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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 5, 2021 7:00pm-7:30pm BST

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this is bbc news — the headlines at seven: former girls aloud singer sarah harding has died at the age of 39, after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year. she was a girl next door that had got it all. she was identifiable by the audience that were going to buy her records. that was the beauty of sarah. the head of one of prince charles�* charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honourfor a major donor. relatives of a female police officer in the ghor province of afghanistan have told the bbc that she has been killed by the taliban. plans to overhaul england's social care system are likely to be unveiled this week — amidst warnings that a rise in national insurance could provoke a "very significant backlash".
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and as the paralympics come to a close with fireworks, the queen congratulates great britain's paralympians — who return home with 124 medals, including 41 golds. good evening. the girls aloud singer sarah harding has died at the age of 39 — she was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. she was part of one of the most successful british female bands of all time, formed on a reality show, they went on to have 21 top 10 hits. sarah harding's mother marie described her as a �*bright shining star', and her bandmate nadine coyle said she was �*absolutely devastated'. our enterainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at her life.
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his report contains some flashing images. after three months of competition, the moment her dream came true. ..sarah. cheering. but sarah harding could scarcely have imagined the success that would follow. every one of their first 16 singles a top ten hit. thanks to a collection of irresistibly catchy songs, they were soon selling thousands of singles... # sound of the underground...# ..and performing to sold—out audiences. # if i had a promise from you... # sarah brought powerful vocals and a willingness to be portrayed... # makes me wanna break the rules! # ..as the band's most outrageous personality, the headline—grabbing party girl. she also acted. there were small
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parts in coronation street in the second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., second of the new saint trillions movies. we have a real giggle in between second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., between takes, second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., between takes, we second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., between takes, we reall second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., between takes, we reall are second of the new saint trillions movies. ~ . ., ., between takes, we reall are like between takes, we really are like naughty schoolgirls, they keep having to say, girls, shut up! nadine coyle has led the tributes. an pop stars judge nadine coyle has led the tributes. an pop starsjudge pete nadine coyle has led the tributes. an pop stars judge pete waterman paid his tribute to her that afternoon.— paid his tribute to her that afternoon. ,, ., , ., paid his tribute to her that afternoon. ,, . , ., afternoon. she was a girl next door that had got _ afternoon. she was a girl next door that had got it _ afternoon. she was a girl next door that had got it all. _ afternoon. she was a girl next door that had got it all. she _ afternoon. she was a girl next door that had got it all. she was - that had got it all. she was identifiable by the audience that were going to buy records, that was the beauty of sarah.— the beauty of sarah. when she discovered _ the beauty of sarah. when she discovered an _ the beauty of sarah. when she discovered an enlarged - the beauty of sarah. when she - discovered an enlarged lymph-node discovered an enlarged lymph—node before covid began, the pandemic was a factor in her delaying seeking treatment. a factor in her delaying seeking treatment-— a factor in her delaying seeking treatment. . , treatment. breast cancer is in fact a very incurable _ treatment. breast cancer is in fact a very incurable illness _ treatment. breast cancer is in fact a very incurable illness if- treatment. breast cancer is in fact a very incurable illness if it - treatment. breast cancer is in fact a very incurable illness if it is - a very incurable illness if it is diagnosed early. the unfortunate
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thing in sarah's case is that she was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer where it had already spread her body and you can only survive for as long as the treatments are helping and stalling breast cancer from spreading any further. sarah and the other— from spreading any further. sarah and the other four _ from spreading any further. sarah and the other four members - from spreading any further. sarah and the other four members of i from spreading any further. sarah and the other four members of girls aloud went their separate ways in 2013, but not before they'd entertained fans the best part of a decade. sarah harding was a crucial part of the group, a woman who achieved so much life cut short at such a young age. sarah harding who has died at the age of 39. tributes and memories have been posted on social media. sarah harding's former boyfriend, calum best, spoke of the "crazy fun times and adventures" they had together, saying she would be "so very missed". spice girl and former judge on popstars: the rivals, geri horner said sarah harding
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would be remembered for the light and joy she brought to the world. and davina mccall who presented pop stars the rivals, which launched sarah's career tweeted to say... a star from the get go, hugely fun and outgoing yet also somehow fragile. and the model and tv personality, katie price, has posted on instagram to say, "sarah harding was always such a genuine and honest person," and that she'd always remember the laughs they had together. sarah harding was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, when she was 38. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns is with me. what more do we know about the diagnosis? we what more do we know about the diaunosis? ~ ~' ., what more do we know about the diaunosis? ~ ~ ., ., , what more do we know about the diaunosis? ~ ~' ., ., , ., ., diagnosis? we know it was around the time of the pandemic _ diagnosis? we know it was around the time of the pandemic that _ diagnosis? we know it was around the time of the pandemic that she - diagnosis? we know it was around the time of the pandemic that she got - time of the pandemic that she got herfirst symptom, and time of the pandemic that she got her first symptom, and this time of the pandemic that she got herfirst symptom, and this is time of the pandemic that she got her first symptom, and this is a pain in her breast which is something that is not seen by itself as a side of breast cancer normally. so she described the pain is overwhelming, though, she said it was stopping her sleeping at night,
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that she was taking so many painkillers to manage it, but she was trying to convince herself it was trying to convince herself it was just a cyst or something harmless. that coupled with the fact there was a pandemic, they were on lockdown, this meant she was delayed in getting to the doctor. it was last august when she announced to the public that she had cancer, and by then it had spread to other parts of her body. by last christmas she knew it was terminal, that christmas was going to be her last one. so what happened is, the delay didn't help her in any way, because what we know about breast cancer as it is the most common cancer in the uk, one in seven women will be diagnosed at some stage, and most of them the survival rates are really good, 85% are expected to survive at least five years. but with any cancer, the earlier you catch it the more likely you are to recover.— earlier you catch it the more likely you are to recover. does age come into it at all — you are to recover. does age come into it at all in _ you are to recover. does age come into it at all in terms _ you are to recover. does age come into it at all in terms of _ you are to recover. does age come into it at all in terms of the - into it at all in terms of the long—term prognosis? she was so young. long-term prognosis? she was so ounu. ,, long-term prognosis? she was so oun _ ,, ., , long-term prognosis? she was so oun, ,, long-term prognosis? she was so ounu. ,, ,, long-term prognosis? she was so
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ouna. ,, ,, long-term prognosis? she was so oun, ,, .,, y., ,, ., , ,':f~ young. she was so young. she was 38 when she was — young. she was so young. she was 38 when she was diagnosed. _ young. she was so young. she was 38 when she was diagnosed. the - young. she was so young. she was 38| when she was diagnosed. the context, just 4% of breast cancer cases in the uk happened to women under a0. by the uk happened to women under a0. by far it as a bigger risk when you are over 50. that was another thing that was unlucky for her, the pandemic having a symptom that isn't a classic symptom of breast cancer, and the fact that her age made her kind of think she could alert a bit. but she isn't alone in doing that. the charity breast cancer now looks at the number of referrals between march and december last year, they fell by 90,000 because people didn't want to come forward. the charity had that people didn't want to be a burden on the nhs, although they were worried about catching covid in the medical appointments. find it were worried about catching covid in the medical appointments.— the medical appointments. and it is that a pattern _ the medical appointments. and it is that a pattern then, _ the medical appointments. and it is that a pattern then, the _ the medical appointments. and it is that a pattern then, the pandemic l that a pattern then, the pandemic effect on cancer diagnosis? and treatment as well? this effect on cancer diagnosis? and treatment as well?— effect on cancer diagnosis? and treatment as well? this is something we are only going _ treatment as well? this is something we are only going to _ treatment as well? this is something we are only going to see _ treatment as well? this is something we are only going to see as _ treatment as well? this is something we are only going to see as time - we are only going to see as time goes on. yes, breast cancer is the most common cancer, we have the numbers for that, but it is something that has happened across many different cancers. we need to
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do now is see the impact of that. breast cancer now, it thinks there will be 11,000 people living with undiagnosed breast cancer in the uk at the moment. undiagnosed breast cancer in the uk at the moment-— undiagnosed breast cancer in the uk at the moment. liz 0'riordan is a breast surgeon, author and broadcaster who has breast cancer herself. shejoins me now. thank you for speaking to us. this must be so hard to hear this news, for someone like you who not only works in the field but is affected by this breast cancer. it’s works in the field but is affected by this breast cancer.— by this breast cancer. it's 'ust trauic by this breast cancer. it's 'ust tragic whenever i by this breast cancer. it's 'ust tragic whenever someone]- by this breast cancer. it'sjust i tragic whenever someone young by this breast cancer. it'sjust - tragic whenever someone young dies of breast cancer. it is just so hard. and like many cancer patients out there, you have the guilt that you are still alive and then the fear that you might be next. and you are still alive and then the fear that you might be next. and in terms of the _ fear that you might be next. and in terms of the impact _ fear that you might be next. and in terms of the impact it _ fear that you might be next. and in terms of the impact it has, - fear that you might be next. and in terms of the impact it has, when i terms of the impact it has, when someone with a public profile mentions their own diagnosis, do you see people picking up on that and actually, if they have any slight
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symptoms, does it help the kind of awareness of this and, by that, but people being diagnosed sooner and having better outcomes? it has people being diagnosed sooner and having better outcomes?— having better outcomes? it has a massive impact _ having better outcomes? it has a massive impact whenever - having better outcomes? it has a massive impact whenever a - having better outcomes? it has a - massive impact whenever a celebrity is diagnosed, we get a lot more referrals, and some... and i would love if off the back of this we could remind women and girls to start checking their breasts at an early age. ideally in the middle of their cycle when the breasts are less lumpy, you know your body, and if you can pick something up is at an earlier stage you are more likely to have a curable disease. find an earlier stage you are more likely to have a curable disease. and what ofthe to have a curable disease. and what of the symptoms — to have a curable disease. and what of the symptoms that _ to have a curable disease. and what of the symptoms that women - to have a curable disease. and what| of the symptoms that women should look out for? the of the symptoms that women should look out for?— look out for? the main symptom is that lump in _ look out for? the main symptom is that lump in the _ look out for? the main symptom is that lump in the breast. _ look out for? the main symptom is that lump in the breast. and - look out for? the main symptom is that lump in the breast. and that i look out for? the main symptom isj that lump in the breast. and that is a lump that stays for more than two to four weeks, because breast cysts will come and go with a period. it can also be dimpling of the breast or puckering of the nipple. it's important to at your breasts in the mirror, blood around the nipple can also be a sign. pain is rarely a symptom, but if you have pain it's
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been evermore than a month and you can't explain it, go get yourself checked. , ,., can't explain it, go get yourself checked. , , ., , checked. there will be some people who will pick — checked. there will be some people who will pick op _ checked. there will be some people who will pick up on _ checked. there will be some people who will pick up on these _ checked. there will be some people | who will pick up on these symptoms, these warning signs, but either they will be anxious about going into health care settings, they may fear they will come across people with covid, they may worry that they may be contributing to a spread of covid, or pressure on services. for multiple reasons they may put off going for very valid reasons. how would you advise them to weigh up those very legitimate but conflicting feelings? the first thin to conflicting feelings? the first thing to say _ conflicting feelings? the first thing to say is _ conflicting feelings? the first thing to say is that _ conflicting feelings? the first thing to say is that breast - conflicting feelings? the first. thing to say is that breast cancer is actually a very slow growing disease, and it may take anywhere between five and ten years to grow from a sale to a cancer that can spread around the body. so the waiting a couple of months probably won't do any harm. but we know 5% of women can be diagnosed with advanced disease at the onset without knowing they have it, which is probably what happened to sarah. i would advise anyone to go get checked, most breast units are carrying on in
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cleaner parts of the hospital where you are not exposed to patients and medical wards with covid. just go get checked, for your own peace of mind, i know how hard it can be sitting at home, wondering if it is something serious or not. in terms of outcomes _ something serious or not. in terms of outcomes and _ something serious or not. in terms of outcomes and fighting _ something serious or not. in terms of outcomes and fighting breast. of outcomes and fighting breast cancer, are things getting better overall or are they getting worse in terms of numbers and outcomes for people across the uk? the terms of numbers and outcomes for people across the uk?— people across the uk? the survival statistics are _ people across the uk? the survival statistics are getting _ people across the uk? the survival statistics are getting better - people across the uk? the survival statistics are getting better and - statistics are getting better and better all the time, there are more drugs being developed, but we still need more research into trying to find cures for metastatic disease. and sadly up to a third of women with breast cancer will get recurrent disease and that can be ten or 20 years down the line. so it's really important that patients know what signs to look out for to see if the cancer has come back. thank you very much for speaking to us. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this
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evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are entertainmentjournalist, caroline frost and parliamentary journalist tony grew. the chief executive of one of prince charles' charities, the prince's foundation, has temporarily stepped down from the role, following claims that he helped secure an honour for a major donor. michael fawcett is accused of helping a saudi businessman receive an honourary cbe. here's our royal correspondentjonny dymond; for decades, michael fawcett was the aide with the answers to the prince's problems. mr fawcett, did you secure honours for cash? any comment on the allegations in the newspapers this morning? is the sunday times story true? this morning he wasn't taking questions. he's accused of promising to help this wealthy saudi businessman — mahfouz marei mubarak bin mahfouz — to get british citizenship and an honour in exchange for donations to the prince's charities.
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he was the prince's valet until 2003 — but he was more than just a servant. a controversial figure at the palace, he won the loyalty of prince charles. twice he left the prince. twice he came back. until yesterday, the chief executive of the prince's foundation. today, a former minister said there were questions to answer. well, michael fawcett has been forced to resign twice already. and both times — under cover of darkness, almost — he was reinstated by prince charles when the hoo—ha had died down. so prince charles is very, very closely linked with this man and i'm sure that whatever michael fawcett did would have been done with the full support of prince charles. prince charles needs to answer questions about this, not michael fawcett. the foundation said it takes very seriously the allegations that had recently been brought to its attention and the matter is currently under investigation. mr bin mahfouz said he expected no
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reward for his charitable donations. a source close to the prince told the bbc that prince charles was not aware of any link between donations to his charities and honours or british citizenship. michael fawcett has temporarily stepped down from his position. jonny dymond, bbc news. a female police officer in central afghanistan has been shot dead by armed men inside her home. banu negar�*s family told the bbc the gunmen tied them up and searched the house before killing her. she was heavily pregnant. despite a journalist saying he witnessed the attack by the taliban in ghor province, the family couldn't confirm if the group was responsible. they have denied all involvement. earlier, pakistan chaired a virtual meeting on afghanistan, bringing together neighbouring countries, including china and iran. an official statement said they'd agreed that peace in afghanistan was crucial to the region's security. 0ur south asia correspondent
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danjohnson has the latest from delhi. we have reliable accounts that three gunmen went to the home of that female police officer last night, tied her up as they searched her home, and then shot her in front of her husband and children. exactly who those gunmen were remains unclear. the family say they can't confirm whether that was taliban, is or perhaps some other group, but some witnesses with knowledge of the situation there in that city say that was an attack carried out by the taliban and it was in response to an action earlier in the day that the police woman had been involved in where a taliban flag was taken down from the streets of that provincial capital. we don't know if she was working in her official capacity as a police officer, because the afghan national police has effectively been in chaos since the taliban took over control of so many provinces in the rest of the country.
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we don't know if she was actually on duty as a police officer or if that was something she was involved in in a personal capacity, but she was known to have been previously part of the police force, so that perhaps was why she has been targeted. her family have actually denied she was part of that — perhaps they are just trying to maintain her innocence. so, a really unclear situation. but what you can take from it, even though the taliban has said it will investigate this and find out who the killers were, it shows that even people who were previously in positions of authority are not safe in cities across afghanistan, something that has been warned about for the weeks since the taliban started taking control. and that, potentially, if this was carried out by militants, that there are reprisals, that there are attacks on people who are seen to have either broken the rules or gone against the regime. the headlines on bbc news... former girls aloud
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singer sarah harding has died at the age of 39, after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year. the head of one of prince charles' charities temporarily steps down after claims he helped secure an honour for a major donor. relatives of a female police officer in the ghor province of afghanistan have told the bbc that she has been killed by the taliban. there's a growing backlash in the conservative party to suggestions of increasing national insurance contributions in order to fund social care in england. the former chancellor, lord hammond, has warned borisjohnson he'll damage the party if he adopts the policy, which would break a manifesto commitment. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. this is kate visiting her mother, carolyn, who is 75, in a care home with dementia. kate is selling her mother's flat to pay for the care. £7,000 a month and it has risen fast.
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the stress of, will we be able to afford it? you hear about these astronomical care home prices and they are, the fees are not sustainable, certainly with mum's fees going up by a8% in six years, should i ever need to go into a care home i dread to think what the price would be. the care system is in crisis. some pay all their costs if they have assets, others rely on local authorities who struggle to fund adequate provision. and battered by the pandemic, it is short on staff. underpaid, there is 100,000 vacancies. we will work with national and local partners and those who have lived experience of the social care sector to get this right and get it right as we are determined to do. we will fix the crisis in social care once and for all. borisjohnson on his first day as prime minister promised to fix this crisis, but that will cost billions each year, and he also pledged no increase in
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major taxes, a pledge he is now considering breaking. it's thought the government is looking at raising national insurance contributions. some conservative mps, though, don't want taxes to go up at all. others think this would be a deeply unfair way to fix the problem. and labour doesn't think it's the right solution. the issue is, an increase in national insurance contributions is asking young working people, some of whom will never inherit a property, to subsidise older people who have accumulated wealth during their lifetime and have a property. and on any basis, that has got to be wrong. we are sceptical about the idea of loading the entire burden of the social care crisis onto the supermarket workers and delivery drivers who are already dealing with really high housing costs, childcare costs and others. so this is a huge test for borisjohnson. as much as money, far reaching reform is required and he will have to get it
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through his own party as well as through parliament. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, has confirmed that proof of vaccination will be required to get into nightclubs and other large indoor events in england. he said it was the right time to introduce vaccine certificates, as all over—18s will have been offered two jabs by then. the scheme — which will be introduced at the end of the month — has been criticised by venues and some mps. the scottish labour leader, anas sarwar, says he's not supporting plans to bring in covid vaccination passports for nightclubs and large events like football matches and festivals. the scottish government wants msps to approve the plans, in a bid to increase vaccine take—up in the younger generation. 0ur correspondent in glasgow, jamie mcivor has more. we now have two of the three opposition parties in the scottish parliament saying they won't back the scheme. labour confirming today that they won't vote for the scheme. they say they have serious concerns.
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indeed, their concern is that rather than encouraging younger people to get vaccinated, anything that could start to look like a form of compulsion could actually end up being counter—productive and entrench vaccine hesitancy rather than help it. we already knew that the scottish liberal democrats were opposed to the idea. they came out straightaway with their opposition, describing it as a deeply illiberal idea. the scottish conservatives have got serious concerns, though they are still to confirm just how they plan to vote this week. and, yes, there are concerns, too, in the business community. one major business organisation, scottish chambers of commerce, calling for urgent clarity on just what businesses are going to be affected by this. there was a bit of a debate, bit of a concern among some in the hospitality industry in scotland aboutjust which businesses will be classed as nightclubs rather than pubs. the scottish professional football league, they have got concerns, too. large sporting events with more
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than 10,000 people in attendance, so some top—flight football matches such as maybe a rangers—celtic game or an international game, they could be affected and others that would be affected by the scheme, well, any unseated event with more than 500 people indoors or a000 outdoors. so certainly debate growing, opposition growing. let's take a look at the latest uk coronavirus figures — there were 37,011 new infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period, which means an average ofjust over 35,500 cases per day in the last week. the figures also show there were just over 7,500 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus three days ago. 68 deaths were reported in the latest 2a hour period — that's people who died
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within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. that takes the average number of deaths per day to 113 over the last week. 0n vaccinations, nearly 89 percent of people over the age of 16 have had theirfirstjab, and nearly 80 percent of people over 16 have had both doses. the un has condemned a military coup in the west african nation of guinea — where soldiers have appeared on tv saying that they've ousted president alpha conde. there are also unconfirmed reports that mr conde, has been arrested by security forces after hours of heavy gunfire in the capital conakry. residents say there are soldiers patrolling the streets of the city. developments are said to be centred in the kaloum area — where the presidential palace is located. videos shared on social media showed president conde being detained by security forces. the videos could not immediately be authenticated by the bbc. soldiers have appeared on television announcing there has been a coup.
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there are reports that an elite national army unit led by a former french legionnaire, mamady doumbouya, is behind it. the bbc�*s mayeni jones gave us this update from the region. so at the moment, both embassies and the military are asking members of the public to stay at home and many guineans right now will be home watching television, listening to radio, and being particularly worried. it has been a very tumultuous year for the country. last year there were clashes between demonstrators and members of the authorities. they were against the fact that president alpha conde was trying to run for a third term. constitutionally, he used to only be allowed to run for two consecutive terms. dozens of people were killed in those clashes and now, just a year later, we are seeing a coup d'etat by the military. they claim that it is because of corruption and mismanagement. guinea is a country that should be very wealthy, it has a lot of mineral wealth, diamond, iron ore, bauxite, but it is amongst one of the world's poorest countries and last year,
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when those protests were happening, a lot of young people were complaining about economic management and unemployment. so this all seems tied to this economic downfall of the country and the unhappiness that a lot of guineans feel with the government. at the moment, that is what they say they want to do, they want to scrap the past constitution, start a new one. they have not said anything about elections, but they said they want a guinea that is more inclusive for everyone and this is part of a worrying trend across west africa. we have seen coups recently in mali and in other countries like niger and it seems that we are seeing a trend in west africa after several years where there have been many successful elections and peaceful transitions of power. many analysts are now worried that we are going back and going back to an era where the military are taking control because of weak civilian institutions. police in north yorkshire say their operation to drain lakes and search woodland in relation to the disappearance
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of claudia lawrence has concluded without any significant discoveries. detectives say a number of smaller items were recovered but appear not to be related to 35—year—old's disappearance. claudia lawrence has not been seen since she failed to arrive for work at the university of york in march 2009. a number of people have been questioned in connection with her disappearance, but no charges have ever been brought. grenfell tower looks set to be demolished after the fire four years ago that killed 72 people. structural engineers employed by the government have decided that the building in west london should be carefully taken down once current safety works are completed next year. the government says it's considering the independent safety advice, and is engaging closely with the community before a final decision is taken — but survivors groups say they have not been consulted. more than 8,000 chain stores
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disappeared from our high streets and shopping centres in the first six months of this year. that's according to new research which suggests city centres have suffered the most, as footfall has yet to recover to pre—pandemic levels. our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports. it is the most famous shopping street in london, but now one of the hardest hit. oxford street littered with boarded up shops. city centres have suffered the most this year as chain stores continue to close. there is quite a lot closed down, we've noticed. that's what we've noticed walking all along. it's not as crowded as it used to be. i it is quite unexpected to come into central london and actually see how effected they are by the pandemic. it's the same in brighton, loads of shops have gone. new figures show the scale of upheaval. in the first part of this year, 3,a88 chain stores opened. these include everything from gyms and cafes to banks and bars — but more than 8,700 of them closed, meaning a net loss of more than 5,200 outlets.
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these figures are stark, they are not quite as bad as this time last year. out of all the locations across great britain, it's retail parks and out—of—town shopping that have fared best. so, is this a permanent shift? over the next few months, city centres will start to liven up again as people start to go back to work, as schools go back and people spend more time in cities. however, i don't think you're going to get the same level of footfall in city centres as before. this bakery chain definitely prefers the high street. it's just opening its latest store here in the london suburb of kew, one of four new branches. opening the extra stores, you know, and being able to expand at a time when rents are low and there is opportunity for us to rethink even what a bakery is. tempting people back in is the big challenge now for so many of our towns and city
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centres, which are still struggling to fully recover from the pandemic. emma simpson, bbc news, central london. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. hello there. finally we have some much—needed sunshine and warmth across east england and wales today. there was some rain around and that will continue to drift slowly south across the borders into the north of england, weakening all the time. quite a lot of cloud through scotland and northern ireland, and some cloud, patchy mist and fog across south wales in south—west england. a relatively mild start to monday morning. some beautiful sparkling blue sunshine across much of england and wales first thing. that will gradually break up any cloud across northern england as well. could see some fog lingering for cornwall. that week where the front producing a few spots of rain, slowly easing into the afternoon. a
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light southerly breeze for most, feeling quite pleasant, and temperatures on the up. low 20s for scotland and northern ireland, highest values of 27 somewhere in the south—east. take care. hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos. the headlines: former girls aloud singer sarah harding has died at the age of 39,
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after being diagnosed

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