., another... because that was also in the manifesto, _ another... because that was also in the manifesto, wasn't _ another... because that was also in the manifesto, wasn't it? _ another... because that was also in the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, i the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, deafini the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, dealing with _ the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, dealing with social— the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, dealing with social game - the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, dealing with social game in - the manifesto, wasn't it? exactly, dealing with social game in the i dealing with social game in the manifesto, not raising those three taxes but it is quite striking the range a number of conservatives who think national insurance is not the way to do it. so you have got some like sirjohn major perhaps broadly on the left of the party saying you shouldn�*t do it because it is progressive and hits the poor the hardest. you have others like marcus fish the back saying he sees it as a socialist state solution but also makes the same point sirjohn saying it is unfair because it burdens those who are in work and relatively poor versus cliche of the person
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with a bit conservative in survey who has paid for the home outright would quite like to hand it on to their children, are perfectly human thing to do, but then would get the state to pay for their social care under this new proposal if we are to believe what the briefing suggests it is going to look like. so believe what the briefing suggests it is going to look like.— it is going to look like. so there is likely to _ it is going to look like. so there is likely to be _ it is going to look like. so there is likely to be quite _ it is going to look like. so there is likely to be quite a _ it is going to look like. so there is likely to be quite a fight, i it is going to look like. so there i is likely to be quite a fight, then, over the actualfunding. is likely to be quite a fight, then, over the actual funding. the principle, though, that we need something that amounts to a social care system in england, that is almost now accepted, is it, across the board?— the board? yes, i think that is where there _ the board? yes, i think that is where there is _ the board? yes, i think that is where there is a _ the board? yes, i think that is where there is a consensus, i the board? yes, i think that is. where there is a consensus, that the board? yes, i think that is- where there is a consensus, that the state should have a much bigger role and you should have a situation as is the case now as i set out in the report there were above assets of around £23,000 in england you have to pay the entire cost of your social care bill with the potential that that cost is huge. with people on average living much longer and potentially with chronic conditions with huge weekly bills in
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residential care. there is a massive, massive question from all of the political parties to wrestle with here so firstly as we discussed how you pay for it but then also precisely what cap you put in place if you accept that there should be some sort of lifetime cap. but thatis some sort of lifetime cap. but that is a wide boundary, hugely wide boundary and then if you do that working out how much it is going to cost and therefore where you levy taxes so massive, massive question, politics resuming for the autumn term this week and this is going to be the talking point this week. vaccine passports, we are in that
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territory? vaccine passports, we are in that territo ? �* ., , territory? and indeed nothing is restatini territory? and indeed nothing is restating the — territory? and indeed nothing is restating the policy _ territory? and indeed nothing is restating the policy that - territory? and indeed nothing is restating the policy that there i territory? and indeed nothing is. restating the policy that there will be vaccine passports in places like nightclubs and it was some question that may be the young people might government would say they were doing them as a nudge to get young people vaccinated with then we got the idea but today he is insisting it is definite happening. saline but today he is insisting it is definite happening. but today he is insisting it is definite ha -ienin. ., ., definite happening. saw england and scotland to 70 _ definite happening. saw england and scotland to 70 going. _ definite happening. saw england and scotland to 70 going. chris _ definite happening. saw england and scotland to 70 going. chris mason, l scotland to 70 going. chris mason, thanks very much. a little bit of breaking news now and very sad news that obviously this person�*s friends and family but also fans of the group girls aloud. this is a message from sarah hardy�*s mum who has posted on instagram.
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that is a message from marie, sarah harding�*s mum, announcing the death of the singer. the headlines on bbc news... the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honourfor a major donor former girls aloud singer sarah harding has died, after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year. sources have told the bbc that the taliban have killed a female police officer in the ghor province of afghanistan in afghanistan the taliban have still not announced the formation of a new government. it had been expected earlier this week — but no reason has been given for the delay. meanwhile taliban fighters have been accused of using pepper spray, tear gas and violence to break up a demonstration in kabul, held by a group of women demanding rights under the new regime.
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courtney bembridge reports. women in kabul demanding rights and a voice in government say they were met with violence. translation: the taliban hit women i with electric tasers and they used i tear gas against women. they also hit women on the head with guns and the women were bleeding. there was no—one to ask why. it�*s the latest of several protests in kabul and herat from women who fear a return to the way they were treated the last time the taliban was in power. the taliban have said women can be involved in government, but not hold ministerial positions. afghans have watched on as remnants of their old lives are erased. the taliban says this is just cleaning and decorating, but as the wait for a new
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government drags on, there�*s growing uncertainty. translation: security is good all over the country, _ the people are happy, but the lack of work and the non—announcement of the government, that�*s worrying people. everyone is confused and people don�*t know what the future of the homeland will be because, well, everyone�*s confused. long lines have formed outside the banks for weeks now. translation: currently, - there are economic problems. prices have increased in the market. the cost of food and ingredients has rocketed. the people pouring in here don't know if their money is in the bank. people think their money has been emptied from the banks. afghanistan�*s economy is heavily dependent on cash and this weekend the country�*s largest money exchange market reopened after a 20—day closure. there are other signs of normality too. a cricket match was held in kabul this week with taliban commanders in the stands. a stark contrast to the last time the taliban were in power and most sports were banned. but the taliban doesn�*t yet control the whole country. in the panjshir valley,
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north of kabul, fighting continues. it�*s the last area holding out against taliban rule and the resistance maintains it won�*t surrender. courtney bembridge, bbc news. 0ur correspondent in delhi is danjohnson. dan, the details on this a pretty sketchy at the moment, and they? th sketchy at the moment, and they? t�*i terms of this place officer who has been chilled, yes. we have been told is that this female police officer apparently took down a taliban flag from the streets of a provincial capital in the south—west of afghanistan and was then attacked. apparently, one report says that she was beaten but then there were reports that later she was shot. 0ne reports that later she was shot. one of my colleagues have spoken to her family, who havejust told of my colleagues have spoken to her family, who have just told the of my colleagues have spoken to her family, who havejust told the bbc that later on yesterday three gunmen came to her house, searched it first and tied up all the members of her family and then shot her in front of herfamily. they say
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family and then shot her in front of her family. they say that she was seven months pregnant and that the family has subsequently been visited by senior figures of the taliban in that province who have promised that they will investigate that case and punish the killers, but witnesses have told us it was taliban fighters who carried out that retaliation attack, if that is what it is. we don�*t know if the police officer was actually on duty, if this was something she did in the course of her work or some sort of act of protest beyond herjob. the details are very sketchy at the minute but i think certainly people will see it as a sign that other parts of afghanistan beyond kabul can be lawless, can be violent, and that women in particular are at risk. yes, we have seen reports from places like herat and stop talking about some fairly brutal punishments being handed out already and people talking about almost kangaroo court set up to try, in inverted commas, people accused of various crimes like theft and adultery in all the rest of it but it will have a
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chilling effect, won�*t it, particularly for those people who have been so concerned about what fate awaits women who have any role in public life under this new regime. in public life under this new reiime. . .,, in public life under this new reime. ., .,, ., in public life under this new reiime. . ., ., , regime. that has got to be the fee and we only _ regime. that has got to be the fee and we only have _ regime. that has got to be the fee and we only have people _ regime. that has got to be the fee and we only have people on - regime. that has got to be the fee and we only have people on the i and we only have people on the streets of campbell protesting for their rights and being beaten by taliban fighters and this is an illustration of the problem that whatever the taliban at its higher levels promises in terms of its government and protection of peoples rights what happens on the ground is not necessarily same thing and that evenif not necessarily same thing and that even if other people get involved and commit acts of violence against people is right or the taliban is unable to exert the kind of discipline and control to live up to the standards it promised and the talks are still in place over what will go on over what the government will go on over what the government will look like so in this activity is no wonder people across afghanistan are fearful and people are suffering in at least a vacuum
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if not under the new taliban regime you can see why there is so much uncertainty, confusion and fear over what the future of the country may actually be. what the future of the country may actually be— actually be. dan, another sub'ect was a very — actually be. dan, another sub'ect was a very important i actually be. dan, another sub'ect was a very important one i actually be. dan, another sub'ect was a very important one in i actually be. dan, another subject| was a very important one in terms actually be. dan, another subject i was a very important one in terms of the long—term stability of country, any further attempts by the taliban to take control of the panjshir valley? to take control of the pan'shir valle ? , ., ., ., valley? very little. the information from there has _ valley? very little. the information from there has been _ valley? very little. the information from there has been really - from there has been really confusing, conflicting, and we have heard that the taliban have made some further advances there in the last 21i hours or so, more fierce fighting, more fierce injuries on both sides but the resistance still hasn�*t amended or given up there despite the cat taliban claiming victory two days ago. so it looks like the conflict there is going to continue and that may be why the talks and announcement of a new government have vaulted. perhaps the taliban wants to complete that victory before it announces what sort of government people will live
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on right across afghanistan.- on right across afghanistan. daniel johnson in delhi. _ on right across afghanistan. daniel johnson in delhi. thank— on right across afghanistan. daniel johnson in delhi. thank you - on right across afghanistan. daniel johnson in delhi. thank you very i johnson in delhi. thank you very much for that. back here, the government says that no decision has yet been taken on whether to demolish grenfell tower in west london, four years after the fire killed 72 people there. newspaper reports suggest ministers are set to announce it will be taken down because of safety concerns. the government says it�*s considering independent safety advice that advises demolition, and is engaging closely with the community before a decision is taken — but survivors groups say they have not been consulted. the government has admitted that long queues at immigration desks at heathrow — one of the world�*s biggest airports — are unacceptable. some passengers were delayed for several hours on friday. the airport says the lack of border force immigration staff was to blame. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. long queues and fed up passengers — these have been the scenes at heathrow airport this weekend, with waiting times of several hours to get through passport control. travellers took to social media to vent their anger
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at the situation, describing overcrowding and poor ventilation, even claiming some had fainted. the end of the school holidays means extra pressure at airports. this weekend is the busiest of the year for returning passengers, many with young children who can�*t use the electronic passport gates. but heathrow has criticised border force over the unacceptable queueing times, putting it down to simply not enough staff on duty, particularly with the extra checks being made due to coronavirus. in a statement, the airport apologised for the delays. it said border force were aware of extra demand and that it was very disappointed that they didn�*t provide sufficient resource. it also said it was drafting in more workers to help manage the queues and provide passenger welfare, but that at peak times, all immigration desks should be manned. the home office has admitted that the long waits are unacceptable and said border force was now
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rapidly reviewing its rosters and deploying more staff across the airport to improve waiting times. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. police in north yorkshire say their operation to drain fishing lakes and search woodland in relation to the disappearance of claudia lawrence has concluded without any significant discoveries. detectives say a number of smaller items were recovered but these items appear unrelated to the 35—year—old�*s disappearance. claudia lawrence has not been seen since she failed to arrive for work at the university of york in march 2009. a number of people have been questioned in connection with her disappearance, but no charges have ever been brought. the closing ceremony for the paralympic games is under way in tokyo. great britain won two more medals on the final day, taking their tally to 124, 41 of them gold. they finished second in the table behind china. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss has more. last but definitely not least. britain�*s final medal of the games was one of its most emotional,
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as krysten coombs took bronze in the badminton. the team�*s 124th medal but to coombs, it meant more than any of them. it was, he said, a dream come true. it was a glittering end to what has been a glittering games for paralympicsgb. earlier, there had also been bronze in the wheelchair basketball. yet another celebration here in tokyo, and there have been a lot of them. britain finished second in the overall table. of recent games, only rio has been better, and after such a difficult build—up, the head of the british team is full of praise. how would you sum up what this team have achieved? um, history making. they have ripped up the, sort of, the stats and we�*ve put a marker down in terms of the depth of talent and we�*re very, very proud of what we�*ve achieved out here in tokyo. and so to the end of what has been
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an unprecedented paralympics. delayed for a year but finally finishing amid a colourful ceremony. for the hosts, japan, it has been the toughest of challenges. like the olympics, these games have been held amid a pandemic and amid tight restrictions. but, despite concerns, the warmth of their welcome has been universally praised. and so to the parade of the athletes, including afghanistan�*s two competitors, who were evacuated from kabul to take part here, while the british flag was brought in by boccia gold medallist david smith. a memorable end to what has been an extraordinary games. and the swiss reporting. ——andy swiss reporting. more than 8,000 chain stores disappeared from our high streets and shopping centres in the first six months of this year. new research suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london, but now one of the hardest hit. oxford street littered with boarded up shops. city centres have suffered
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the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot closed down, we�*ve noticed. that�*s what we�*ve noticed walking all along. it�*s not as crowded as it used to be. it is quite unexpected to come into central london and actually see how effected they are by the pandemic. it's the same in brighton, | loads of shops have gone. new figures show the scale of upheaval. in the first part of this year, 3,488 chain stores opened. these include everything from gyms and cafes to banks and bars — but more than 8,700 of them closed, meaning a net loss of more than 5,200 outlets. these figures are stark, they are not quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, it�*s retail parks and out—of—town shopping that have fared best. so is this a permanent shift? over the next few months, city centres will start to liven up again as people start to go back to work and schools go back and people spend more time in cities.
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however, i don�*t think you�*re going to get the same level of footfall in city centres as before. this bakery chain definitely prefers the high street. it�*s just opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches. opening the extra stores, you know, and being able to expand at a time when rents are low and there is opportunity for us to rethink even what a bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for so many of our towns and city centres, which are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic. emma simpson, bbc news, central london. the perilous state of the planets wildlife is being laid bare at the world�*s largest biodiversity summit with the fate of many animals still in the balance as gail maclellan reports.
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weighing in at around 150kg, the komodo dragon is the world�*s largest living lizard. they�*re notorious hunters with deadly venom and no predators, so it�*s hard to imagine that they are under threat, but the reptile has just been added to the endangered species list. they�*re only found in a handful of indonesian islands and their habitat is shrinking rapidly. because of global warming and climate change, rising sea levels, that species will lose 30% of its habitat in the next 30 to a0 years. here�*s another animal that may not conjure up an image of vulnerability, but conservationists. say two in five sharks are at risk of extinction, and rays 0cean species tend to be neglected because they�*re under the water, people don�*t really pay attention to what is happening to them. but there is some good news. scientists say that tuna populations aree starting to recover after years of overfishing.
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it clearly demonstrates what can be done when regions and fisheries and management teams work together, because these are massively wide—ranging species. 0bviously, all the regions have to coordinate, and it�*s finally paying off. the report was released at a global conservation summit in france, bringing together thousands of scientists, conservation experts and campaigners, including the actor harrison ford. the conference was officially opened by french president emmanuel macron. | translation: the battle for the | climate against climate disruption is twinned with the battle to preserve and restore biodiversity. and there was a warning about the economic impacts of inaction. translation: there's no economic i stability and financial stability i without respect for nature and without nature's contribution because our economies are dependent on nature,

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