Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 6, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson faces a backlash, over plans to raise national insurance to pay for social care reforms in england. but ministers say change is vital. this is a change that is long overdue, it won't be easy, there is no right answer that everybody will find consensus around, every single possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. we'll be asking what other tax options the government might have to pay for social care. also this afternoon: the taliban claims control of the panjshir valley, the last region to fall in afghanistan. but opposition forces, say they're still fighting. back to school for millions more children in england, wales and northern ireland, but will the return spark a rise in covid cases?
2:01 pm
making eye contact for the first time, the conjoined twins separated after rare surgery. and, wickets fall at the oval as england chase a huge total, to save the fourth test, against india. good afternoon. mps return to westminster today, following the summer break, with the funding of social care and the nhs at the top of the agenda. some tory mps have expressed anger at reports of an increase in national insurance contributions to help fund social care in england, which would break a conservative manifesto pledge not to raise taxes. labour is also opposing a rise in ni. it's expected that an extra
2:02 pm
£5.5 billion will be announced for the nhs. here's our political correspondent chris mason. for yea rs for years governments have not got around to sorting a new system for social care in england. it is complex, controversial and vastly expensive. should there be a cap on the bill anyone should face? which tax should be put up to pay for it. it appears the government does want a cap and a hike in national insurance. it a cap and a hike in national insurance.— a cap and a hike in national insurance. , . . ., , ., insurance. it is change that is long overdue. there _ insurance. it is change that is long overdue. there is _ insurance. it is change that is long overdue. there is no _ insurance. it is change that is long overdue. there is no right - insurance. it is change that is long overdue. there is no right answer| overdue. there is no right answer that everybody will find consensus around, every possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. i don't know the detail of what he will propose, but this is we need to be honest with the public and be ready for the debate and to put in place reforms. here and be ready for the debate and to put in place reforms.— put in place reforms. here is one reason it is _ put in place reforms. here is one reason it is hard _ put in place reforms. here is one reason it is hard for— put in place reforms. here is one reason it is hard for the - reason it is hard for the government. look at this i pulled
2:03 pm
out of the archive from before the election. , ~ w' ~ out of the archive from before the election. , ~ w . u, election. here is the kicker. we can do all these — election. here is the kicker. we can do all these things _ election. here is the kicker. we can do all these things without - election. here is the kicker. we can do all these things without racing i do all these things without racing income _ do all these things without racing income tax, vat or national insurance _ income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that is our guarantee — insurance contributions. that is our . uarantee. , insurance contributions. that is our auarantee. , ,, a ., guarantee. here is the kicker now that guarantee _ guarantee. here is the kicker now that guarantee looks _ guarantee. here is the kicker now that guarantee looks like - guarantee. here is the kicker now that guarantee looks like it - guarantee. here is the kicker now that guarantee looks like it will i guarantee. here is the kicker now| that guarantee looks like it will be shredded, because... .the that guarantee looks like it will be shredded, because... . the simplest wa to shredded, because... . the simplest way to raise — shredded, because... . the simplest way to raise large — shredded, because... . the simplest way to raise large amounts - shredded, because... . the simplest way to raise large amounts of - shredded, because... . the simplest| way to raise large amounts of money is increasing — way to raise large amounts of money is increasing rates— way to raise large amounts of money is increasing rates of— way to raise large amounts of money is increasing rates of the _ way to raise large amounts of money is increasing rates of the three - is increasing rates of the three main _ is increasing rates of the three main taxes. _ is increasing rates of the three main taxes, national— is increasing rates of the three i main taxes, national insurance is increasing rates of the three . main taxes, national insurance is one, _ main taxes, national insurance is one. income _ main taxes, national insurance is one. income tax— main taxes, national insurance is one, income tax is— main taxes, national insurance is one, income tax is the _ main taxes, national insurance is one, income tax is the obvious . one, income tax is the obvious alternative _ one, income tax is the obvious alternative and _ one, income tax is the obvious alternative and there - one, income tax is the obvious alternative and there is - one, income tax is the obvious alternative and there is vat i one, income tax is the obvious alternative and there is vat asi one, income tax is the obvious - alternative and there is vat as the third~ _ alternative and there is vat as the third. . , ., alternative and there is vat as the third. . ,., ., alternative and there is vat as the third. . ., , , ., third. labour and plenty of conservatives _ third. labour and plenty of conservatives say - third. labour and plenty of conservatives say putting l third. labour and plenty of i conservatives say putting up national insurance in particular will tax the less well off, to subsidise the better off. the government _ subsidise the better off. the government has _ subsidise the better off. tie: government has got to subsidise the better off. tue: government has got to rethink this. they say they want to level up across the country, but in fact they would be hitting many families in constituencies like mine in the midlands and in the north hard but
2:04 pm
not getting improvements in care and they would be seeing greater taxes on businesses too, just when they are struggling. tt on businesses too, 'ust when they struggling.— on businesses too, 'ust when they are struggling. it seems to me that lookin: at are struggling. it seems to me that looking at income _ are struggling. it seems to me that looking at income tax, _ are struggling. it seems to me that looking at income tax, which - are struggling. it seems to me that looking at income tax, which of- looking at income tax, which of course — looking at income tax, which of course is — looking at income tax, which of course is a _ looking at income tax, which of course is a far less regressive tax and a _ course is a far less regressive tax and a tax — course is a far less regressive tax and a tax that everyone who has income — and a tax that everyone who has income pays. those who are repaired, even if— income pays. those who are repaired, even if they— income pays. those who are repaired, even if they have a —— retired won't pay national — even if they have a —— retired won't pay national insurance. mp5 even if they have a -- retired won't pay national insurance.— pay national insurance. mps are returnin: pay national insurance. mps are returning to _ pay national insurance. mps are returning to parliament - pay national insurance. mps are returning to parliament and - pay national insurance. mps are returning to parliament and a i pay national insurance. mps are i returning to parliament and a row pay national insurance. mps are - returning to parliament and a row is brewing already. let's speak to our correspondent, ione wells, who's in westminster. there are no easy answers to this and the government made pledges before it got into power, we saw borisjohnson in chris mason's report. but something has to be done about social care. the prime minister suggested he did have a proposal before he became prime minister to deal with social care, he clearly didn't. this suggest that national insurance could be raised, is that a real starter now, given
2:05 pm
the opposition that we have seen from some in his own party and labour. . from some in his own party and labour. , , ., labour. yes, there is no disagreement _ labour. yes, there is no disagreement that - labour. yes, there is no - disagreement that something labour. yes, there is no _ disagreement that something needs to be done about social care. everyone wants a solution so people are not put out—of—pocket to pay for necessary social care and this is something that people at all stages of their life may need and it applies to the elderly and younger people with disabilities. we have seen reports about this rumoured rise to national insurance by at least i%. that is what has caused the row in westminster. there is a number of key oppositions really to that tax rise. firstly, as you say, the fact that this was a tory manifesto commitment not to raise taxes. that is something that has angered a lot of tory mps, who say to break a manifesto commitment you
2:06 pm
need a good reason and some say when that promise was made, they also promised to fix social care scotland care. there is a concern about who this is going to hit. there is a concern that the lower paid younger workers will be hit hard, because it is a tax that you pay up to a certain age, up to your sort of state pension age. there is a worry that younger people will be hit hardest at the cost of elderly people, some of maybe may be more affluent. one of the things that a number of tory mps have been raising is also they feel like some of the announcements about the funding model have come before we have seen the plan. obviously, lots of speculation about how it will be funded and will we see tax rises, but we don't know what we are yet funding, what cap could be put in place for social care and what this
2:07 pm
future model look like. that is a big concern. obviously, nothing has been necessarily been confirmed yet. earlier at a briefing for journalists no 10 said that any plan for social care would be put before parliament and they wouldn't be committing on any speculation and not commenting on any time scale. so while the rumours are we could hear more tomorrow, no confirmation of that by downing street.— millions of pupils are returning to classrooms in england and wales, amid fears of a spike in students with covid. scientists have warned of a rapid rise in school cases without such measures and experts have not recommended jabs for healthy 12— to is—year—olds. in england, there are over 30 times more children with covid compared with last year. in scotland cases among the under—15s have trebled since school restarted in mid—august. we can't say that the rise has been
2:08 pm
solely caused by schools returning. this graph shows cases in 2020 — in green — and this year — in red. although cases were much lower at this point in 2020, they followed a similar pattern, rising before schools went back and then increasing more steeply later in september. martine croxall is at a school in stockton—on—tees. hello, yes i am. it is the north shore academy and a fantastic building it is too. lunch time is over, if you hear any crashing and banging, it is the dinner ladies tidying up. the halls are full of students, which they weren't last year, most of it was online, that brought a huge number of challenges to staff, pupils and parents. but it is not quite back to normal. there are considerations that schools have to bear in mind, there are still thousands of cases of covid be
2:09 pm
reported still each day. let's look at the wider picture then, with our education correspondent. please be attentive, have a lovely day and i'll speak to you later in the day. it was billed as the most normal school year since before the pandemic, but even before some english and welsh students have taken their seats in class, more uncertainty about whether i2 to 15—year—olds will be routinely offered the vaccine. that question has been hotly debated here at the north shore academy in stockton upon tees. i would definitely get the vaccine, because we have been one of the countries fortunate enough to obviously have vaccines and we should take that, use the advantage. i think i would to savei people, yeah, iwould. the joint committee on vaccination and immunisations told uk governments they would not on health grounds alone be recommending all 12 to 15—year—olds are offered the jab. instead, chief medical officers across the four nations
2:10 pm
are being asked to review the scientists' advice and decide on a wider set of criteria whether to overrule them. i think many of the school and college leaders who i represent will have been disappointed in the decision byjcvi. not because they are fans of vaccination, but we know that vaccination in the absence of other control measures apart from ventilation are going to be very important in getting away from that terrible disruption that so many young people experienced over the past year. the they considered the individual health benefits and took account they considered the individual health benefits and took account of the potential for extremely rare heart complications. authorities in england, wales and northern ireland are monitoring the situation closely in scotland, where schools returned in the middle of august. some experts are linking this with a sharp rise in covid infections. in england, cases have remained steady throughout august, but the rate of infection among five to 15—year—olds to the end of the month was 30 times higher, compared with the same time last year. everybody is working really hard
2:11 pm
to keep children safe and to be very alert for any rises and act if there are any rises. i have been the in schools right through summer and actually right through covid, i was in schools myself until march as a head teacher and ceo and i know that everyone's working really hard to make this return safe. the uk government has pledged to give english school children the most normal classroom experience possible. the decision on whether to offer vaccinations to all 12 to 15—year—olds could shape what this year's education looks like in reality. children often moan and groan about going to school, but the pupils here seem to be relieved to come back. the head teacherjoins us. you seemed to get ahead of the curve
2:12 pm
when lockdown started. you knew the writing was on the wall. yes when lockdown started. you knew the writing was on the wall.— writing was on the wall. yes it was a difficult time, _ writing was on the wall. yes it was a difficult time, probably - writing was on the wall. yes it was a difficult time, probably the - writing was on the wall. yes it was a difficult time, probably the mostj a difficult time, probably the most difficult of my headship, a time i won't forget. initially when the lockdown announcement came we were probably about 48—hours ahead, we knew it was coming and started planning for it. initially it was a case of getting work out to kids and we developed work packs and they went home with the children. if the children were not in, doorstep delivery for children and when we came back into school, we thought, how do we re—create the classroom? what is the best solution for our kids? because that wasn't the best solution for our kids. we made the decision to start live streaming. we did an audit, the ceo ordered a lot of computers and luckily the government came with the laptop for schools scheme and they arrived fairly quickly. so we were able to
2:13 pm
live stream. fairly quickly. so we were able to live stream-— fairly quickly. so we were able to live stream. now you're got to get used to being _ live stream. now you're got to get used to being in _ live stream. now you're got to get used to being in the _ live stream. now you're got to get used to being in the classroom - used to being in the classroom again, how have you had to adapt for this term? you have a testing centre on site too? yes this term? you have a testing centre on site too?— on site too? yes the last two or three years _ on site too? yes the last two or three years brought _ on site too? yes the last two or three years brought a _ on site too? yes the last two or three years brought a lot - on site too? yes the last two or three years brought a lot of - three years brought a lot of challenges and as a school and a trust we look at those as challenges and how do we do what is best for our children? and today there will be 700 children tested, they were tested on friday. it is the first time the children are back in school and not sat in rows with masks on. today the children walking around the building, not being in a bubble, it is the first time they have done that and that has brought challenges. butjust being pragmatic in what we do and wanting the best for the children and the building. that pragmatism and wanting the best has helped you turn the school around, there is 40% of children
2:14 pm
entitled to the pupil premium, you've managed to turn the school into a success. how have you done it? ., , i: , ., . , it? nearly 70% of the children, but over the last _ it? nearly 70% of the children, but over the last three _ it? nearly 70% of the children, but over the last three years _ it? nearly 70% of the children, but over the last three years it - it? nearly 70% of the children, but over the last three years it has - over the last three years it has been a journey and three years ago we were in a very different place. we are part of a multi—academy trust and i needed a lot of support from that trust. we had a lot of vacancies. we don't now. we have had support and the local authority have been brilliant, particularly in the pandemic with the school. that has been fantastic and the staff in the building, it is a special place, the staff go above and beyond day after day, just to make sure our kids get the best and during the pandemic it was harder keeping them out of the building than keeping them in. there has been a shift in culture. the children have _ has been a shift in culture. the children have said _ has been a shift in culture. the children have said they're glad to
2:15 pm
be back and looking forward to getting fantastic gcse results. before we go, i want to show you this map. it is called a reading route. you invented this. you pick a line, like a railway line and a different colour, that represents a different colour, that represents a different genre of reading and you choose different books and it prompts you to have wider discussions. one girl mentioned her faith, she has read. 8? discussions. one girl mentioned her faith, she has read.— discussions. one girl mentioned her| faith, she has read._ about faith, she has read. 89 books. about a million words. _ faith, she has read. 89 books. about a million words. you _ faith, she has read. 89 books. about a million words. you are _ faith, she has read. 89 books. about a million words. you are to _ faith, she has read. 89 books. about a million words. you are to thank- a million words. you are to thank for this. you're being very modest. it came from north shore, it is trust—wide, access reading routes. it has been a huge success. tt is trust-wide, access reading routes. it has been a huge success.- it has been a huge success. it is a treat it has been a huge success. it is a great idea- _ it has been a huge success. it is a great idea- very _ it has been a huge success. it is a great idea. very innova _ it has been a huge success. it is a great idea. very innova thif. - great idea. very innova thif. novative. that is what this place is about. thank you. we have, we are here all afternoon and in the next the hour we will speak to a couple of parents about their experience of coaxing their children through
2:16 pm
education while they were all working from home and now they have sent them back to school. so relief in those quarter too. clive. thank you. we willjoin her later. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister faces a backlash over plans to raise national insurance to pay for social care reforms in england. ministers say families desperately need changes to the system. the taliban claims control of panjshir valley, the last part of afghanistan to resist their rule, but opposition forces say they're still fighting. back to school for millions more children in england, wales and northern ireland ? but will it spark a rise in covid cases? the taliban say it's seized panjshir province, the only part of afghanistan not under their control. a spokesman says no civilians have been killed in days of heavy fighting against opposition forces. leaders of the movement
2:17 pm
opposing taliban rule deny they've been defeated, and say they still have a presence in panjshir. our south asia correspondent, yogita limaye has more details. "we are raising the white flag in the provincial headquarters of panjshir," taliban fighters said in a video released by the group. they claim to have conquered the final stronghold of opposition, and with it, all of afghanistan. at a press conference in kabul, the group declared victory. "we tried our best to resolve the issue in panjshir through negotiations but it didn't work," a spokesman said. "we couldn't accept a power island in afghanistan, we had to use force." the panjshir valley lies to kabul�*s north—east. it has a narrow entrance and its terrain offers natural protection. attacked several times
2:18 pm
during afghanistan's long history of violence, its defenders have always held fort. and even now, those resisting taliban control say it hasn't been fully captured so far. we are present throughout panjshir at the moment. panjshir is in a small province or valley. panjshir has many semi valleys. from the southern part up to the northern part of the valley, right now the taliban are only in a few locations. they are facing difficulties. ourforces are resisting, ourforces are defending their people, their honour, their home and their values. one of the leaders of the resistance has released a voice message, blaming the international community for legitimising the taliban. amrullah saleh, afghanistan's former vice president was the other man leading the movement. a few days ago he'd send the bbc this clip, saying he was in panjshir. his whereabouts are now unknown.
2:19 pm
yogita limaye, bbc news. secunder kermani is in kabulfor us and says the situation in panjshir remains unclear, and there's still no news, on the taliban's plans for government. the taliban are yet to establish a new government first we were told they were waiting for the final men troops to leave. —— american troops to leave. one source is telling me we should get an announcement by the end of the week, but it is not clear if that will happen or not. there has been a suggestion the delays are also because of internal rivalries within the taliban about who will be appointed to what position. the man who is expected to be in over all control of the country, whatever form of government emerges is the supreme leader of the the taliban.
2:20 pm
the problem is he has been been very elusive. we have seen no public appearances or videos since the taliban took over and that has led to speculation that he could be dead. a taliban spokesman said that is not true and we will see him soon. the formation of the new government is key, because at the moment afghans are living through what feels like a state of limbo. no one is sure what the future will look like and what rules and laws the taliban want to implement and how willing they are to share power. tony blair has called on leading world powers to unite to develop a strategy to counter islamist extremism. in a speech the former prime minister said �*radical islam' still presented a security threat to the world. he said following the covid pandemic, bio—terror possibilities were no longer science fiction and the world would be wise to prepare for their use
2:21 pm
by extremist terror groups. disturbing reports of sexual abuse of children by other children almost doubled in the two years up to 2019, according to police figures obtained by bbc panorama. yearly reports show the cases have risen to between 15 and 16 thousand, with some of the alleged perpetrators aged just 10 or younger. daniela relph reports. the new figures paint a picture of a toxic sexual culture being experienced by some young people. where both perpetrators and victims are under 18. with some even aged 10 or under. when 90% of the victims are girls. jazmin met herfirst boyfriend on social media. he asked herfor naked boyfriend on social media. he asked her for naked photos and progressed to him filming them in bed together. i didn't want to do it. me saying no
2:22 pm
wasn't enough. there was no no. he would keep pushing it.— would keep pushing it. earlier this ear a would keep pushing it. earlier this year a web-site _ would keep pushing it. earlier this year a web-site was _ would keep pushing it. earlier this year a web-site was set _ would keep pushing it. earlier this year a web-site was set up - would keep pushing it. earlier this year a web-site was set up for- year a web—site was set up for people to publish anonymous accounts of abuse they say they suffered. there have been more than 50,000 posts on the site. for those helping teenagers navigate intimate relationships the situation is complex. relationships the situation is com - lex. relationships the situation is comlex. ., ., , ., , complex. the ma'ority of girls re ort complex. the ma'ority of girls report things — complex. the majority of girls report things like _ complex. the majority of girls report things like unwanted i complex. the majority of girls - report things like unwanted touching and being _ report things like unwanted touching and being pestered to send nudes. that is— and being pestered to send nudes. that is so— and being pestered to send nudes. that is so frequent it has become a part of— that is so frequent it has become a part of every day life to the point where _ part of every day life to the point where they wouldn't bother reporting it, where they wouldn't bother reporting it. because _ where they wouldn't bother reporting it, because it feels like a normal part of— it, because it feels like a normal part of the — it, because it feels like a normal part of the day. it, because it feels like a normal part of the day-— it, because it feels like a normal part of the day. what is the legal a . e part of the day. what is the legal are of part of the day. what is the legal age of consent? _ part of the day. what is the legal age of consent? does _ part of the day. what is the legal age of consent? does anyone - part of the day. what is the legal age of consent? does anyone in l part of the day. what is the legal i age of consent? does anyone in the class _ age of consent? does anyone in the class know? — age of consent? does anyone in the class know? that _ age of consent? does anyone in the class know? that ability _ age of consent? does anyone in the class know? that ability to - age of consent? does anyone in the class know? that ability to say- age of consent? does anyone in the class know? that ability to say yes i class know? that ability to say yes or no— class know? that ability to say yes or no freedom _ class know? that ability to say yes or no freedom is _ class know? that ability to say yes or no freedom is an _ class know? that ability to say yes or no freedom is an important - or no freedom is an important option — or no freedom is an important option ht_ or no freedom is an important 0 tion. �* . or no freedom is an important otion. �* , ,. option. at this school, the government's _ option. at this school, the government's new - option. at this school, the government's new sex - option. at this school, the - government's new sex education curriculum is being taught and
2:23 pm
discussed. the school also runs projects focussed on the power social media to promote abusive behaviour. tt social media to promote abusive behaviour. . social media to promote abusive behaviour-— behaviour. it is so accessible, if ou behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have _ behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have a _ behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have a phone _ behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have a phone or _ behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have a phone or lapton - behaviour. it is so accessible, if you have a phone or lapton you | behaviour. it is so accessible, if. you have a phone or lapton you can access whatever you want and some of that can be extreme. if it is seen evenis that can be extreme. if it is seen even is doing it, if it is online it must be ok. isis part of normalisation. tt must be ok. isis part of normalisation.— must be ok. isis part of normalisation. , ., . ., must be ok. isis part of normalisation. , . . ., ., normalisation. it is a challenge to rotect normalisation. it is a challenge to protect children _ normalisation. it is a challenge to protect children from _ normalisation. it is a challenge to protect children from each - normalisation. it is a challenge to protect children from each other. normalisation. it is a challenge to i protect children from each other and the pressures in wider society. you can watch panorama's who s protecting our kids with mariella frostrup tonight at 7:35pm on bbc1. and details of organisations offering information and support with sexual abuse are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call forfree, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077.
2:24 pm
let's return to the question of how to pay for social care. the government is reported to be mulling a rise in national insurance but the idea is opposed by some of its own mps. with me is jasmine birtles, founder of moneymagpie.com and graham atkins, from the institute for government. the former health secretaryjeremy hunt says taxpayers should pay more to fund social care. is it your belief that the opposition coming from within the conservative party itself is based on the fact that the government said that it wouldn't raise taxes, or is the very idea of raising national insurance in any case the problem?— raising national insurance in any case the problem? yes, i think both of those things. _ case the problem? yes, i think both of those things. certainly, _ case the problem? yes, i think both of those things. certainly, as - case the problem? yes, i think both of those things. certainly, as you i of those things. certainly, as you say, the government did say right at the start, we are not going to raise
2:25 pm
taxes. well, things have changed to be fair in the last year and a half, all sorts of things have changed and it means they are going to have to raise taxes. national insurance is annoying, because it is not called a tax, but it is a tax. it could be seen as an insidious tax, because it is not something self—employed people can reduce by putting their outgoings against it. also there is a sense i think that this means, this, what they're saying, means that it this, what they're saying, means thatitis this, what they're saying, means that it is the young people who yet again are going to have to pay for the older ones, rather than people taking responsibility for their own lives, for their own futures and their own care, which what is a lot of people in the tory party feel should be done.—
2:26 pm
of people in the tory party feel should be done. , . ., ,., ., should be done. graham, the bottom line is that you _ should be done. graham, the bottom line is that you know _ should be done. graham, the bottom line is that you know older _ should be done. graham, the bottom line is that you know older people - line is that you know older people vote. might this be the trigger for the potential possibility that it is national insurance rises that will take place?— national insurance rises that will take lace? _ , take place? possibly. i suppose the imortant take place? possibly. i suppose the important point _ take place? possibly. i suppose the important point is _ take place? possibly. i suppose the important point is there _ take place? possibly. i suppose the important point is there are - take place? possibly. i suppose the important point is there are a - important point is there are a couple — important point is there are a couple of— important point is there are a couple of ways you could fund social care reform. — couple of ways you could fund social care reform, one is national insurance _ care reform, one is national insurance and that has adverse consequences for the way we treat self—employed people and the earnings of those under 65. on the other— earnings of those under 65. on the other hand. — earnings of those under 65. on the other hand, income tax has a broader base and _ other hand, income tax has a broader base and is— other hand, income tax has a broader base and is more progressive and has not been _ base and is more progressive and has not been raised for a long time. in either— not been raised for a long time. in either case — not been raised for a long time. in either case the government will have to find _ either case the government will have to find a _ either case the government will have to find a way of raising revenue to fund _ to find a way of raising revenue to fund this— to find a way of raising revenue to fund this spending on social care. boris _ fund this spending on social care. borisjohnson said that he had a plan for social care before he came
2:27 pm
into office and that was tied to making promises about not raising taxes. did you have any idea what that plan might have been? trio. t that plan might have been? no, i don't! i that plan might have been? no, i dont! i must— that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit _ that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit to _ that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit to be - that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit to be fair - that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit to be fair it i that plan might have been? no, i don't! i must admit to be fair it is a very thorny problem, because as you say it is older people who vote. so you want to be on their side. but the thing is that this is, it already the situation is broken. the social care situation is really bad in this country and it is only going to get worse, as we have an ageing population. and then you have many people who say, why should i sell my property, why should i use the money that i've spent all my years earning, to pay for care? and others 90. earning, to pay for care? and others go, why should we have to pay it? as i said, why the under 65s and particularly the younger people who have done badly compared to the baby
2:28 pm
boomers. why should they pay extra to help the baby boomers? there are other possibilities and i don't know what boris had in mind, but something i consider may become more prominent is insurance products. there are already some insurance products, they're not taubgted about very much —— talked about very much and there is not a great deal of take up for paying for care. i suspect that, you know, given that our government likes public/private partnerships, they might bring some of those insurance products to the foreand say we will pay for some of it, but you need to have some sort of investment or insurance product to pay for your care, you need to take responsibility for it. graham, that is another _ take responsibility for it. graham, that is another option _ take responsibility for it. graham, that is another option isn't - take responsibility for it. graham, that is another option isn't it? - take responsibility for it. graham, j that is another option isn't it? not just raising income tax, but what about a wealth tax, capital gains tax, might those not be options? the
2:29 pm
wealth tax is capital gains tax are different— wealth tax is capital gains tax are different ways you can raise money. it is different ways you can raise money. it is worth— different ways you can raise money. it is worth saying the broad outlines _ it is worth saying the broad outlines of reform are well known. it is outlines of reform are well known. it is not _ outlines of reform are well known. it is not like — outlines of reform are well known. it is not like the nhs, social care is means— it is not like the nhs, social care is means tested fyou require care, you will— is means tested fyou require care, you will he — is means tested fyou require care, you will be assessed to see whether you will be assessed to see whether you have _ you will be assessed to see whether you have the money to pay for it up to a certain — you have the money to pay for it up to a certain point. after which the state _ to a certain point. after which the state will— to a certain point. after which the state will pay. when we talk of insurance—based solutions, what we need _ insurance—based solutions, what we need to— insurance—based solutions, what we need to address is why a lot of these — need to address is why a lot of these products don't exist already and the _ these products don't exist already and the main reason companies don't offer such— and the main reason companies don't offer such things, they risk the person— offer such things, they risk the person with insurance might run up very high— person with insurance might run up very high bills that go on definitely is very large. so you need — definitely is very large. so you need some kind of taxpayer—funded mandatory — need some kind of taxpayer—funded mandatory contributions, so that the amount— mandatory contributions, so that the amount that any one person would pay is capped. _ amount that any one person would pay is capped, but once you have that
2:30 pm
kind of— is capped, but once you have that kind of cap — is capped, but once you have that kind of cap in place, there is a lot of other— kind of cap in place, there is a lot of other different options you can explore — of other different options you can explore it— of other different options you can explore. it is worth saying that these — explore. it is worth saying that these are — explore. it is worth saying that these are all, all we are discussing are extensions to how many people would _ are extensions to how many people would receive social care and the existing — would receive social care and the existing social care system is very fragile _ existing social care system is very fragile. there are a lot of vacancies, a lot of turnover, many providers— vacancies, a lot of turnover, many providers even before the pandemic were thinking of leaving the market, so the _ were thinking of leaving the market, so the government will have to spend more _ so the government will have to spend more to— so the government will have to spend more to maintain the existing system — briefly, what is your solution? i think there are a lot of different potential— i think there are a lot of different potential solutions. the government need to— potential solutions. the government need to he _ potential solutions. the government need to be clear about the scope of the social— need to be clear about the scope of the social care system. it needs to see and _ the social care system. it needs to see and identify tax rises to do so. national— see and identify tax rises to do so. national insurance is one option, but given— national insurance is one option, but given that the beneficiaries of this will— but given that the beneficiaries of this will mainly be older people, a broader—based tax will be more
2:31 pm
appropriate. 0k. - appropriate. 0k, jasmine, briefly, if national ok, jasmine, briefly, if national insurance is the chosen route for the government, why not, isn't part of the iniquity of that for some people the idea that wealthy pensioners won't be contributing? so wealthy pensioners, there is perhaps working, maybe they should be paying national insurance? weill. working, maybe they should be paying national insurance?— national insurance? well, very good oints, national insurance? well, very good points. and — national insurance? well, very good points, and that _ national insurance? well, very good points, and that may _ national insurance? well, very good points, and that may possibly - national insurance? well, very good points, and that may possibly be . points, and that may possibly be something that the government will consider, because as we are seeing, people are working far later, a lot of people want to, many people have too. so it would make sense that to increase the number of years at which one should and could continue to pay national insurance. it will be slightly difficult to organise, but as the state pension age increases, and it will come at the moment, to 66, it is going to be 67, probably soon up to 70, it makes sense, frankly, to increase the national insurance payment years up
2:32 pm
to that as well, i agree. we will leave it there. jasmine birtles and graham atkins, good to see you both. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello. the next few days will bring a taste of summer to many parts of the country. temperatures continue to rise, particularly across england and where is, getting up to 27—28. it will be warmer further north in scotland and northern ireland, even though we have more cloud around here. still a few spots of drizzle coming into western parts of scotland. should be a sunny end to the day across much of england and way is, leading to clear skies and more mist and fog, this time across north—west england and the north midlands. stilla north—west england and the north midlands. still a lot more clever scotland and northern ireland. quite a one night, temperatures 12—15. tomorrow will see the mist and fog across parts of england lifting through the morning. sunshine will develop more widely across england and wales, and eventually, we will see the cloud clearing across northern ireland, southern scotland,
2:33 pm
with sunshine coming out, so temperatures will be lifting here. so rather more cloudy across northern parts of scotland. the higher temperatures still across england and wales. possibly 30 degrees across the south—east of england. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the prime minister faces a backlash over plans to raise national insurance to pay for social care reforms in england. ministers say families desperately need changes to the system. this is a change that is long overdue. it won't be easy. there is no right answer that everybody will find consensus around. every single possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. the taliban claims control of panjshir valley — the last part of afghanistan to resist them — but rebel forces say they're still there. back to school for millions more children in england, wales and northern ireland — but will it spark
2:34 pm
a rise in covid cases? making eye contact for the first time. the conjoined twins separated after rare surgery. sport now, and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's olly. a nailbiter, sort of in the cricket. not good news coming up. the fourth test has quickly turned india's way on the final day at the oval. they needed ten wickets at the start of the day to beat england. they have taken 604. england are zooming in 77 without loss, chasing what would be a record 368 for victory. that is a long shot now. rory burns went for 50. how how mead 63. but in back overs, ollie pope and bairstow
2:35 pm
bowled by bumrah. moeen ali hasjust gone as well. four wickets down for six runs. 149—6. they need 219 runs to win. they need to dig very deep. joe root the key wicket that india are often now. liverpool say they are satisfied that naby keita is safe and well as they try to bring him back to england. there has been an apparent military coup in his country. he was due to play in a qualifier against morocco in the capital today, but following hours of heavy gunfire near the presidential palace, football's governing body fifa and african chiefs have postponed the game. the morocco team have gone out of the country, escorted across the border. that was yesterday. liverpool say they are in constant contact with keita and the relevant authorities. the international break has also been far from smooth in south america. fifa say they regret the scenes that saw the world cup
2:36 pm
qualifier between brazil and argentina abandoned minutes after kick off. brazilian health officials walked onto the pitch in sao paulo to confront three uk—based argentina players. they say the players, from tottenham, and aston villa, all posed a serious health risk. another aston villa player, who was not in the squad, has also been accused of breaching covid protocols after travelling from the uk. that is a red list country in brazil. health authority say all four had been told to isolate and leave the country hours before that game, but they failed to comply, turned out to play. failed to comply, turned out to play, which is why they took such drastic action, forcing the game to be called off. fifa say they are going to have a look at the official match reports and their disciplinary department. the problem here isjust as brazil is in the uk press �*s red list, so the uk is in brazil's red list, and those who have been in the uk,
2:37 pm
non—brazilians who have been in the uk in the last 14 days, have to go through quarantine period. it seems argentina had the backing of south america's uefa, the continental football authority, to go ahead with this game using these players, but brazil's health authority clearly did not agree. a real mess, that one. that story will run and run. valterri bottas is going to leave mercedes at the end of the year and move to alfa romeo, which should pave the way for george russell to become lewis hamilton's new partner from 2022. after five seasons at mercedes alongside hamilton, bottas will now replace raking in at alfa romeo. he is retiring at the end of the year. bottas has won nine races since the join mercedes back in 2017. paralympics gb are reflecting on a brilliant games injapan, finishing second in the medal table once again, with 124 medals, 41 of them gold, two of them one by swimmer
2:38 pm
maisie sommers newton. she told my colleague sally nugent, what it was like racing alongside her hero. when i first started racing against ellie simmonds, especially when she came back from rio, i think it was really surrealfor me, came back from rio, i think it was really surreal for me, because she is or has been such an idol for me, and someone i have a was looked up to. so to race against her was pretty strange! but i have definitely got used to it over the past few years. she is such an inspiration, such a good friend in such a lovely person. because we have done the same races when we were out there, so to have her in the room, and it wasjust having that person who has the knowledge and experience to know that i can trust her and rely on her, and it is going to be a great race, and it will be really fun. finally, just to mark your card for some exciting golf coming up. europe need just five points from today's five singles matches in ohio to retain the solheim cup. they leave the usa 9-7, retain the solheim cup. they leave the usa 9—7, playing just after 5pm, and you can follow it all on the bbc
2:39 pm
sport website. lots more on there, but i'll be back in the next hour as well. clive. thank you, ollie. millions of pupils are returning to classrooms in england and wales, amid fears of a spike in students with covid. scientists have warned of a rapid rise in school cases without such measures and experts have not recommended jabs for healthy 12— to 15—year—olds. in england, there are over 30 times more children with covid compared with last year. in scotland, cases among the under—15s have trebled since school restarted in mid—august. we can't say that the rise has been solely caused by schools returning. this graph shows cases in 2020 — in green — and this year — in red. although cases were much lower at this point in 2020, they followed a similar pattern, rising before schools went back and then increasing more steeply later in september. martine croxall is at a school
2:40 pm
in stockton—on—tees. let's rejoin her. hi, martin. —— martine. let's rejoin her. hi, martin. -- martine-— let's rejoin her. hi, martin. -- martine. ~ ,. martine. welcome back. the school da has martine. welcome back. the school day has ended _ martine. welcome back. the school day has ended for— martine. welcome back. the school day has ended for today, _ martine. welcome back. the school day has ended for today, the - martine. welcome back. the school day has ended for today, the first i day has ended for today, the first day has ended for today, the first day back, but normally, the students would be doing all kinds of enrichment activities like sport, music and drama. you come to school for things other than classroom learning and passing exams, and schools have a lot of responsibilities other than just teaching you, don't they? making sure children are fed properly, often, and offering pastoral care. well, michael garthwaite is an associate principal here, and also the designated safeguarding lead. he joins us now. you went very quickly from having everyone in school to having everyone learning at home. how did your pastoral support have to change? how did your pastoral support have to chance? . how did your pastoral support have to chance? , ., to change? yes, it was a rapid response _ to change? yes, it was a rapid response will _ to change? yes, it was a rapid response will stop _ to change? yes, it was a rapid response will stop the - to change? yes, it was a rapid l response will stop the timescale didn't— response will stop the timescale didn't give us a great deal of time to put— didn't give us a great deal of time to put things in place, but we started — to put things in place, but we started with an addendum to the safeguarding policy so that we can ensure _ safeguarding policy so that we can ensure our— safeguarding policy so that we can ensure our most vulnerable students
2:41 pm
in the _ ensure our most vulnerable students in the academy were catered for right— in the academy were catered for right from — in the academy were catered for right from the get go. and putting hierarchical needs in place, so those — hierarchical needs in place, so those that— hierarchical needs in place, so those that were most vulnerable had the most _ those that were most vulnerable had the most experienced members of staff within the pastoral team as a link. _ staff within the pastoral team as a link. as— staff within the pastoral team as a link. as i_ staff within the pastoral team as a link, as i too, is a key worker with them. _ link, as i too, is a key worker with them. and — link, as i too, is a key worker with them, and those students in the first instance were making contact three _ first instance were making contact three or— first instance were making contact three or four macro times a week, checking _ three or four macro times a week, checking in— three or four macro times a week, checking in on students and family were _ checking in on students and family were seeing what the need was and what we _ were seeing what the need was and what we could do as a school to work with external agencies and social care teams in order to support them. this obviously evolved and developed as time _ this obviously evolved and developed as time went on, and it was a very bespoke _ as time went on, and it was a very bespoke plan, but every student within— bespoke plan, but every student within the academy who we identified as being _ within the academy who we identified as being vulnerable had a key worker who made _ as being vulnerable had a key worker who made the phone calls on a weekly basis. _ who made the phone calls on a weekly basis, sometimes three or four times a week. _ basis, sometimes three or four times a week, sometimes to touch base once a week, sometimes to touch base once a week. _ a week, sometimes to touch base once a week. and _ a week, sometimes to touch base once a week, and from that, plans were put in _ a week, and from that, plans were put in place — a week, and from that, plans were put in place from that pastoral team to support _ put in place from that pastoral team to support the family and the students outside of school. and it is a hue students outside of school. and it is a huge responsibility, - students outside of school. and it is a huge responsibility, isn't- students outside of school. and it is a huge responsibility, isn't it, l is a huge responsibility, isn't it, because it is about making sure they
2:42 pm
are getting proper food and they are safe? . are getting proper food and they are safe? , ., ., ~' , are getting proper food and they are safe? , ., ., ~ , , safe? yes, one of the key things in a school is — safe? yes, one of the key things in a school is that _ safe? yes, one of the key things in a school is that we _ safe? yes, one of the key things in a school is that we know _ safe? yes, one of the key things in a school is that we know the - a school is that we know the students _ a school is that we know the students will come to us on a daily basis. _ students will come to us on a daily basis. and — students will come to us on a daily basis. and if— students will come to us on a daily basis, and if they don't, we have systems— basis, and if they don't, we have systems in— basis, and if they don't, we have systems in place to find out whether students _ systems in place to find out whether students are, way they are not in school. _ students are, way they are not in school. and — students are, way they are not in school, and to check they are safe if they— school, and to check they are safe if they are — school, and to check they are safe if they are not in the school building _ if they are not in the school building was not —— why they are not in school _ building was not —— why they are not in school. that was taken away almost — in school. that was taken away almost instantaneously and we did not have _ almost instantaneously and we did not have that contact with their students. — not have that contact with their students, so that it needs for different— students, so that it needs for different students could be if a member— different students could be if a member of staff drop a food parcel off, member of staff drop a food parcel off. or— member of staff drop a food parcel off. or a _ member of staff drop a food parcel off, ora member of staff member of staff drop a food parcel off, or a member of staff making a phone _ off, or a member of staff making a phone call— off, or a member of staff making a phone call to a social worker, because — phone call to a social worker, because we haven't had that contact. it because we haven't had that contact. it varied _ because we haven't had that contact. it varied on _ because we haven't had that contact. it varied on transition back into the academy. it was very much, other students _ the academy. it was very much, other students ready for it? what impact has ahead — students ready for it? what impact has ahead negatively, positively, and mental health, because every student— and mental health, because every student reacted to the lockdown differently to others. what student reacted to the lockdown differently to others.— student reacted to the lockdown differently to others. what were the im acts differently to others. what were the impacts that — differently to others. what were the impacts that you — differently to others. what were the impacts that you notice? _ differently to others. what were the impacts that you notice? because i differently to others. what were the impacts that you notice? because it| impacts that you notice? because it has been of a huge concern that children have been deprived of the social life that school gives them. worrying to start with, because it was unknown, but we tried to invite
2:43 pm
every _ was unknown, but we tried to invite every single — was unknown, but we tried to invite every single student into the academy with parents. we had a really— academy with parents. we had a really high percentage of parents and students who actually took that opportunity to come in, socially distance. — opportunity to come in, socially distance, have a one—on—one meeting before _ distance, have a one—on—one meeting before transitioning on, filled out a questionnaire, as a pastoral team we have _ a questionnaire, as a pastoral team we have a _ a questionnaire, as a pastoral team we have a weekly inclusion meeting, we have a weekly inclusion meeting, we sat— we have a weekly inclusion meeting, we sat down as a team, we had a place _ we sat down as a team, we had a place to— we sat down as a team, we had a place to live _ we sat down as a team, we had a place to live 30, who have the, some that we _ place to live 30, who have the, some that we have — place to live 30, who have the, some that we have the piercing students of the _ that we have the piercing students of the transition back into the of the main — after the first book, noting that the term back into i put that down to the servants identification of
2:44 pm
that and get a certain urgency is the burden that and get a certain urgency is the burde— that and get a certain urgency is the burde . , ., the burden that in the purpose that in the hope — the burden that in the purpose that in the hope know— the burden that in the purpose that in the hope know that _ the burden that in the purpose that in the hope know that her, - in the hope know that her, nationally, then i would not is having — nationally, then i would not is having an _ nationally, then i would not is having an p per 's motor have as an academy— having an p per 's motor have as an academy of— having an p per 's motor have as an academy of have been pretty positive _ academy of have been pretty ositive. . . , academy of have been pretty ositive. , . , . academy of have been pretty ositive. . . , . . positive. generally, reflective and that is happening _ positive. generally, reflective and that is happening across - positive. generally, reflective and that is happening across the - that is happening across the country, and that i am about that you have had to be very innovative, but they're an investment, but that they combat this purpose that both of them have my open garden open at designated safeguarding the server cabinet to step in the next parents to find out how impasse. conjoined twins from israel have made eye contact with each other for the first time after being separated. the one year old sisters underwent a twelve hour operation that took
2:45 pm
months of preparation and involved dozens of experts. mark lobel reports. sisters spoke to both the first area of over the smirk operation. turned at the back in their heads, separation served to meticulously plan to merge a better than their heads, the delicate personal step that then please be prepared to step in their step after the preparation of them never to have the surgery room, who prepared the surgery room, prepared purpose of a surgical ability to have prepared no vendor to attacks, there is no spurn spur, so that the liberty to the of of,
2:46 pm
philip and baggs both open to their heads and expanded to search there. that movement that instructed their spurs after the separation, no had access to server spurs up via tokyo ever finish access to server spurs up via tokyo everfinish in the pursuit access to server spurs up via tokyo ever finish in the pursuit of the hotel is then connect an excellent team and a pleasure to be a that the has ever been curtailed her toes poker so no, there is a hotel
2:47 pm
parents of children with special needs and disabilities say they've been �*largely excluded' from a government review into how pupils are supported. a campaign — backed by politicians and charities — has called on ministers to put disabled people and their carers at the heart of reforms. last year in england, more than 16—thousand applications for assessment of children's special needs were rejected — and many parents say they're unable to secure adequate support. let's talk to hayley harding, from the �*let us learn' campaign group. it is good to see you, thank you for joining us. what are your concerns with regards to the government review and the idea that people like you and your group haven't been consulted. igrate you and your group haven't been consulted-— you and your group haven't been consulted. ~ ~' ., , consulted. we know the review is ”lannin consulted. we know the review is planning to _ consulted. we know the review is planning to put— consulted. we know the review is planning to put whatever - consulted. we know the review is i planning to put whatever proposals they have put on green paper and our concern is there nobody around that table making the decision that is a true parent and disabled child's voice. as a result of that, given we have heard other comments from
2:48 pm
someone called matt dunckley, the chair of the directors of children's services, they have said give us more money or they will be reforms. it is unnerving, because we are not there. . it is unnerving, because we are not there. , ., ., i. , there. there is no one you believe is art of there. there is no one you believe is part of the _ there. there is no one you believe is part of the consultation - there. there is no one you believe is part of the consultation process| is part of the consultation process in the preparation of the green paper itself? yes in the preparation of the green paper itself?— in the preparation of the green --aer itself? , ., , , .,, paper itself? yes the only people we know who have _ paper itself? yes the only people we know who have been _ paper itself? yes the only people we know who have been there _ paper itself? yes the only people we know who have been there partly - paper itself? yes the only people we know who have been there partly to | know who have been there partly to give their advice are the national parent carerforum, they give their advice are the national parent carer forum, they have only been consulted with, they're not around the table. this is something the department of education secretary said, there was no one there to represent us as parents. this is what a spokesperson said: we aim to improve outcomes and better young people for adult life, through
2:49 pm
our review, which is an ongoing process. these claims are misleading, the government is committed to supporting and protecting affected children ahead of our public consultation and publication of our proposals, we are working with children and young people, their parents and carers to ensure their views remain at the heart of this work." they're denying everything you're saying. tt is heart of this work." they're denying everything you're saying.— everything you're saying. it is very interesting- _ everything you're saying. it is very interesting. we _ everything you're saying. it is very interesting. we have _ everything you're saying. it is very interesting. we have a _ everything you're saying. it is very interesting. we have a letter - everything you're saying. it is very i interesting. we have a letter coming out on wednesday, the contents of the letter will be published there, but we have nearly every charity signing the letter saying involve us, that includes children's partnership, the national autistic society, we are all in, we have no idea what is going on right now. you would have thought if that was the case, they wouldn't be signing up to this letter, so it is a little surprising their response right now. because nobody else seems to know wh is going on but them. iloathed
2:50 pm
because nobody else seems to know wh is going on but them.— is going on but them. what would you want to net is going on but them. what would you want to get across _ is going on but them. what would you want to get across if _ is going on but them. what would you want to get across if you _ is going on but them. what would you want to get across if you were - want to get across if you were sitting across the stable? == table. sitting across the stable? -- table. our biggest worry, is if you speak to a local authority and then a parent or a carer who has had to go through the system, you would get a very different response as to the stress and upset and challenges this process follows. and expects of a parent and so if we want real change thatis parent and so if we want real change that is going to resolve the issues, which for us are things like accountability, making sure the laws are followed, which a lot of local authorities do not do, one tribunal is backing up 95% of parents who appeal, which is an extraordinary claim, percentage, then that is not going to change unless we are sat there and we can help and i think just to say that we are being misleading, we are not, we are are saying we want to be around the table, because we want the right things for our children, because we want them to have the best futures.
2:51 pm
this isn't meant to be a negative campaign. this is a positive campaign, because we want to be there, because we want to improve things. there, because we want to improve thins. . ~' ,, isa despite years of commitments from government and business to improve ethnic diversity at the top of our biggest firms, there are no black bosses leading footsie 100 companies. and new research suggests the problem can't be solved in the short term, given the low number of more junior staff awaiting promotion who are black. our business presenter ben thompsonjoins me now. hello, ben. the hotel. despite the businesses so go to taco bell person to person or business businesses, but research suggests that is not happening ago.
2:52 pm
there are services lotus notes, it is better, but some slow changes. has been arrested though as part of a global this an initiative to launch 2,000 internships for black students to get a foot hold in business and work their way through the organisation. very important for businesses to be representative of their customers and their clients, but as far as racial diversity goes, that is not
2:53 pm
happening. let's get the thoughts of the co—founder of the organisation 10,000 black internals. good afternoon to you. talk to us about why this is so necessary. i was speaking to one of your colleagues, who highlights how much of a problem this is that is just not being addressed at the highest levels of our biggest organisations. fine addressed at the highest levels of our biggest organisations.- our biggest organisations. one of the problems _ our biggest organisations. one of the problems is _ our biggest organisations. one of the problems is we _ our biggest organisations. one of the problems is we tend - our biggest organisations. one of the problems is we tend to - our biggest organisations. one of the problems is we tend to use i our biggest organisations. one of. the problems is we tend to use the world _ the problems is we tend to use the world bame, which masks the fact when _ world bame, which masks the fact when you — world bame, which masks the fact when you look at the b, which is often _ when you look at the b, which is often hidden in plain sight, the b isn't represented across our organisations. the stats are shocking _ organisations. the stats are shocking. if you look at asset management, that we were involved with last _ management, that we were involved with last year, there is less than 15 black— with last year, there is less than 15 black portfolio managers. these are the _ 15 black portfolio managers. these are the jobs that people aspire to,
2:54 pm
well paid _ are the jobs that people aspire to, well paid and that sort of thing, i think— well paid and that sort of thing, i think there are maybe 15 out of 3.000 — think there are maybe 15 out of 3.000 are _ think there are maybe 15 out of 3,000 are black. that doesn't make sense _ 3,000 are black. that doesn't make sense we _ 3,000 are black. that doesn't make sense. we have launched 100 black interns— sense. we have launched 100 black interns and — sense. we have launched 100 black interns and it seems it wasn't the same _ interns and it seems it wasn't the same industry, lawyers had the same issue _ same industry, lawyers had the same issue and _ same industry, lawyers had the same issue and accountants and advertising. so we scaled it up and we are _ advertising. so we scaled it up and we are launching 10,000 black interns — we are launching 10,000 black interns it _ we are launching 10,000 black interns. it is 2,000 for five years. it is interns. it is 2,000 for five years. it is kicking — interns. it is 2,000 for five years. it is kicking off and it is hugely successful. very excited. talk it is kicking off and it is hugely successful. very excited. talk to me about the response _ successful. very excited. talk to me about the response of _ successful. very excited. talk to me about the response of business. - successful. very excited. talk to me about the response of business. arej about the response of business. are they aware for them to be a successful organisation, their board rooms need to represent the people they're selling to, has that message got through and how do they responsibility when you say we have this project to get black interns to get their foot on the ladder? t get their foot on the ladder? i
2:55 pm
think the message is landing, we have _ think the message is landing, we have over— think the message is landing, we have over 750 companies who said yes we want _ have over 750 companies who said yes we want to— have over 750 companies who said yes we want to be part of this. across 24 sectors — we want to be part of this. across 24 sectors. originally we were looking — 24 sectors. originally we were looking for 120 internals. but we -ot looking for 120 internals. but we got 24 _ looking for 120 internals. but we got 24 sectors and if everybody is represented, 750 companies and 2,000 internships— represented, 750 companies and 2,000 internships and almost all have said we will— internships and almost all have said we will do _ internships and almost all have said we will do this for five years. it is of— we will do this for five years. it is of a — we will do this for five years. it is of a time. _ we will do this for five years. it is of a time, after the pandemic, everyone — is of a time, after the pandemic, everyone is— is of a time, after the pandemic, everyone is thinking about how we treat— everyone is thinking about how we treat other— everyone is thinking about how we treat other people and how we are. i think— treat other people and how we are. i think in— treat other people and how we are. i think in the — treat other people and how we are. i think in the last 12 months, particularly after the murder of george — particularly after the murder of george floyd there was a question that increasing executives are asking. — that increasing executives are asking, how do we treat people better. — asking, how do we treat people better, particular my ly when it comes— better, particular my ly when it comes to — better, particular my ly when it comes to black people to make sure they're _ comes to black people to make sure they're brought along with everybody else. . ~ they're brought along with everybody
2:56 pm
else. . ,, , ., they're brought along with everybody else. . ,, i. , ., they're brought along with everybody else. . ,, , ., , , else. thank you. improving diversity is so important _ else. thank you. improving diversity is so important and _ else. thank you. improving diversity is so important and although - is so important and although business say it is a priority, the figures suggest that is not happening. this is one of the initiatives, but it is so important for boards to represent their customers and what big business does filters down and we should say at the moment smaller businesses are really stealing a lead and making this happen and getting diversity on their boards and in their offices, much more than some larger organisations.— the original hands from big ben's clockface are to be returned to the elizabeth tower in london after three years of conservation work. experts have painted them to match the original prussian blue colour scheme. tim muffett has been to meet the team behind the 80—million—pound restoration project. countdown to completion. one of the biggest restoration jobs
2:57 pm
ever undertaken on a landmark british building is approaching the finish line. good to see you, ian. and you. what is it you're doing here? we're servicing the rollers. this is one of the bits that we couldn't actually get to and service while the minute hands were on. if you're a clock mechanic, this is like the champions league and the world cup rolled into one, i'd imagine, this project. to actually have taken it all to pieces, putting it back together again, and then carry on looking after it for a few more years, that's just going to be fantastic. one of the most striking things you notice is the colour of the clock faces. for many years, the minute demarcations, the numbers and the clock hands, were painted black. but during the refurbishment, as many layers of paint were stripped away, it became clear that they were originally this shade of blue — it's called prussian blue — and that is what they've been repainted in. this restoration project was originally budgeted at £29 million.
2:58 pm
the total bill is now set to exceed 80 million. as you pulled off the layers of this building, you find more and more that needs to be done. when we're taking out one piece of stain, adjacent stains often needed to be replaced. it's one of those things — until you can get up close to it, it's very difficult to see the scope of the repair. chiming with the clock mechanism out of action, a computerised system has meant that on special occasions, big ben has still been struck. we're standing in the belfry of the elizabeth tower, - and it was specially constructed so that the chiming bells - for the four quarters could be heard right across london. _ there's one piece of damage here that's been deliberately left alone. this crack appeared when big ben was struck during a test in 1858 — the hammer was too heavy, but it gives the bell its unique tone. this is london. chiming
2:59 pm
it should be - e, the note e, but it does give it a slightly flat sound. a very serious sound, in fact. so that's one bit of repairing you didn't want to do? that's right, yes. no change to the bell. whatsoever, because it's become the familiar, the familiar note. - chiming a much—loved building, largely hidden for the past few years, slowly revealing itself once more. tim muffett, bbc news.
3:00 pm
this is bbc news i'm clive myrie. borisjohnson faces a backlash, over plans to raise national insurance to pay for social care reforms in england. but ministers say change is vital. this is a change that is long overdue, it won't be easy, there is no right answer that everybody will find consensus around, every single possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. we'll be asking what other tax options the government might have to pay for social care. also on the programme... the taliban claims control of the panjshir valley, the last region to fall in afghanistan. but opposition forces, say they're still fighting. we'll be live in the house of commons as the prime minister updates mps on the uk
3:01 pm
withdrawal from afghanistan. back to school for millions more children in england, wales and northern ireland, but will the return spark a rise in covid cases? i'm ata i'm at a school in stockton —on—tees and looking at how schools are preparing for the new school term. making eye contact for the first time, the conjoined twins separated after rare surgery. and, wickets fall at the oval as england chase a huge total, to save the fourth test, against india.
3:02 pm
good afternoon. mps have retuened to westminster, after the summer break, with the funding of social care and the nhs at the top of the agenda. some tory mps have expressed anger at reports of an increase in national insurance contributions to help fund social care in england, which would break a conservative manifesto pledge not to raise taxes. labour is also opposing a rise in ni. it's expected that an extra 5 and half billion pounds will be announced for the nhs. labour is also opposing a rise in ni. it's expected that an extra 5 and half billion pounds will be announced for the nhs. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. for yea rs for years governments have not got around to sorting a new system for social care in england. it is complex, controversial and vastly expensive. should there be a cap on the bill anyone should face? which tax should be put up to pay for it? it appears the government does want a cap and a hike in national insurance.— a cap and a hike in national insurance. , , . . ., ., , insurance. this is a change that is lona insurance. this is a change that is
3:03 pm
long overdue- _ insurance. this is a change that is long overdue. there _ insurance. this is a change that is long overdue. there is _ insurance. this is a change that is long overdue. there is no - insurance. this is a change that is long overdue. there is no right i long overdue. there is no right answer. every possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. i don't know the detail of what he is going to propose, but i know it is hard, we need to be honest with the public and be ready for the debate ahead. here honest with the public and be ready for the debate ahead.— for the debate ahead. here is one reason why _ for the debate ahead. here is one reason why it _ for the debate ahead. here is one reason why it is _ for the debate ahead. here is one reason why it is hard _ for the debate ahead. here is one reason why it is hard for - for the debate ahead. here is one reason why it is hard for the - reason why it is hard for the government, look at this, i pulled out from the archive before the election. . ~ out from the archive before the election. , ~ election. here is the kicker, we can do all these — election. here is the kicker, we can do all these things _ election. here is the kicker, we can do all these things without - election. here is the kicker, we can do all these things without raising i do all these things without raising our income tax, vat or national insurance — our income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that is our guarantee — insurance contributions. that is our . uarantee. . insurance contributions. that is our auarantee. , ,, a ., guarantee. here is the kicker now, that guarantee _ guarantee. here is the kicker now, that guarantee looks _ guarantee. here is the kicker now, that guarantee looks like - guarantee. here is the kicker now, that guarantee looks like it - guarantee. here is the kicker now, that guarantee looks like it is - that guarantee looks like it is about to be shredded. because... the simlest about to be shredded. because... the simplest way to raise large amounts of money— simplest way to raise large amounts of money is — simplest way to raise large amounts of money is through _ simplest way to raise large amounts of money is through increasing - simplest way to raise large amounts of money is through increasing the i of money is through increasing the rates _ of money is through increasing the rates of— of money is through increasing the rates of three _ of money is through increasing the rates of three main _ of money is through increasing the rates of three main taxes, - of money is through increasing the rates of three main taxes, so - rates of three main taxes, so national— rates of three main taxes, so national insurance _ rates of three main taxes, so national insurance is - rates of three main taxes, so national insurance is one, - rates of three main taxes, so - national insurance is one, income tax is _ national insurance is one, income tax is the — national insurance is one, income tax is the most _ national insurance is one, income tax is the most obvious _ national insurance is one, incomel tax is the most obvious alternative and there — tax is the most obvious alternative and there is— tax is the most obvious alternative and there is vat— tax is the most obvious alternative and there is vat as _ tax is the most obvious alternative and there is vat as the _ tax is the most obvious alternative and there is vat as the third. - and there is vat as the third.
3:04 pm
labour— and there is vat as the third. labour and _ and there is vat as the third. labour and plenty— and there is vat as the third. labour and plenty of - and there is vat as the third. - labour and plenty of conservatives say putting up national insurance in particular will tax the less well off to subsidise the better off. the government _ off to subsidise the better off. tue government has off to subsidise the better off. tue: government has got to rethink this. they say they want to level up, but in fact they would be hitting many factuallies in con—— families in constituencies like mine hard, but not getting improvements in the kind of care and in fact seeing greater taxes on businesses, just when they're struggling. tt taxes on businesses, 'ust when they're struggling._ taxes on businesses, 'ust when they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax. _ they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax, which _ they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax, which is _ they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax, which is a _ they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax, which is a far- they're struggling. it seems looking at income tax, which is a far less i at income tax, which is a far less regressive — at income tax, which is a far less regressive tax and a tax that everybody who has income pays, let's not forget _ everybody who has income pays, let's not forget those who are retired, even _ not forget those who are retired, even if _ not forget those who are retired, even if they have a high income, won't _ even if they have a high income, won't pay— even if they have a high income, won't pay national insurance. mp5 won't pay national insurance. mps are returning _ won't pay national insurance. mps are returning to _ won't pay national insurance. t" are returning to parliament and a row is brewing already. social care is long overdue, many would argue.
3:05 pm
so what could these new measures look like in practice? our social affairs correspondent is alison holt. we hope to see the details soon, but expect a cap will be introduced to limit the amount any one person pays towards their care. we know there have been arguments over what level that should be at, whether it is 50,000 or80,000, it that should be at, whether it is 50,000 or 80,000, it would mean somebody would pay for their care up to the top of that cap and then turn to the top of that cap and then turn to the top of that cap and then turn to the the the local authority for help. at the moment if you have savings or assets of £23,000 or more then you pay for all your care. we expect you to be allowed to keep more. at the moment, whether you live in a council house that you have boughten or a mansion in surrey you're likely to have to sell your home if you need residential care.
3:06 pm
not other sorts of care. if you simplify things down to selling houses and the funding mechanism to some degree it misses the point, the care system which is about people is in crisis, it has understaffing, years of underfunding and needs to be fixed. so things we need to see, will there be investment now in the system? will the staffing problems be fixed and what is the vision for the future of the service that looks not just after people the future of the service that looks notjust after people over 65, but many younger adults and it should be about quality of life and keeping people out of hospital. millions of pupils are returning to classrooms in england and wales, amid fears of a spike in students with covid. scientists have warned of a rapid rise in school cases without precautions being taken and experts have not recommended jabs for healthy 12— to 15—year—olds. in england, there are over 30 times more children with covid compared with last year.
3:07 pm
in scotland cases among the under—15s have trebled since school restarted in mid—august. we can't say that the rise has been solely caused by schools returning. this graph shows cases in 2020 in green and this year — in red. although cases were much lower at this point in 2020, they followed a similar pattern, rising before schools went back and then increasing more steeply later in september. martine croxall is at a school in stockton—on—tees. thank you, clive. this is the north shore academy. it has gone quiet, because the school day is often. it was the first day back. a sense of relief and excitement that the classes are taking place once again in this building. but of course the schools have had to think about keeping pupils safe, running tests to make sure people don't bring in covid, how do you make sure there is
3:08 pm
fresh air in the classrooms? these are the headaches that a lot of teachers have been juggling are the headaches that a lot of teachers have beenjuggling with over the summer holidays to make sure when people come back into school they're kept safe. we will be speaking to the executive head, but first let's hear about the circumstances facing all schools from our education correspondent. please be attentive, have a lovely day and i'll speak to you later in the day. it was billed as the most normal school year since before the pandemic, but even before some english and welsh students have taken their seats in class, more uncertainty about whether 12 to 15—year—olds will be routinely offered the vaccine. that question has been hotly debated here at the north shore academy in stockton upon tees. i would definitely get the vaccine, because we have been one of the countries fortunate enough to obviously have vaccines and we should take that, use the advantage.
3:09 pm
i think i would to savei people, yeah, iwould. the joint committee on vaccination and immunisations told uk governments they would not on health grounds alone be recommending all 12 to 15—year—olds are offered the jab. instead, chief medical officers across the four nations are being asked to review the scientists' advice and decide on a wider set of criteria whether to overrule them. i think many of the school and college leaders who i represent will have been disappointed in the decision byjcvi. not because they are fans of vaccination, but we know that vaccination in the absence of other control measures apart from ventilation are going to be very important in getting away from that terrible disruption that so many young people experienced over the past year. they considered the individual health benefits and took account of the potential for extremely rare heart complications. authorities in england, wales and northern ireland are monitoring the situation closely in scotland, where schools returned in the middle of august.
3:10 pm
some experts are linking this with a sharp rise in covid infections. in england, cases have remained steady throughout august, but the rate of infection among five to 15—year—olds to the end of the month was 30 times higher, compared with the same time last year. everybody is working really hard to keep children safe and to be very alert for any rises and act if there are any rises. i have been the in schools right through summer and actually right through covid, i was in schools myself until march as a head teacher and ceo and i know that everyone's working really hard to make this return safe. the uk government has pledged to give english school children the most normal classroom experience possible. the decision on whether to offer vaccinations to all 12 to 15—year—olds could shape what this year's education looks like in reality. there are 700 students at north
3:11 pm
shore academy, one of 21 academies, belonging to the northern education trust. mike robinson is the executive head. you've 14,000 trust. mike robinson is the executive head. you've14,000 pupils in total across your who trust, how did that make it easier or more difficult with that scale of provision you need to provide during the pandemic? easier or more difficult? t the pandemic? easier or more difficult? ~' , , :, difficult? i think there is pros and cons. difficult? i think there is pros and cons- 14.000 _ difficult? i think there is pros and cons. 14,000 students _ difficult? i think there is pros and cons. 14,000 students across i difficult? i think there is pros and cons. 14,000 students across 21| cons. 14,000 students across 21 sites brings a lot of responsibility, it takes a lot of co—ordination, a lot of different local authorities with different approaches and messages and they want you to do it one way in one place and differently in another and getting resources to places brings challenges. i have to say, you know, as a big multi—academy trust we were able to pool resources, we were able to outline teams and specific remits
3:12 pm
and we had an opes team look at our estates and making sure the testing was right and one—way systems and rows and bubbles, and somebody would order things for you. i consider myself lucky, i have six schools to look after, when it comes to looking at a science curriculum, where children have missed bits of learning that we would have expected them to have, we were able to say to heads of departments, can you share resources? we were lucky. it brought a lot of pressure, a lot of responsibilityf a lot of pressure, a lot of responsibility f you get it wrong, you get it wrong on a massive scale if it is 14,000 students. i think the pros outwayed the cons. brute if it is 14,000 students. i think the pros outwayed the cons. we are heafina the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearin: a the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearing a lot — the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearing a lot about _ the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearing a lot about what _ the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearing a lot about what it - the pros outwayed the cons. we are hearing a lot about what it will i hearing a lot about what it will take education to recover. children have missed out. how much are you getting from the government for that recovery and what are you going to
3:13 pm
do with it? ~ :, :, :, do with it? well, we have got a substantial _ do with it? well, we have got a substantial package _ do with it? well, we have got a substantial package last - do with it? well, we have got a substantial package last year. i do with it? well, we have got a i substantial package last year. this year we are in the infancy, there has been early announcements, the expectation is approximately £50 a student. we don't know that for sure. i suppose there is a lot of attention on money the sector gets and sir kevin wanted 15 billion. that was the recovery tzar, who resigned, because there wasn't enough money. resigned, because there wasn't enough money-— resigned, because there wasn't enough money. heads and school leaders will _ enough money. heads and school leaders will tell _ enough money. heads and school leaders will tell you _ enough money. heads and school leaders will tell you always i enough money. heads and school leaders will tell you always that i leaders will tell you always that more is welcomed. as a trust we have 21 schools and we have been able to plan well and get resources to where it matters at the front line, to our children, private tuition in maths, english and science and really our recovery curriculum has worked well. that said, i think to balance that
3:14 pm
with my peers in other schools, if you're a stand alone head and things are tight and you have to pay for things, a little can go a long way if you spend it effectively. a lot can be wasted if you don't. we have the luxury of pooling and we have been ok, but that is not the case every where. been ok, but that is not the case every where-— been ok, but that is not the case eve where. :, :, , :, :, , :, every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! — every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! a — every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! a funny _ every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! a funny path _ every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! a funny path way. - every where. you only wanted to be a pe teacher! a funny path way. thank| pe teacher! a funny path way. thank ou. the pe teacher! a funny path way. thank you- the school _ pe teacher! a funny path way. thank you. the school day _ pe teacher! a funny path way. thank you. the school day is _ pe teacher! a funny path way. thank you. the school day is over, - pe teacher! a funny path way. thank you. the school day is over, but i you. the school day is over, but this time tomorrow, the pupils here will take part in enrichment activities like sport and drama and you name it and it keeps them occupied when they could be at home playing on a gaming station. this school has other ideas. we are back in half an hour. more now on our top story now, and mps returning to westminster, and mps returning to westminster
3:15 pm
after the summer break with the funding of social care and the nhs at the top of the agenda. some tory mps have expressed anger at reports of an increase in national insurance contributions to help fund social care in england, which would break a conservative manifesto pledge not to raise taxes. let's speak to the snp's alison thewliss. hello, thank you for being with us. the snp at westminster is saying that any government at westminster should guarantee scottish workers would not pay for an england only policy. what do you mean by that on the? it seems to us that this policy lives in scotland as a complete afterthought. we have been finding social care in scotland from the resources we have any scottish parliament. resources we have any scottish parliament-— resources we have any scottish parliament. :, :, , :, parliament. the told are proposing to raise taxes _ parliament. the told are proposing to raise taxes in _ parliament. the told are proposing to raise taxes in scotland - parliament. the told are proposing to raise taxes in scotland to - parliament. the told are proposing to raise taxes in scotland to pay i to raise taxes in scotland to pay for an england only policy with no thought to scotland and no commitment to the barnett consequentials which will only
3:16 pm
really benefit people in england. social care costs in scotland, harry paid for? we pay for these through the resources of the scottish parliament, we have three person kid in scotland and of course in some cases people do pay for those social care cast themselves as well. but this has been done without any consultation with the scottish parliament, the scottish government, which millie does this respect the fact that we have developed demolition and social care within scotland —— which really does this respect. it is the suggestion that perhaps national insurance and taxes meant by that is out there. you're basically firing a shot across the bow was of the government before they make this policy for real. thea;r they make this policy for real. they have had a — they make this policy for real. they have had a long _ they make this policy for real. they have had a long time _ they make this policy for real. they have had a long time to _ they make this policy for real. tue: have had a long time to think about this policy. the cow crisis in social care in england is not new and has something that has been considered —— the crisis in social care. what they have announced is a rise in taxation which will hit the poorest, which will hit young people in society and they are floating this with the real intention that it
3:17 pm
will be carried out against their own manifesto commitments. so it really is quite irresponsible from this government to behave in this way. and to go ahead and on and something like this without any consultation with the scottish government and no real understanding of what it means for social care in scotland as well. find of what it means for social care in scotland as well.— of what it means for social care in scotland as well. and most people ha - with scotland as well. and most people happy with the _ scotland as well. and most people happy with the provision _ scotland as well. and most people happy with the provision of- scotland as well. and most people happy with the provision of social i happy with the provision of social care and the way you funded in scotland? is that true? t care and the way you funded in scotland? is that true?- scotland? is that true? i think there is always _ scotland? is that true? i think there is always room - scotland? is that true? i think there is always room for i scotland? is that true? i think - there is always room for improvement and social care. that is a challenge many countries across the world are facing. but this is not the way to go about it, just making announcements on the hoof, deciding to put taxes up for the poorest in society at the same time as people are being hit by the £20 a week a reduction in universal credit, at the same time people are recovering from covid, at the same time as brexit and, at the same time as the furlough schemes are coming to an end. there is a lot going onjust now and for the uk government to announce this with no prior notice, no prior consultation is a really quite irresponsible. b5 t no prior consultation is a really quite irresponsible.—
3:18 pm
no prior consultation is a really quite irresponsible. as i say, they have not announced _ quite irresponsible. as i say, they have not announced it _ quite irresponsible. as i say, they have not announced it has - quite irresponsible. as i say, they have not announced it has yet, i quite irresponsible. as i say, they| have not announced it has yet, but you do point to there being potential problems with the way social care is dealt with in scotland. what would you say needs to change there? t scotland. what would you say needs to change there?— to change there? i think what we have been _ to change there? i think what we have been doing _ to change there? i think what we have been doing in _ to change there? i think what we have been doing in scotland i to change there? i think what we have been doing in scotland has| to change there? i think what we i have been doing in scotland has been working across the sector, working to integrate health and social care in scotland. we are way ahead of where england is on this front and we have also had a free personal care in scotland for many years as well so people are not having to pay that cost themselves and that has been expanded in recent years too. so we are actually tackling the issues that we face in scotland very well. and i do not think it is fair that scottish taxpayers should be asked to pay additional money to fund england's social care system. it is just not fair or reasonable. we will leave it there, alison thewliss, the sm eyes tragedy spokesperson. —— snp's treasury
3:19 pm
spokesperson. the taliban say it's seized panjshir province, the only part of afghanistan that wasn't under their control. a spokesman says no civilians have been killed in days of heavy fighting against opposition forces, but leaders of those forces deny they've been defeated, and say they still have a presence in panjshir. our south asia correspondent yogita limaye has more details. "we are raising the white flag in the provincial headquarters of panjshir," taliban fighters said in a video released by the group. they claim to have conquered the final stronghold of opposition, and with it, all of afghanistan. at a press conference in kabul, the group declared victory. "we tried our best to resolve the issue in panjshir through negotiations but it didn't work," a spokesman said. "we couldn't accept a power island in afghanistan, we had to use force." the panjshir valley lies to kabul�*s north—east. it has a narrow entrance and its terrain offers natural protection. attacked several times during afghanistan's long history of violence, its defenders have always held fort.
3:20 pm
and even now, those resisting taliban control say it hasn't been fully captured so far. we are present throughout panjshir at the moment. panjshir is in a small province or valley. panjshir has many semi valleys. from the southern part up to the northern part of the valley, right now the taliban are only in a few locations. they are facing difficulties. ourforces are resisting, ourforces are defending their people, their honour, their home and their values. one of the leaders of the resistance has released a voice message, blaming the international community for legitimising the taliban. amrullah saleh, afghanistan's former vice president, was the other man leading the movement. a few days ago he'd send the bbc this clip, saying he was in panjshir. his whereabouts are now unknown. yogita limaye, bbc news.
3:21 pm
well, what about the taliban's plans for government since their lightning take—over of afghanistan? secunder kermani has more on that from kabul. it's been more than three weeks since the taliban took over kabul and they're yet to establish a new government. first, we were told that they were waiting for the final american troops to leave the country, that was a few days ago. then we were told they were waiting to resolve the situation in panjshir. well, that's now happened it appears. one source is telling me that we could get an announcement by the end of this week, but it is not yet clear if that will happen or not. there has been some suggestion the delays are also because of internal rivalries and debates within the taliban about who exactly is going to be appointed to what position. now, the man who is widely expected to be in overall control of the country, whatever form of government exactly emerges, is the supreme leader of the taliban. the problem is he has
3:22 pm
always been very elusive. we have seen no public appearance, no videos released by him since the taliban took over and that has led to some speculation that he could be dead. the taliban spokesman at a news conference today said that is not true and that we will see him soon. the formation of this new government really is key, because at the moment, afghans are living through what feels like a state of limbo. no one is exactly sure what the future will look like, what kind of laws and rules that the taliban want to implement and how willing they are to share power with any other political factions. disturbing reports of sexual abuse of children by other children almost doubled in the two years up to 2019, according to police figures obtained by bbc panorama. yearly reports show the cases have risen to between 15,000 and 16,000, with some of the alleged perpetrators aged just 10 or younger. daniela relph reports. the new figures paint a picture of a toxic sexual culture
3:23 pm
being experienced by some young people, where both perpetrators and victims are under 18, with some even aged ten or under, and when 90% of the victims are girls. jasmine met herfirst boyfriend on social media. from the start of the relationship he asked her for naked photos. it progressed to him filming them in bed together. i didn't want to do it. it wasn't something i felt comfortable doing and me saying no wasn't enough either. like, there was no no. he would keep pushing it even if i said no. earlier this year the website everyone's invited was set up for people to publish anonymous accounts of abuse they say they have suffered. over the past year there have been more than 50,000 posts on the site. for those helping teenagers navigate intimate relationships, the situation is increasingly complex. the majority of girls report things like unwanted touching, groping, being pressured and pestered to send
3:24 pm
nudes, that that is so frequent it's become part of everyday life to a point where they wouldn't bother reporting it, because itjust feels like it's a normal part of the day. so what is the legal age of consent? does anybody in the classroom know what the legal age of consent is? that ability to say yes or no. so we've got freedom is a really important option here. at this academy in solihull, the government's new mandatory sex education curriculum is being taught and discussed. the school also runs projects focused on the power of social media to promote abusive sexual behaviour. if you've got a phone, a laptop, you've got access to whatever you want and some of that can be extreme. then it's, well, if everybody�*s doing it, because it would appear it is online, if it is online, it must be ok. it is part of the normalisation. it is an enormous challenge. protecting children from each other
3:25 pm
and the pressures in wider society. daniela relph, bbc news. you can watch panorama's who's protecting our kids with mariella frostrup tonight at 7:35pm on bbc1. and details of organisations offering information and support with sexual abuse are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077. tributes continue to pour in from across the music world, for the former girls aloud singer sarah harding, who's died from breast cancer at the age of 39. sarah found lumps under her arms in 2019 and in an extract from her memoir published in the times, she admitted putting off getting medical help, which was further complicated by the outbreak of the pandemic. debroahjames from 5 lives you me and the big c podcast,
3:26 pm
podcast, whojoins me now. thank you for being with us. sarah admitted in her memoir that she felt numb is and she put them off —— she felt lumps. i suppose in breast cancer is something that is not very common in women under the age of 40. if you do feel something, you have got to get it looked at, haven't you? got to get it looked at, haven't ou? : , , ~' got to get it looked at, haven't ou? : , ~ :, �*, you? absolutely. i think sarah's death is very — you? absolutely. i think sarah's death is very hard-hitting i you? absolutely. i think sarah's death is very hard-hitting for i death is very hard—hitting for anybody, notjust any cancer community, but what it represents and it represents at the death of what is 35 people, women on average, in the uk every day from secondary breast cancer. it is notjust breast cancer we are talking about here, it is knowing a body, understanding the difference between an early diagnosis and delayed diagnosis and it is tragic that it takes these kind of headlines to remind us that
3:27 pm
none of us are exempt from the one in two of us that will get cancer in our lifetime and it is not about scaremongering, but about understanding that actually, if you're sat at home right now, it could be the difference. coronavirus is not the only thing going on in the medical world, we need to know our bodies and get it checked out sooner rather than later. yes. our bodies and get it checked out sooner rather than later.- our bodies and get it checked out sooner rather than later. yes, it is such an important _ sooner rather than later. yes, it is such an important message. i sooner rather than later. yes, it is| such an important message. sarah went on to say in her biography, the pain was getting worse, my skin started but i know i was terrified. one day i woke up realising that i had been in denial about the whole thing. had been in denial about the whole thin. . had been in denial about the whole thing. yes, i can absolutely relate to that. i thing. yes, i can absolutely relate to that. | live — thing. yes, i can absolutely relate to that. i live with _ thing. yes, i can absolutely relate to that. i live with incurable i thing. yes, i can absolutely relate j to that. i live with incurable bowel cancer and ifeel very to that. i live with incurable bowel cancer and i feel very grateful to be alive. i am exactly the same age as sarah and for me i put off my own diagnosis with bowel cancer and yes at that age you're too young for cancer. it took me around six months to get diagnosed and by the time i was diagnosed, i had a later stage advance bowel cancer and my chances
3:28 pm
of survival... i'm very grateful to be approaching five years, but i know i snatching every statistic to do that. that is what we need to do, the key messages cancer is survivable, more people will survive for more than ten years after they are diagnosed from cancer that will divert and that is because where we are moving in terms of catching things early, but the first step in doing that as per people —— than it will die from it. and the first step is a people recognising it starts with them, we have to come forward. it is not putting the blame back. i have personally beating myself up as many times about regretting not getting to my gp earlier, but i think if you are kind of one of those people who is a little concerned, i think it is knowing that actually, it is knowing that actually, to scarier the longer we leave it, rather thanjust getting it started straightaway. xtea. it started straightaway. yes. education. _ it started straightaway. yes. education, then, _ it started straightaway. yes. education, then, very, i it started straightaway. yes. education, then, very, veryl education, then, very, very important and knowing our bodies. what is the situation when it comes to screening? and being able to get access to screening for women of a
3:29 pm
certain age? we access to screening for women of a certain age?— access to screening for women of a certain are? ~ ~' :, :, certain age? we know that during the andemic, certain age? we know that during the pandemic, screening _ certain age? we know that during the pandemic, screening was _ certain age? we know that during the pandemic, screening was an - pandemic, screening was an efficiently halted across the uk and it is something i investigated —— unofficially halted. we know that the impact and backlog that has caused any system and whilst screening picked up —— picks up about 5% of cancers, for women mainly over the age of 50, we can't rely on it. we have to rely upon knowing our bodies. the majority of people who actually are diagnosed as i threw the two week wait referral, the gp pathway, around 25% cancers are diagnosed that way and that is people actually going to their gps saying, i have got the signs and symptoms that i am worried about and within that window, gps should have an two weeks within england. we know that during the pandemic, this referral rate dropped, dropped an all—time low, in fact, last april. we know refiners have picked back
3:30 pm
up, but there is massive overwhelming voice from cancer charity single needs to be done to ensure the backlog coming through to ensure the backlog coming through to ensure people sitting at home realise. and i think sarah's death makes us realise how cruel this disease is and i think we have to remember that in the uk, last year when we were talking about coronavirus, over160,000 when we were talking about coronavirus, over 160,000 people also died from cancer, so we need to get talking about the forgotten c as well. tt get talking about the forgotten c as well. . :, :, get talking about the forgotten c as well. , :, :, :, , i. get talking about the forgotten c as well. , :, , i. :, ,, well. it is good to see you. thank ou for well. it is good to see you. thank you forjoining — well. it is good to see you. thank you forjoining us _ well. it is good to see you. thank you forjoining us for _ well. it is good to see you. thank you forjoining us for good - well. it is good to see you. thank you forjoining us for good luck i you forjoining us for good luck with your treatment. deborahjames from the five live programme. yumi and the dixie. —— you me and the big c. temperatures continue to rise across england and wales getting up to 27, 20 8 degrees. it will be warmer further north than northern
3:31 pm
ireland. we do have more cloud around here. there is still if you sponsor brazil in western parts of scotland. a is an end to the day because much of england and wales are leading to clear skies. still a lot more cloud for scotland and northern ireland and quite you are met, temperatures are 12—15 c. tomorrow we will see the mist and fog across parts of england lifting through the morning. sunshine will develop more widely across england and wales. eventually, we will see the cloud clearing across northern ireland, southern scotland and some sunshine coming out so temperatures were left here. more cloud across northern parts of scotland, the higher temperature still across england and wales. possibly 30 degrees across the midlands and at the south—east of england. let's go straight to the commons. a boris johnson is on his feet getting a statement on the situation in afghanistan. proving their courage and loyalty beyond doubt, sometimes in the heat of battle. the whole house would
3:32 pm
join in commending the courage and ingenuity of everyone involved in the kabul area. one of the most spectacular operations in our country's post—war military history. this feat exemplified the spirit of all the 150,000 british servicemen and women who deployed in afghanistan over the last two decades. of whom 457 laid down their lives, and many others suffered trauma and injury. thanks to their efforts, no terrorist attack against this country or any of our western allies has been launched from afghanistan for 20 years. they fulfilled the first duty of the british armed forces, to keep our people safe, and they and their families should take pride in everything they did. just as they kept us safe, so we shall do right by our veterans. in addition to the extra £3 million we have invested in mental health support through nhs of
3:33 pm
courage, we are providing water military charities who provide that would do such excellent work, with the aim that no veteran has make a request for help or go unanswered. now, the evacuation will give way to operation warm welcome, with an equal effort to help our afghan friends begin a new life here in the united kingdom, and recognising the strength of feeling across the health about the plight of individual afghans. health about the plight of individualafghans. —— health about the plight of individual afghans. —— across the house. we began to fulfil our obligations to those afghans, bringing 1400 to the uk. this april, we expanded our efforts by opening the afghan relocations and assistance policy, and even before the onset of operation pitting, we brought around 2000 to the uk betweenjune and august, and our obligation lives on. so let me say to anyone who we made commitments
3:34 pm
to, and who is currently in afghanistan. we are working urgently with our friends in the afghanistan. we are working urgently with ourfriends in the region afghanistan. we are working urgently with our friends in the region to secure safe passage, and as soon as routes are available, we will do everything possible to help you to reach safety. over and above this effort, the uk's formally launching a separate resettlement programme providing a safe and legal route for “p providing a safe and legal route for up to 20,000 afghans in the region over the coming years, with 5000 in the first year. we are upholding britain's finest tradition of welcoming those in need, and i emphasise that under the scheme, we will of course work with the un and aid agencies to identify those we should help as we have done in respect of those who fled the war in syria. but we will also include afghan who contributed to civil society or who face a particular risk from the taliban, for example because of their role in standing up for democracy and human rights, or because of their gender or sexuality
3:35 pm
or religion. all who come to our country through this safe and legal route will receive not a five year visa, but indefinite leave to remain. and our support will include three english courses for adults and 300 university scholarships. we will shortly be writing to local authorities and the devolved administrations with details on funding for extra school places and long term accommodation across the uk. i'm gratefulfor everything they are doing. and of course, for the work of my honourable friend, the minister for afghan resettlement. work of my honourable friend, the ministerfor afghan resettlement. i minister for afghan resettlement. i am ministerfor afghan resettlement. i am delighted but not surprised that across our country, people have been fundraising for our afghan friends, and we have received numerous offers of help from charities and ordinary families are like. and anyone who
3:36 pm
wishes tojoin that families are like. and anyone who wishes to join that effort can do so through gov.uk. mr speaker, our first responsibility is to the security of the united kingdom, and if the new government in kabul wants recognition and access to the billions of dollars currently frozen in overseas accounts, then we and our friends will help them to their agreement to prevent afghanistan from ever again becoming an incubator for terrorism and we shall insist on safe passage for anyone who wishes to leave, and respect for the rights of women and girls. our aim is to rally the strongest international consensus behind these principles, so that as far as possible, the world speaks to the taliban with one voice. to that end, i call an emergency meeting of the g7 leaders which made these aims the basis of our common approach. —— i called. the uk help to secure a un resolution last week making the same
3:37 pm
demands. laterthis resolution last week making the same demands. later this month that the un general assembly in new york, i will work with the un secretary general and other leaders to widen that consensus still further. we will judge that consensus still further. we willjudge the tally banned by their actions, not their words. willjudge the tally banned by their actions, not theirwords. —— willjudge the tally banned by their actions, not their words. —— the taliban. and use every economic and diplomatic leaver to protect their own countries from harm and to help the afghan people, who have already doubled the uk has met a humanitarian and development assistance, including to help people in the region. mr speaker, on saturday, we shall mark the 20th anniversary of the reason why we went into afghanistan in the first place. the terrorist attacks in the united states which claimed 2000 2977 lives, including those of 67
3:38 pm
britons. and if anyone is tempted to say that we have achieved nothing in that country, or are still tempted to say that we have achieved nothing in that country in 20 years, tell them that our armed forces and those of our allies enabled 3.6 million girls to go to school. tell them that this country and the western world where protected from al-qaeda in afghanistan throughout that period. and tell them that we have just melted the biggest humanitarian airlift in recent history. eight times the raf rescued more than 400 people on board a single plane, the most that had ever travelled on an raf aircraft in its 103 year history. helping thousands of people in fear for their lives, helping thousands to whom this country owes so much, and thereby revealing the fundamental values of the united kingdom. there are very few
3:39 pm
countries that have the military capability to do what we have just done, and fewer still who would have felt the moral imperative to act in the same way. we can be proud of our armed forces and everything they have achieved, and for the legacy they leave behind, and what they did was in the best traditions of this country, and i commend this statement to the house. leader of the opposition. — statement to the house. leader of the opposition, keir— statement to the house. leader of the opposition, keir starmer. i statement to the house. leader of i the opposition, keir starmer. thank ou, mr the opposition, keir starmer. thank you. mr speaker. — the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker, and _ the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker, and thank - the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker, and thank you i the opposition, keir starmer. you, mr speaker, and thank you to the prime — you, mr speaker, and thank you to the prime minister for advance copy of his— the prime minister for advance copy of his statement. the _ of his statement. the heroes on the ground of operation pitting out the best of us. operation pitting out the best of us the — operation pitting out the best of us. the ambassador stayed to process every— us. the ambassador stayed to process every case _ us. the ambassador stayed to process every case that he could. paratroopers lifted people from the crash _ paratroopers lifted people from the crash. afghan soldiers continued to serve _ crash. afghan soldiers continued to serve alongside us to the end. and thousands— serve alongside us to the end. and thousands of others risked their lives _ thousands of others risked their lives to— thousands of others risked their lives to help others escape. they faced _ lives to help others escape. they faced deadly violence and deliberately engineered chaos with courage. _ deliberately engineered chaos with
3:40 pm
courage, with calm, and with determination. thanks to their remarkable efforts, thousands were evacuated — remarkable efforts, thousands were evacuated. british nationals have returned — evacuated. british nationals have returned safely to their families, and afghan friends are starting a new life — and afghan friends are starting a new life here in britain. speaking directly— new life here in britain. speaking directly to— new life here in britain. speaking directly to those who served in operation pitting, i say, thank you. operation pitting, ! say, thank you. your— operation pitting, i say, thank you. your service — operation pitting, i say, thank you. your service deserves recognition and honour. — your service deserves recognition and honour, and i hope that the prime _ and honour, and i hope that the prime minister will accept labour's proposal— prime minister will accept labour's proposal to scrap the 30 day continuous service rule so that medals— continuous service rule so that medals are awarded for your bravery. the entire _ medals are awarded for your bravery. the entire army, our armed forces and veterans, deserve proper support for mental— and veterans, deserve proper support for mental health. the new funding announced — for mental health. the new funding announced today is welcome, but it's unlikely— announced today is welcome, but it's unlikely to _ announced today is welcome, but it's unlikely to be enough. previous funding — unlikely to be enough. previous funding was described as scandalous by the _ funding was described as scandalous by the select committee, and the
3:41 pm
0ffers— by the select committee, and the offers for— by the select committee, and the offers for veterans' fairs is still being _ offers for veterans' fairs is still being cut — offers for veterans' fairs is still being cut. —— office for veterans' affairs _ being cut. —— office for veterans' affairs they— being cut. —— office for veterans' affairs. they were let down. they were _ affairs. they were let down. they were let — affairs. they were let down. they were let down strategy. the prime minister— were let down strategy. the prime minister underestimated the strength of the _ minister underestimated the strength of the taliban, despite warnings. a return— of the taliban, despite warnings. a return to _ of the taliban, despite warnings. a return to power of the taliban, and our embassies shutting down amid reduced _ our embassies shutting down amid reduced security. the government continued — reduced security. the government continued to act on the assumption that there — continued to act on the assumption that there was no path to military victory— that there was no path to military victory for— that there was no path to military victory for the taliban. complacent and wrong — victory for the taliban. complacent and wrong. they were let down, mr speaker. _ and wrong. they were let down, mr speaker. by— and wrong. they were let down, mr speaker, by lack of planning. 18 months — speaker, by lack of planning. 18 months passed between the doha agreement and the fall of kabul. yet, agreement and the fall of kabul. yet. as — agreement and the fall of kabul. yet, as the prime minister now concedes. _ yet, as the prime minister now concedes, only 2000 of the 8000 people _ concedes, only 2000 of the 8000 people eligible for the scheme had
3:42 pm
been brought to britain. 2000 of 8000. _ been brought to britain. 2000 of 8000. a — been brought to britain. 2000 of 8000. a strategic review was published to much fanfare, but did not mention the taliban, nato withdrawal or the doha agreement, and the _ withdrawal or the doha agreement, and the prime minister only convened and the prime minister only convened a g7 meeting in afghanistan after kabut— a g7 meeting in afghanistan after kabul was lost. because of this lack of leadership, the government has left many— of leadership, the government has left many behind to whom we owe so much _ left many behind to whom we owe so much mps. — left many behind to whom we owe so much. mps, in the last few weeks, have _ much. mps, in the last few weeks, have had _ much. mps, in the last few weeks, have had thousands of desperate calls from — have had thousands of desperate calls from people trying to get to safety. _ calls from people trying to get to safety. many remain in danger. including — safety. many remain in danger. including the afghan guards who protected the british embassy in my constituency, and i am not alone. members— constituency, and i am not alone. members across the house will have had this _ members across the house will have had this. afghans who applied for the scheme weeks ago, sometimes months _ the scheme weeks ago, sometimes months ago, who were clearly eligible. — months ago, who were clearly eligible, but were not processed quickly— eligible, but were not processed quickly enough by this government, didn't— quickly enough by this government, didn't make it to the planes. the
3:43 pm
stress _ didn't make it to the planes. the stress levels of them and their families. — stress levels of them and their families, and all of our teams and caseworkers, has been palpable in the last— caseworkers, has been palpable in the last few weeks and months. a familiar— the last few weeks and months. a familiar and desperate story to many across— familiar and desperate story to many across this _ familiar and desperate story to many across this house on both sides. the government— across this house on both sides. the government doesn't even know how many— government doesn't even know how many uk _ government doesn't even know how many uk nationals and how many afghans _ many uk nationals and how many afghans eligible under the arap scheme — afghans eligible under the arap scheme have been left behind to the cruelty— scheme have been left behind to the cruelty of— scheme have been left behind to the cruelty of the taliban. a national disgrace — cruelty of the taliban. a national disgrace. even if they could identify— disgrace. even if they could identify who they had left behind, the government doesn't have a plan to get— the government doesn't have a plan to get everybody out. kabul airport remains _ to get everybody out. kabul airport remains close to international flights — remains close to international flights. safe passage has not been created _ flights. safe passage has not been created to afghanistan's neighbours, and whatever the prime minister says today. _ and whatever the prime minister says today, there is no agreement of the resettlement of afghan refugees. we have a _ resettlement of afghan refugees. we have a prime minister incapable of international leadership just when we needed it most. i know it is
3:44 pm
uncomfortable. the terrible attacks from arap — uncomfortable. the terrible attacks from arap scheme to highlight the new threats. the government must act quickly— new threats. the government must act quickly to— new threats. the government must act quickly to coordinate international partners — quickly to coordinate international partners -- — quickly to coordinate international partners. —— isis—k. there is a desperate need for humanitarian support. the return to 2019 levels — humanitarian support. the return to 2019 levels of aid spending is necessary, and where is the plan to ensure _ necessary, and where is the plan to ensure it _ necessary, and where is the plan to ensure it does not fall into the wrong — ensure it does not fall into the wrong hands? mr speaker, to those that have _ wrong hands? mr speaker, to those that have managed to escape afghanistan and have arrived here in the uk. _ afghanistan and have arrived here in the uk. we — afghanistan and have arrived here in the uk, we say welcome. i know you will give _ the uk, we say welcome. i know you will give as— the uk, we say welcome. i know you will give as much to this country as you make — will give as much to this country as you make it— will give as much to this country as you make it your new home. all you need _ you make it your new home. all you need is _ you make it your new home. all you need is help— you make it your new home. all you need is help and support, and high i'm pleased that indefinite leave to remain— i'm pleased that indefinite leave to remain will now be granted to all those _ remain will now be granted to all those who— remain will now be granted to all those who arrive by safe and legal roots _ those who arrive by safe and legal roots. local authorities across the country _ roots. local authorities across the country are — roots. local authorities across the country are trying to play their part. — country are trying to play their part. but— country are trying to play their part, but they have been in the dark as to _ part, but they have been in the dark as to how— part, but they have been in the dark as to how many people they will be asked _ as to how many people they will be asked to _ as to how many people they will be asked to support and what resources
3:45 pm
they have _ asked to support and what resources they have to do so, so we will look at the _ they have to do so, so we will look at the details of the letter the prime — at the details of the letter the prime minister referred to and examine — prime minister referred to and examine the details. history will tell the — examine the details. history will tell the tale of operation pitting is one _ tell the tale of operation pitting is one of— tell the tale of operation pitting is one of immense bravery. we are proud _ is one of immense bravery. we are proud of— is one of immense bravery. we are proud of all— is one of immense bravery. we are proud of all those who contributed, their story— proud of all those who contributed, their story made even more remarkable by the fact that whilst they were saving lives, our political _ they were saving lives, our political leadership was missing in action _ political leadership was missing in action. thank you.— political leadership was missing in action. thank you. prime minister. well, mr speaker, _ action. thank you. prime minister. well, mr speaker, there _ action. thank you. prime minister. well, mr speaker, there weren't i action. thank you. prime minister. i well, mr speaker, there weren't many questions at the right honourable gentleman put to me. he made the general assertion that the government had not been focusing on afghanistan, but as far as i remember, he didn't even bother to turn up to the first of three statements i have given up on afghanistan in this house this year. i don't know where that... such were his instincts and his understanding of the importance of that issue. i can tell him that actually, his figures are quite wrong. before
3:46 pm
april, we had helped 1400 people to safety from afghanistan under the arap scheme, and since august the 14th, we helped a further 2000, and as he knows very well, between august and 14th and august the 28th, this country performed an absolutely astonishing feat... yes... yes, of course, mr speaker, we are going to do everything we can to help those who wish to have safe passage out of afghanistan, which is why we will continue with our international friends and partners to apply whatever pressure we can, economic, diplomatic, on the taliban, to ensure that they comply with that, as they have said they will. but i think the right honourable gentleman should in all candour or acknowledge the immensity of the achievement of the immensity of the achievement of the armed forces of this country in
3:47 pm
planning and preparing for months, four months of operation pitting, and then, mr speaker, contrary to what he has just said, extracting almost double, almost double the number that they originally prepared to do. it is a quite astonishing feat. it is a quite astonishing military and logistic feet, and one thing i welcome, mr speaker, one thing i welcome, mr speaker, one thing i welcome is his congratulations to the armed forces for what they did.— congratulations to the armed forces for what they did. tobias ellwood. thank you. _ for what they did. tobias ellwood. thank you. mr _ for what they did. tobias ellwood. thank you, mr speaker. _ for what they did. tobias ellwood. thank you, mr speaker. veterans, families— thank you, mr speaker. veterans, families and — thank you, mr speaker. veterans, families and the wider public are asking _ families and the wider public are asking what it is awful. the country is back— asking what it is awful. the country is back in— asking what it is awful. the country is back in the hands of dictatorship, terrorism is allowed to thrive. — dictatorship, terrorism is allowed to thrive, and the people of afghanistan face humanitarian disaster. — afghanistan face humanitarian disaster. more worryingly, the limits— disaster. more worryingly, the limits of— disaster. more worryingly, the limits of uk and western influence have been— limits of uk and western influence have been exposed, with america now adopting _ have been exposed, with america now adopting a _ have been exposed, with america now adopting a more isolationist foreign
3:48 pm
policy. _ adopting a more isolationist foreign policy. and — adopting a more isolationist foreign policy, and we have passed the high water— policy, and we have passed the high water mark— policy, and we have passed the high water mark of western liberalism that began after the second world war. this— that began after the second world war. this is a dangerous geopolitical turning point. war. this is a dangerous geopoliticalturning point. i war. this is a dangerous geopolitical turning point. iask the prime — geopolitical turning point. iask the prime minister, would he agree there _ the prime minister, would he agree there is— the prime minister, would he agree there is now a void of leadership in there is now a void of leadership in the west— there is now a void of leadership in the west and nato, and if britain wants— the west and nato, and if britain wants to — the west and nato, and if britain wants to fill that void, as we should — wants to fill that void, as we should do, it will require a complete overhaul of whitehall to upgrade _ complete overhaul of whitehall to upgrade our strategic thinking, our foreign _ upgrade our strategic thinking, our foreign policy output, and our ability— foreign policy output, and our ability to— foreign policy output, and our ability to lead? mr— ability to lead? mr speaker, my right honourable friend deserves to be listened to with great respect on afghanistan, for his service. he understands theseissues for his service. he understands these issues deeply. but i must tell him that i think people listening to this debate across the country could be forgiven for not recognising that this country actually ceased military operations in afghanistan in 2014, and what we are doing now is making sure that we work with our friends and partners around the world to prevent afghanistan from
3:49 pm
relapsing into a breeding ground for terror, to make sure we use all the levers we can to ensure that the rights of women and girls are respected, and that everybody who wants safe passage out of afghanistan is allowed to do that. that is what we are going to do, and we will continue to show the leadership that we have in the g7, in the p5, in nato, and in all the otherforums in which nato in the p5, in nato, and in all the other forums in which nato leads in the p5, in nato, and in all the otherforums in which nato leads —— which britain leads in the west. ian black point.— which britain leads in the west. ian black oint. :, ~' :, ian black point. thank you, and may ian black point. thank you, and may i thank everyone _ ian black point. thank you, and may i thank everyone involved _ ian black point. thank you, and may i thank everyone involved in - ian black point. thank you, and may i thank everyone involved in the i i thank everyone involved in the afghanistan evacuation, and may i thank— afghanistan evacuation, and may i thank the — afghanistan evacuation, and may i thank the prime minister for advance copy of— thank the prime minister for advance copy of a _ thank the prime minister for advance copy of a statement. mr— copy of a statement. mr speaker, normally we have a cabinet — mr speaker, normally we have a cabinet minister sent to the house to cover— cabinet minister sent to the house to cover for— cabinet minister sent to the house to cover for the prime minister, but today. _ to cover for the prime minister, but today. we _ to cover for the prime minister, but today, we have before us the prime minister. _ today, we have before us the prime minister, desperately trying to cover— minister, desperately trying to cover for— minister, desperately trying to cover for a foreign secretary who should _ cover for a foreign secretary who should have been sacked weeks ago. during _ should have been sacked weeks ago. during committee last week, the foreign— during committee last week, the
3:50 pm
foreign secretary failed to answer even _ foreign secretary failed to answer even basic— foreign secretary failed to answer even basic questions from my honourable friend, the member for glasgow— honourable friend, the member for glasgow south. i genuinely hope the prime _ glasgow south. i genuinely hope the prime minister is better prepared today. _ prime minister is better prepared today. mr— prime minister is better prepared today. mr speaker, there is barely an mp _ today. mr speaker, there is barely an mp in _ today. mr speaker, there is barely an mp in this house who hasn't submitted _ an mp in this house who hasn't submitted urgent and sensitive information to the foreign office on uk and _ information to the foreign office on uk and afghan nationals desperate to find safe _ uk and afghan nationals desperate to find safe passage away from the taliban — find safe passage away from the taliban it — find safe passage away from the taliban. it is a disgrace that most of these — taliban. it is a disgrace that most of these urgent queries have been left unresolved and unanswered. a disgrace _ left unresolved and unanswered. a disgrace not for us, but for all of those _ disgrace not for us, but for all of those who— disgrace not for us, but for all of those who have been left behind, uk and afghan nationals, who are now fearful— and afghan nationals, who are now fearful and — and afghan nationals, who are now fearful and in many cases in hiding. thousands— fearful and in many cases in hiding. thousands of desperate people, people _ thousands of desperate people, people we have a debt of responsibility too, have been left with no _ responsibility too, have been left with no clarity, no answers, and no help. _ with no clarity, no answers, and no help. so _ with no clarity, no answers, and no help. so let— with no clarity, no answers, and no help. so let me ask the prime minister. _ help. so let me ask the prime minister. what assessment has been made _ minister. what assessment has been made of— minister. what assessment has been made of the number of uk nationals left in _ made of the number of uk nationals
3:51 pm
left in afghanistan? and what plans are there _ left in afghanistan? and what plans are there to assist them? how many afghans _ are there to assist them? how many afghans that qualify under the arap scheme _ afghans that qualify under the arap scheme as interpreters or other groups— scheme as interpreters or other groups who have been left behind? and will— groups who have been left behind? and will the prime minister apologised to those who have been left behind, left high and dry, though— left behind, left high and dry, though is— left behind, left high and dry, though is that the uk has a responsibility to? last night, in correspondent, the government gave the excuse _ correspondent, the government gave the excuse that delays in evacuating all those _ the excuse that delays in evacuating all those with rights were because the foreign office had received more correspondent than during covid. but there is— correspondent than during covid. but there is a _ correspondent than during covid. but there is a fundamental difference. no one _ there is a fundamental difference. no one knew covid was coming. the government— no one knew covid was coming. the government had 18 months to prepare an exit— government had 18 months to prepare an exit strategy in afghanistan. so can the _ an exit strategy in afghanistan. so can the prime minister give a firm deadline — can the prime minister give a firm deadline when the massive backlog of applications will be processed, and provide _ applications will be processed, and provide a _ applications will be processed, and provide a new target date for when safe passage will be offered to those — safe passage will be offered to those uk and afghan citizens? when
3:52 pm
parliament was recalled, the prime minister— parliament was recalled, the prime minister publicly agreed to hold a four nation summit on the uk's responsibility to welcome refugees here _ responsibility to welcome refugees here can— responsibility to welcome refugees here can i— responsibility to welcome refugees here. can i ask the prime minister to give _ here. can i ask the prime minister to give us— here. can i ask the prime minister to give us the date when that summit will take _ to give us the date when that summit will take place? and finally, with all the _ will take place? and finally, with all the talk of cabinet reshuffle is, all the talk of cabinet reshuffle is. can— all the talk of cabinet reshuffle is, can the prime minister guarantee that the _ is, can the prime minister guarantee that the foreign secretary will finally — that the foreign secretary will finally be sacked in any reshuffle, or does— finally be sacked in any reshuffle, or does he — finally be sacked in any reshuffle, or does he intend to reward incompetence? incompetence ? always, mr speaker, i incompetence? always, mr speaker, lam happy to always, mr speaker, iam happy to meet representatives of the scottish government and other devolved administrations. of course, mr speaker. but he asked some specific questions about the handling of requests from those still in afghanistan and those who have been interceding on their behalf. i can tell on that by close of play today, every single one of the e—mails from colleagues around this house will be answered, and thousands and
3:53 pm
thousands have already been done. and as for the question, mr speaker, of how many arap candidates are remaining, i can tell him that the total number is 311, of which 192 responded to the calls that were put out, and i repeat, we will do absolutely everything we can to ensure that those people get the safe passage that they deserve, using the levers that i have described. but the contrast should be readily apparent to everybody in this country, with the huge number, 15,000 people, that we were able to help just in the course of those few daysin help just in the course of those few days in august, and i think people will understand that it was a very considerable effort by our armed forces. to considerable effort by our armed forces. :, , :, , forces. to help the house, we will be running — forces. to help the house, we will be running this _ forces. to help the house, we will be running this till _ forces. to help the house, we will be running this till around - forces. to help the house, we will| be running this till around 4:45pm. not everybody _ be running this till around 4:45pm. not everybody will— be running this till around 4:45pm. not everybody will get _ be running this till around 4:45pm. not everybody will get in. - be running this till around 4:45pm. not everybody will get in. people i not everybody will get in. people will be _ not everybody will get in. people will be disappointed. _ not everybody will get in. people will be disappointed. but- not everybody will get in. people will be disappointed. but we i not everybody will get in. people will be disappointed. but we willl not everybody will get in. people i will be disappointed. but we will do our best. _ will be disappointed. but we will do our best. so — will be disappointed. but we will do our best. so let's _ will be disappointed. but we will do our best. so let's help _ will be disappointed. but we will do our best. so let's help each - will be disappointed. but we will do
3:54 pm
our best. so let's help each other. i our best. so let's help each other. theresa _ our best. so let's help each other. theresa may. _ our best. so let's help each other. theresa may. i_ our best. so let's help each other. theresa may. ijoin_ our best. so let's help each other. theresa may. ijoin my— our best. so let's help each other. theresa may. ijoin my right- theresa may. ijoin my right honourable _ theresa may. ijoin my right honourable friend _ theresa may. ijoin my right honourable friend and - theresa may. ijoin my right- honourable friend and commending theresa may. ijoin my right— honourable friend and commending all those involved — honourable friend and commending all those involved with _ honourable friend and commending all those involved with the _ honourable friend and commending all those involved with the afghanistan i those involved with the afghanistan lf those involved with the afghanistan lp and also all those in our armed forces who _ lp and also all those in our armed forces who served _ lp and also all those in our armed forces who served in _ lp and also all those in our armed forces who served in afghanistan. sadly. _ forces who served in afghanistan. sadly. 457— forces who served in afghanistan. sadly, 457 of whom, as we know, paid the ultimate _ sadly, 457 of whom, as we know, paid the ultimate sacrifice. we should all be _ the ultimate sacrifice. we should all be proud of their achievements. does _ all be proud of their achievements. does my— all be proud of their achievements. does my right honourable friend agree _ does my right honourable friend agree that as a result of nato forces — agree that as a result of nato forces withdrawing from afghanistan, the terrorist threat has increased, and will— the terrorist threat has increased, and will he — the terrorist threat has increased, and will he confirm that all those involved — and will he confirm that all those involved in — and will he confirm that all those involved in counterterrorism work here _ involved in counterterrorism work here in _ involved in counterterrorism work here in the — involved in counterterrorism work here in the uk will be given the necessary— here in the uk will be given the necessary support to ensure they can keep us— necessary support to ensure they can keep us safe? i thank my right honourable friend and know how much work she has done in her career to protect this country and assist in counterterrorism. mr speaker, i can give her note that we have no direct information as yet of any increase to the threat. i can assure here in the house that every effort will be made to make sure that our counterterrorist agents have the resources they need to keep us safe.
3:55 pm
thank you, mr speaker. i have received — thank you, mr speaker. i have received hundreds of e—mails from constituents about afghanistan and i have british nationals in afghanistan, a husband and his pregnant— afghanistan, a husband and his pregnant wife. can the prime minister— pregnant wife. can the prime minister say what discussions the government has had with afghanistan neighbours about keeping borders open for— neighbours about keeping borders open for those at risk under the taliban. — open for those at risk under the taliban, and to support refugees? prime _ taliban, and to support refugees? prime minister. | taliban, and to support refugees? prime minister.— prime minister. i thank you very much, prime minister. i thank you very much. and _ prime minister. i thank you very much. and i'm _ prime minister. i thank you very much, and i'm sure _ prime minister. i thank you very much, and i'm sure many i prime minister. i thank you very - much, and i'm sure many colleagues around the house will ask similar questions. i can tell my right honourable friend the foreign secretary has talked of the government in pakistan and other regional countries about what we can do to assist them, as i have described, and as she knows, we have in addition to the arap programme, the afghan settlement programme running up to 20,000 in the next few years. thank you, mr speaker. may i first of all_ thank you, mr speaker. may i first of all pay— thank you, mr speaker. may i first of all pay tribute to the prime minister— of all pay tribute to the prime minister for his increased funding
3:56 pm
towards _ minister for his increased funding towards mental health care for veterans? i'm sure he will keep that sum under_ veterans? i'm sure he will keep that sum under review shouldn't need to rise~ _ sum under review shouldn't need to rise~ may— sum under review shouldn't need to rise~ may i — sum under review shouldn't need to rise. may i ask him, however, if he will draw_ rise. may i ask him, however, if he will draw the — rise. may i ask him, however, if he will draw the lesson he has already learned _ will draw the lesson he has already learned from the appointment of our film learned from the appointment of our right honourable friend, the member for horncastle, in having a single point _ for horncastle, in having a single point of— for horncastle, in having a single point of contact in the uk, and seek to have _ point of contact in the uk, and seek to have a _ point of contact in the uk, and seek to have a single point of contact for those — to have a single point of contact for those in afghanistan who may need _ for those in afghanistan who may need to— for those in afghanistan who may need to access either the route of exit or— need to access either the route of exit or support from her majesty's government? yes, - government? yes, mr speaker, and i thank the honourable gentleman. he knows whereof he speaks, and i have met people who come from afghanistan only recently who have helped us greatly in the last 20 years, and the key issue for them is, is a house in the stands, where they will send their children to school, can they get access to the housing they need? i want to thank my right honourable friend the secretary of state for communities and local government for what he is doing, and he's quite right that my honourable friend is the single point of contact that they should focus upon.
3:57 pm
we all saw the horrific carnage outside — we all saw the horrific carnage outside kabul airport. 0ver we all saw the horrific carnage outside kabul airport. over 180 outside kabul airport. 0ver180 people — outside kabul airport. 0ver180 people killed. sol outside kabul airport. 0ver180 people killed. so ijoin the prime minister— people killed. so ijoin the prime minister and people killed. so ijoin the prime ministerand remembering all people killed. so ijoin the prime minister and remembering all those victims. _ minister and remembering all those victims, not least the two british nationals— victims, not least the two british nationals and the child of a british national — nationals and the child of a british national. that airport atrocity was the work — national. that airport atrocity was the work of — national. that airport atrocity was the work of the terrorist organisation isis—k. everyone agrees we must _ organisation isis—k. everyone agrees we must now work to stop isis—k becoming _ we must now work to stop isis—k becoming a threat to the british people — becoming a threat to the british people. yet under the spread minister's watch, not only has he failed _ minister's watch, not only has he failed to— minister's watch, not only has he failed to agree an international strategy— failed to agree an international strategy to take on isis—k, he has failed _ strategy to take on isis—k, he has failed eveh — strategy to take on isis—k, he has failed even to proscribe them as a terrorist _ failed even to proscribe them as a terrorist organisation like other countries _ terrorist organisation like other countries. will he explain these failures— countries. will he explain these failures and national security? i�*m failures and national security? i'm afraid he is _ failures and national security? afraid he is in failures and national security? i�*m afraid he is in error. isis—k is a
3:58 pm
subset of dae, and as he knows very well, one of the bitter ironies of the situation —— a subset of daesh, one of the bitter ironies of the situation is that the taliban themselves are no friends to isis—k, and whatever government there is an kaba will need help fighting them. we are proving our immense generosity by supporting those in dire need — generosity by supporting those in dire need in afghanistan with safe passage _ dire need in afghanistan with safe passage to the uk, but our ability to do— passage to the uk, but our ability to do so— passage to the uk, but our ability to do so restrained by the continuing uncontrolled illegal migration of the english channel. what _ migration of the english channel. what more can the government do to prevent— what more can the government do to prevent it? _ prevent it? my - prevent it? my honourable friend is completely right, and of course, the issue is that, very sadly, i think our friends across the channel in france are faced with a very difficult problem, of large numbers of people who want to come to this country, and we are doing everything that we
3:59 pm
can to encourage the french to do the necessary and impede their passage. but i know that my right honourable friend the home secretary is working around the clock to ensure that we not only encourage the french to stiffen their sinews and stop people making the journey, but we use every possible tactic thatis but we use every possible tactic that is available to us as well. john mcdonnell. can that is available to us as well. john mcdonnell.— that is available to us as well. john mcdonnell. ., ., ,~ john mcdonnell. can i ask the prime minister, john mcdonnell. can i ask the prime minister. a — john mcdonnell. can i ask the prime minister, a razor— john mcdonnell. can i ask the prime minister, a razor constituency - minister, a razor constituency matter— minister, a razor constituency matter with the prime minister? i have _ matter with the prime minister? i have had — matter with the prime minister? i have had over 100 afghani local families— have had over 100 afghani local families contact me about their cohcerhs— families contact me about their concerns about their relatives in afghanistan, and we now have the thousands— afghanistan, and we now have the thousands that are coming to this country. — thousands that are coming to this country, largely coming through heathrow, and being quarantined in about— heathrow, and being quarantined in about seven hotels in my constituency. there is a real anxiety— constituency. there is a real anxiety on _ constituency. there is a real anxiety on past performance of what happened _ anxiety on past performance of what happened with asylum seekers in hotels _ happened with asylum seekers in hotels and our constituency. they could _ hotels and our constituency. they could be — hotels and our constituency. they could be trapped in those hotels for quite a _ could be trapped in those hotels for quite a long time to come. i would
4:00 pm
like to— quite a long time to come. i would like to arrange a meeting with myself— like to arrange a meeting with myself or— like to arrange a meeting with myself or other ministers or officials _ myself or other ministers or officials to discuss the plan for these — officials to discuss the plan for these support —— the support for these _ these support —— the support for these plans, because i welcome, in my community does, the support for those _ my community does, the support for those families, but also the long term _ those families, but also the long term relocation plan, to make sure that they— term relocation plan, to make sure that they have all that they can to settle _ that they have all that they can to settle here for the future. the honourable gentleman is right to draw attention to the issue. some councils have responded magnificently. notably in the east midlands andest where. i know that my honourable friend is putting funding in place, if he wants a further meeting, i've no doubt the relevant minister will oblige. i’m relevant minister will oblige. i'm workin: relevant minister will oblige. i'm working with _ relevant minister will oblige. i'm working with constituents who are dedicating — working with constituents who are dedicating their— working with constituents who are dedicating their time _ working with constituents who are dedicating their time to— working with constituents who are dedicating their time to helping i dedicating their time to helping afghan— dedicating their time to helping afghan families _ dedicating their time to helping afghan families under- dedicating their time to helping afghan families under threat. l dedicating their time to helping - afghan families under threat. these people _ afghan families under threat. these people are — afghan families under threat. these people are in — afghan families under threat. these people are in hiding, _ afghan families under threat. these people are in hiding, the _ afghan families under threat. these people are in hiding, the taliban- people are in hiding, the taliban
4:01 pm
have _ people are in hiding, the taliban have lreen— people are in hiding, the taliban have been going _ people are in hiding, the taliban have been going door—to—doorl people are in hiding, the talibanl have been going door—to—door to people are in hiding, the taliban- have been going door—to—door to find thenr~ _ have been going door—to—door to find thenr~ they— have been going door—to—door to find thenr~ theyare— have been going door—to—door to find them. they are terrified. _ have been going door—to—door to find them. they are terrified. prime - them. they are terrified. prime minister. — them. they are terrified. prime minister, will— them. they are terrified. prime minister, will you _ them. they are terrified. prime minister, will you ensure - them. they are terrified. prime minister, will you ensure and l them. they are terrified. prime . minister, will you ensure and help me to _ minister, will you ensure and help me to show— minister, will you ensure and help me to show these _ minister, will you ensure and help me to show these family- minister, will you ensure and help me to show these family they - minister, will you ensure and help. me to show these family they should not lose _ me to show these family they should not lose hope — me to show these family they should not lose hope and _ me to show these family they should not lose hope and help _ me to show these family they should not lose hope and help us _ me to show these family they should not lose hope and help us provide i not lose hope and help us provide timely— not lose hope and help us provide timely information _ not lose hope and help us provide timely information about - not lose hope and help us provide timely information about safe - timely information about safe passage — timely information about safe passage options. _ timely information about safe passage options.— timely information about safe passage options. timely information about safe -assaaeo-tions. , ., , ~ passage options. yes, of course, mr seaker, passage options. yes, of course, mr speaker. my — passage options. yes, of course, mr speaker, my honourable _ passage options. yes, of course, mr speaker, my honourable friend - passage options. yes, of course, mr speaker, my honourable friend is i speaker, my honourable friend is right in what she says. that is why we are going to continue to put all the pressure we can on the taliban to ensure safe passage for the groups that i have described and we are joined groups that i have described and we arejoined in that by groups that i have described and we are joined in that by friends and partners around the world. can are joined in that by friends and partners around the world. cami partners around the world. can i 'oin to partners around the world. can i join to the _ partners around the world. can i join to the tributes _ partners around the world. can i join to the tributes to _ partners around the world. can i join to the tributes to our- partners around the world. can i join to the tributes to our armed forces — join to the tributes to our armed forces. there are still people being persecuted and hunted by the taliban, — persecuted and hunted by the taliban, because they worked for the uk government, but through contractor, not as direct employees. they haven't — contractor, not as direct employees. they haven't had replies to their arup— they haven't had replies to their arup applications and the rumour
4:02 pm
circulating — arup applications and the rumour circulating is they may have to wait for the _ circulating is they may have to wait for the resettlement scheme and also the places— for the resettlement scheme and also the places on the scheme have many of them _ the places on the scheme have many of them already been allocated and the scheme is almost full. could he clarify— the scheme is almost full. could he clarify the _ the scheme is almost full. could he clarify the situation for those people. _ clarify the situation for those people, also tell us whether some of the resettlement scheme places have been preahe kated and if so —— preallocated and will be done for contractors as well as direct employees. contractors as well as direct employees— contractors as well as direct emlo ees. �* ., ., employees. i'm grateful to the honourable _ employees. i'm grateful to the honourable lady _ employees. i'm grateful to the honourable lady and _ employees. i'm grateful to the honourable lady and she - employees. i'm grateful to the j honourable lady and she raises employees. i'm grateful to the i honourable lady and she raises an important question. i can tell her the arup places have not been transferred, they continue to be valid. people are the scheme continue to be eligible and nor is it correct to to say the initial budget has already been filled. that is not correct. the budget has already been filled. that is not correct-— is not correct. the council for at risk academics _ is not correct. the council for at risk academics has _ is not correct. the council for at risk academics has been - is not correct. the council for at. risk academics has been rescuing
4:03 pm
scholars — risk academics has been rescuing scholars in — risk academics has been rescuing scholars in danger— risk academics has been rescuing scholars in danger from - risk academics has been rescuing i scholars in danger from oppressive regimes— scholars in danger from oppressive regimes since _ scholars in danger from oppressive regimes since the _ scholars in danger from oppressive regimes since the nazi _ scholars in danger from oppressive regimes since the nazi period - scholars in danger from oppressive regimes since the nazi period in i regimes since the nazi period in 1935 _ regimes since the nazi period in 1935 the — regimes since the nazi period in 1933. the home _ regimes since the nazi period in 1933. the home office - regimes since the nazi period in 1933. the home office has- regimes since the nazi period in 1933. the home office has been regimes since the nazi period in - 1933. the home office has been sent a list of— 1933. the home office has been sent a list of 12_ 1933. the home office has been sent a list of 12 such — 1933. the home office has been sent a list of 12 such scholars, _ 1933. the home office has been sent a list of 12 such scholars, some - 1933. the home office has been sent a list of 12 such scholars, some are l a list of 12 such scholars, some are in hiding _ a list of 12 such scholars, some are in hiding in — a list of 12 such scholars, some are in hiding in afghanistan _ a list of 12 such scholars, some are in hiding in afghanistan and - a list of 12 such scholars, some are in hiding in afghanistan and some. a list of 12 such scholars, some are i in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding— in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding in— in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding in pakistan. _ in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding in pakistan. will— in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding in pakistan. will the - in hiding in afghanistan and some in hiding in pakistan. will the home i hiding in pakistan. will the home office _ hiding in pakistan. will the home office make — hiding in pakistan. will the home office make their— hiding in pakistan. will the home office make their case _ hiding in pakistan. will the home office make their case a - hiding in pakistan. will the home office make their case a priority, | office make their case a priority, because — office make their case a priority, because in— office make their case a priority, because in them _ office make their case a priority, because in them lies _ office make their case a priority, because in them lies any - office make their case a priority, because in them lies any hope i office make their case a priority, i because in them lies any hope for the future — because in them lies any hope for the future of— because in them lies any hope for the future of afghanistan? - because in them lies any hope for the future of afghanistan? yes, l the future of afghanistan? yes, there are many _ the future of afghanistan? yes, there are many difficult - the future of afghanistan? there are many difficult cases, the future of afghanistan?“ there are many difficult cases, but my right honourable friend is, i thank him for drawing attention to these particular individuals and i will ensure that the relevant foreign office minister is in touch with him about the specific cases that he raises.— that he raises. thank you mr speaker. _ that he raises. thank you mr speaker. we _ that he raises. thank you mr speaker, we know— that he raises. thank you mr speaker, we know that - that he raises. thank you mr speaker, we know that the l speaker, we know that the humanitarian _ speaker, we know that the humanitarian crisis - speaker, we know that the humanitarian crisis in - speaker, we know that the - humanitarian crisis in afghanistan and the _ humanitarian crisis in afghanistan and the regis— humanitarian crisis in afghanistan and the regis growing _ humanitarian crisis in afghanistan and the regis growing by- humanitarian crisis in afghanistan and the regis growing by the - humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. and the regis growing by the hour. the famine — and the regis growing by the hour. the famine is— and the regis growing by the hour. the famine is expected _ and the regis growing by the hour. the famine is expected and - and the regis growing by the hour. the famine is expected and of- and the regis growing by the hour. . the famine is expected and of course aid is _ the famine is expected and of course aid is going _ the famine is expected and of course aid is going to— the famine is expected and of course aid is going to be _ the famine is expected and of course aid is going to be difficult _ the famine is expected and of course aid is going to be difficult to- the famine is expected and of course aid is going to be difficult to get- aid is going to be difficult to get through — aid is going to be difficult to get through so _ aid is going to be difficult to get through. so what _ aid is going to be difficult to get through. so what specific - aid is going to be difficult to get through. so what specific stepsl aid is going to be difficult to get. through. so what specific steps has
4:04 pm
he taken _ through. so what specific steps has he taken to— through. so what specific steps has he taken to ensure _ through. so what specific steps has he taken to ensure that _ through. so what specific steps has he taken to ensure that that - through. so what specific steps has| he taken to ensure that that famine is averted, — he taken to ensure that that famine is averted, but _ he taken to ensure that that famine is averted, but also _ he taken to ensure that that famine is averted, but also the _ he taken to ensure that that famine is averted, but also the region - is averted, but also the region receive — is averted, but also the region receive the _ is averted, but also the region receive the international- receive the international development _ receive the international development aid - receive the international development aid it - receive the international. development aid it requires receive the international- development aid it requires in receive the international— development aid it requires in order to avert— development aid it requires in order to avert a _ development aid it requires in order to avert a further— development aid it requires in order to avert a further crisis? _ development aid it requires in order to avert a further crisis? i— development aid it requires in order to avert a further crisis?— to avert a further crisis? i talked immediately _ to avert a further crisis? i talked immediately that _ to avert a further crisis? i talked immediately that the _ to avert a further crisis? i talked immediately that the crisis - to avert a further crisis? i talked| immediately that the crisis broke to avert a further crisis? i talked i immediately that the crisis broke to the un secretary general about what the un secretary general about what the un secretary general about what the un should be doing and what the uk would do to support. the un continues to be in country, in afghanistan and we have doubled our humanitarian support and we will be working with friends and partners to ensure that we tackle the humanitarian crisis as well. thank ou mr humanitarian crisis as well. thank you mr speaker- _ humanitarian crisis as well. thank you mr speaker. the _ humanitarian crisis as well. thank you mr speaker. the last - humanitarian crisis as well. thank you mr speaker. the last months| humanitarian crisis as well. thank you mr speaker. the last months have seen the shattering of many illusions, but does my right honourable friend agree if we are to help the people of afghanistan, millions of whom are out in the open and will not be fed, we need to make sure that the whole international
4:05 pm
community focuses on doing so through the mechanism of the un and probably through the traditional mechanism of a regional contact group and that britain, through its experience on these matters, through its membership of the security council is in a pivotal position to help those people i mentioned? mr; help those people i mentioned? 151 right help those people i mentioned? m right honourable help those people i mentioned? m1 right honourable friend is right to raise the contact group, in addition to the otherforums raise the contact group, in addition to the other forums i have described and to pay particular note to the role of the un and i know the foreign secretary has talked to the un secretary general�*s representative to afghanistan. i think the contact group is a vital part of the way we should co—ordinate our efforts. part of the way we should co-ordinate our efforts. 8096 of the world's heroin _ co-ordinate our efforts. 8096 of the world's heroin originates _ co-ordinate our efforts. 8096 of the world's heroin originates in - world's heroin originates in afghanistan, providing the taliban with more — afghanistan, providing the taliban with more than half its income and
4:06 pm
causing _ with more than half its income and causing misery across the road. what steps _ causing misery across the road. what steps is _ causing misery across the road. what steps is he _ causing misery across the road. what steps is he taking in partnership with uk— steps is he taking in partnership with uk allies to prevent the taliban— with uk allies to prevent the taliban and the organised gangs they work with— taliban and the organised gangs they work with from flooding our communities with heroin and now they have fewer— communities with heroin and now they have fewer impediments to growing more _ have fewer impediments to growing more opium. the have fewer impediments to growing more opium-— more opium. the sadly, the rate of production — more opium. the sadly, the rate of production and _ more opium. the sadly, the rate of production and export _ more opium. the sadly, the rate of production and export of _ more opium. the sadly, the rate of production and export of heroin i more opium. the sadly, the rate of production and export of heroin as| production and export of heroin as opium from afghanistan has been increasing in recent years and i think the figure is higher now than the one the honourable lady suggests and what is needed is of course to insist that the taliban stop this and they don't allow afghanistan to continue to be a narco—state, but the way to fight heroin consumption in this country is to have a strong crime fighting institution, such as the national crime agency and i was
4:07 pm
privileged to see the work of our crime fighters doing fantastic work in glasgow. the crime fighters doing fantastic work in glasuow. ~ , in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as — in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as a _ in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as a result _ in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as a result of _ in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as a result of the - in glasgow. the prime minister will be aware as a result of the nato i be aware as a result of the nato withdrawal— be aware as a result of the nato withdrawal from _ be aware as a result of the nato withdrawal from afghanistan i be aware as a result of the nato i withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern _ withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern that — withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern that the _ withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern that the terrorist _ withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern that the terrorist threat i withdrawal from afghanistan there is concern that the terrorist threat to l concern that the terrorist threat to this country— concern that the terrorist threat to this country has _ concern that the terrorist threat to this country has increased. - concern that the terrorist threat to this country has increased. so i concern that the terrorist threat to this country has increased. so can| this country has increased. so can he reassure — this country has increased. so can he reassure the _ this country has increased. so can he reassure the people _ this country has increased. so can he reassure the people of- this country has increased. so can he reassure the people of this- he reassure the people of this country— he reassure the people of this country that _ he reassure the people of this country that we _ he reassure the people of this country that we maintain i he reassure the people of this country that we maintain not. he reassure the people of this. country that we maintain not only the military— country that we maintain not only the military capability, _ country that we maintain not only the military capability, but - country that we maintain not only the military capability, but the i the military capability, but the political— the military capability, but the political will _ the military capability, but the political will to— the military capability, but the political will to take _ the military capability, but the political will to take whateverl political will to take whatever action — political will to take whatever action is— political will to take whatever action is necessary— political will to take whatever action is necessary against i political will to take whatever i action is necessary against groups like isis— action is necessary against groups like lsis k— action is necessary against groups like lsis k to — action is necessary against groups like isis k to keep— action is necessary against groups like isis k to keep this _ action is necessary against groups like isis k to keep this country- like isis k to keep this country safe? — like isis k to keep this country safe? ~ , like isis k to keep this country safe? g ., ., .,, ., ,, , like isis k to keep this country safe? g ., ., .,, .,~ , ., safe? my honourable friend makes an im ortant safe? my honourable friend makes an important point _ safe? my honourable friend makes an important point and _ safe? my honourable friend makes an important point and a _ safe? my honourable friend makes an important point and a question - safe? my honourable friend makes an important point and a question a i safe? my honourable friend makes an important point and a question a lot l important point and a question a lot of people will have formed in their minds and i know the defence secretary has answered this before, but of course we keep those options on the table and of course the taliban are aware of that. mr speaker. _ taliban are aware of that. mr speaker, there are many barriers facing people in the immigration system, one is some of my constituents have spouse and
4:08 pm
children whose original documentation are with the foreign office and the other is the english language test. is he proposing any movements on those system to help people to get here as soon as possible. 1 people to get here as soon as ossible. . ~ people to get here as soon as ossible. ., ,, ., ., ., , possible. i thank the honourable lad and possible. i thank the honourable lady and she _ possible. i thank the honourable lady and she should _ possible. i thank the honourable lady and she should know- possible. i thank the honourable lady and she should know that i possible. i thank the honourable| lady and she should know that of course we try to help people coming from afghanistan in the most expeditious way possible and this country cannot be faulted for the generosity of our offer on the resettlement programme and it can't be faulted for the sheer number of people we have moved already to this country. people we have moved already to this count . . ~ people we have moved already to this count . ., ,, i. people we have moved already to this count . . ~' ,, ~ people we have moved already to this count . ., ,, ~ .,~ people we have moved already to this count . ., ,, ~ ., country. thank you mr speaker, and i welcome the — country. thank you mr speaker, and i welcome the prime _ country. thank you mr speaker, and i welcome the prime minister's - welcome the prime minister's statement. aside from the g7 and traditional— statement. aside from the g7 and traditional partners that the prime minister— traditional partners that the prime minister referred to, in the months ahead, _ minister referred to, in the months ahead, in— minister referred to, in the months ahead, in the region in central asia, _ ahead, in the region in central asia, along with pakistan and uzbekistan and china what, role does
4:09 pm
he envisage _ uzbekistan and china what, role does he envisage these countries playing in the _ he envisage these countries playing in the politics of region? my honourable _ in the politics of region? m1 honourable friend asks a very important question. but i think the answer to that question is it is in the interests of everyone of the countries he has just the interests of everyone of the countries he hasjust mentioned the interests of everyone of the countries he has just mentioned to ensure that afghanistan does not relapse into being a breeding ground for terror. relapse into being a breeding ground forterror. it relapse into being a breeding ground for terror. it is not in china's interest or uzbekistan's or russia's interest. russia has abundant experience of the risks of afghanistan. that is why it is important we work with partners and those who are not ordinarily classifieds a our friends on the pressure we must apply to the taliban. a , pressure we must apply to the taliban. n, , ., pressure we must apply to the taliban. , ., , pressure we must apply to the taliban. , , taliban. many of my constituents have family _ taliban. many of my constituents have family members _ taliban. many of my constituents have family members in - taliban. many of my constituents i have family members in afghanistan who could _ have family members in afghanistan who could be — have family members in afghanistan who could be eligible _ have family members in afghanistan who could be eligible for— have family members in afghanistan who could be eligible for asylum i have family members in afghanistan who could be eligible for asylum by. who could be eligible for asylum by more _ who could be eligible for asylum by more than — who could be eligible for asylum by more than one _ who could be eligible for asylum by more than one route. _ who could be eligible for asylum by more than one route. yet - who could be eligible for asylum by more than one route. yet there i who could be eligible for asylum by more than one route. yet there is. who could be eligible for asylum by. more than one route. yet there is no co-ordination— more than one route. yet there is no co—ordination between— more than one route. yet there is noj
4:10 pm
co—ordination between departments. my constituents _ co—ordination between departments. my constituents are _ co—ordination between departments. my constituents are being _ co—ordination between departments. my constituents are being passed i my constituents are being passed from pillar— my constituents are being passed from pillar to— my constituents are being passed from pillar to post. _ my constituents are being passed from pillar to post. arup - my constituents are being passed from pillar to post. arup are i from pillar to post. arup are refusing _ from pillar to post. arup are refusing cases _ from pillar to post. arup are refusing cases where - from pillar to post. arup are refusing cases where there. from pillar to post. arup are i refusing cases where there may from pillar to post. arup are - refusing cases where there may be an alternative _ refusing cases where there may be an alternative raoult _ refusing cases where there may be an alternative raoult and _ refusing cases where there may be an alternative raoult and the _ refusing cases where there may be an alternative raoult and the foreign i alternative raoult and the foreign secretary — alternative raoult and the foreign secretary and _ alternative raoult and the foreign secretary and the _ alternative raoult and the foreign secretary and the home _ alternative raoult and the foreign secretary and the home secretary alternative raoult and the foreign i secretary and the home secretary are not replying _ secretary and the home secretary are not replying to — secretary and the home secretary are not replying to their _ secretary and the home secretary are not replying to their e—mails. - secretary and the home secretary are not replying to their e—mails. when. not replying to their e—mails. when will the _ not replying to their e—mails. when will the prime — not replying to their e—mails. when will the prime minister— not replying to their e—mails. when will the prime minister sort - not replying to their e—mails. when will the prime minister sort out i will the prime minister sort out this lack— will the prime minister sort out this lack of— will the prime minister sort out this lack of co—ordination. - will the prime minister sort out this lack of co—ordination. [- will the prime minister sort out this lack of co-ordination. i must re'ect this lack of co-ordination. i must reject that _ this lack of co-ordination. i must reject that in _ this lack of co-ordination. i must reject that in the _ this lack of co-ordination. i must reject that in the strongest i reject that in the strongest possible terms, because i want to pay... the house has paid tribute to the work of the armed services. over the work of the armed services. over the last few week and months. but they should also pay tribute to the rapid reaction team that went to afghanistan and to the border force officials who went there and worked to help thousands of people come to this country in safety. mark to help thousands of people come to this country in safety.— this country in safety. mark harper. in terms of— this country in safety. mark harper. in terms of protecting _ this country in safety. mark harper. in terms of protecting our— this country in safety. mark harper. in terms of protecting our country, | in terms of protecting our country, now the _ in terms of protecting our country, now the risk— in terms of protecting our country, now the risk from terrorist is has indoubtedly increased, what is the
4:11 pm
prime _ indoubtedly increased, what is the prime minister's assessment notjust of the _ prime minister's assessment notjust of the taliban's willingness to deal with terrorists in afghanistan, but their capability to deal with that threat _ their capability to deal with that threat after what we saw from isis x a week— threat after what we saw from isis x a week ago? my threat after what we saw from isis x a week ago?— threat after what we saw from isis x a week ago? my honourable friend is ri . ht to a week ago? my honourable friend is right to draw — a week ago? my honourable friend is right to draw attention _ a week ago? my honourable friend is right to draw attention to _ a week ago? my honourable friend is right to draw attention to the - a week ago? my honourable friend is right to draw attention to the risks i right to draw attention to the risks that the taliban are themselves running. because they now possess the government of afghanistan and it is their responsibility and they face that threat from isk and indeed potentially other groups. of course, they will do everything i imagine to protect the public. but in the end mr speaker, we have to face the reality, the taliban have now got the problem. we will everything we can of course to ensure that we guard against future outbreaks of terrorism from that country. but it
4:12 pm
is in the interests of the new government of afghanistan to crackdown on terrorism as much as everybody else. . crackdown on terrorism as much as everybody else- -— everybody else. . under the nationality _ everybody else. . under the nationality and _ everybody else. . under the nationality and borders i everybody else. . under the nationality and borders bill, | everybody else. . under the i nationality and borders bill, an afghan— nationality and borders bill, an afghan woman _ nationality and borders bill, an afghan woman who _ nationality and borders bill, an afghan woman who flees - nationality and borders bill, an afghan woman who flees with i nationality and borders bill, an i afghan woman who flees with her children— afghan woman who flees with her children and — afghan woman who flees with her children and arrives _ afghan woman who flees with her children and arrives in _ afghan woman who flees with her children and arrives in britain- afghan woman who flees with her children and arrives in britain by. children and arrives in britain by an irregular— children and arrives in britain by an irregular route _ children and arrives in britain by an irregular route won't - children and arrives in britain by an irregular route won't be - an irregular route won't be welcomed. _ an irregular route won't be welcomed, she _ an irregular route won't be welcomed, she will- an irregular route won't be welcomed, she will be i an irregular route won't be - welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales— welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has— welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has declared _ welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has declared our— welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has declared our role - welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has declared our role in- welcomed, she will be criminalised. wales has declared our role in the l wales has declared our role in the world _ wales has declared our role in the world to _ wales has declared our role in the world to be — wales has declared our role in the world to be as— wales has declared our role in the world to be as a _ wales has declared our role in the world to be as a nation _ wales has declared our role in the world to be as a nation of- world to be as a nation of sanctuary, _ world to be as a nation of sanctuary, will— world to be as a nation of sanctuary, will he - world to be as a nation of. sanctuary, will he withdraw world to be as a nation of- sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders — sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders bill— sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders bill to _ sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders bill to enable - sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders bill to enable us - sanctuary, will he withdraw the borders bill to enable us to- sanctuary, will he withdraw the . borders bill to enable us to make that warm — borders bill to enable us to make that warm welcome _ borders bill to enable us to make that warm welcome he _ borders bill to enable us to make that warm welcome he spoke i borders bill to enable us to make i that warm welcome he spoke about? no, i_ that warm welcome he spoke about? no, i can't _ that warm welcome he spoke about? no, lcan't accept— that warm welcome he spoke about? no, i can't accept what _ that warm welcome he spoke about? no, i can't accept what the _ that warm welcome he spoke about? no, i can't accept what the the - no, i can't accept what the the honourable lady has said. because this country has been extremely generous, more generous than most countries around the world, notjust in bringing people immediately from afghanistan, but in setting out a safe and legal route for 20,000 more
4:13 pm
to come. and that is a big number and the route for those people is clear. �* , . , and the route for those people is clear. �* , ., , ., and the route for those people is clear. �* , ., ., ., clear. i'm pleased to hear about the o eration clear. i'm pleased to hear about the operation warm _ clear. i'm pleased to hear about the operation warm welcome _ clear. i'm pleased to hear about the operation warm welcome and i clear. i'm pleased to hear about the operation warm welcome and my i clear. i'm pleased to hear about the i operation warm welcome and my county is home to many thousands of british soldiers who served with afghan colleagues, i hope the prime minister willjoin me in congratulating them for the welcome. yes, i thank him and of course i congratulate wiltshire council for what they are doing. as i congratulate all councils who are helping afghans to settle and to integrate. what i can tell him is wiltshire council and other councils will get the support and funding they need.
4:14 pm
will get the support and funding the need. ~ ., , , , they need. like other members, my constituency — they need. like other members, my constituency office _ they need. like other members, my constituency office and _ they need. like other members, my constituency office and i _ they need. like other members, my constituency office and i have i they need. like other members, my constituency office and i have been l constituency office and i have been doing _ constituency office and i have been doing everything we can to help constituents trapped in combans. but it is -- _ constituents trapped in combans. but it is -- in— constituents trapped in combans. but it is —— in afghanistan. but the government is failing to do what it can to _ government is failing to do what it can to help— government is failing to do what it can to help vulnerable people and putting _ can to help vulnerable people and putting more people's lives at risk. more _ putting more people's lives at risk. more widely president biden called for an— more widely president biden called for an end to an era of major military— for an end to an era of major military operations to remake other countries _ military operations to remake other countries. given the huge loss of life in— countries. given the huge loss of life in the — countries. given the huge loss of life in the disastrous and tragic wars _ life in the disastrous and tragic wars in — life in the disastrous and tragic wars in iraq, afghanistan, libya and elsewhere. — wars in iraq, afghanistan, libya and elsewhere, isn't it time that we do the same? — elsewhere, isn't it time that we do the same? mr elsewhere, isn't it time that we do the same?— the same? mr speaker, as i have reminded the _ the same? mr speaker, as i have reminded the house, _ the same? mr speaker, as i have reminded the house, the - the same? mr speaker, as i have reminded the house, the uk i the same? mr speaker, as i have l reminded the house, the uk ended the same? mr speaker, as i have - reminded the house, the uk ended its military operation in afghanistan in 2014. a, military operation in afghanistan in 2014. ., ~ , 2014. can i ask the prime minister what engagement _ 2014. can i ask the prime minister what engagement he _ 2014. can i ask the prime minister what engagement he had - 2014. can i ask the prime minister what engagement he had with - 2014. can i ask the prime minister i what engagement he had with ngos, which are _ what engagement he had with ngos, which are the — what engagement he had with ngos, which are the only _
4:15 pm
what engagement he had with ngos, which are the only western _ which are the only western organisations— which are the only western organisations still- which are the only western organisations still on- which are the only western organisations still on the l which are the only western - organisations still on the ground in afghanistan — organisations still on the ground in afghanistan he _ organisations still on the ground in afghanistan he and _ organisations still on the ground in afghanistan he and the _ organisations still on the ground in afghanistan he and the foreign- afghanistan he and the foreign secretary— afghanistan he and the foreign secretary have _ afghanistan he and the foreign secretary have had _ afghanistan he and the foreign secretary have had and - afghanistan he and the foreign secretary have had and can - afghanistan he and the foreign secretary have had and can i i afghanistan he and the foreign. secretary have had and can i ask what _ secretary have had and can i ask what parameters _ secretary have had and can i ask what parameters need _ secretary have had and can i ask what parameters need to- secretary have had and can i ask what parameters need to be - secretary have had and can i ask| what parameters need to be met secretary have had and can i ask. what parameters need to be met to see the _ what parameters need to be met to see the british _ what parameters need to be met to see the british embassy— what parameters need to be met to see the british embassy re—open. l see the british embassy re—open. that is— see the british embassy re—open. that is surely— see the british embassy re—open. that is surely the _ see the british embassy re—open. that is surely the way— see the british embassy re—open. that is surely the way to - see the british embassy re—open. that is surely the way to help - see the british embassy re—open. i that is surely the way to help those left behind? — that is surely the way to help those left behind? hie _ that is surely the way to help those left behind?— left behind? my right honourable friend is right _ left behind? my right honourable friend is right to _ left behind? my right honourable friend is right to draw _ left behind? my right honourable friend is right to draw attention l left behind? my right honourable | friend is right to draw attention to the work done by aid agencies and by ngos the work done by aid agencies and by ngos and it is to support those fantastic agencies that we have doubled our humanitarian aid to afghanistan, to the region, to £286 million this year.— million this year. thank you mr seaker. million this year. thank you mr speaker. later— million this year. thank you mr speaker. later today _ million this year. thank you mr speaker. later today i - million this year. thank you mr speaker. later today i will - million this year. thank you mr speaker. later today i will be l speaker. later today i will be reunited with an afghan special forces commander that i served alongside. he is relieved to be here, but concerned about the hundreds of his men and theirfamily members who although approved for relocation to the uk consider left
4:16 pm
behind. what can i tell him is being done to ensure those who are in limbo are afforded safe passage, protection and access to the uk? n protection and access to the uk? i want to pay tribute to the service of the honourable gentleman opposite and in addition to the service of the afghan special forces and he is right to draw attention to what they did, i believe the 333 were incredibly important and we will do what we can to ensure those who are not come out yet get safe passage. the prime minister said no veteran's call for— the prime minister said no veteran's call for help — the prime minister said no veteran's call for help will— the prime minister said no veteran's call for help will go _ the prime minister said no veteran's call for help will go unanswered. - call for help will go unanswered. and i_ call for help will go unanswered. and i suriport _ call for help will go unanswered. and i support that _ call for help will go unanswered. and i support that ambition. - call for help will go unanswered. and i support that ambition. in i call for help will go unanswered. . and i support that ambition. in fact that was_ and i support that ambition. in fact that was a — and i support that ambition. in fact that was a central— and i support that ambition. in fact that was a central aim _ and i support that ambition. in fact that was a central aim of _ and i support that ambition. in fact that was a central aim of the - that was a central aim of the establishment _ that was a central aim of the establishment of— that was a central aim of the establishment of the - that was a central aim of the establishment of the office l that was a central aim of the i establishment of the office of affairs — establishment of the office of affairs when _ establishment of the office of affairs when he _ establishment of the office of affairs when he started. - establishment of the office of affairs when he started. but i establishment of the office of. affairs when he started. but he establishment of the office of- affairs when he started. but he know and i
4:17 pm
affairs when he started. but he know and t know _ affairs when he started. but he know and t know he — affairs when he started. but he know and i know he has— affairs when he started. but he know and i know he has consistently- and i know he has consistently failed — and i know he has consistently failed to— and i know he has consistently failed to take _ and i know he has consistently failed to take the _ and i know he has consistently failed to take the measures i and i know he has consistently- failed to take the measures required to make _ failed to take the measures required to make that— failed to take the measures required to make that a — failed to take the measures required to make that a reality _ failed to take the measures required to make that a reality for _ failed to take the measures required to make that a reality for veterans . to make that a reality for veterans and communities— to make that a reality for veterans and communities like _ to make that a reality for veterans and communities like mine. - to make that a reality for veterans and communities like mine. what| to make that a reality for veterans i and communities like mine. what is hi going _ and communities like mine. what is hi going to — and communities like mine. what is hi going to do — and communities like mine. what is hi going to do differently— and communities like mine. what is hi going to do differently to - and communities like mine. what is hi going to do differently to make . hi going to do differently to make veterahs— hi going to do differently to make veterans feel— hi going to do differently to make veterans feel like _ hi going to do differently to make veterans feel like this _ hi going to do differently to make veterans feel like this change - hi going to do differently to make veterans feel like this change and notjust— veterans feel like this change and notjust hear— veterans feel like this change and not just hear it _ veterans feel like this change and notjust hear it in _ veterans feel like this change and notjust hear it in newspapers? . veterans feel like this change and notjust hear it in newspapers? [i notjust hear it in newspapers? i tank notjust hear it in newspapers? tank my honourable friend for notjust hear it in newspapers?“ tank my honourable friend for the work he did as ministerfor tank my honourable friend for the work he did as minister for veterans affairs and for his service in afghanistan and i believe that he underestimates what this country has done on veteran's mental health. the house will have heard the further support we are offering. but this is a government that is determined to support our veteran and that is why we passed the overseas operations s bill. i we passed the overseas operations s bill. ., we passed the overseas operations s bill. . , , we passed the overseas operations s bill. . , ., ,., we passed the overseas operations s bill. ., , ., , ., [111 i: bill. i have cases involves over 300 --eole bill. i have cases involves over 300 peeple who — bill. i have cases involves over 300 peeple who are _ bill. i have cases involves over 300 people who are still—
4:18 pm
bill. i have cases involves over 300 people who are still stranded - bill. i have cases involves over 300 people who are still stranded in - people who are still stranded in afghanistan and despite raising every case with the home office i'm yet to receive a substantial response. not one. my constituents are desperate for information on how to travel to third countries and when the full resettlement scheme will be launched. will the prime minister meet with me to discuss the cases and promise every e—mail will receive a proper response from the relevant department? i receive a proper response from the relevant department?— receive a proper response from the relevant department? i thank her and i susect relevant department? i thank her and i suspect she — relevant department? i thank her and i suspect she speaks _ relevant department? i thank her and i suspect she speaks for _ relevant department? i thank her and i suspect she speaks for many - i suspect she speaks for many colleagues who like me will have received messages from those who wish to leave afghanistan, but i repeat what i said earlier, that every single e—mailfrom repeat what i said earlier, that every single e—mail from colleagues is being responded to by close of play today. is being responded to by close of play today-— is being responded to by close of -la toda. ., ,, ~ play today. thank you, mr speaker. like many members, _ play today. thank you, mr speaker. like many members, i— play today. thank you, mr speaker. like many members, i have - play today. thank you, mr speaker. like many members, i have had - like many members, i have had
4:19 pm
e-maits— like many members, i have had e—mails from afghans in this country worried _ e—mails from afghans in this country worried about their people back in afghanistan. and the home office and the foreign office have managed to -et the foreign office have managed to get some _ the foreign office have managed to get some of those people relocated. but i get some of those people relocated. but i had _ get some of those people relocated. but i had the extraordinary situation sir where i had an e—mail, a detailed _ situation sir where i had an e—mail, a detailed e—mail about these afghans — a detailed e—mail about these afghans who were being persecuted, who had _ afghans who were being persecuted, who had worked for the british and it was— who had worked for the british and it was very— who had worked for the british and it was very detailed and they produced documentation, the following day my constituent wrote to me _ following day my constituent wrote to me to _ following day my constituent wrote to me to say sorry, it is a lie, these — to me to say sorry, it is a lie, these people are taliban and i can't io these people are taliban and i can't go through— these people are taliban and i can't go through with this. i wonder if we should _ go through with this. i wonder if we should be _ go through with this. i wonder if we should be on guard against letting such people into this country? my such people into this country? honourable such people into this country? m honourable friend such people into this country? ii: honourable friend will such people into this country? iii: honourable friend will be relieved like many to know from the beginning of the arup scheme and the schemes we have put in place, the highest possible security checks have been instituted to make sure that people
4:20 pm
are who they say they are and we received to this country the people who genuinely deserve to come here. can the prime minister clarify the current— can the prime minister clarify the current situation— can the prime minister clarify the current situation that _ can the prime minister clarify the current situation that applies - can the prime minister clarify the current situation that applies to l current situation that applies to those _ current situation that applies to those afghans _ current situation that applies to those afghans who _ current situation that applies to those afghans who were - current situation that applies to those afghans who were in - current situation that applies to those afghans who were in this| those afghans who were in this country— those afghans who were in this country and _ those afghans who were in this countryand in— those afghans who were in this country and in our— those afghans who were in this country and in our asylum - those afghans who were in this . country and in our asylum system prior— country and in our asylum system prior to _ country and in our asylum system prior to the — country and in our asylum system prior to the fall— country and in our asylum system prior to the fall of— country and in our asylum system prior to the fall of kabul. - country and in our asylum system prior to the fall of kabul. will - prior to the fall of kabul. will they— prior to the fall of kabul. will they be — prior to the fall of kabul. will they be given _ prior to the fall of kabul. will they be given leave _ prior to the fall of kabul. will they be given leave to - prior to the fall of kabul. will. they be given leave to remain. surety— they be given leave to remain. surely there _ they be given leave to remain. surely there is _ they be given leave to remain. surely there is no _ they be given leave to remain. i surely there is no circumstances they be given leave to remain. - surely there is no circumstances in which _ surely there is no circumstances in which they— surely there is no circumstances in which they would _ surely there is no circumstances in which they would be _ surely there is no circumstances in which they would be forced - surely there is no circumstances in which they would be forced to - surely there is no circumstances in. which they would be forced to return to afghanistan: _ which they would be forced to return to afghanistan.— which they would be forced to return to afghanistan. many of these people will be auoin to afghanistan. many of these people will be going through _ to afghanistan. many of these people will be going through the _ to afghanistan. many of these people will be going through the courts - to afghanistan. many of these people will be going through the courts and l will be going through the courts and we can't interfere with that. the prime minister _ we can't interfere with that. the prime minister celebrated the her rowism of our troops, but that showed it was an abandonment by the west of people and principle. can i ask the prime minister whether he believes tony blair was right this
4:21 pm
morning when he said that western leadership was naive to believe kroints countries could be remade, or did our remaking of afghanistan need to last longer? if or did our remaking of afghanistan need to last longer?— need to last longer? if tony blair was saying _ need to last longer? if tony blair was saying that _ need to last longer? if tony blair was saying that it _ need to last longer? if tony blair was saying that it was _ need to last longer? if tony blair was saying that it was naive - need to last longer? if tony blair was saying that it was naive to i was saying that it was naive to believe countries could be remade, mr speaker, and he was thinking of some of the things that he supported, then i think he was spot on. ., supported, then i think he was spot on. . , ., supported, then i think he was spot on. . ., ~ , on. can i say to the prime minister he will know— on. can i say to the prime minister he will know that _ on. can i say to the prime minister he will know that after _ on. can i say to the prime minister he will know that after the - on. can i say to the prime minister| he will know that after the collapse of the _ he will know that after the collapse of the government _ he will know that after the collapse of the government in _ he will know that after the collapse of the government in kabul, - he will know that after the collapse of the government in kabul, the i of the government in kabul, the disorderly— of the government in kabul, the disorderly retreat— of the government in kabul, the disorderly retreat by— of the government in kabul, the disorderly retreat by western . disorderly retreat by western powers. _ disorderly retreat by western powers. there _ disorderly retreat by western powers, there was _ disorderly retreat by western powers, there was rejoicing i disorderly retreat by western l powers, there was rejoicing in mozambique _ powers, there was rejoicing in mozambique and _ powers, there was rejoicing in mozambique and in— powers, there was rejoicing in mozambique and in somalia. i powers, there was rejoicing in- mozambique and in somalia. those are countries _ mozambique and in somalia. those are countries that _ mozambique and in somalia. those are countries that we _ mozambique and in somalia. those are countries that we have _ mozambique and in somalia. those are countries that we have an _ mozambique and in somalia. those are countries that we have an interest, - countries that we have an interest, because _ countries that we have an interest, because they — countries that we have an interest, because they can _ countries that we have an interest, because they can be _ countries that we have an interest, because they can be a _ countries that we have an interest, because they can be a source - countries that we have an interest, because they can be a source of. because they can be a source of terrorism — because they can be a source of terrorism here: _ because they can be a source of terrorism here. what _ because they can be a source of terrorism here. what messages because they can be a source of. terrorism here. what messages is because they can be a source of- terrorism here. what messages is he prepared _ terrorism here. what messages is he prepared now— terrorism here. what messages is he prepared now to— terrorism here. what messages is he prepared now to give _ terrorism here. what messages is he prepared now to give about - terrorism here. what messages is he
4:22 pm
prepared now to give about the - terrorism here. what messages is he prepared now to give about the uk, i prepared now to give about the uk, about— prepared now to give about the uk, about the _ prepared now to give about the uk, about the uk— prepared now to give about the uk, about the uk working _ prepared now to give about the uk, about the uk working with - prepared now to give about the uk, about the uk working with partners| about the uk working with partners to guarantee — about the uk working with partners to guarantee there _ about the uk working with partners to guarantee there is— about the uk working with partners to guarantee there is a _ about the uk working with partners to guarantee there is a proper- to guarantee there is a proper response. _ to guarantee there is a proper response. a _ to guarantee there is a proper response, a measured - to guarantee there is a proper. response, a measured response to guarantee there is a proper- response, a measured response that will make _ response, a measured response that will make sure — response, a measured response that will make sure that _ response, a measured response that will make sure that we _ response, a measured response that will make sure that we are _ response, a measured response that will make sure that we are not - response, a measured response that will make sure that we are not at - will make sure that we are not at risk of— will make sure that we are not at risk of terrorism? _ will make sure that we are not at risk of terrorism? mr— will make sure that we are not at risk of terrorism?— will make sure that we are not at risk of terrorism? mr speaker, the honourable — risk of terrorism? mr speaker, the honourable gentleman _ risk of terrorism? mr speaker, the honourable gentleman is - risk of terrorism? mr speaker, the | honourable gentleman is focussing risk of terrorism? mr speaker, the . honourable gentleman is focussing on the right question and on the right response from the western world and the whole global community. we need to work together to ensure that as far as we can, we condition the new government, the new authorities in kabul, to understand that afghanistan can'tjust kabul, to understand that afghanistan can't just slide kabul, to understand that afghanistan can'tjust slide back into being a cesspit of terror. studio: the floor of the house of commons and the prime minister taking questions on the situation in afghanistan. the prime minister said a lot had been achieved by british forces in the last 20 years in
4:23 pm
helping the afghan people. we will 'ud . e the helping the afghan people. we will judge the taliban _ helping the afghan people. we will judge the taliban by _ helping the afghan people. we will judge the taliban by their- helping the afghan people. we will judge the taliban by their actions, | judge the taliban by their actions, not their words and use every economic, politicaland not their words and use every economic, political and diplomatic lever to protect our own countries from harm and to help the afghan people. we have already doubled the uk's humanitarian and development assistance to £286 million, including to help people in the region. mr speaker, on saturday, we shall mark the 20th anniversary of the reason why we went into afghanistan in the first place. the terrorist attacks on the united states which claimed 2,977 lives, including those of 67 britons. and if anyone is tempted to say that we have achieved nothing in that country, or still tempted to say mr speaker we have achieved nothing in
4:24 pm
that country in 20 years, tell them that country in 20 years, tell them that our armed forces and those of our allies enabled 3.6 million girls to go to school. tell them this country and the western world were protected from al-qaeda in afghanistan throughout that period. and tell them that we have just mounted the biggest humanitarian airlift in recent history. eight times the raf rescued more than 400 people on board a single plane. the most that had ever travelled on an raf aircraft. helping thousands of people in fear for their lives, helping thousands to whom this country owes so much and thereby revealing the fundamental values of the united kingdom. the revealing the fundamental values of the united kingdom.— the united kingdom. the prime minister in _ the united kingdom. the prime minister in the _ the united kingdom. the prime minister in the commons - the united kingdom. the prime minister in the commons giving the united kingdom. the prime - minister in the commons giving that statement on afghanistan. let's get some more from our political correspondent in the central lobby. the prime minister made a couple of
4:25 pm
interesting points in that statement. he talked about working with the uk's friends in the region to help those people who has been given commitments that they would be helped out of the country, in order to get them out of the country, now that the airlift has ended. but he talked about updating the resettlement scheme, making it clear that it wouldn't just resettlement scheme, making it clear that it wouldn'tjust be those afghans who worked directly with british forces, who would be eligible to leave, but also those who talked and have campaigned for democratic norms in the country, women's rigs campaigners and other. so he has widened the catchment area for those who could have the right to come here. for those who could have the right to come here-— to come here. yes, there are two different schemes _ to come here. yes, there are two different schemes at _ to come here. yes, there are two different schemes at play. - to come here. yes, there are two different schemes at play. we - to come here. yes, there are two i different schemes at play. we know about this arup scheme, for people who have worked with the uk government. but they have a scheme
4:26 pm
thatis government. but they have a scheme that is wider, to help vulnerable people who are fleeing the taliban to have safe passage t uk. we know the uk wants to accept about 20,000 people with that scheme with 5,000 in the first year. we got more detailfrom the prime minister about what this scheme might entail. people under the scheme would get indefinite leave to remain in the uk, that is something that had already been come firmed for the scheme —— confirmed for the other scheme. so when people arrive in the uk they won't just scheme. so when people arrive in the uk they won'tjust be temporary allowed to stay here, we learned more about the scheme. be prime minister said he would be writing to the devolved governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland and writing to local councils with more information about how the scheme will work and how it will be funded. this is something the government has been under pressure to announce for some time, because
4:27 pm
over the last couple of days, the government have been stressing to local authorities in particular that they want people to come forward offers of support to house vulnerable people, but councils have been saying we can't make offering until we have clarity about what funding we get. so we will get more information on that. but still a lot of criticism from the prime minister's own backbenchers and from the opposition about the fact that the opposition about the fact that the government has not yet confirmed exactly how many people are still in afghanistan, how many people are trying to flee, but the way in which they are going to try and help people leave the country, whether they have safe passage and in some talks with taliban, whether they are clearer in knowing the airport in kabul could stay open. so the pressure is building to provide more detail on how these vulnerable people will get out. bud detail on how these vulnerable people will get out. and continued ressures people will get out. and continued pressures on _ people will get out. and continued pressures on the _ people will get out. and continued pressures on the prime _ people will get out. and continued pressures on the prime minister.
4:28 pm
people will get out. and continued i pressures on the prime minister and criticism from the likes of the labour party and the snp over the government's handling of the afghan crisis and criticism of the foreign secretary too in today's events in the commons? yes secretary too in today's events in the commons?— secretary too in today's events in the commons? yes particularly from the commons? yes particularly from the snp's ian — the commons? yes particularly from the snp's ian blackford _ the commons? yes particularly from the snp's ian blackford who, - the snp's ian blackford who, targeted the foreign secretary, calling him on his handling of the crisis, saying he was underprepared for the speed in which kabul collapsed. we know that the foreign secretary's received criticisms from opposition parties and from his own mps in the last couple of weeks. there was firstly the reports suggesting he was still on holiday on that sunday when kabul fell to the taliban. i think the pressure is mounting on the foreign secretary. in the prime minister's response he did defend the government's response, highlighting the way they had managed to get a number of
4:29 pm
people evacuated. he didn't specifically mention dominic raab in his response to that criticism from the snp. ., ~i his response to that criticism from the snp. ., ,, _, his response to that criticism from the snp. ., «i ,~« , ., the snp. thank you. i should say that we are _ the snp. thank you. i should say that we are expecting _ the snp. thank you. i should say that we are expecting a - the snp. thank you. i should say. that we are expecting a statement from the foreign secretary dominic raab in the next few minutes. we will bring it to you live here. he will bring it to you live here. he will give an update on, to to commons and mps on visit to qatar, which has close links to the taliban. we expect that statement in a next few minute and the us secretary of state has arrived in qatar for talks with authorities and he has been thanking the government for facilitating some channel in communication between many of the world's concerned nation over the situation in afghanistan and the taliban regime.
4:30 pm
that they have all that they can to settle here for the future. wow taliban leaders have been speaking under the auspices of the the taliban and cat eye, that is important as the west tries to work out as future relationship with the new regime in afghanistan. —— in qatar. so antony blinken is in qatar right now. foreign secretary dominic raab was in qatar a few weeks ago and will be giving a progress report on the talks he had there in the next few minutes. so, much more to come. now, though time for a look at the weather. hello, yesterday temperatures reached 27 celsius, and likely to get even hotter. more sunshine on the way in the next couple of days, and the hottest weather will be for england and wales. all change on
4:31 pm
late wednesday onwards, with the threat of some thundery rain and temperatures falling away. the breakdown and the weather comes from this area of low pressure. it has not got here yet, with high—pressure moving away from the uk, and that low pressure approaching was not we develop this south—easterly breeze, which will bring the worn thin from continental europe and lift the temperatures. so east wales, the midlands, south west england will see temperatures of 27—28 today. warmer everywhere than yesterday, even with the cloud in scotland and northern ireland. a breeze coming in from the south. still drizzle across western scotland. a sunny of the day for most of england and wales. i will followed by clearer skies, but and fog, this time in the north—west midlands, western england, in cloudy skies overnight in scotland and northern ireland. quite a one night, temperatures 12—15. 30 degrees and to everybody�*s 's taste, but it is possible on tuesday. last time it
4:32 pm
happened was in northern ireland on the 23rd ofjuly. we start with mist and fog in some areas, which will tend to live. sunshine comes out widely, sunshine across northern ireland eventually ended to southern scotland. clodius goes to the north. temperatures will rise in southern scotland, peaking at 25 and northern ireland, but the midlands towards the south—east could reach 30 on tuesday. more hot weather, more sunshine probably more widely on wednesday, but not in the south—western parts of wales, may be northern ireland, where we start to see the weather changing with some showers that could be heavy and thundery, especially later in the day. so not as one for northern ireland, wales and the southwest. art elsewhere, the heat building up into scotland, again, temperatures not far away from 30 degrees. watch what happens overnight. you can see these storms breaking out, developing, heading northwards into thursday, wetter weather moving toward scotland, continuing in northern ireland and heavy showers breaking out in england and wales. with more cloud, wetter weather, it
4:33 pm
will be cooler, top temperature at 24-25 in will be cooler, top temperature at 24—25 in the south—east. hello. this is bbc news. our top stories: borisjohnson promises resettled afghans that they'll receive indefinite leave to remain, as he updates mps on the uk withdrawal from afghanistan. we are working urgently with our friends in the region to secure safe passage, and are seen as routes are available, we will do everything possible to help you to reach safety. the taliban claims control of the panjshir valley, the last region to fall in afghanistan. but opposition forces, say they're still fighting. the prime minister faces a backlash over plans to raise national insurance to pay for social
4:34 pm
care reforms in england. but ministers say change is vital. back to school for millions more children in england, wales and northern ireland, but will the return spark a rise in covid cases? israeli authorities launch a massive manhunt as six palestinians escape from one of the country's most secure prisons after digging an underground tunnel from their cell. in israel, a 12 hour operation has seen the separation of conjoined twins, fused at the head. the surgical procedure on the one—year—old sisters took months of preparation and involved dozens of experts. mark lobel reports. sisters face—to—face for the first time after surviving a miraculous marathon operation. conjoined at the back of their heads from birth a year ago, separation surgery was meticulously planned between major blood vessels in their heads.
4:35 pm
a very delicate task — one bleed could be catastrophic. translation: of course, after all the preparations| and all of the models we have built in a designated surgery room, we specifically prepared for this thing with a surgical theatre and vr of the twins and with a 3d model we prepared in advance. where the two were attached, there was no skin and skull, so doctors needed the babies to essentially grow more skin. inflatable silicon bags were inserted into their heads and gently expanded to stretch their skin slowly. this meant that when doctors reconstructed their skulls after the separation, they had excess skin, which they could use to seal their new heads. we are just finishing the twins' separation procedure. it has gone extremely well and i'm delighted how well the whole team's done. it's an excellent team here and it's been a real pleasure to be a part of it. medics say this type of surgery,
4:36 pm
a first for israel, has only ever happened 20 times worldwide. separating them so young, they say there is now a high chance they will live normal lives — already breathing and eating on their own. there is rehabilitation for their physical and cognitive development planned which will, no doubt, be spurred on by these remarkable sisters' own determination to succeed. mark lobel, bbc news. i'm joined now by one of the lead surgeons from the operation — dr eldad silberstein, head of plastic surgery at soroko medical centre. hello sir. thank you very much for joining us. what an achievement. congratulations. it seems to be going well so far. how long have you been planning for this? good
4:37 pm
afternoon- — been planning for this? good afternoon. yes, _ been planning for this? good afternoon. yes, we - been planning for this? good afternoon. yes, we have - been planning for this? good | afternoon. yes, we have been planning for this surgery actually for almost a year, since the birth of these wonderful twins. so, yeah, it has been a long preparation. ids, it has been a long preparation. a long preparation, and 12 hours in the operating theatre. what were the main potential problems that you face in separating the twins? well, you know, it is a unique case stop none of us has much experience with such a case. this there were major blood vessels connected between the two babies that had to between the two babies that had to be separated slowly and gently. and
4:38 pm
thatis be separated slowly and gently. and that is the major concern, that, you know, if things go wrong, there might be fatality or handicap for these young babies.— might be fatality or handicap for these young babies. yes. you say you are prepping — these young babies. yes. you say you are prepping for— these young babies. yes. you say you are prepping for a _ these young babies. yes. you say you are prepping for a year. _ these young babies. yes. you say you are prepping for a year. apparently i are prepping for a year. apparently this operation has only been done 20 times. you have never done it before. were you nervous? i}i times. you have never done it before. were you nervous? of course, i was very nervous- — before. were you nervous? of course, i was very nervous. i _ before. were you nervous? of course, i was very nervous. i think— before. were you nervous? of course, i was very nervous. i think all- before. were you nervous? of course, i was very nervous. i think all the - i was very nervous. i think all the team was nervous. but challenged. but also, obviously, very satisfying achievement.— but also, obviously, very satisfying achievement. yes. i mean, what are the chances — achievement. yes. i mean, what are the chances now— achievement. yes. i mean, what are the chances now of _ achievement. yes. i mean, what are the chances now of these _ achievement. yes. i mean, what are the chances now of these two - the chances now of these two adorable little girls, babies, what are the chances of them growing and
4:39 pm
continuing to survive?— continuing to survive? ithink the chances are _ continuing to survive? ithink the chances are very _ continuing to survive? ithink the chances are very good _ continuing to survive? ithink the chances are very good now. - continuing to survive? ithink the | chances are very good now. they continuing to survive? ithink the - chances are very good now. they are almost three and a half days out of surgery, and they are doing extremely well, really as good as we could hope for. they are both not ventilated, they eat, they move their limbs, they smile, they cry. and they seem to look and be very well. so i think they... yes, have a great chance to thrive.— great chance to thrive. yes, so thin . s great chance to thrive. yes, so things are _ great chance to thrive. yes, so things are working _ great chance to thrive. yes, so things are working out. - great chance to thrive. yes, so things are working out. are i great chance to thrive. yes, so i things are working out. are there any critical stages still to come that potentially could see problems or are we seeing, you know, and looking to the future now, that is
4:40 pm
going to be stress free?- looking to the future now, that is going to be stress free? well, we are not totally _ going to be stress free? well, we are not totally out _ going to be stress free? well, we are not totally out of _ going to be stress free? well, we are not totally out of the - going to be stress free? well, we are not totally out of the woods l are not totally out of the woods yet. but we are getting there. as i said, by now, we don't have any complications yet. but still, we have to make sure, to see that the wounds are all healed well, that they have no infection coming, and they have no infection coming, and they are still in an intensive care unit. they should be moving, hopefully, in the next few days to a regular paediatric unit. and soon enough, hopefully, go home. i}i(. enough, hopefully, go home. 0k, well, it is enough, hopefully, go home. 0k, well. it is a— enough, hopefully, go home. ok, well, it is a wonderful achievement. thank you, dr eldad silberstein, and congratulations to you and your team. . ~ congratulations to you and your team. ., «i i. congratulations to you and your team. . ,, ,, , congratulations to you and your team. ., «i i. , .
4:41 pm
meanwhile, a group of conservative mps representing northern constituencies, has warned the government against raising national insurance to pay for social care in england. the leader of the northern research group said it was unreasonable to ask those on lower wages to pay tax so others wouldn't have to sell their houses in wealthier areas. the government's yet to unveil the detail of its proposals. chris mason reports. for years, governments of various persuasions have not got round to sorting a new system for social care in england. it is complex, controversial and vastly expensive. should there be a cap on the bill anyone should face? which tax should be put up to pay for it? it appears the government does want a cap and a hike in national insurance. this is a change that is long overdue, it won't be easy, there is no right answer that everybody will find consensus around. every single possible solution that the chancellor has will have pros and cons. i don't know the detail of what he is about to propose, but i do know this is hard, we need to be honest with the public
4:42 pm
about that and then we need to be ready for the debate that lies ahead and to put in place those reforms. here is one reason why it's hard for the government. have a look at this i've pulled out of the archive from before the last election. here's the kicker, we can do all these things without raising our income tax, vat, or national insurance contributions. that's our guarantee. here's the kicker now, that guarantee looks like it is about to be shredded, because... the simplest way to raise large amounts of money is through increasing the rates of three main taxes — so national insurance is one, income tax is the most obvious alternative, there's also vat as the third. labour and plenty of conservatives say putting up national insurance in particular will tax the less well off to subsidise the better off. the government has got to rethink this. you know, they say they want
4:43 pm
to level up across the country, but in fact they would be hitting many families in many constituencies like mine in the midlands, but also in the north, hard, but not getting those improvements in the care and in fact they would be seeing greater taxes on businesses too, just when they are struggling. it seems to me that looking at income tax, which is a far less regressive tax and it is a tax that anyone who has income pays, let's not forget that those who are retired, even if they have a relatively high income, won't pay national insurance. mps are returning to parliament and a row is brewing already. chris mason reporting. talk of reforming social care has been around for several years, under several governments. how do you pay for an ageing population that is living longer? here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. we expect that a cap will be
4:44 pm
introduced to limit the amount of money that any one person pays towards their care. we know there have been arguments over what level that should be set at, whether 50,000 or 80,000, over what level that should be set at, whether50,000 or80,000, but over what level that should be set at, whether 50,000 or 80,000, but it would then mean that someone would pay for their care up to the top of that cap, and then they could turn to the local authority for help. at the same time, we expect the amount of money someone can keep to be increased. at the moment, if you have savings or assets of £23,250, or more, then you pay for all of your care. we expect you to be allowed to keep more. at the moment, whether you live in a council house that you have bought under the conservatives' right to buy scheme, or a mansion in surrey, you would likely have to sell your home if you need residential care, not of the sorts of care. you simplify things down to selling houses on the funding mechanism to some degree, it misses the point. the care system,
4:45 pm
which is about people, is in crisis. it has understaffing, years of underfunding, and it needs to be fixed. so the things we need to cr, will there be investment now in the system? will be staffing problems be fixed? and what is the vision for the future this service? as it looks after people notjust over the age of 65, but also many younger adults, and it should be, they say, about quality of life and keeping people out of hospital.— out of hospital. alison holt speaking — out of hospital. alison holt speaking earlier. _ a three—year—old boy who went missing in the australian bush four days ago has been found safe after a search. anthony "aj" elfalak was spotted by police helicopters on monday, drinking water from a creek on his family's property in rural new south wales. the little boy, who has autism and doesn't speak, had been last seen at the house on friday. his family had feared that he had been abducted. shaimaa khalil reports from sydney.
4:46 pm
overwhelmed with emotion, mother reunited with her toddler four days after he went missing. and this was the moment three—year—old ajay was found by rescue teams. he was spotted from a helicopter, drinking from a creek on his family's rural property in the caps idol hunter valley in rural new south wales, an area that was searched several times for the past four days. hundreds of rescue personnel and a police plane, search dogs and divers, as well as ajay�*s family and friends, look for him tirelessly. many feared the worst. wondering how he survived in this rugged, unforgiving bushland. then, the news of his rescue. cheering thanks, god! thank you for everyone. thank— thanks, god! thank you for everyone. thank you _ thanks, god! thank you for everyone. thank you for— thanks, god! thank you for everyone. thank you for everyone! thank you for the _ thank you for everyone! thank you for the government, thank you for
4:47 pm
the police. — for the government, thank you for the police, thank you very much! what _ the police, thank you very much! what sustains you through all of this? , ., , , what sustains you through all of this? , .,, , what sustains you through all of this? , ., , , aj's this? just to see my son. aj's father anthony _ this? just to see my son. aj's father anthony said _ this? just to see my son. aj's father anthony said his - this? just to see my son. aj's father anthony said his son i this? just to see my son. aj's l father anthony said his son had this? just to see my son. aj's - father anthony said his son had some nappy rash and ant bites, but was in reasonably good shape. he said they prayed for his safe return. the toddler clung to his mother as he was taken to a nearby hospital for a checkup. a huge relief. after a family's nightmare has turned into what they describe as their miracle. israeli authorities have launched a manhunt after six palestinian prisoners tunnelled their way out of one the country's most secure jails. the escapees appear to have dug this tunnel in one of the cells
4:48 pm
and then apparently emerged hundreds of metres away from the prison walls in northern israel. the alarm was raised when prison authorities carried out a head count in the jail and discovered that six prisoners were missing. this prison in northern israel is considered one of the highest security facilities of its kind in the country. it is known as the safe, and yet these six palestinian men managed to escape. what has emerged is that they broke through the concrete floor of a cell below a sink and appeared to go down via parts of the drainage system and also tunnelling their way through under the prison, under the prison walls, emerging out of a very small hole in a rural area of land outside those prison walls that officials later discovered had been covered with weeds. the six palestinian men are all members of palestinian militant groups. one is a very high—profile individual known to both israelis and palestinians. he, along with four others, have been
4:49 pm
jailed in connection, serving life sentences in connection with deadly attacks on israelis. so now there is attacks on israelis. so now there is a manhunt. they remain on the run, and israel has deployed a very large number of forces, including police and army troops. there are sniffer dogs on the ground, and idf army aircraft searching for the men. the area of the city the men are from in the occupied west bank has now been effectively closed down. many extra checkpoints are in place. an israeli security source, speaking to the media, described this as a major security and intelligence failure. there is now an investigation going on as to exactly how this could have happened. as for the palestinian militant groups, they are hailing this, describing the actions as heroic. tom bateman there. on his feet in the commons is the foreign secretary dominic raab, giving an update on
4:50 pm
his recent trip to qatar and pakistan. let's listen in. as the security situation deteriorated, we accelerated that process throughoutjuly and early august. in total, since april, we have helped over 17,000 people leave. i want to place on record my thanks and pay tribute to the herculean efforts of our troops, diplomats, civil servants, who have done an incredible job diplomats, civil servants, who have done an incrediblejob in diplomats, civil servants, who have done an incredible job in the toughest of conditions. and as we remember their efforts, we also remember their efforts, we also remember those of the uk armed forces who paid the ultimate sacrifice in afghanistan, trying to make that country a better place for the afghan people. mr speaker, now the afghan people. mr speaker, now the evacuation has ended, we have moved into a new phase. we stand by our commitment to support those who have worked for us, and to take all remaining eligible cases, securing their safe passage out of the country, as an immediate priority. we are working through our diplomatic channels to that end. and
4:51 pm
of course, the taliban have given assurances that they will provide safe passage for foreign assurances that they will provide safe passage forforeign nationals and those eligible afghans who wish to leave. so on the 30th of august, the un security council passed resolution 25—93, driven by the uk alongside the us and france, affirming the international community's expectation and requirement that the taliban should follow through on the assurances they have given. last week, i visited qatar and pakistan, and in qatar i met with the emir and deputy prime minister and foreign minister sheikh mohammed to discuss safe passage alongside the international community's wider approach to dealing with the taliban. we discussed ongoing efforts to re—establish flights at cabo airport, where qatari technical staff are working on the ground, and seeing how we can co—operate in handling the operation of future flights. —— kabulairport. ialso announced our new resident charge of affairs. in pakistan, met with the
4:52 pm
prime minister and foreign minister discuss free passage and holding the taliban to its commitments. i also announced we are sending £30 million of support to afghanistan's neighbours, which will provide life—saving support for refugees including shelters, household necessities, sanitation and other hygiene facilities. at the same time, i dispatched last week a new rapid deployment team to the region with an extra 22 staff in total. they will reinforce our embassy teams, our high commission teams, in those neighbouring countries, processing british nationals and eligible afghans seeking to leave via third countries, which we want to do as fast as we possibly can once they can leave, and subject to the necessary security checks. i also spoke to the foreign minister of uzbekistan, and today, the foreign minister of to chicas down last week, and the minister for south asia, lord ahmed last week visited to jig is down and will return to the region shortly. —— to
4:53 pm
tajikistan. turning to the wider international strategy, the international strategy, the international community is adjusting, and it must, to the new reality in afghanistan, and recalibrate its approach. the uk is playing a leading role. my right honourable friend the prime minister convened g7 leaders in the 24th of august to discuss the shared response to the situation, following a g7 foreign minister is�* meeting, and we are building a global coalition around four key priority set out in the uk g7 paper that we shared with those partners. first, we must prevent afghanistan from ever becoming a safe haven or harbour for terrorist ever again. second, we must prevent a humanitarian disaster and support refugees wherever possible in the region. the uk has allocated £286 million in aid to afghanistan this year. we are supporting afghanistan's neighbours as they have already set out, and the home secretary set out our resettlement
4:54 pm
scheme, so we are leading by example, which enables us to encourage others to step up in what inevitably will have to be an international team effort third, we must preserve regional stability, which risks being shattered by the combination of renewed terrorist threat and an exodus of refugees. fourth, we must hold the taliban and other factions to account for their conduct, including in particular on human rights and their treatment of women and girls. i am taking this forward through our bilateral partners. i have a g7 plus meeting later this week, and the uk is also pressing forfurther later this week, and the uk is also pressing for further discussions amongst the permanent members of the un security council. we plan to host an event at the un general assembly later this month as indicated by the prime minister. mr speaker. we will not recognise the taliban, but we will engage, and we will carefully calibrate our actions to the choices that they make, and the actions that they take. given our strategic priorities that i have set out, we
4:55 pm
must also set some credible tests to hold the taliban to the undertakings they have made on safe passage, on terrorism, and humanitarian access, and on a more inclusive government, and on a more inclusive government, and we stand ready to use all the leavers at our disposal, political, economic and diplomatic. mr speaker, we continue to galvanise the international community to bring together the widest possible group of influential countries, and deliver on the strategic priorities, and exercise the maximum moderating influence on the taliban that we possibly can, and i commend this statement to the house. lets possibly can, and i commend this statement to the house.- statement to the house. lets call the shadow _ statement to the house. lets call the shadow foreign _ statement to the house. lets call the shadow foreign secretary, i statement to the house. lets call i the shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandi: _ the shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandi. « . « « the shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandi. , . , , . the shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandi. , , ., ., nandi. this has been a painful and soberin: nandi. this has been a painful and sobering few _ nandi. this has been a painful and sobering few weeks, _ nandi. this has been a painful and sobering few weeks, were - nandi. this has been a painful and sobering few weeks, were it - nandi. this has been a painful and sobering few weeks, were it not i nandi. this has been a painful andl sobering few weeks, were it not for the heroic— sobering few weeks, were it not for the heroic efforts of the armed forces— the heroic efforts of the armed forces as — the heroic efforts of the armed forces as well as the brave diplomats and civil servants involved _ diplomats and civil servants involved in operation pitting, many more _ involved in operation pitting, many more lives — involved in operation pitting, many more lives would have been lost on many _ more lives would have been lost on many were — more lives would have been lost on many were left behind. they reminded us what _ many were left behind. they reminded us what courage looks like, and i would _ us what courage looks like, and i would like — us what courage looks like, and i would like to put on record my thanks— would like to put on record my thanks to _ would like to put on record my thanks to them, to one of those who have served — thanks to them, to one of those who
4:56 pm
have served in afghanistan over the last two— have served in afghanistan over the last two decades, and to add my condolences to the families of all those _ condolences to the families of all those killed in the horrific bombing at kabut— those killed in the horrific bombing at kabul airport. but if more lives are not— at kabul airport. but if more lives are not to — at kabul airport. but if more lives are not to be lost, we need some urgent _ are not to be lost, we need some urgent clarity today. what specifically is the advice to people trying _ specifically is the advice to people trying to— specifically is the advice to people trying to leave? should they stay put and _ trying to leave? should they stay put and be hunted by the taliban, or should _ put and be hunted by the taliban, or should they— put and be hunted by the taliban, or should they make their way to a border— should they make their way to a border and risk being turned back? could _ border and risk being turned back? could the _ border and risk being turned back? could the foreign secretary take care of— could the foreign secretary take care of some basic issues? the home office _ care of some basic issues? the home office phone — care of some basic issues? the home office phone number provided to afghans — office phone number provided to afghans asks people to hold for hours. — afghans asks people to hold for hours, and it is still chargeable. this— hours, and it is still chargeable. this is— hours, and it is still chargeable. this is pretty easy to fix. could he have _ this is pretty easy to fix. could he have a _ this is pretty easy to fix. could he have a word — this is pretty easy to fix. could he have a word with the home secretary and get _ have a word with the home secretary and get it— have a word with the home secretary and get it dealt with? he wasn't able to— and get it dealt with? he wasn't able to tell us how many british nationals— able to tell us how many british nationals are still there, but i imagine — nationals are still there, but i imagine he must know by now. so can he tell— imagine he must know by now. so can he tell us? _ imagine he must know by now. so can he tell us? we know that only one security— he tell us? we know that only one security guard from the embassy got out, security guard from the embassy got out. so _ security guard from the embassy got out, so what is his plan for the rescue — out, so what is his plan for the rescue macro i did a quick check before _ rescue macro i did a quick check before i— rescue macro i did a quick check before i left my office today. there are still— before i left my office today. there are still hundreds of unanswered e-mails — are still hundreds of unanswered e—mails from mps and many of them have raised _ e—mails from mps and many of them have raised that with the prime minister— have raised that with the prime minister today. have raised that with the prime ministertoday. how have raised that with the prime minister today. how many staff are now working on this in the foreign
4:57 pm
office. _ now working on this in the foreign office. and — now working on this in the foreign office, and why has it not been dealt _ office, and why has it not been dealt with? if they are to get an answer— dealt with? if they are to get an answer by— dealt with? if they are to get an answer by this evening, can he assure — answer by this evening, can he assure us _ answer by this evening, can he assure us that that will be a real answer. — assure us that that will be a real answer, and notjust a holding response? _ answer, and notjust a holding response? and can we have some clarity _ response? and can we have some clarity about who is actually eligible, particularly under the arap _ eligible, particularly under the arap scheme? it is welcome the defence — arap scheme? it is welcome the defence secretary has stayed for this statement. without clarity about — this statement. without clarity about who is eligible, people cannot risk heading to the border, so the special— risk heading to the border, so the special cases in particular, it would — special cases in particular, it would be _ special cases in particular, it would be really useful to have a much _ would be really useful to have a much tighter idea of who they are. what _ much tighter idea of who they are. what is _ much tighter idea of who they are. what is the — much tighter idea of who they are. what is the assurance that safe passage — what is the assurance that safe passage that he believes he has from the taliban? doesn't apply to all of those _ the taliban? doesn't apply to all of those with— the taliban? doesn't apply to all of those with documentation orjust a british— those with documentation orjust a british nationals? i understand the british nationals? ! understand the technical— british nationals? i understand the technical problems at the airport had now— technical problems at the airport had now been overcome and that is welcome. _ had now been overcome and that is welcome, but can he tell us a bit more _ welcome, but can he tell us a bit more about— welcome, but can he tell us a bit more about the diplomatic progress that has— more about the diplomatic progress that has been making macro how, for example. _ that has been making macro how, for example, does he intend to square the circle. — example, does he intend to square the circle, to comply with the taliban— the circle, to comply with the taliban does make a refusal to allow a foreign _ taliban does make a refusal to allow a foreign military presence but to safeguard — a foreign military presence but to safeguard those technicians from turkey— safeguard those technicians from turkey or — safeguard those technicians from turkey or qatar or whichever other
4:58 pm
country _ turkey or qatar or whichever other country is — turkey or qatar or whichever other country is chosen to oversee that operation — country is chosen to oversee that operation in order to make sure that they can _ operation in order to make sure that they can be — operation in order to make sure that they can be safeguarded? i very much they can be safeguarded? ! very much support— they can be safeguarded? i very much support his _ they can be safeguarded? i very much support his view that it would be wrong _ support his view that it would be wrong to— support his view that it would be wrong to recognise the taliban is a legitimate — wrong to recognise the taliban is a legitimate government, but this also presents _ legitimate government, but this also presents a _ legitimate government, but this also presents a practical challenge to those _ presents a practical challenge to those countries that are considering stepping _ those countries that are considering stepping in to oversee the airport about— stepping in to oversee the airport about how— stepping in to oversee the airport about how guarantees can be upheld. can i about how guarantees can be upheld. can liust _ about how guarantees can be upheld. can ijust say to him that the coordination between the foreign office _ coordination between the foreign office and the ministry of defence, despite _ office and the ministry of defence, despite some very hard—working civil servants— despite some very hard—working civil servants on— despite some very hard—working civil servants on the ground who are working — servants on the ground who are working around the clock, is still appalling? — working around the clock, is still appalling? my office is in touch with a — appalling? my office is in touch with a small number of afghan workers. — with a small number of afghan workers, for example, who were attached — workers, for example, who were attached to intelligence and to mi6 in recent— attached to intelligence and to mi6 in recent years. they are being treated — in recent years. they are being treated as _ in recent years. they are being treated as special cases and our app. _ treated as special cases and our app. and — treated as special cases and our app, and many of them have been waiting _ app, and many of them have been waiting for— app, and many of them have been waiting for months. i would like to praise _ waiting for months. i would like to praise and — waiting for months. i would like to praise and record my thanks to the secretary— praise and record my thanks to the secretary of state for defence and also to _ secretary of state for defence and also to the minister for afghanistan, who have made themselves available to many of us that all— themselves available to many of us that all hours and at short notice to assist— that all hours and at short notice to assist with some of these cases. their— to assist with some of these cases. their personal intervention has made
4:59 pm
a difference, but this is no substitute for a system. could he also clear— substitute for a system. could he also clear up some comments he made at the _ also clear up some comments he made at the select— also clear up some comments he made at the select committee? he suggested those who had been cleared to travel— suggested those who had been cleared to travel as _ suggested those who had been cleared to travel as part of operation pitting — to travel as part of operation pitting would now have to undergo security— pitting would now have to undergo security checks before they were accepted — security checks before they were accepted onto the arap scheme? where there is— accepted onto the arap scheme? where there is checks not done, or is he now— there is checks not done, or is he now reneging on his promise? both those _ now reneging on his promise? both those scenarios are of concern. these — those scenarios are of concern. these are — those scenarios are of concern. these are practical issues within his gift. — these are practical issues within his gift, and the fact we have still not been — his gift, and the fact we have still not been dealt with sends a strong message _ not been dealt with sends a strong message that he has been more focused — message that he has been more focused in — message that he has been more focused in recent days and keeping hisiob _ focused in recent days and keeping hisjob than actually focused in recent days and keeping his job than actually doing it. i want _ his job than actually doing it. i want him _ his job than actually doing it. i want him to prove us wrong, because a lot rides— want him to prove us wrong, because a lot rides on— want him to prove us wrong, because a lot rides on this, including the lives _ a lot rides on this, including the lives of— a lot rides on this, including the lives of many afghans who assisted us. lives of many afghans who assisted us: can _ lives of many afghans who assisted us: can i _ lives of many afghans who assisted us. can i also ask him to say a bit more _ us. can i also ask him to say a bit more about— us. can i also ask him to say a bit more about how the uk is going to -et more about how the uk is going to get aid _ more about how the uk is going to get aid into— more about how the uk is going to get aid into afghanistan, to those who need — get aid into afghanistan, to those who need it? i have been in touch with aid _ who need it? i have been in touch with aid workers on the ground, many of them _ with aid workers on the ground, many of them female, who have been banned from working by the taliban. those aid agencies are of course understandably saying they will not operate _ understandably saying they will not operate with those conditions in place. _ operate with those conditions in place. but — operate with those conditions in place, but that means they are not operating — place, but that means they are not operating at all. on the refugee crisis. _ operating at all. on the refugee crisis. can— operating at all. on the refugee crisis. can i_ operating at all. on the refugee crisis, can ijust say to him gently
5:00 pm
that countries in the region are not hugely— that countries in the region are not hugely impressed by the decision by the home _ hugely impressed by the decision by the home secretary to cap the number of refugees— the home secretary to cap the number of refugees that the uk will accept at 5000 _ of refugees that the uk will accept at 5000 when they are dealing with a far greater— at 5000 when they are dealing with a far greater refugee crisis. a bit of generosity— far greater refugee crisis. a bit of generosity from the uk would go a lon- generosity from the uk would go a long way— generosity from the uk would go a long way to helping to resolve the issues _ long way to helping to resolve the issues at — long way to helping to resolve the issues at the borders. mr speaker, these _ issues at the borders. mr speaker, these are _ issues at the borders. mr speaker, these are immediate concerns, but we are also— these are immediate concerns, but we are also concerned that for a generation of young afghans, the future _ generation of young afghans, the future that they have expected is unravelling in front of their eyes. can he _ unravelling in front of their eyes. can he say— unravelling in front of their eyes. can he say something about the lgbt plus community and how their rights will be _ plus community and how their rights will be upheld as well as religious minorities? can he outline the measures— minorities? can he outline the measures that he intends to take to set conditions for the taliban regime. _ set conditions for the taliban regime, and particularly of the situation — regime, and particularly of the situation of women and girls will be the cornerstone of any future engagement? and finally, can ijust say, engagement? and finally, can ijust say. our— engagement? and finally, can ijust say, our intelligence has been downgraded, our diplomats and troops now no— downgraded, our diplomats and troops now no longer on the ground, the prime _ now no longer on the ground, the prime minister appeared to say in the statementjust now that
5:01 pm
prime minister appeared to say in the statement just now that the prime minister appeared to say in the statementjust now that the risk that is— the statementjust now that the risk that is posed to the

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on