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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 7, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... boris johnson's plan to fix the catastrophic cost of social care in england but there's mounting anger from his mps over how to pay for it. a vision of hope and optimism — to have a purpose—built centre, i was totally brown away. to bring the family some where they want to come and feel at ease, it affects the whole family. a vision of hope and optimism — we catch up with rob burrow�*s family as they back a campaign to build
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a specialist mnd centre. the fairytale continues for 18—year—old emma raducanu. she's into herfirst major quarter final after easing past home favourite shelby rogers at the us open. are too many cookies making us sick? there could be changes to those website pop—ups, which gather data — as critics say we accept cookies without thinking. but it needs a global effort. i'll take a look. good morning. it was the warmest day across the uk yesterday since the 22nd ofjuly. could be even warmer today. i am 22nd ofjuly. could be even warmer today. iam in 22nd ofjuly. could be even warmer today. i am in oxfordshire to enjoy the morning and bring you the latest forecast. good morning, it's tuesday 7th september. our top story... the prime minister will set out his plan for social care in england today — saying it will fix a broken system in which people face catastrophic costs. he is expected to announce a rise in national insurance of about i.25%, despite criticism from conservative mps and peers — as well as from labour,
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who say the increase is unfair to working families. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. it has played previous governments. plans for reforming social care in england have often come unstuck. but on the very day entered as the 19 he became prime minister, borisjohnson made this bold pledge. we became prime minister, boris johnson made this bold pledge.— made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis and _ made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis and social— made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis and social care - made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis and social care once - made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis and social care once and| the crisis and social care once and for all with a clear plan we have prepared. six. for all with a clear plan we have prepared-— for all with a clear plan we have --reared. ,, ., , ., prepared. six months later, during the election _ prepared. six months later, during the election campaign, _ prepared. six months later, during the election campaign, he - prepared. six months later, during the election campaign, he made i the election campaign, he made another bold pledge. we the election campaign, he made another bold pledge.— the election campaign, he made another bold pledge. we can do all listinas another bold pledge. we can do all listings without _ another bold pledge. we can do all listings without income _ another bold pledge. we can do all listings without income tax, - another bold pledge. we can do all listings without income tax, vat i another bold pledge. we can do allj listings without income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that is our guarantee. moise national insurance contributions. that is our guarantee.— national insurance contributions. that is our guarantee. now it seems he cannot keep _ that is our guarantee. now it seems he cannot keep both _ that is our guarantee. now it seems he cannot keep both promises - that is our guarantee. now it seems he cannot keep both promises and l that is our guarantee. now it seems| he cannot keep both promises and is on the brink of breaking the pledge not to increase national insurance rates. keir starmersays not to increase national insurance rates. keir starmer says this would be unfair as it would hit working
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people hard, including low earners and young people. perhaps more worryingly for the prime minister, many of his own conservative mps seem to agree. i many of his own conservative mps seem to agree-— many of his own conservative mps seem to agree. i don't want to see national insurance _ seem to agree. i don't want to see national insurance raised - seem to agree. i don't want to see national insurance raised for - seem to agree. i don't want to see | national insurance raised for people of all ages. i think many youngsters have paid enough as a result of this pandemic. if we want people to be able to retain their own homes, those people should have the bulk of the cost with their own insurance policy against the catastrophe of losing all their money on pear. initially the cash raised is not expected to be earmarked for social care but to clear the backlog in nhs england. there are concerns that social care could still be left as a poor relation. social care could still be left as a poor relation-— social care could still be left as a poor relation. we're really hoping there will be _ poor relation. we're really hoping there will be something, - poor relation. we're really hoping there will be something, not - poor relation. we're really hoping there will be something, not only| there will be something, not only for the long—term sustainable future. care but we do need
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something immediately now because most care providers at breaking point at this moment in time. the roblem point at this moment in time. the problem of _ point at this moment in time. the problem of paying for care predates the pandemic. borisjohnson says he will not duck tough decisions and he will not duck tough decisions and he will end the catastrophic costs of care. ultimately those costs will be capped. even some of his own mps wonder if it will be able completely to prevent people selling their own homes to pay for a pair home. let's speak now to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. adam, the cabinet is meeting at number 10 for the first time since last march to hear the prime minister's plan. what is the atmosphere going to be like? morning to you. it will be a slightly unusual cabinet meeting for a number of reasons. it is the first time they will be squished around the slightly too small tabling and in straight sets starter the
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pandemic last year. second level we know there are some cabinet ministers who are strongly opposed to the idea of increasing national insurance to pay full social care and extra funding for the nhs. bad of all, there are quite a lot of rumours doing the rounds there might be a reshuffle of the prime minister's top team in the next few days. it might be the first time they had seen each other in ages and it may be the last. for the last few days, the picture has basically been occupied by critics and opponents. people say national insurance would be a tax on the young and also that it is a tax on employers because employers also had to pay national insurance. what we are seeing is the prime minister and ministers making the case for this change. there has been a statement from downing street spelling out the size of the backlog in the nhs from covid and that
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something fundamental has to be done about social care. the prime minister will go to the house of commons and that is when we will get the details. what will be the new level of the means test below which people will get subsidised care from the state? what will the mechanism beware extra many ways stops going to the nhs after a few years and then starts going into social care? that is something people are interested in. what will be the political mechanism for putting all of this into place question but that is where we will get clues about where opponents will try to derail it. ~ where opponents will try to derail it. . , , ., ~ where opponents will try to derail it. ~ , , ., ~ ., where opponents will try to derail later this morning we'll be speaking to the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, and get reaction from the health and social care sector. a baby and several young children were among a large group of migrants brought ashore on monday, after trying to cross the english channel. a steady stream of crossings is believed to have taken place yesterday, due to the calm waters and good weather conditions. simonjones is in doverfor us
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now with the latest. morning to you. it is a beautiful day. what more can you tell us? the home office — day. what more can you tell us? tue: home office has day. what more can you tell us? tte: home office has so day. what more can you tell us? tt2 home office has so far refused to say exactly how many people made the crossing yesterday. we do know it was several hundred, possibly a record for a single day. that is yet to be confirmed. the record currently stands at 820 people who crossed on one day last month. at times yesterday the board are forcing to overwhelmed when i had to call in a lifeboat to help pick up boats at sea. one boat was brought back to dungeness with a large group of people brought to shore. in dover, someone he worked at the port told me it was disorganised chaos. why so many people yesterday? it is largely down to the weather. like todayit largely down to the weather. like today it was incredibly warm and calm in the channel. for the last
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couple of weeks it has been breezy out in the channel. the opportunities for crossing were quite rare. we saw very few numbers over the past ia days. people have been waiting over in northern france in their hundreds for the right weather and that came yesterday. smugglers helping put them on board boats. britain recently pledged an extra £5a million to the french authorities to up the number of patrols on beaches in northern france to increase aerial surveillance. i think it is going to be a concern that yesterday, the french in the channel only managed to stop two boats carrying ai people. the french saying they will only intervene if the boats get into difficulty. only intervene if the boats get into difficul . . ~ only intervene if the boats get into difficul . ., ~ , ., a public inquiry into controversial plans for the uk's first deep coal mine for 30 years will begin later today. the site near whitehaven on the cumbrian coast was originally approved by the communities secretary robert jenrick, but the decision is now being reviewed.
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supporters say the mine will create hundreds ofjobs, but critics argue opening the mine will harm the government's commitment to cut carbon emissions. scotland's first minister will set out her government's plan for the coming year later today. nicola sturgeon's statement at holyrood is likely to focus on pandemic recovery, but she's also made clear her determination to pursue another independence referendum in the nearfuture. let's get more now from our political correspondent david wallace lockhart. david, what can we expect to hear later? welcome at nicola sturgeon recently asked the scottish greens to join her government. that gives an idea of the direction she wants to take. she will talk about economic recovery, specifically a net zero recovery, specifically a net zero recovery, one that is more environmentally friendly. there will be marketed today's proceedings and apples are possibly i2 bills will be announced including wraparound
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childcare for those on low incomes by free childcare before school, after—school and over the holidays. the snp also talked about creating a national care service as a priority. we need to hear about that and plans to make it easierfor people in scotland to change their legally recognised gender. we are expecting a pardon for striking miners. we will have to wait to hear from nicola sturgeon speaking at holyrood this afternoon. labour has said there must be a focus on a jobs recovery plan and they are warning on any announcements on as they see it breaking up the country and i warning against a second independence referendum. nicola sturgeon paused planning on independence when the pandemic hit, probably too early for concrete plans on that at the moment. scotland still seeing very high covid cases at the moment but
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possibly we will hear plans to take that forward. possibly we will hear plans to take that forward-— possibly we will hear plans to take that forward. thank you very much. seak to that forward. thank you very much. speak to you _ that forward. thank you very much. speak to you later _ that forward. thank you very much. speak to you later this _ that forward. thank you very much. speak to you later this morning. . actor michael k williams, best known for starring in drama series "the wire", has been found dead in his new york apartment, aged 5a. mr williams played popular character omar little across all five seasons of the wire, with former us president barack obama previously speaking of his fondness for the character. reports suggest that he died from a suspected drug overdose, but this has not been officially confirmed. our north america correspondent, david willis has more. it was the role of a charming vigilante that came to define michael k williams' career. omar little, a gay man with a sharp wit and a shorn—off shotgun, arguably the most memorable character in one of the best shows in television history. hollywood's red carpet a long way from the brooklyn projects where he grew up. but a talent for dancing paved
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the way to guest appearances in several hit tv series and once the wire had come to an end, to roles in films, such as 12 years a slave and matthew broderick�*s wonderful world, in which he plays a man falling into a diabetic coma. i didn't rush the audition process. i was a little intimidated by matthew... matthew barry's name, reputation. i kind of prejudged what the situation would be like. then when i finally read the script, i was like foaming at the mouth. please, i need this project. friends and fans alike have taken to social media to pay tribute. among them lance reddick, who played lieutenant cedric daniels in the wire. he called michael k williams one of the kindest, gentlest, most genuine, giving and courageous souls i've ever met whilst wendell pierce, who played detective bunk moreland, hailed him as an immensely talented
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man with an ability to give voice to the human condition. edward norton, who worked with michael k williams on the film, motherless brooklyn, called the experience one of the greatest privileges of his career. nominated for five emmys, including one in the award show that's due to take place this month, michael k williams never made a secret of his struggle with drugs. reports suggest his death is being investigated as a possible heroin overdose. our north america correspondent, david willis, reporting there. "you are not alone." that's the message from a family who lost both a daughter and a father to suicide, within eight months of each other. after struggling with their grief, the family wanted to help others who have lost loved ones to suicide, and now have set up a charity, focused on giving advice and support. jayne mccubbin has been to meet them. you have that feeling constantly in your stomach of, is it real?
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has it really happened? it's like a visceral contraction of things. somebody punches you in the stomach and you go, "oof!" the devastation just... you think once—in—a—lifetime, that's enough. but twice... just... it's life changing. in november 2019, angela's daughter katrina took her own life. eight months later, her husband damian, katrina's stepdad, also took his own. we live in waddington, the perfect english village. very happy. one day in november, life changed. she just was so magnetic.
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she was beautiful. and funny. and damien, the same. now theyjust...shone so brightly, they were mesmerising. theyjust loved, loved people and people loved them. they made the decision to leave waddington and rebuild their lives on the north—west coast. their focus now is a new charity. this is a bag for strife... obviously we've got some tissues because you're going to need a lot of those. ..to be handed out by police in cases of suicide. it's a small bag of kindness, along with practical information on what to do when you are faced with the very worst. there's nothing in there that is extraordinary but we want people to feel they don't need
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to feel alone. how alone did you feel in that moment? because that's your motivating here, isn't it? yeah, i think alone and just a lack of direction. you just look at each other and you say, "is that it?" we didn't know who to go to or where to go. there's no signposts. there aren't, or they're not the right ones. it's a journey none of us wanted to start upon. but you need to start taking the first few steps and that's what this bag will help you do. do you want to read it out? do you want me to read the whole thing? we are so very sorry for your loss. at this time of inexplicable shock and sadness, you may have many questions. you may feel there is so much to do
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but no idea where to start. at least that's how we felt. so we hope that within this bag you receive some support and direction. you will get through this, even though at the moment you have no idea how. you are not alone. with kindest thoughts and wishes from all of us at bags for strife. for angela, their dogs have been a lifeline. for tash, it's been running. i lived in leeds and my friends over there were completely the reason i was able to get through. they were the most supportive, lovely, generous. and running with people and having conversations whilst running, that was it for me, that really, really helped, yeah. now you're going to be doing a lot more? yes. yes, we are. and slightly dreading it. yes. equal levels of nervous and terrified. today, tash will start a ioo—mile charity run from her home in leeds to lake windermere. money raised will go towards bags for strife.
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lancashire police say they will distribute to those in need and the family hope this will roll out nationwide. this was the last family holiday together, just two months before everything changed for ever. that was the last time i saw kat, i think. there was this one night. we sat down for three hours and watched her dance. all of us were crying, laughing. it was one of those where we are so grateful to have had that. so we are rebuilding. we'll never get used to life without her. but we are learning to live with that. if you've been affected
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by any of the issues raised in that report, you can contact the bbc action line. the website is bbc.co.uk/action line. she is going to be with us at 20 to nine this morning. she will be here on bbc breakfast. we will have a look at the papers as well. let's take a look at today's front pages. the express leads on the plans for social care reform, which are due to be announced by the government later. the paper says the prime minister will "stick to his guns" and "not duck tough tax decisions" over the issue. the i reports on plans for an october firebreak, which would see an extended half—term holiday, to tackle the rising number of covid hospital admissions. it's a theme also picked up by the south wales evening post, who say there are now more people in intensive care with coronavirus in wales, than when a firebreak was announced last year. in the name of my son oliver — that's the headline in the mirror. they report that the government
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is planning to make it mandatory for every school to have a defibrillator, following a campaign by mark king, whose son oliver died aged 12. we have spoken to on the programme before. he is so passionate about it. shavvy have a look at the inside pages? i do not know about you but the queens gambit was one of my favourite rings. since then, chess mania. lots of people, millions of players, are getting on board. there was a picture rather like this of unutterable snigger and tyson playing. regency chess, the leading supplier of set has noticed many being sold out due to the queens gambit. there are lots of benefits.
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you burn up to 6000 calories a day during tournaments. just playing chess! daylong chess. elevated blood pressure and muscle contractions. according to researcher into theirs in the 19. it can raise iq scores as well. lots of benefits. i can see why has become so popular. i played speed chess against a nine—year—old had lost in about 20 seconds. it was one of the most embarrassing moments of my life. he was very good, trained by his father. he had chess books. i still strode in there like i would defeat him easily. you took on usain bolt in running, didn't you? ok, you and me. ready, steady, go everyone is getting used to going
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back to school. these quads are getting ready for class. they were born into thousand i7. identical brothers roman, often, arlo and rea. they were known as miracle babies. they were known as miracle babies. they managed to survive, born i! they managed to survive, born 11 weeks premature. the mum says it has been lovely to have them around the house. getting four children ready, she says she spent £600 on uniforms and only has half the stuff they need. if you feel like you can't go online today without having to click on endless pop—up messages about what happens to your information, then you're not alone. the uk's information commissioner says we all have so—called "cookie fatigue" and she wants the system to change. nina's got the latest. what's going on here, nina?
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they are so ubiquitous that you just say ok because you cannot be bothered to look at the implications. on one website it says if you do not click yes, we will assume you accept cookies. they can be a bit sneaky. good morning. we're talking cookies — not the tasty ones but they may be more important than the chocolate chip variety. good morning, everyone. "this website uses cookies." how many times have you seen a messagejust like this? these pop—up banners have become a permanent feature when we browse online. but what do they mean? we all know now that websites are often used to find out more about who we are. they do this by storing information files called cookies on our computers, tablets and smartphones. some of them help the site work. for example, you've probably noticed items staying in your basket even if you've left the site and come back. others collect information on us to pinpoint what we like; on our own,
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or in a group. so they might harvest the fact that you've been browsing for a new pair of heels. or which vacuum cleaners are most popular with men over a0. and these cookies might well be passed on to other companies for ads. since 2018, the law requires that we agree to this information being stored and shared. that's where the pop—up banners come in. but have they become such a part of our browsing experience that we automatically click ok without thinking about it? and are some websites taking advantage of that? the opt out isn't always easily visible. and if we're browsing at speed we don't feel we have time to check. that's where the information commissioner comes in. she's appointed by the government to make sure data is collected properly and she thinks a change is needed. most of your viewers probably have cookie _ most of your viewers probably have cookie pop—up fatigue so that every time they— cookie pop—up fatigue so that every time they visit a website they had
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to make _ time they visit a website they had to make a — time they visit a website they had to make a choice about what data they choose to share with that website — they choose to share with that website and partners. we are proposing a privacy by design solution _ proposing a privacy by design solution so that cookie pop—ups don't _ solution so that cookie pop—ups don't continue to suck the joy add to browsing the internet. she wants an international agreement, which would see us store our choices in our internet browser; like chrome or firefox or internet explorer — rather than having to tell each website in turn. but tech experts are sceptical. they say the problem is not the law but the way it's being interpreted and enforced. the law we have in the uk is clear. the law we have in the uk is clear. the problem — the law we have in the uk is clear. the problem is that businesses do not want _ the problem is that businesses do not want to follow it because it is inconvenient and makes it harder to .et inconvenient and makes it harder to get lots _ inconvenient and makes it harder to get lots and lots of data about lots and lots _ get lots and lots of data about lots and lots of — get lots and lots of data about lots and lots of people. this is look around — and lots of people. this is look around at _ and lots of people. this is look around at other businesses and say everybody — around at other businesses and say everybody is doing this, why shouldn't we? if it gives us a
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disadvantage to play fair. so enforcement is really the only thing that is— enforcement is really the only thing that is going to force says to playfair~ _ that is going to force says to playfair. because consumer action requires _ playfair. because consumer action requires consumers to be informed. and this _ requires consumers to be informed. and this is _ requires consumers to be informed. and this is quite complicated stuff. it is indeed. we would love to hear from you on this one — get in touch with your thoughts. are you sick of these pop—ups, are you not bothered about the information being gathered, have you blocked them already? let us know. a bit later we will have some tips on how to navigate the cookie system. not those ones, sadly! t system. not those ones, sadly! i have lots of questions to ask you. i will send them over. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new london refugee response fund is being launched by the mayor of london today. it will help refugees build a new life in london, including support with learning english and finding work. city hall is working with the charity, the london community foundation, to provide a way for more people to donate funds to help refugees arriving from afghanistan. social workers are being placed within schools in eight london boroughs as part of a new trial. the aim is to see whether identifying abuse and neglect early, and supporting pupils at risk, can reduce referrals of children into care and improve family life and education for more vulnerable pupils. we deal with all kinds of trauma and challenges and problems that impact on children's future. domestic abuse, children who have lived in a household where adults are criminals or, you know, with mental health.
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jim henson, the creator of the muppets, has been honoured with a blue plaque at his former home in north london. english heritage has unveiled the plaque ahead of what would have been his 85th birthday. he bought his house in hampstead in 1979, after the muppet show was commissioned for british television, and made the uk his creative home for many of his subsequent projects. let's take a look at the tube board now then. lots of issues. there are minor delays on the circle line, the district line is part suspended, as is the overground and the piccadilly line. and tfl rail has minor delays too. so it's worth checking before you travel. and for all the other travel news, to find out what's happening on the roads, you can tune into your bbc local radio station details there now for regular updates. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another warm, dry and sunny day of weather today across the capital. very similar to how it was yesterday. another mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid teens in celsius for many of us,
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and there is poor visibility on many of the roads for a time as well. lots of mist and fog, plenty of moisture in the air. and of course it's all condensed into that mist and fog with lowering temperatures last night. so that's all set to lift into cloud. plenty of high cloud about this morning. that will turn the sunshine rather hazy again, but lots more blue sky and sunshine breaking through, particularly through the afternoon. temperatures could be a bit higher than they were yesterday. certainly the high 20s in celsius, 29, even 30 celsius for a few spots. just a very light south easterly breeze too. that will pick up times throughout the day. overnight tonight, we do the whole thing all over again. so, clear skies, temperatures dropping, perhaps the mid—teens in celsius, more mist and fog developing into the start of the day on wednesday. on wednesday, rinse and repeat — the heat and the sunshine will continue again. temperatures reaching the high 20s quite widely in celsius, but by the time we get to wednesday night, there's a weather front pushing eastwards that will bring outbreaks of rain on thursday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website, facebook and instagram. now though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. coming up on breakfast this morning... after a successful games in tokyo, we'll be joined in the studio by britain's most decorated paralympian, dame sarah storey, and seven—time gold medallist, hannah cockroft. we've been closely following the story of former leeds rhino player rob burrow on breakfast, after he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. later this morning, we'll be hearing the latest development in his inspirationaljourney. # and if you should see dave, say hello... and we'll be joined by jj burnel and baz warne from rock
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band the stranglers, as they release their latest album in tribute to band—mate dave greenfield, who died with covid last year. speaking to bear grylls this morning. he will be live on the sofa before eight o'clock. very excited. without extra funding we won't be able to provide prompt, high quality, safe care — that's previously been the warning from health care leaders dealing with extra pressures caused by the pandemic. today, more funding will be announced by the prime minister as he sets out plans to help the nhs in england respond to covid—19, as well as his long—term proposals for the future of social care. matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation, which represents health and care leaders in england, wales and northern ireland, joins us now. good morning. really good to talk to you. we will talk a little bit about what we know so far. we understand it is going to be £5.a billion to plug gaps in the short term. your reaction to that figure?—
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reaction to that figure? well, it's aood reaction to that figure? well, it's good news- _ reaction to that figure? well, it's good news- we _ reaction to that figure? well, it's good news. we would _ reaction to that figure? well, it's good news. we would like - reaction to that figure? well, it's good news. we would like to - reaction to that figure? well, it's| good news. we would like to have heard _ good news. we would like to have heard it _ good news. we would like to have heard it a — good news. we would like to have heard it a bit earlier, because this is the _ heard it a bit earlier, because this is the second half of the year. but better— is the second half of the year. but better late — is the second half of the year. but better late than never. this money will help _ better late than never. this money will help with two direct consequences of the covid pandemic. first is _ consequences of the covid pandemic. first is the _ consequences of the covid pandemic. first is the ongoing cost of covid. there _ first is the ongoing cost of covid. there are — first is the ongoing cost of covid. there are 7000 patients in hospital. they tend _ there are 7000 patients in hospital. they tend to be a challenging patients — they tend to be a challenging patients with infection controls, they have — patients with infection controls, they have to be in intensive care. we have — they have to be in intensive care. we have got ppe, long covid, demands on our— we have got ppe, long covid, demands on our mental health services. so there _ on our mental health services. so there is— on our mental health services. so there is the — on our mental health services. so there is the continuing cost of covid-19 _ there is the continuing cost of covid—19. as there is the continuing cost of covid—19.as a there is the continuing cost of covid—19. as a country we've decided to free _ covid—19. as a country we've decided to free things up. that means we are tolerating _ to free things up. that means we are tolerating quite a high of infection. and secondly, as you know. — infection. and secondly, as you know. we — infection. and secondly, as you know, we build up a major backlog of people _ know, we build up a major backlog of people who _ know, we build up a major backlog of people who need treatment. it is not 'ust people who need treatment. it is not just the _ people who need treatment. it is not just the nearly 6 million on waiting list, just the nearly 6 million on waiting list. but _ just the nearly 6 million on waiting list, but many people who need to be added _ list, but many people who need to be added to— list, but many people who need to be added to those waiting list because
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during _ added to those waiting list because during covid they have not been having _ during covid they have not been having checkups they ought to be having _ having checkups they ought to be having so — having checkups they ought to be having. so this money will enable us for the _ having. so this money will enable us for the next — having. so this money will enable us for the next six months in the health— for the next six months in the health service to address those two issues, _ health service to address those two issues, the — health service to address those two issues, the ongoing cost of covid, and part— issues, the ongoing cost of covid, and part of— issues, the ongoing cost of covid, and part of that bad luck. —— what might— and part of that bad luck. —— what might backlog. but we will need that £10 billion sustained for the next few years — £10 billion sustained for the next few years if we are going to deal with the — few years if we are going to deal with the continuing cost of covid and to— with the continuing cost of covid and to work with the backlog. can! and to work with the backlog. can i talk about the _ and to work with the backlog. can i talk about the backlog? _ and to work with the backlog. (112ng i talk about the backlog? there are many millions of patients on it. when you think you can get to the bottom of it, and will that money make the crucial difference? there are two parts _ make the crucial difference? there are two parts to — make the crucial difference? there are two parts to this. _ make the crucial difference? there are two parts to this. if— make the crucial difference? there are two parts to this. if we - make the crucial difference? there are two parts to this. if we do - make the crucial difference? there are two parts to this. if we do get. are two parts to this. if we do get the 10 _ are two parts to this. if we do get the 10 billion we require, that is basically— the 10 billion we require, that is basically sustaining the funding that has— basically sustaining the funding that has been announced for the rest of this— that has been announced for the rest of this year~ — that has been announced for the rest of this year. but over the next three — of this year. but over the next three years. we are confident this backlog _ three years. we are confident this backlog can be cleared in two to three _ backlog can be cleared in two to three years. without that, then we are talking — three years. without that, then we are talking six, seven years. we are
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talking _ are talking six, seven years. we are talking a _ are talking six, seven years. we are talking a long way into the future. of the _ talking a long way into the future. of the second point to make is also health— of the second point to make is also health service leaders are working hard with — health service leaders are working hard with those waiting list. it is notiust— hard with those waiting list. it is notjust when we hard with those waiting list. it is not just when we think of a waiting list, not just when we think of a waiting list. we _ not just when we think of a waiting list, we probably think of a single line of— list, we probably think of a single line of people queueing up. it is important — line of people queueing up. it is important to prioritise those with the greatest need, but also to reach out to _ the greatest need, but also to reach out to people who are not on the waiting _ out to people who are not on the waiting list— out to people who are not on the waiting list which should be on the waiting _ waiting list which should be on the waiting list which should be on the waiting list because they have not been _ waiting list because they have not been to— waiting list because they have not been to the doctor. the second part of this— been to the doctor. the second part of this process is to make sure we are treating — of this process is to make sure we are treating those people most in need _ are treating those people most in need. , . are treating those people most in need. ,. ., ,, , ., are treating those people most in need. ,. ,., , need. this all happens, of course, with coronavirus _ need. this all happens, of course, with coronavirus still _ need. this all happens, of course, with coronavirus still with - need. this all happens, of course, with coronavirus still with us. - need. this all happens, of course, with coronavirus still with us. howj with coronavirus still with us. how concerned are you about it going into the winter?— concerned are you about it going into the winter? well, we know that it is likely that — into the winter? well, we know that it is likely that schools _ into the winter? well, we know that it is likely that schools are - it is likely that schools are reopening, children going back at not having — reopening, children going back at not having any restrictions, is likely— not having any restrictions, is likely to — not having any restrictions, is likely to lead to an increase in the number— likely to lead to an increase in the number of— likely to lead to an increase in the number of cases. we are in a strange position. _ number of cases. we are in a strange position, aren't we? in one way we are much— position, aren't we? in one way we are much worse than we were last year in _ are much worse than we were last year in terms of the level of infection _ year in terms of the level of infection. much, much worse. but of
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course _ infection. much, much worse. but of course many— infection. much, much worse. but of course many fewer people who get of the virus _ course many fewer people who get of the virus are — course many fewer people who get of the virus are ending up getting very sick and _ the virus are ending up getting very sick and ending up in hospital. but we will— sick and ending up in hospital. but we will have to keep a very careful eye on— we will have to keep a very careful eye on this — we will have to keep a very careful eye on this because if the numbers really— eye on this because if the numbers really spiral, even though it is a small— really spiral, even though it is a small proportion, they will still grow— small proportion, they will still grow as — small proportion, they will still grow as a — small proportion, they will still grow as a number and we are all concerned — grow as a number and we are all concerned about any evidence of resistance — concerned about any evidence of resistance to vaccines. there is an important — resistance to vaccines. there is an important message to the public. we are glad _ important message to the public. we are glad of— important message to the public. we are glad of the government and the taxpayer— are glad of the government and the taxpayer is— are glad of the government and the taxpayer is doing its bit in giving us the _ taxpayer is doing its bit in giving us the money we need for the rest of this year~ _ us the money we need for the rest of this year. the nhs will certainly do its bit. _ this year. the nhs will certainly do its bit, working all hours. even over— its bit, working all hours. even over the — its bit, working all hours. even over the last few months with covid, we have _ over the last few months with covid, we have been able to chip away at the people who have waited the longest — the people who have waited the longest time to get cancer services back on— longest time to get cancer services back on track. but we also need the public— back on track. but we also need the public to— back on track. but we also need the public to play their part. on the one hand — public to play their part. on the one hand that means continuing to take those — one hand that means continuing to take those measures that make it less likely— take those measures that make it less likely you will get a covid or pass— less likely you will get a covid or pass it _ less likely you will get a covid or pass it on — less likely you will get a covid or pass it on. we know what those measures — pass it on. we know what those measures are. and secondly it means if you _ measures are. and secondly it means if you are _ measures are. and secondly it means if you are offered an online consultation, take an online
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consultation. you will be seeing doctors — consultation. you will be seeing doctors face—to—face. online consultations are a perfectly good way to _ consultations are a perfectly good way to have your first interaction with doctors. it ensures gps could see more — with doctors. it ensures gps could see more people. don't go to accident— see more people. don't go to accident and emergency unless you feel you _ accident and emergency unless you feel you need to. use services like 111. feel you need to. use services like in the _ feel you need to. use services like 111. the government is doing its bit, 111. the government is doing its bit. the — 111. the government is doing its bit, the nhs is doing its business -- where — bit, the nhs is doing its business —— where bit. if the public does a spit. _ —— where bit. if the public does a spit. hope — —— where bit. if the public does a spit, hope we can get through the challenging winter.— challenging winter. should the government _ challenging winter. should the government be _ challenging winter. should the government be considering i challenging winter. should the | government be considering the possibility of some sort of a winter lockdown if those numbers continue to rise to a worrying level? weill. to rise to a worrying level? well, ou to rise to a worrying level? well, you know. _ to rise to a worrying level? well, you know. it's— to rise to a worrying level? well, you know, it's the _ to rise to a worrying level? well, you know, it's the cliche - to rise to a worrying level? well, you know, it's the cliche but - to rise to a worrying level? well, you know, it's the cliche but we i you know, it's the cliche but we 'ust you know, it's the cliche but we just have — you know, it's the cliche but we just have to— you know, it's the cliche but we just have to follow the signs. we have _ just have to follow the signs. we have to — just have to follow the signs. we have to see how this goes. at the moment— have to see how this goes. at the moment it — have to see how this goes. at the moment it doesn't look as if that is necessary — moment it doesn't look as if that is necessary. and we have a national strategy— necessary. and we have a national strategy of— necessary. and we have a national strategy of freeing things up. the important — strategy of freeing things up. the important thing is if we take that strategy— important thing is if we take that strategy we have to accept the consequences. that is what the government is doing with funding the
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nhs. government is doing with funding the nhs~ if— government is doing with funding the nhs. if there's one thing we have all learned — nhs. if there's one thing we have all learned over the past 18 to 20 months _ all learned over the past 18 to 20 months it— all learned over the past 18 to 20 months it is that we have to keep watching — months it is that we have to keep watching and we have to keep observing and see what happens to those _ observing and see what happens to those figures. observing and see what happens to those figures-— observing and see what happens to those figures. appreciate your time. matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation. tt taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation.— taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation. it was one of those ni . hts confederation. it was one of those niihts last confederation. it was one of those nights last night _ confederation. it was one of those nights last night when _ confederation. it was one of those nights last night when i _ confederation. it was one of those nights last night when i stayed - confederation. it was one of those nights last night when i stayed up| nights last night when i stayed up far too late watching sport. emma raducanu and the solheim cup. it went on far too late for me. for the normal people who didn't stay up late to watch it all, we are going to show it to you now. i have been told off by the bus for staying up late. do you listen? staying up late. do ou listen? ., ., do you listen? you don't need to watch it live. _ watch it live. you've got to plough your own furrow in life, haven't you? british tennis definitely has a new star. emma raducanu's remarkable run at the us open continues, as she reaches herfirst major quarter final. the 18—year—old beat the home favourite shelby rogers with ease,
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winning in straight sets in new york as michael redford reports. the arthur ashe stadium, an arena full of atmosphere and anticipation. if you're lucky enough to have a ticket, you're guaranteed to see a star. even emma raducanu needed a minute to take it all in. it's a different story for shelby rogers. ten years older than her opponent, she's been here before and her experience quickly shone through. but while the brit is just 18, she is playing tennis beyond her years. from 2—0 down to 6—2, the first set done injust 38 minutes. as the last us woman in the tournament, rogers was expected to be roared on by the crowd. instead they sat silent, shocked and surprised, simply in awe. less than half an hour had gone in the second set when raducanu sealed the win. it means a lot to have gone out there and to have performed. from the beginning i received so
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much support. they've made me feel extremely welcome here. i'm really grateful. to play shelby, who is american, and receive that much support and hear my name being chanted, i couldn't believe it. it meant so much. i'm really, really happy and super grateful to everybody out there. raducanu had to come through the qualifiers to get this far. seven matches played, not a single set of dropped. tickets to see the next big tennis star in action are going to be harder and harder to come by. michael redford, bbc news. she's amazing, isn't she? europe have retained golf�*s solheim cup after a thrilling final day of singles in ohio. leading 9—7 at the start of the day, europe got the five points they needed to secure the trophy. rookie matilda castren with the winning moments, as she beat lizette salas. england cricket captainjoe root says his he and his team—mates need to be more ruthless, after losing the fourth test against india. england resumed the final day at the oval on 77 without loss, and with a chance of victory.
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but after a strong start they crumbled with the bat. england were bowled out for 210, losing the match by 157 runs. india now the lead the five match series 2—1, with the final test at old trafford starting on friday. they utilised the conditions well, they got the ball moving laterally, which we know is so important in england, or anywhere in the world, you know, and they took some crucial wickets at an important part of the day. so, yeah, as i say, we've got to manage that passage a little bit better, be a bit more streetwise maybe. but at the same time there's certainly a lot of things that we can take from this week. the last of the paralympics gb team arrived back to the uk last night, after the close of tokyo 2020. gb won 12a medals, including a1 golds, to finish second in the medal table behind china. the athletes arrived at heathrow airport to a raucous welcome, including boccia gold medallist, and paralympic gb�*s flag bearer for the closing
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ceremony, david smith. it feels great. it's been... this is by far the best homecoming that i've ever had. i think after rio i came back, because we were so long getting off the plane i felt like there was nobody here. so this is amazing. i'm really chuffed. the flight was really good and it went well, and obviously the closing ceremony as well. so, pretty tired, but no, really, really positive, and yeah, it was a fantastic experience. scotland's footballers resume their world cup qualifying campaign tonight, with a tough trip to austria. at the halfway stage in the group, scotland sit third, and a win tonight would put them right in contention to qualify for qatar next year. but manager steve clarke says his squad must take it one game at a time. every game's important, i think, when you represent your country, especially in qualifiers, every game's important, because every point can be important towards the end. i don't know what the points total will be now. you look at it and you've got so many combinations and so many
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thoughts in your head, and so many results that can go one way or the other, that it's betterjust to concentrate on the game, look for a good performance and get the result that we can get. lewis hamilton will have a new mercedes teammate next season. valterri bottas is leaving the team and moving to rivals alfa romeo. the move should see george russell move from williams to fill the empty seat, and mean mercedes will have an all british driver line—up next season. it's stage three of the tour of britain today — a team time trial finishing at the national botanical garden of wales. there's a surprise new race leader after stage two in devon yesterday. american rider robin carpenter broke away on dartmoor, and held off the chasing peloton all the way to the finish in exeter, winning stage two and taking the overall lead by 22 seconds. the race finishes in aberdeen on sunday. are you ready for this? what is it,
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sall ? i are you ready for this? what is it, sally? i saw _ are you ready for this? what is it, sally? i saw it _ are you ready for this? what is it, sally? i saw it in _ are you ready for this? what is it, sally? i saw it in the _ are you ready for this? what is it, sally? i saw it in the running - sally? i saw it in the running order. what is it? finally, to a goal which perhaps has pet—tential to be goal of the season. well, if you take into consideration that it was scored by a dog on the football pitch. this is from a league in chile, posted on san miguel�*s social media. keep your eye on the goal—hungry hound here, who sniffs a chance, and has an eye for the goal, creeping in behind the defence i love the way we have highlighted the dog, in case you were confused about which player was the dog! if anybody didn't know where the dog was on the football pitch, there you go. igo. suppose go. i suppose that counts. go. i su ose that counts. ., , i suppose that counts. it was offside. obviously. _ i suppose that counts. it was offside. obviously. is- i suppose that counts. it was offside. obviously. is that i i suppose that counts. it was offside. obviously. is that of| i suppose that counts. it was - offside. obviously. is that of the actual dog _ offside. obviously. is that of the actual dog behind _ offside. obviously. is that of the actual dog behind you _ offside. obviously. is that of the actual dog behind you there? i l offside. obviously. is that of the - actual dog behind you there? i don't know what this _ actual dog behind you there? i don't know what this is! _ actual dog behind you there? i don't know what this is! is _ actual dog behind you there? i don't know what this is! is that _ actual dog behind you there? i don't know what this is! is that your - know what this is! is that your roducer know what this is! is that your producer this _ know what this is! is that your producer this morning, - know what this is! is that your producer this morning, has i know what this is! is that your producer this morning, has he know what this is! is that your - producer this morning, has he just producer this morning, has hejust typed in, dog with ball? !
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producer this morning, has he 'ust typed in, dog with ball? !�* typed in, dog with ball? ! thank ou, typed in, dog with ball? ! thank you. sally- _ typed in, dog with ball? ! thank you. sally- you _ typed in, dog with ball? ! thank you, sally. you are _ typed in, dog with ball? ! thank you, sally. you are involved - typed in, dog with ball? ! thank you, sally. you are involved in l typed in, dog with ball? ! thank. you, sally. you are involved in this next bit. here on breakfast we've been following the story of former leeds rhino player rob burrow, and the challenges he's faced since being diagnosed with motor neurone disease. now, rob and his family are leading an appeal to raise £5 million to build a state of the art centre in leeds, dedicated to caring for mnd patients. sally has more. it's a long way from the car park to the motor neurone disease clinic at seacroft hospital in leeds, a building which is almost a0 years old and is now showing its age. for rob burrow and his family, it is another challenge, one of so many they have taken on since he was diagnosed with mnd nearly two years ago. but it's also a talent they would like other patients and their
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families to avoid. that's what my challenge. that's why they are backing an appeal to raise £5 million for a new centre, purpose built for mnd patients, and named after rob. t’m built for mnd patients, and named after rob. �* ., ., ., ., ., after rob. i'm honoured to have a motor neurone _ after rob. i'm honoured to have a motor neurone disease _ after rob. i'm honoured to have a motor neurone disease centre - after rob. i'm honoured to have a - motor neurone disease centre named after me. when the doctor asked me if i would back the project, i immediately wanted to be involved. to have a purpose—built centre in my name, i was totally blown away. to bring the family to a new building with wheelchair access and to have a kids wake the kids want to come and feel at ease. it affects the whole family, so they all feel appreciated. it's nice to know their loved one is in the best place possible. tt loved one is in the best place ossible. , ., , . loved one is in the best place possible-— loved one is in the best place ossible. , ., , ., ., possible. it is to be a safe haven, a sanctuary _ possible. it is to be a safe haven, a sanctuary where _ possible. it is to be a safe haven, a sanctuary where people - possible. it is to be a safe haven, a sanctuary where people could i possible. it is to be a safe haven, - a sanctuary where people could come in. a sanctuary where people could come in what _ a sanctuary where people could come in what i_ a sanctuary where people could come in. what i want to create is this really— in. what i want to create is this really beautiful building, bespoke, suited _ really beautiful building, bespoke, suited to _ really beautiful building, bespoke, suited to the needs of the motor neurone — suited to the needs of the motor neurone disease patients. where the rooms— neurone disease patients. where the rooms are _ neurone disease patients. where the rooms are wide enough. maybe we can
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showcase _ rooms are wide enough. maybe we can showcase the latest tech for voice banking, — showcase the latest tech for voice banking, different speech gadgets that can _ banking, different speech gadgets that can be used. technology is changing — that can be used. technology is changing all the time. a place where arts, science, sport all come together, _ arts, science, sport all come together, a place where, no matter who you _ together, a place where, no matter who you are — together, a place where, no matter who you are from any social economic straighter. _ who you are from any social economic straighter, any ethnicity, everybody is welcome — straighter, any ethnicity, everybody is welcome there. the straighter, any ethnicity, everybody is welcome there.— is welcome there. the appeal is off to a fl in: is welcome there. the appeal is off to a flying start- — is welcome there. the appeal is off to a flying start. leeds _ is welcome there. the appeal is off to a flying start. leeds rhinos, - is welcome there. the appeal is off| to a flying start. leeds rhinos, who rob served for 16 years, has already pledged £50,000 through its charity foundation. the club has stood by rob since his diagnosis in 2019, and it's notjust money they raised, its awareness. it's notjust money they raised, it's awareness.— it's notjust money they raised, it's awareness. there are patients who come — it's awareness. there are patients who come to _ it's awareness. there are patients who come to me _ it's awareness. there are patients who come to me and _ it's awareness. there are patients who come to me and say, - it's awareness. there are patients who come to me and say, i've - it's awareness. there are patients who come to me and say, i've got it's awareness. there are patients - who come to me and say, i've got rob burrow's _ who come to me and say, i've got rob burrow's disease. i had one
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yesterday. people look at the documentary, or look at him and a video— documentary, or look at him and a video clip, — documentary, or look at him and a video clip, and they are able to relate — video clip, and they are able to relate it— video clip, and they are able to relate it to _ video clip, and they are able to relate it to themselves. he is inspirational to me. relate it to themselves. he is inspirationalto me. his relate it to themselves. he is inspirational to me. his courage, love. _ inspirational to me. his courage, love, kindness, you name it. to be able _ love, kindness, you name it. to be able to— love, kindness, you name it. to be able to go— love, kindness, you name it. to be able to go out and expose your life out there _ able to go out and expose your life out there to everybody, that his courage — out there to everybody, that his courage at — out there to everybody, that his courage at a different level. i think— courage at a different level. i think the _ courage at a different level. i think the positivity, the focus, i think— think the positivity, the focus, i think that's really great. love will be at the heart _ think that's really great. love will be at the heart of _ think that's really great. love will be at the heart of the _ think that's really great. love will be at the heart of the new- think that's really great. love will| be at the heart of the new centre. the family support is invaluable to people with mnd. flil" the family support is invaluable to people with mnd.— the family support is invaluable to people with mnd. our vision is it a centre of hope _ people with mnd. our vision is it a centre of hope and _ people with mnd. our vision is it a centre of hope and optimism, - people with mnd. our vision is it a centre of hope and optimism, is i centre of hope and optimism, is centred — centre of hope and optimism, is centred i— centre of hope and optimism, is centred i feel is quite homely and family— centred i feel is quite homely and family friendly, that people can bring _ family friendly, that people can bring their children and bring relatives— bring their children and bring relatives in and not feel like you are coming _ relatives in and not feel like you are coming to a hospital. you want to come _ are coming to a hospital. you want to come rather than you have to come to come rather than you have to come to that _ to come rather than you have to come to that environment. it's hugely important _
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the name rob burrow has become a byword for courage, honesty and good humour in the face of this cruel disease. now if this appeal succeeds, those values will stand in bricks and mortar, helping people with motor neurone disease for generations to come. it's great, isn't it? you are going to speak to his dad at ten past eight. to speak to his dad at ten past eiiht. �* . . to speak to his dad at ten past eiiht. �* , , ., ., eight. it's been wonderful weather for some people. _ eight. it's been wonderful weather for some people. we _ eight. it's been wonderful weather for some people. we sent - eight. it's been wonderful weather for some people. we sent matt i eight. it's been wonderful weather| for some people. we sent matt out and about. ijust love this shot. look you look like you were in the most beautiful place. good morning. ids, most beautiful place. good morning. most beautiful place. good mornini. . ., ., good morning. a real treat for you this morning- _ good morning. a real treat for you this morning. good _ good morning. a real treat for you this morning. good morning. - good morning. a real treat for you this morning. good morning. the. this morning. good morning. the sents wonderful. amazing sense of calm as well. we are just outside oxford this morning. it was set up in 1932 as the walter barrie
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horticultural school for ladies. now it is a beautiful surrounding of eight acres of gardens, parkland and of course it attracts a huge number of course it attracts a huge number of visitors. around 1a0,000 every year. they will be piling on, i'm sure, the next few days is this fine speu sure, the next few days is this fine spell of weather contagious. yesterday was the warmest day across the uk sincejuly 22. temperatures approaching 29 degrees. today it could be a step warmer. let's look at that forecast. another hot and sunny one. the hot and sunny weather will extend to parts of scotland and northern ireland as we go through it to tomorrow. high pressure with us. you can see where it is situated just to the east. winds flying clockwise. all that warmth starting to waft its way further north. we start with some mist and fog around this morning, especially in northern england, north midlands and north
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wales. it will gradually clear in the next few hours. cloudy across some parts of scotland and northern ireland. a little bit more sunshine than we saw yesterday. the best of the sunshine in england and wales, the sunshine in england and wales, the highest temperatures, we could get above 30 degrees this afternoon. temperatures in scotland and northern ireland also climbing a little bit. this evening and overnight we could see some mist and fog patches return. more cloud towards the south—west. most will be dry overnight. and it will be another pretty warm night, with temperatures sitting in the mid teens for the vast majority. as we go into tomorrow morning, another warm start. if anything for most it is going to be another day of sunshine. there will be some showers in the far north of scotland, particularly across parts of shetland. and towards parts of south—west england, the channel islands and wales, showers will develop through the morning, with the odd rumble of thunder. tomorrow it is going to be a hotter day for
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those in scotland. 26, maybe 27 degrees. high 20s in parts of england. cooler towards wales and the south—west. showers and thunderstorms continue into the evening. on wednesday evening overnight into thursday, humid across the board. showers and thunderstorms pushing north. a more disturbed day on thursday. a greater chance of showers and storms in scotland and northern ireland, developing and parts of wales and west in england. some sunshine might. it will feel quite pleasant in the sunshine. temperatures into the low 20s. it will be cooler for the low 20s. it will be cooler for the next few days. we could see temperatures peak across parts of england and wales at around 30 degrees for a couple of days. a short spell of hot weather before the storms arrived. enjoy the sun is out today. back to you both. it does look lovely this morning. a quick question from our boss. he would like to know if you have permission to wear shorts today, or are you just breaking regulations?
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we are above 28 degrees, i'm afraid it is regulation. can wejust it is regulation. can we just have a look at those pins? oh, please don't! see you later on. you look great. thanks, matt. how to save the planet while also keeping the lights on? that's a question which is dividing opinion on the shetland isles. islanders are split over whether a proposed oilfield off their coastline should be given approval. but some environmentalists are even more concerned about a new wind farm which is currently being built. our correspondent james cook reports. we are sitting on a wealth of natural resource and it's about harnessing that. in 50 years' time, 100 years' time, we'll be looking at the rusted remains of the once glittering wind farm and asking, what the hell were we thinking?
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oil very drastically changed the community in so many ways. oil has been a real positive for shetland. here, on the idyllic edge of the uk, trouble is brewing. just over this horizon lies the campbell oilfield, 800 million barrels which climate campaigners say it should stay in the ground. should we stop drilling in these waters now? that's the question facing shetland, and in a way it's the question facing all of us. are we really ready to power the modern world without oil and gas? there is no point stopping production of oil and gas, where we can control it in the uk, to see it being imported from outside the uk. i think it's not feasible to flick the switch overnight in terms of that oil and gas. we can't turn it over, turn it off overnight, and have the renewable energy there, because quite frankly, the renewable energy is not there. it is coming though.
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this huge new wind farm, called viking, will send electricity from shetland to mainland scotland for the first time. yes, we have massively benefited from oil and gas over the past decades, but we are sitting on a wealth of natural resources and we should be leading by example here and look for ways to transition to cleaner energy without creating new oilfields and drilling for new oil. but critics worry about the industrialisation of shetland. if you had to choose between campbell drilling for oil or this wind farm, as an environmentalist what would you choose? as an environmentalist i would still choose campbell. viking energy is not a green answer. campbell is removing oilfossilfuel from the ground, but viking energy, in order to get their turbines up, they're using, they're displacing the peat, which is a fossil fuel. viking energy say they are restoring
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far more peatland than they disturb. the carbon payback of this project, taking all of those things into account, will be less than two years. we have a vast renewable energy source in shetland and the whole world is moving to carbon net—zero. shetland needs to play its part. modern shetland was built on oil. the proceeds paid for this swimming pool and seven others. but now these beautiful islands are torn about when and how to give up their grimy golden goose. james cook, bbc news, lerwick. lots of things on today's programme, including bear grylls. he is lots of things on today's programme, including bear grylls.— including bear grylls. he is going to be here _ including bear grylls. he is going to be here at _ including bear grylls. he is going to be here at about _ including bear grylls. he is going to be here at about ten - including bear grylls. he is going to be here at about ten minutesl including bear grylls. he is going i to be here at about ten minutes to eight talking about a new show on netflix and what success looks like it to him. ., , ., ,, netflix and what success looks like ittohim. ., , ., ,, netflix and what success looks like it to him-_ you i it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know ou it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know you have _ it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know you have been _ it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know you have been talking - it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know you have been talking a - it to him. lots of tips, maybe. you know you have been talking a lot l
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know you have been talking a lot about dreams?— know you have been talking a lot about dreams? . ., , . , ., know you have been talking a lot about dreams? i about dreams? have i affected you? i have been having _ about dreams? have i affected you? i have been having dreams _ about dreams? have i affected you? i have been having dreams about - have been having dreams about dancing competitions. they are very weird. i'm not sure i can tell you any details. he weird. i'm not sure i can tell you any details-— any details. he has actually described — any details. he has actually described a _ any details. he has actually described a little _ any details. he has actually described a little bit - any details. he has actually described a little bit of- any details. he has actually described a little bit of the | any details. he has actually - described a little bit of the dream and i would describe it as an anxiety dream.— and i would describe it as an anxiety dream. and i would describe it as an anxie dream. ., ~ _ anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craii a anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craig a few _ anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craig a few times _ anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craig a few times in _ anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craig a few times in my _ anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by craig a few times in my dream. i anxiety dream. ok, i got killed by| craig a few times in my dream. i'm that anxiety! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new "london refugee response" fund is being launched by the mayor of london today. it will go towards helping refugees build a new life in london, including support with learning english and finding work. city hall is working with the charity — the london community foundation — to provide a way for more people to donate to help refugees arriving from afghanistan. social workers are being
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placed within schools in eight london boroughs as part of a new trial. the aim is to see whether identifying abuse and neglect early and supporting pupils at risk can reduce referrals of children into care. they say she is warm and friendly and genuinely here to support. it takes away fear, the idea of a social worker with the family. if every school had a social worker at the transform the way we are able to safeguard children. jim henson — the creator of the muppets — has been honoured with a blue plaque at his former home in north london. english heritage has unveiled the plaque ahead of what would have been his 85th birthday. he bought his house in hampstead in 1979 after the muppet show was commissioned for tv and made the uk his creative home for many of his subsequent projects. let's take a look at the travel
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situation now then. lots of issues. there are minor delays on the circle line, the district line is part suspended. the overground, piccadilly line and tfl rail all have delays too. so it's worth checking before you travel. it was the busiest rush—hour on the cheap since the first lockdown yesterday. on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another warm, dry and sunny day of weather today across the capital. very similar to how it was yesterday. another mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid teens in celsius for many of us, and there is poor visibility on many of the roads for a time as well. lots of mist and fog, plenty of moisture in the air. and of course it's all condensed into that mist and fog with lowering temperatures last night. so that's all set to lift into cloud. plenty of high cloud about this morning. that will turn the sunshine rather
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hazy again, but lots more blue sky and sunshine breaking through, particularly through the afternoon. temperatures could be a bit higher than they were yesterday. certainly the high 20s in celsius, 29, even 30 celsius for a few spots. just a very light south easterly breeze too. that will pick up times throughout the day. overnight tonight, we do the whole thing all over again. so, clear skies, temperatures dropping, perhaps the mid—teens in celsius, more mist and fog developing into the start of the day on wednesday. on wednesday, rinse and repeat — the heat and the sunshine will continue again. temperatures reaching the high 20s quite widely in celsius, but by the time we get to wednesday night, there's a weather front pushing eastwards that will bring outbreaks of rain on thursday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website, facebook and instagram. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... boris johnson's plan to fix the catastrophic cost of social care in england but there's mounting anger from his mps over how to pay for it. a surge in migrants crossing the channel — hundreds arrived yesterday in what could be a record for a single day. the fairytale continues for 18—year—old emma raducanu. she's into herfirst major quarter final, after easing past home favourite shelby rogers at the us open. and hurricane hannah cockcroft shows no sign of slowing down,
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she'll be here fresh from her tokyo success. because greatness is not born, it is learnt. adventurer extrodinaire bear grylls on his new project to inspire young people. yesterday was the warmest day across the uk since latejuly and it could get hotter today. i am on the outskirts of oxford to enjoy the surroundings make the most of the beautiful morning. join me for the full forecast. taste beautiful morning. join me for the full forecast.— full forecast. we will get matt a cu of full forecast. we will get matt a cup of tea- _ full forecast. we will get matt a cup of tea. we'll _ full forecast. we will get matt a cup of tea. we'll know - full forecast. we will get matt a cup of tea. we'll know that - full forecast. we will get matt a - cup of tea. we'll know that feeling! good morning, it's tuesday 7th september. our top story... the prime minister will set out his plan for social care in england today, saying it will fix a broken system in which people face catastrophic costs. he is expected to announce a rise
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in national insurance of about 1.25% despite criticism from conservative mps and peers — as well as from labour, who say the increase is unfair to working families. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. it has plagued previous governments. plans for reforming social care in england have often come unstuck. but on the very day in 2019 he became prime minister, borisjohnson made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis in social care once and for all with a clear plan we have prepared. six months later, during the election campaign, he made another bold pledge. we can do all these things without raising income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that's our guarantee. now it seems he can't keep both promises and is on the brink of breaking the pledge not to increase national insurance rates.
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labour leader keir starmer says this would be unfair as it would hit working people hard, including low earners and young people. perhaps more worryingly for the prime minister, many of his own conservative mps seem to agree. i don't want to see national insurance raised for people of all ages. i think many youngsters have paid enough as a result of this pandemic. if we want people to be able to retain their homes, those people should have the bulk of the cost perhaps by buying their own insurance policy against the catastrophe of potentially losing all their money on care. initially, the extra cash raised is not expected to be earmarked for social care but to clear the backlog in the nhs in england, which has been pummelled by the pandemic and increase hospital capacity. there are concerns that social care could still be left as a poor relation. we're really hoping there will be something, not only for the long—term sustainable future for social care but we do need
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something immediately now because most care providers are at breaking point at this moment in time. the problem of paying for care predates the pandemic. borisjohnson says he will not duck tough decisions and he will end the catastrophic costs of care. ultimately, those costs will be capped. even some of his own mps wonder if it will be able completely to prevent some people selling their own homes to pay for a care home. iain watson, bbc news. let's speak now to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. adam, the cabinet is meeting at number 10 for the first time since last march to hear the prime minister's plan. this is a really thorny issue, isn't it. what's the atmosphere going to be like? it will be a slightly strange cabinet meeting because it is the
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best time they will have been around the slightly small table in downing street in person since the start of the pandemic. it will be slightly tense because quite a few cabinet ministers think an increase in national insurance contributions is not the right way to fund the nhs and to fund adult social care in england. there are lots of rumours going round that might be a reshuffle of the cabinet later this week. let's see. i am reshuffle of the cabinet later this week. let's see. iam not reshuffle of the cabinet later this week. let's see. i am not sure they have been given the details about what has been announced. we are moving into a different phase of the debate. the field has been open for critics to complain that increasing it is a tax on the young to pay for the old or a tax onjobs. now the government is making the case for why this is necessary. what they are saying this morning is it is not just about changing social pair and delivering the decades long—awaited to that, it is about rescuing the nhs from the meteorite that has hit
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it, which is covid, said there will bejust as much it, which is covid, said there will be just as much stress on money going into the health service today as that is on to social pair. cynics might say it is a way of closing down critics. it is a way of responding to keir starmer, who has written to the prime minister overnight saying, hang on, this does not amount to a proper plan. you get a sense from people they are worried about the nhs for the next few months and the next p years and that is why they are doing theirs. taste is why they are doing theirs. we will be talking about it today and tomorrow. —— they are doing this. later this morning we'll be speaking to the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, and get reaction from the health and social care sector. a baby and several young children were among hundreds of migrants brought ashore on monday, after trying to cross the english channel. a steady stream of crossings is believed to have taken place yesterday, due to the calm waters and good weather conditions. simonjones is in doverfor us now with the latest. morning to you, simon. the home
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office have — morning to you, simon. the home office have so _ morning to you, simon. the home office have so far— morning to you, simon. the home office have so far refused - morning to you, simon. the home office have so far refused to - office have so far refused to confirm how many people exactly made it across the channel yesterday stop we do know the figure is likely to be on the high hundreds, possibly a record thinkable a single day. that has yet to be confirmed. —— is a record figure. last month that he bates managed to make it across the channel in one day alone. yesterday the board are foreseen to be pretty much overwhelmed. some lifeboats had to be called into action, one at dungeness picking up a large group of migrants bringing them to shore, others were brought here today dover for processing. one person who worked down at the port involved in that help me it was disorganised chaos, there were so many people. why the big increase yesterday? the keyword was the weather. like today it was incredibly calm in the
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channel, very warm. for the past couple of weeks it has been pretty choppy. couple of weeks it has been pretty choppy, pretty windy in couple of weeks it has been pretty ch°ppy. pretty windy in the couple of weeks it has been pretty choppy, pretty windy in the channel. the opportunities to get across have been limited. hundreds of people have been over in calais waiting for their chance to get across, helped on—board boats by people smugglers. priti patel are said to be furious about this, people questioning what the french are doing so they have a huge stretch of coach coastline to patrol. huge stretch of coach coastline to atrol. . . huge stretch of coach coastline to atrol. . , ., , ., patrol. that is the latest line from da this patrol. that is the latest line from day this morning. _ —— from dover. a public inquiry into controversial plans for the uk's first deep coal mine for 30 years will begin later today. the site near whitehaven on the cumbrian coast was originally approved by the communities secretary robert jenrick, but the decision is now being reviewed. supporters say the mine will create hundreds ofjobs, but critics argue opening the mine
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will harm the government's commitment to cut carbon emissions. scotland's first minister will set out her government's plan for the coming year later today. nicola sturgeon's statement at holyrood is likely to focus on pandemic recovery, but she's also made clear her determination to pursue another independence referendum in the near future. let's get more now from our political correspondent david wallace lockhart. morning to you. what can we expect later? ides. morning to you. what can we expect later? �* , ., .,, ~' morning to you. what can we expect later? ~ , ., ., , ,, ., morning to you. what can we expect later? �* , ., ., , ~' ., ., morning to you. what can we expect later? ~ , ., ., , ,, ., ., ,, later? as of last week we had an snp and green partnership _ later? as of last week we had an snp and green partnership in _ later? as of last week we had an snp and green partnership in governmentj and green partnership in government in scotland. that gives a hint of the direction the first minister wants to go in. we will hear about economic recovery from covid this afternoon, specifically net zero recovery any idea it is making it more environmentally friendly. there will be more on that, with possibly a dozen bells being announced, specific bills potentially regarding the creation of a national pair service in scotland, making it
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easierfor someone to service in scotland, making it easier for someone to change their legally recognised gender. opposition parties are saying the focus must be on the economy and its recovery after the pandemic and not on a second independence referendum. nicola sturgeon pulls planning for that when the pandemic hit. perhaps a bit too early for concrete next steps but i am sure we will get an idea of the first minister's inking of what will happen in her pursuit of what will happen in her pursuit of independence. actor michael k williams, best known for starring in drama series "the wire", has been found dead in his new york apartment, aged 5a. mr williams played popular character omar little across all five seasons of the wire, with former us president barack obama previously speaking of his fondness for the character. reports suggest that he died from a suspected drug overdose, but this has not been officially confirmed. dragonflies are moving into new habitats across britain and ireland — despite other insect
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populations declining. scientists at the british dragonfly society say they're taking advantage of rising temperatures, which could be an indicator of climate change. more than a0% of species have seen their numbers increase since 1970, while only about 10% have declined. a blue plaque has been installed at the former home of the muppets creatorjim henson. henson bought the home in hampstead in north london at the peak of the muppets' success at the end of the 1970s. english heritage unveiled the plaque ahead of what would have been the puppeteer�*s 85th birthday. i love reading a blue plaque. i thought it was going to say the muppets led the. so we put one on the sofa for you next week? —— lived there. such a kind thought! not
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necessary. louise sat here... for ages. we were worried about you during the headlines. have you had a cup of tea? i have indeed. welcome to the gardens on the outskirts of oxford. we all need a bit of escapism. why not come here? this is the silent space within the formal gardens, just to escape the pressures of life. it is peaceful and the scents are amazing. let's have a look at the forecast across the uk. yesterday was particularly hot in england and wales. it could still get hotter today and tomorrow as the sunshine extends further than northwoods. there are missed and fog patches around if you are about to head out across the uk. at the bit
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of plaid across scotland and northern ireland which will continue to then and break. —— a fair bit of cloud. temperatures in the mid to high teens. temperature starting to left across scotland and northern ireland. a hot day for england and wales with temperatures may be about 30 celsius. that will lead to a warm night once again across many areas. claudia is mainly across parts of northern scotland. elsewhere starry skies to take us into tomorrow morning with temperatures in the mid teens as we go through the day. showers overnight which may become more expensive during the day. the old rumble of thunder. more sunshine across scotland and northern ireland. across england and wales once again we could approach 29,30.
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all before things turn colour and thundery. a full forecast in half—an—hour. —— cooler. a record number of people are currently waiting for nhs hospital treatment in england, because of delays caused by the pandemic. yesterday, the government announced £5.a billion to help the health service manage ongoing pressures and to tackle the backlog. but, ministers say the situation will get worse before it gets better. our correspondent, zoe conway, has been speaking to some of those affected by delayed treatment. it is one of the very last days of summer in sussex. the kind of day members of the seaford bowling club would hate to miss out on. several people playing today have had their hips, knees and cataracts operated on privately, to avoid nhs waiting lists, to avoid conditions deteriorating, to stay in the game.
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rosemary went private to get a cataract removed. she recently lost her husband. facing a one—year wait, she feared not being able to drive. it would have been quite devastating. it is difficult enough losing a partner. when you then lose your independence, that is like a double sort of whammy. do you resent having to go private? ifeel, you know, when you have had all your working life, you have paid your dues, if you like, taxes and national insurance, you sort of do expect that you at some point in your life, you can benefit from it. bruce paid for his new hip because he didn't want to wait 18 months. i feel fortunate because there are people in this club, two or three people, who are walking round with sticks and things that are also in pain and also, probably, in as bad a state
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as maybe i was but i'm not in a position to do that. charity versus arthritis says the overwhelming majority of people they have contacted experienced worsening pain as they waited for treatment. chrissy waited a year for one knee to be done, the other is due to be operated on next month, though she fears it will be postponed. on the bad days i have to rest. i find it difficult climbing up and down the stairs. i make myself do it because with arthritis the key is to keep moving. but it can be exhausting. what about the argument we have been in the middle of a pandemic, a crisis in the nhs, you are going to have to be patient. there are thousands of people who need these kind of operations and have paid
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into the national health paid their dues all through their lives and cannot get what they paid for. michael needs a triple heart bypass. in the last few weeks, his operation has been cancelled four times. they got you all prepared and said he would be in the theatre for half past nine. near lunchtime they came and told him he wasn't because it had been cancelled again. he's hoping his operation will now go next week. i have no get up and go like i had before, no... i'm on a downer. the government says an extra £1 million is to be spent in england over the next months, clearing the backlog of operations caused by covid. they said the money will go
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straight to the front line. let's speak to the vice president of the royal college of surgeons, tim mitchell. hejoins us live on he joins us live on the hejoins us live on the programme. thank you for being with us this morning. we have had a lot of patients waiting for an operation. what is the situation you and your colleagues are facing at the moment? we have a massive waiting list of nearly 5.5 million people waiting for surgery with about 6000 people who have been waiting for two years for their operation. this is a massive impact from covid, which of course required the health service to deal with a huge influx of emergency cases. the money announced yesterday is very welcome and it is good to have clarity of the funding of the health service in the next six months. we have been calling for a new deal. with an additional
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pledge of £6 billion for the next five years as a result of dealing with the backlog caused by covid. some of the problems were caused before the pandemic. there were problems in the winter and back in 2017 nhs england asked hospitals to stop all routine activity for a month. although the funding is very welcome, we do need additional funding in the future. mst! welcome, we do need additional funding in the future.— welcome, we do need additional funding in the future. msn idea. you are talkini funding in the future. msn idea. you are talking about _ funding in the future. msn idea. you are talking about money _ funding in the future. msn idea. you are talking about money that - funding in the future. msn idea. you are talking about money that has - are talking about money that has been announced and the need for more of that, more of the same. what services will have to be compromised if you do not get the funding you require? tt if you do not get the funding you reiuire? . if you do not get the funding you reiuire? , ,., ., ., require? it is important to recognise _ require? it is important to recognise surgeons - require? it is important to i recognise surgeons prioritise patients. patients waiting for hip and knee replacements often that operations are postponed and they are therefore waiting for their
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operation, unable to function. people are unable to work as a consequence. this has got dramatically worse during covid and this is why we need substantial investment. we had fewer beds and fewer staff than many other european countries. without that investment we will have great difficulties. haifa we will have great difficulties. how do ou we will have great difficulties. how do you prioritise _ we will have great difficulties. how do you prioritise patients on the waiting list? obviously it is a difficultjob. you talk about hip and knee replacements. some people have been waiting over 18 months. as they continue to wait for operations they continue to wait for operations they can get additional problems which increases the burden to the nhs. . , which increases the burden to the nhs. . r u, , , which increases the burden to the nhs. .,, nhs. emergency cases and answer cases are prioritise. _ nhs. emergency cases and answer cases are prioritise. surgeons - nhs. emergency cases and answerj cases are prioritise. surgeons have always prioritised the weightless tape people needing emergency care get treatment in a timely fashion.
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—— the waiting lists save people. we are seeing an increase in the number of patients waiting and the increase in waiting times. we need to address that. if in waiting times. we need to address that. . in waiting times. we need to address that. , ., , ., ., , that. if there is to be extra money, we talked about _ that. if there is to be extra money, we talked about extra _ that. if there is to be extra money, we talked about extra money - that. if there is to be extra money, we talked about extra money for i that. if there is to be extra money, l we talked about extra money for the nhs and a lot of money forsake a pair as well. if there is a lot of extra money made available, a lot of that might get swallowed up by the nhs. -- that might get swallowed up by the nhs. —— for social pair. in the pandemic, it could be a bottomless pit of money needed. tt is pandemic, it could be a bottomless pit of money needed. it is important to see social— pit of money needed. it is important to see social care _ pit of money needed. it is important to see social care and _ pit of money needed. it is important to see social care and health - pit of money needed. it is important to see social care and health as - to see social care and health as interlinked issues. it is important to support social care. there is a difficulty in discharging patients from hospital because of difficulty
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with social provision. that impacts on social activity. we have also called for separation of routine activity from emergency care within hospitals with so—called surgical hubs to deal with routine activity, to allow that to be maintained. thank you for your time this morning. tim mitchell, vice president of the royal college of surgeons. this year's paralympic games in tokyo have been one for the history books for great britain — they came away with 12a medals, including a1 golds. once again we had more gold medals in the studio. head you have on the sofa now? we in the studio. head you have on the sofa now? ~ ., ., in the studio. head you have on the sofa now? ~ . ., ,, . ., in the studio. head you have on the sofa now? ~ . . ,, . ., ., sofa now? we had a special treat this morning- _ sofa now? we had a special treat this morning. it _ sofa now? we had a special treat this morning. it is _ sofa now? we had a special treat this morning. it is hannah - sofa now? we had a special treat this morning. it is hannah craft l this morning. it is hannah craft with her two — this morning. it is hannah craft with her two gold _ this morning. it is hannah craft with her two gold medals. - this morning. it is hannah craftj with her two gold medals. gold medallist problems. hat
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with her two gold medals. gold medallist problems.— with her two gold medals. gold medallist problems. not many people know that problem. _ medallist problems. not many people know that problem. we _ medallist problems. not many people know that problem. we had _ medallist problems. not many people know that problem. we had been - medallist problems. not many peoplej know that problem. we had been with you for a long time, waiting for this. ~ ., , you for a long time, waiting for this. a, , ., ., ., you for a long time, waiting for this. , ., ., ., ~ ., this. months ago we did not know if the names this. months ago we did not know if the games will— this. months ago we did not know if the games will go _ this. months ago we did not know if the games will go ahead. _ this. months ago we did not know if the games will go ahead. what - this. months ago we did not know if the games will go ahead. what is i this. months ago we did not know if the games will go ahead. what is it| the games will go ahead. what is it like that they went ahead? ids, the games will go ahead. what is it like that they went ahead? a relief, obviousl . like that they went ahead? a relief, obviously- we _ like that they went ahead? a relief, obviously. we are _ like that they went ahead? a relief, obviously. we are almost _ like that they went ahead? a relief, obviously. we are almost ten - like that they went ahead? a relief, obviously. we are almost ten years| obviously. we are almost ten years on from london 2012. not many of us were winning then and are still winning now. it is a massive privilege to put on this kit and sea have fast i can get. haifa privilege to put on this kit and sea have fast i can get.— privilege to put on this kit and sea have fast i can get. how did it feel for ou? have fast i can get. how did it feel for you? the _ have fast i can get. how did it feel for you? the games _ have fast i can get. how did it feel for you? the games as _ have fast i can get. how did it feel for you? the games as a - have fast i can get. how did it feel for you? the games as a whole i have fast i can get. how did it feel| for you? the games as a whole are incredible. — for you? the games as a whole are incredible, they _ for you? the games as a whole are incredible, they did _ for you? the games as a whole are incredible, they did not _ for you? the games as a whole are incredible, they did not feel - for you? the games as a whole are incredible, they did not feel that i incredible, they did not feel that different. we needed covid test every day that it is kind of part of everyday life now. the strangest bit was no crowd but at that hit me hard after the 100. was no crowd but at that hit me hard afterthe100. i had a was no crowd but at that hit me hard after the 100. i had a little cry. strange crossing the line and
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looking up and there was no one there. that is what i struggled with. most of my team—mates had finished writing and they cheered me on, which was nice. t finished writing and they cheered me on, which was nice.— finished writing and they cheered me on, which was nice. i saw the moment when ou on, which was nice. i saw the moment when you stop — on, which was nice. i saw the moment when you stop and _ on, which was nice. i saw the moment when you stop and you _ on, which was nice. i saw the moment when you stop and you are _ on, which was nice. i saw the moment when you stop and you are looking - when you stop and you are looking for faces in the crowd, nobody there. how long did it take you to get your head around that? t do get your head around that? i do an hini get your head around that? i do anything i _ get your head around that? i do anything i had _ get your head around that? t if anything i had even got my head around it now. i knew there was going to be no crowd. i thought i would deal with it quite well. it is not till you are that you realise to the atmosphere has gone. it was really, really quiet. ijust had to say, it is ok, we will get the noise and we get home. you did stop it was so nice logging on to social media. that is something you normally stay away from that it was like a lifeline this time. it was amazing
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to have that support. thank you to everyone for tuning in. lats to have that support. thank you to everyone for tuning in.— everyone for tuning in. lots of athletes will _ everyone for tuning in. lots of athletes will say _ everyone for tuning in. lots of athletes will say the _ everyone for tuning in. lots of athletes will say the crowd - everyone for tuning in. lots of l athletes will say the crowd gives them an extra push. you did not have that. when you look at your performance, it didn't matter in end, did it? t performance, it didn't matter in end. did it?— performance, it didn't matter in end, did it? . , ., end, did it? i had carry next to me to rive end, did it? i had carry next to me to give me — end, did it? i had carry next to me to give me that — end, did it? i had carry next to me to give me that extra _ end, did it? i had carry next to me to give me that extra push. - end, did it? i had carry next to me i to give me that extra push. normally it is about having a crowd. we normally get a crowd every four years. just come to the commonwealth games next year and that will be grateful that i want to talk about crowds and integration. you have talked in the _ crowds and integration. you have talked in the past _ crowds and integration. you have talked in the past about - crowds and integration. you have talked in the past about how - crowds and integration. you have talked in the past about how the | talked in the past about how the paralympics and olympics should be held together so that olympians can benefit from the crowd. brute
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held together so that olympians can benefit from the crowd.— benefit from the crowd. we are so roud as benefit from the crowd. we are so proud as paralympian _ benefit from the crowd. we are so proud as paralympian of— benefit from the crowd. we are so proud as paralympian of the - proud as paralympian of the paralympic movement. it has grown so much and we would never want to get rid of the legacy. we definitely need more integration in every event. in the diamonds league, why not run the men's100 metres and then havejonnie peacock? if you give it, people will come. as paralympian as we have to keep pushing for it. jonnie peacock spoke a lot about in tokyo and i commented on it as well. it is something we hope will grow as you go into paris. how important is it you get the bigger level of exposure and keep fighting formal?— fighting formal? massively important- _ fighting formal? massively important. i— fighting formal? massively important. i did _ fighting formal? massively important. i did not - fighting formal? massively important. i did not start l important. i did not start wheelchair racing until i was 13. i have been doing this 15 years now and i still get messages from kids going, i do not do sport because my school will not let me. it breaks my
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heart. i had been there, done it. we have access and funding and equipment. let's get everybody involved because it is a sport for everyone. by putting us on the screens, on the front pages, whatever it is by putting results out there, more children can see as an say i want to be the next her or him. whatever they can see what they can do. ., , , ~' , him. whatever they can see what they can do. ., , , ,, , , can do. hopefully kids will be insired can do. hopefully kids will be inspired by — can do. hopefully kids will be inspired by what _ can do. hopefully kids will be inspired by what you - can do. hopefully kids will be inspired by what you have - can do. hopefully kids will be l inspired by what you have said. can do. hopefully kids will be - inspired by what you have said. the team behind you is so important. one person in particular, make then, here is with you when you are training. —— nathan. let's have a word about nathan, he was outside and watching. that word about nathan, he was outside and watching-— and watching. that was his first paralympic _ and watching. that was his first paralympic medal. _ and watching. that was his first paralympic medal. the - and watching. that was his first paralympic medal. the silver i and watching. that was his first - paralympic medal. the silver medal in the four by 100 relay. we have done all our preparation together, change in plastic greenhouses, in the barrage. t
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change in plastic greenhouses, in the barrage-— the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage- _ the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage. that _ the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage. that was _ the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage. that was a _ the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage. that was a part - the barrage. i have seen it. -- in the garage. that was a part of i the barrage. i have seen it. -- ml the garage. that was a part of the names the garage. that was a part of the games when _ the garage. that was a part of the games when i _ the garage. that was a part of the games when i got _ the garage. that was a part of the games when i got emotional. - the garage. that was a part of the l games when i got emotional. when the garage. that was a part of the - games when i got emotional. when he won, i was gone. games when i got emotional. when he won. t was gone-— won, i was gone. when we were chattin: won, i was gone. when we were chatting this — won, i was gone. when we were chatting this morning _ won, i was gone. when we were chatting this morning you - won, i was gone. when we were chatting this morning you seem | won, i was gone. when we were i chatting this morning you seem so calm about your gold medals. yes. for me, calm about your gold medals. yes. for me. people _ calm about your gold medals. yes. for me, people expect. _ calm about your gold medals. .23 for me, people expect. that is calm about your gold medals. t2; for me, people expect. that is a lot of pressure. ifeel for me, people expect. that is a lot of pressure. i feel more relief when i had done it. it is exciting. at the same time, and other four years i have done what i set out to do. there is no expectation with nathan. to go out there and race against the guys, racing against the likes of marcel hug. and david weir. that is no mean feat. he marcel hug. and david weir. that is no mean feat-— no mean feat. he will be blushing outside the _ no mean feat. he will be blushing outside the studios _ no mean feat. he will be blushing outside the studios as _ no mean feat. he will be blushing outside the studios as he - no mean feat. he will be blushing outside the studios as he is - outside the studios as he is listening. iso you training in the
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garage. congratulations. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new london refugee response fund is being launched by the mayor of london today. it will go towards helping refugees build a new life in london, including support with learning english and finding work. city hall is working with the charity, the london community foundation, to provide a way for more people to donate to help refugees arriving from afghanistan. social workers are being placed within schools in eight london boroughs as part of a new trial. the aim is to see whether identifying abuse and neglect early — and supporting pupils at risk — can reduce referrals of children into care. we deal with all kinds of trauma
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and challenges and problems that impact on children's future. domestic abuse, children who have lived in a household where adults are criminals or, you know, with mental health. jim henson, the creator of the muppets, has been honoured with a blue plaque at his former home in north london. english heritage has unveiled the plaque ahead of what would have been his 85th birthday. he bought his house in hampstead in 1979, after the muppet show was commissioned for tv, and made the uk his creative home for many of his subsequent projects. let's take a look at the travel situation now then. lots of issues. there are severe delays on the the district line. the overground, piccadilly line and tfl rail all have minor delays too. so it's worth checking before you travel. it was the busiest rush hour on the tube since the first lockdown yesterday. to find out what's happening on the roads and for all the other travel news, you can tune
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into your bbc local radio station details there now for regular updates. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another warm, dry and sunny day of weather today across the capital. very similar to how it was yesterday. another mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid teens in celsius for many of us, and there is poor visibility on many of the roads for a time as well. lots of mist and fog, plenty of moisture in the air. and of course it's all condensed into that mist and fog with lowering temperatures last night. so that's all set to lift into cloud. plenty of high cloud about this morning. that will turn the sunshine rather hazy again, but lots more blue sky and sunshine breaking through, particularly through the afternoon. temperatures could be a bit higher than they were yesterday. certainly the high 20s in celsius, 29, even 30 celsius for a few spots. just a very light south easterly breeze too. that will pick up times throughout the day. overnight tonight, we do the whole thing all over again. so, clear skies, temperatures
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dropping, perhaps the mid—teens in celsius, more mist and fog developing into the start of the day on wednesday. on wednesday, rinse and repeat — the heat and the sunshine will continue again. temperatures reaching the high 20s quite widely in celsius, but by the time we get to wednesday night, there's a weather front pushing eastwards that will bring outbreaks of rain on thursday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in an hour. plenty more on our website, facebook and instagram. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. as we've been hearing this morning, the prime minister is meeting with ministers in downing street this morning, to outline his plans for how health and social care will be funded in the future. let's speak to the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us. can we talk about the announcement yesterday, an extra £5.a billion to support the nhs covid response in england. that includes the backlog of operations are routine treatments. that has been welcomed, that money, but people we have spoken to this morning, including the royal college of art surgeons, the nhs federation, says it needs to be more than that? so, the 5.a billion that you quite rightly— so, the 5.a billion that you quite rightly outlined, by the way within that there — rightly outlined, by the way within that there is about a78 million ring—fenced for enhanced hospital discharge, which is so important to allow— discharge, which is so important to allow the _ discharge, which is so important to allow the nhs to continue to cope running _ allow the nhs to continue to cope running both the pressures of covid and deal— running both the pressures of covid and deal with the backlog of elective _ and deal with the backlog of elective recovery, but the 5.a billion— elective recovery, but the 5.a billion is— elective recovery, but the 5.a billion is for this six months. there — billion is for this six months. there were 6.6 billion for the previous— there were 6.6 billion for the previous six months. that takes the total for— previous six months. that takes the total for this year alone to about 34 billion— total for this year alone to about 34 billion of additional funding for the nhs _
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34 billion of additional funding for the nhs to cope with the covid pressures, and of course begin to deal with— pressures, and of course begin to deal with that backlog, 5 million we know— deal with that backlog, 5 million we know is— deal with that backlog, 5 million we know is the — deal with that backlog, 5 million we know is the backlog, probably an additional— know is the backlog, probably an additional 7 million people haven't come _ additional 7 million people haven't come forward for their treatments. i would _ come forward for their treatments. i would urge — come forward for their treatments. i would urge them to come forward because _ would urge them to come forward because the money is in place to be able to— because the money is in place to be able to deal— because the money is in place to be able to deal with that. as well as, of course. — able to deal with that. as well as, of course, they deliver what will be an incredibly ambitious booster programme, to deliver the additional vaccine _ programme, to deliver the additional vaccine protection to the most vulnerable as we get into the winten — vulnerable as we get into the winter. ~ . , ., , vulnerable as we get into the winter. ~ . , ., ,, vulnerable as we get into the winter. ~ . , ., ~ ., winter. what people you work on the nhs and patients _ winter. what people you work on the nhs and patients as _ winter. what people you work on the nhs and patients as well _ winter. what people you work on the nhs and patients as well want - winter. what people you work on the nhs and patients as well want to - nhs and patients as well want to know is, will that level of investment you have outlined continue beyond this year? 50. investment you have outlined continue beyond this year? so, the secretary of _ continue beyond this year? so, the secretary of state _ continue beyond this year? so, the secretary of state for _ continue beyond this year? so, the secretary of state for health - continue beyond this year? so, the secretary of state for health care, | secretary of state for health care, the chancellor and the prime minister. _ the chancellor and the prime minister, will be setting out later today— minister, will be setting out later today how we intend to deal with the real challenges of a social care
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system — real challenges of a social care system that many people will agree needs— system that many people will agree needs dealing with. many people describe — needs dealing with. many people describe it as a broken social care system _ describe it as a broken social care system you _ describe it as a broken social care system. you can't deal with that without — system. you can't deal with that without having the additional funding — without having the additional funding into your health care system in place _ funding into your health care system in place. you will hear more details from _ in place. you will hear more details from the _ in place. you will hear more details from the secretary of state for health — from the secretary of state for health and care phase later today. but you _ health and care phase later today. but you are absolutely right, the two things have to go hand—in—hand. greater— two things have to go hand—in—hand. greater integration between health and social careful stop but the funding — and social careful stop but the funding for health care to deal with the short— funding for health care to deal with the short term massive challenge of covid _ the short term massive challenge of covid and _ the short term massive challenge of covid and to deal with the backlog has to— covid and to deal with the backlog has to go— covid and to deal with the backlog has to go hand—in—hand with what i think— has to go hand—in—hand with what i think will— has to go hand—in—hand with what i think will be — has to go hand—in—hand with what i think will be a truly historic and ambitious — think will be a truly historic and ambitious reform of social care in our country— ambitious reform of social care in our country that the prime minister will announce later today. let�*s our country that the prime minister will announce later today.— will announce later today. let's go back to the _ will announce later today. let's go back to the waiting _ will announce later today. let's go back to the waiting list. _ will announce later today. let's go back to the waiting list. you - will announce later today. let's go back to the waiting list. you talk l back to the waiting list. you talk about 5 million being on it right now. possibly another 7 million who have missed out on treatments. they will be people watching this morning who perhaps can't go to work because they are waiting for an operation they are waiting for an operation they need and have not been able to get. when will that backlog be
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cleared? ., ., ., , , cleared? you are absolutely right. we announced _ cleared? you are absolutely right. we announced £1 _ cleared? you are absolutely right. we announced £1 billion _ cleared? you are absolutely right. we announced £1 billion in - cleared? you are absolutely right. we announced £1 billion in the - we announced £1 billion in the previous— we announced £1 billion in the previous six months to help with the backlog _ previous six months to help with the backlog. that has now doubled. another— backlog. that has now doubled. another billion in the six months. you are _ another billion in the six months. you are right. so people were waiting — you are right. so people were waiting around 26 weeks for a surgery — waiting around 26 weeks for a surgery. they now awaiting aa weeks. so that _ surgery. they now awaiting aa weeks. so that is— surgery. they now awaiting aa weeks. so that is something that we are serious — so that is something that we are serious about dealing with. i mentioned the numbers area, 5 million — mentioned the numbers area, 5 million backlog, but there is possibly— million backlog, but there is possibly up to 7 million people waiting — possibly up to 7 million people waitini. ~ ., i. possibly up to 7 million people waitini. ~ ., ,~. .,, ., waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? — waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? so, _ waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? so, look, _ waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? so, look, i— waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? so, look, i can't- waiting. when do you hope that will be cleared? so, look, i can't give i be cleared? so, look, i can't give ou a be cleared? so, look, i can't give you a date- _ be cleared? so, look, i can't give you a date- it _ be cleared? so, look, i can't give you a date. it would _ be cleared? so, look, i can't give you a date. it would be _ be cleared? so, look, i can't give you a date. it would be arrogantl be cleared? so, look, i can't give i you a date. it would be arrogant and wrong _ you a date. it would be arrogant and wrong to _ you a date. it would be arrogant and wrong to say, yes, of course this money— wrong to say, yes, of course this money will— wrong to say, yes, of course this money will clear the whole lot. we are going — money will clear the whole lot. we are going to make a big dent to deal with the _ are going to make a big dent to deal with the backlog. but as things get better. _ with the backlog. but as things get better, the backlog numbers can grow _ better, the backlog numbers can grow. there are 7 million people who have not— grow. there are 7 million people who have not come forward and i would ur-e have not come forward and i would urge them — have not come forward and i would urge them to come forward for their treatments. very important that they do.
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treatments. very important that they do we _ treatments. very important that they do we are _ treatments. very important that they do. we are making the funding available. _ do. we are making the funding available, as we have announced yesterday. — available, as we have announced yesterday, and i think we will continue _ yesterday, and i think we will continue to put that pressure, to reduce _ continue to put that pressure, to reduce the — continue to put that pressure, to reduce the backlog as quickly as possible — reduce the backlog as quickly as possible. but i think it would be completely wrong of me to sit here and say. _ completely wrong of me to sit here and say. oh. — completely wrong of me to sit here and say, oh, yeah, it will be done in no _ and say, oh, yeah, it will be done in no time — and say, oh, yeah, it will be done in no time at _ and say, oh, yeah, it will be done in no time at all. this is a big challenge _ in no time at all. this is a big challenge. the nhs has dealt with covid _ challenge. the nhs has dealt with covid. they have treated 500,000 people _ covid. they have treated 500,000 people for— covid. they have treated 500,000 people for covid, serious covid, in hospitals — people for covid, serious covid, in hospitals. one day injanuary of this year. — hospitals. one day injanuary of this year, there were 34,000 people in hospital— this year, there were 34,000 people in hospital with covid that the nhs has had _ in hospital with covid that the nhs has had to— in hospital with covid that the nhs has had to deal with, as well as deal— has had to deal with, as well as deal with— has had to deal with, as well as deal with all the other things, continuing with cancer treatments and all— continuing with cancer treatments and all the other things the nhs does _ and all the other things the nhs does so — and all the other things the nhs does so bravely, the funding we put in for— does so bravely, the funding we put in for the _ does so bravely, the funding we put in for the next six months will help enhance _ in for the next six months will help enhance that. and i hope it will get it to a _ enhance that. and i hope it will get it to a place — enhance that. and i hope it will get it to a place where we can deal with the backlog. but it is not an easy thing _ the backlog. but it is not an easy thing to— the backlog. but it is not an easy thing to do _ the backlog. but it is not an easy thing to do— the backlog. but it is not an easy thing to do. the health secretary has said it could _ thing to do. the health secretary has said it could get _ thing to do. the health secretary has said it could get worse - thing to do. the health secretary| has said it could get worse before it gets better with regard to waiting lists. i mean, how much
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worse? ~ ~ ., , worse? well, so we know this 5 million people _ worse? well, so we know this 5 million people that _ worse? well, so we know this 5 million people that we - worse? well, so we know this 5 million people that we have - worse? well, so we know this 5 million people that we have to l worse? well, so we know this 5 - million people that we have to deal with. _ million people that we have to deal with. the _ million people that we have to deal with, the backlog, but we think there's— with, the backlog, but we think there's up— with, the backlog, but we think there's up to 7 million.- with, the backlog, but we think there's up to 7 million. yes, you mentioned _ there's up to 7 million. yes, you mentioned the _ there's up to 7 million. yes, you mentioned the 7 _ there's up to 7 million. yes, you mentioned the 7 million. - there's up to 7 million. yes, you mentioned the 7 million. thank| there's up to 7 million. yes, you - mentioned the 7 million. thank you. so you could be seeing the backlog increase _ so you could be seeing the backlog increase while things are getting better~ _ increase while things are getting better. people are beginning to seal the difference. there are people waiting — the difference. there are people waiting for non—origin treatments. knee. _ waiting for non—origin treatments. knee. hip — waiting for non—origin treatments. knee, hip replacement, cataract. they— knee, hip replacement, cataract. they may— knee, hip replacement, cataract. they may be non—origin but they were detrimental— they may be non—origin but they were detrimental to people's lives, which is why— detrimental to people's lives, which is why we _ detrimental to people's lives, which is why we have announced that this funding _ is why we have announced that this funding that is so important. you need _ funding that is so important. you need that— funding that is so important. you need that to get the nhs to be fit for purpose. that social care reform is given _ for purpose. that social care reform is given so — for purpose. that social care reform is given so there is much space to be successful by having a really strong — be successful by having a really strong nhs to integrate with. ok. let's talk about _ strong nhs to integrate with. ok. let's talk about the reforms strong nhs to integrate with. ct. let's talk about the reforms to social care. and i do appreciate you are going to tell me the prime minister will set out the details later. but let's talk about the
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principle, if we can. we understand it is likely to be 1.25% rise in national insurance. in principle would you back that?— national insurance. in principle would you back that? well, look, i don't want — would you back that? well, look, i don't want to _ would you back that? well, look, i don't want to speculate _ would you back that? well, look, i don't want to speculate and - would you back that? well, look, i don't want to speculate and i - would you back that? well, look, i don't want to speculate and i think it would _ don't want to speculate and i think it would be — don't want to speculate and i think it would be unwise to do with hypotheticals, or in principle, as you put— hypotheticals, or in principle, as you put it _ hypotheticals, or in principle, as you put it... but hypotheticals, or in principle, as you put it---_ you put it... but you are a politician. — you put it... but you are a politician, you _ you put it... but you are a politician, you must- you put it... but you are a politician, you must have | you put it... but you are a - politician, you must have your point of view as to whether that is the right thing to do?— of view as to whether that is the right thing to do? politicians who have left office _ right thing to do? politicians who have left office and _ right thing to do? politicians who have left office and are _ right thing to do? politicians who have left office and are not - right thing to do? politicians who have left office and are not only. have left office and are not only government theme can speculate on these _ government theme can speculate on these issues, as people are doing in these issues, as people are doing in the media. — these issues, as people are doing in the media, but i think it would be wrong _ the media, but i think it would be wrong for— the media, but i think it would be wrong for a — the media, but i think it would be wrong for a member of the team, before _ wrong for a member of the team, before my— wrong for a member of the team, before my prime minister i stood up at the _ before my prime minister i stood up at the dispatch box and set out the plans _ at the dispatch box and set out the plans and — at the dispatch box and set out the plans and how the press conference afterwards — plans and how the press conference afterwards with his chancellor and his health secretary, for me to speculate — his health secretary, for me to speculate on the detail of how we are going — speculate on the detail of how we are going to fund this. | speculate on the detail of how we are going to fund this. i am speculate on the detail of how we are going to fund this.— are going to fund this. i am not askini are going to fund this. i am not asking for _ are going to fund this. i am not asking for details _ are going to fund this. i am not asking for details because - are going to fund this. i am not asking for details because i - are going to fund this. i am not i asking for details because i know you are not going to give me the details. let me put the question to you in a different way. for example,
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there is a lot of concern across parties, across the conservative party, we have also heard from keir starmer overnight, there is a lot of concern if it were to be national insurance, that it puts unfair pressure on lower earners and young people? pressure on lower earners and young --eole? ~ pressure on lower earners and young ..eole? . pressure on lower earners and young --eole? ~ pressure on lower earners and young --eole?~ people? well, look, i hope you understand _ people? well, look, i hope you understand that _ people? well, look, i hope you understand that i _ people? well, look, i hope you understand that i am _ people? well, look, i hope you understand that i am not - people? well, look, i hope you understand that i am not going| people? well, look, i hope you i understand that i am not going to comment— understand that i am not going to comment on hypotheticals. let's wait for the _ comment on hypotheticals. let's wait for the details. it is not in the minister— for the details. it is not in the minister for vaccine deployment's remade _ minister for vaccine deployment's remade to deal with the finances of the government. that is in the chancellor— the government. that is in the chancellor pass my portfolio. it would — chancellor pass my portfolio. it would be — chancellor pass my portfolio. it would be wrong of me to speculate on these _ would be wrong of me to speculate on these things until you have heard from _ these things until you have heard from the — these things until you have heard from the prime minister, the chancellor and the secretary of state _ chancellor and the secretary of state for — chancellor and the secretary of state for helpful stop so forgive me. what i can say to you is that of the social— me. what i can say to you is that of the social care system has been unfair~ — the social care system has been unfair~ we — the social care system has been unfair. we have assets of 23,000, you really— unfair. we have assets of 23,000, you really begin to hoard. —— if you have _ you really begin to hoard. —— if you have assets — you really begin to hoard. —— if you have assets. one in seven people pay
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£100.000 _ have assets. one in seven people pay £100,000 or more for their social care _ £100,000 or more for their social care so _ £100,000 or more for their social care so in — £100,000 or more for their social care. so in my view it has to be grasped. — care. so in my view it has to be grasped, that little has to be grasped, that little has to be grasped, and this prime minister will not _ grasped, and this prime minister will not shirk that responsibility. you will— will not shirk that responsibility. you will hear from him later today as to _ you will hear from him later today as to how — you will hear from him later today as to how we are going to deal with the social— as to how we are going to deal with the social care system over the long term _ the social care system over the long term. ~ .. the social care system over the long term. ~ ., , ., the social care system over the long term. . ., term. what you said your conservative _ term. what you said your conservative colleagues l term. what you said your. conservative colleagues that term. what you said your- conservative colleagues that you might be about to break a manifesto promise? might be about to break a manifesto romise? ~ ~ .,, promise? well, ithink, as i said, i will want to _ promise? well, ithink, as i said, i will want to wait _ promise? well, ithink, as i said, i will want to wait until _ promise? well, ithink, as i said, i will want to wait until the - promise? well, ithink, as i said, i will want to wait until the prime i will want to wait until the prime minister— will want to wait until the prime minister is — will want to wait until the prime minister is on his feet. he will set out the _ minister is on his feet. he will set out the details and the chancellor will set _ out the details and the chancellor will set out the details of how we are going — will set out the details of how we are going to pay for this. then we can have — are going to pay for this. then we can have that debate. i am sure i will come — can have that debate. i am sure i will come back on your programme and we will— will come back on your programme and we will have _ will come back on your programme and we will have the national debate as well as— we will have the national debate as well as the — we will have the national debate as well as the debate in parliament, and a _ well as the debate in parliament, and a vote — well as the debate in parliament, and a vote in parliament. this prime minister— and a vote in parliament. this prime minister promised a plan to once and for all— minister promised a plan to once and for all deal— minister promised a plan to once and for all deal with the broken social care system and have a real plan, a robust _ care system and have a real plan, a robust plan. — care system and have a real plan, a robust plan, that can do that. very
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different— robust plan, that can do that. very different to — robust plan, that can do that. very different to work keir starmer and the labour— different to work keir starmer and the labour party are in terms of sniping — the labour party are in terms of sniping from the sidelines but not really— sniping from the sidelines but not really having a plan. when the prime minister— really having a plan. when the prime minister said that out we will have that debate and we will have those discussions and votes in parliament. and i— discussions and votes in parliament. and i hope _ discussions and votes in parliament. and i hope we can all feel proud that we — and i hope we can all feel proud that we have actually really delivered on the promise of fixing our social— delivered on the promise of fixing our social care system.— delivered on the promise of fixing our social care system. many people will remember _ our social care system. many people will remember the _ our social care system. many people will remember the prime _ our social care system. many people will remember the prime minister i will remember the prime minister saying that would be fixed when he walked into number or downing street? t walked into number or downing street? ., , , . , , , street? i would respectfully dispute that. he street? i would respectfully dispute that- he said _ street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he _ street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he had _ street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he had a _ street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he had a plan - street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he had a plan and - street? i would respectfully dispute that. he said he had a plan and he i that. he said he had a plan and he will engage with people who have lived experience of the social care system _ lived experience of the social care system both at national and local level. _ system both at national and local level. and — system both at national and local level, and i think you will see later— level, and i think you will see later today in the press conference tonight. _ later today in the press conference tonight, that we will deliver on that plan. _ tonight, that we will deliver on that plan, deliver on that promise. but let's— that plan, deliver on that promise. but let's be — that plan, deliver on that promise. but let's be realistic here. the social— but let's be realistic here. the social care _ but let's be realistic here. the social care system has been broken
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for many— social care system has been broken for many years, many decades and many— for many years, many decades and many successive governments have talked _ many successive governments have talked about this, i have consulted but never — talked about this, i have consulted but never really delivered. this prime — but never really delivered. this prime minister is determined to deliver~ — prime minister is determined to deliver~ it — prime minister is determined to deliver. it will take time. i'm not arrogant. — deliver. it will take time. i'm not arrogant, this comet is not arrogant to say— arrogant, this comet is not arrogant to say we _ arrogant, this comet is not arrogant to say we have a magic want and we can fix— to say we have a magic want and we can fix this — to say we have a magic want and we can fix this in — to say we have a magic want and we can fix this in five minutes. —— this— can fix this in five minutes. —— this government. but we are determined to implement it. the prime determined to implement it. tt2 prime minister said he would fix the crisis with a plan that he had prepared. we are talking years on? and, you know, this is not easy. i said _ and, you know, this is not easy. i said to _ and, you know, this is not easy. i said to you. — and, you know, this is not easy. i said to you, successive governments... tony blair said he had a _ governments... tony blair said he had a plan — governments... tony blair said he had a plan and he wanted to fix it. nothing _ had a plan and he wanted to fix it. nothing happened. labourtoday had a plan and he wanted to fix it. nothing happened. labour today don't have a _ nothing happened. labour today don't have a plan. what they have are people — have a plan. what they have are people just sort of sniping from the sidelines _ people just sort of sniping from the sidelines i— people just sort of sniping from the sidelines. i hope they will look at this plan— sidelines. i hope they will look at this plan very seriously and i hope that together we can, as we have developed — that together we can, as we have developed and deployed vaccines, in such a _ developed and deployed vaccines, in such a successful way, we can together— such a successful way, we can together finally deal with the social — together finally deal with the social care system that our constituents, people who are
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suffering a broken system, deserve better~ _ suffering a broken system, deserve better~ i_ suffering a broken system, deserve better. i think this prime minister will deliver. fire better. i think this prime minister will deliver-— will deliver. are you looking at a ossible will deliver. are you looking at a possible lockdown _ will deliver. are you looking at a possible lockdown in _ will deliver. are you looking at a possible lockdown in october? i will deliver. are you looking at a i possible lockdown in october? so, i'm absolutely focused on making sure we _ i'm absolutely focused on making sure we don't have to reverse all of the great _ sure we don't have to reverse all of the great games we have made in terms _ the great games we have made in terms of— the great games we have made in terms of opening up the economy on the booster— terms of opening up the economy on the booster campaign. so the big thing _ the booster campaign. so the big thing for— the booster campaign. so the big thing for us, we have the interim advice _ thing for us, we have the interim advice from _ thing for us, we have the interim advice from the jcvi where we have to boost _ advice from the jcvi where we have to boost the most vulnerable against covid infection and flu. i worry covid infection and flu. ! worry about— covid infection and flu. i worry about flu~ _ covid infection and flu. i worry about flu. we have got a big flu programme. that will continue throughout the winter months. as well as. _ throughout the winter months. as well as. i— throughout the winter months. as wellas, i hope, our covid booster programme — wellas, i hope, our covid booster programme will be begin later this month _ programme will be begin later this month. can programme will be begin later this month. .. . programme will be begin later this month. ., , ., programme will be begin later this month. .. , ., ,., programme will be begin later this month. .. . .. , month. can i 'ust ask you? i 'ust need to mi month. can ijust ask you? i 'ust need to ask that i month. can ijust ask you? i 'ust need to ask that again if i month. can ijust ask you? i 'ust need to ask that again if i h month. can ijust ask you? ijust need to ask that again if i could. just try to get a clear answer. are you looking at a possible lockdown in october? h0. you looking at a possible lockdown in october?— in october? no, i haven't seen an i in october? no, i haven't seen any- -- i know _ in october? no, i haven't seen any... i know where _ in october? no, i haven't seen any... i know where your - in october? no, i haven't seen i any... i know where your question comes— any... i know where your question
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comes from — any... i know where your question comes from i— any... i know where your question comes from. i think that newspapers are reporting that is possible. look. — are reporting that is possible. look. you _ are reporting that is possible. look, you know, vaccines have given us the _ look, you know, vaccines have given us the ability — look, you know, vaccines have given us the ability to reduce infections, see -- _ us the ability to reduce infections, see -- to — us the ability to reduce infections, see —— to save 100,000 lives. it is through— see —— to save 100,000 lives. it is through the — see —— to save 100,000 lives. it is through the booster programme that i hope. _ through the booster programme that i hope. and _ through the booster programme that i hope, and again i'm not going to be arrogant— hope, and again i'm not going to be arrogant and say to you this is a sort _ arrogant and say to you this is a sort of— arrogant and say to you this is a sort of done deal, it is all over, it is— sort of done deal, it is all over, it is fine. — sort of done deal, it is all over, it is fine, this virus is no longer in pandemic— it is fine, this virus is no longer in pandemic stage, but i hope through— in pandemic stage, but i hope through the booster programme we can transition _ through the booster programme we can transition the virus from pandemic to endemic— transition the virus from pandemic to endemic status and deal with it year in _ to endemic status and deal with it year in year— to endemic status and deal with it year in year out. it will be with us for many— year in year out. it will be with us for many years. but not have to close _ for many years. but not have to close down _ for many years. but not have to close down our economy or take the measures. _ close down our economy or take the measures, the severe measures we have had _ measures, the severe measures we have had to _ measures, the severe measures we have had to sadly take, you know, in december— have had to sadly take, you know, in december of— have had to sadly take, you know, in december of last year. so it is through— december of last year. so it is through continuing to get your vaccination, people are still coming forward _ vaccination, people are still coming forward by— vaccination, people are still coming forward by the way... last week we still had _
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forward by the way... last week we still had 111,000 people who had their first — still had 111,000 people who had their first dose through that evergreen offer. and of course the booster— evergreen offer. and of course the booster programme will enhance that protection _ booster programme will enhance that protection and durability of the protection and durability of the protection of the vaccines to the most _ protection of the vaccines to the most vulnerable.— protection of the vaccines to the most vulnerable. thank you. i give talkini most vulnerable. thank you. i give talkin: to most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us- _ most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us. -- _ most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us. -- or— most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us. -- or thank - most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us. -- or thank you - most vulnerable. thank you. i give talking to us. -- or thank you for. talking to us. -- or thank you for talkini talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to — talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to us- _ talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to us. it _ talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to us. it is _ talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to us. it is quarter - talking to us. -- or thank you for talking to us. it is quarter to - talking to us. it is quarter to eight. sally is here. she has got a packed morning. talking to honey carl froch —— hannah cockroft and talking to dame sarah storey later. and talking about another success story? yes, a brilliant story from this incredible player. british tennis definitely has a new star. emma raducanu's remarkable run at the us open continues, as she reached herfirst major quarter final. the 18—year—old beat the home favourite shelby rogers in straight sets in new york. speaking after her win emma said she had been blown away by the support.
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yeah, it means so much to me. from the beginning here in new york, in my first round i received so much support and they made me feel extremely welcome here, and i'm really grateful. and even to play shelby, who's an american, and receive that much support and hear my name being chanted in the crowds, i couldn't believe it, and it meant so much and i'm really, really happy and just super grateful to everyone out there. have you been able to take a moment to enjoy it? yeah, i mean, at the end of the day we have moments with the team and it's really nice, we alljust get to regroup and just chat through the day and whatjust happened. do you do a victory dance, that kinda thing? no, we go get frozen yoghurt together. she laughs. i'm joined now by emma's former coach, mattjames. morning to you. it is great to hear emma sounding so positive, so confident. but it is how she is playing that is incredible. your reaction to that fantastic match?
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just immensely proud, really. a few of us _ just immensely proud, really. a few of us were _ just immensely proud, really. a few of us were here at the national tennis— of us were here at the national tennis centre last night watching it and there — tennis centre last night watching it and there was a good buzz. so pleased — and there was a good buzz. so pleased for her. it has not been a sure _ pleased for her. it has not been a sure journey. pleased for her. it has not been a surejourney. i pleased for her. it has not been a sure journey. i know she is only 18 but this— sure journey. i know she is only 18 but this is— sure journey. i know she is only 18 but this is 12. _ sure journey. i know she is only 18 but this is 12, 13 years in the making _ but this is 12, 13 years in the making. just pleased for her and everybody who has been part of the sacrifice _ everybody who has been part of the sacrifice to — everybody who has been part of the sacrifice to help yourjourney get to this _ sacrifice to help yourjourney get to this point. sacrifice to help your “ourney get to this wilt-h to this point. what is she like, matt? a perfectionist. - to this point. what is she like, matt? a perfectionist. a - to this point. what is she like, matt? a perfectionist. a very i to this point. what is she like, - matt? a perfectionist. a very bright tirl, which matt? a perfectionist. a very bright girl. which is _ matt? a perfectionist. a very bright girl, which is quite _ matt? a perfectionist. a very bright girl, which is quite a _ matt? a perfectionist. a very bright girl, which is quite a dangerous - girl, which is quite a dangerous combination in sport. so obviously she just _ combination in sport. so obviously she just got a level results, and i kind of— she just got a level results, and i kind of know deep down she was probably— kind of know deep down she was probably hoping for a two a stars. she doesn't be a stone unturned. when _ she doesn't be a stone unturned. when she — she doesn't be a stone unturned. when she is focused on something she is going _ when she is focused on something she is going to _ when she is focused on something she is going to go all guns blazing and id is going to go all guns blazing and go for— is going to go all guns blazing and go for it — is going to go all guns blazing and go for it. her career on the tennis side _ go for it. her career on the tennis side starts — go for it. her career on the tennis side starts now. school has been put to one _ side starts now. school has been put to one side — side starts now. school has been put to one side. more things to come, i would _ to one side. more things to come, i would say —
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to one side. more things to come, i would say. it�*s to one side. more things to come, i would say-— would say. it's interesting, isn't it? we saw— would say. it's interesting, isn't it? we saw her— would say. it's interesting, isn't it? we saw her have _ would say. it's interesting, isn't it? we saw her have that - would say. it's interesting, isn't it? we saw her have that blip i would say. it's interesting, isn'tj it? we saw her have that blip at wimbledon. the wobble. and i suppose in that moment lots of people might have looked at her and thought, is this going to become a problem? what she has done over night ec has very quickly put that behind her, hasn't she? .. . quickly put that behind her, hasn't she? ., , ., ., ., ., she? yeah, she learnt a lot from wimbledon- _ she? yeah, she learnt a lot from wimbledon. i— she? yeah, she learnt a lot from wimbledon. i don't _ she? yeah, she learnt a lot from wimbledon. i don't think - she? yeah, she learnt a lot from wimbledon. i don't think you - she? yeah, she learnt a lot fromj wimbledon. i don't think you can wimbledon. idon't think you can really— wimbledon. i don't think you can really compare it because wimbledon is going _ really compare it because wimbledon is going to _ really compare it because wimbledon is going to be a high point for every— is going to be a high point for every british tennis player during that two— every british tennis player during that two weeks. it is an added pressure _ that two weeks. it is an added pressure. it's quite nice that she has been — pressure. it's quite nice that she has been out of the media for a few days at— has been out of the media for a few days at least but she has found herself— days at least but she has found herself back into it. she will be in a nice _ herself back into it. she will be in a nice routine out there and she will be — a nice routine out there and she will be focused on her match. and to try to _ will be focused on her match. and to try to be _ will be focused on her match. and to try to be smart and not get too much involved _ try to be smart and not get too much involved in— try to be smart and not get too much involved in social media and looking at it too _ involved in social media and looking at it too much. she will be using the crowd — at it too much. she will be using the crowd out there and trying to avoid _ the crowd out there and trying to avoid any— the crowd out there and trying to avoid any distractions. and the crowd out there and trying to avoid any distractions.— avoid any distractions. and of course with — avoid any distractions. and of course with the _ avoid any distractions. and of course with the next - avoid any distractions. and of course with the next match i avoid any distractions. and of- course with the next match coming up, they will be added attention. what would you say to her about managing that? t
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what would you say to her about managing that?— what would you say to her about managing that? i think she does a really good _ managing that? i think she does a really good job — managing that? i think she does a really good job herself. _ managing that? i think she does a really good job herself. all - managing that? i think she does a really good job herself. all the - really good job herself. all the experiences she has had so far, she has played — experiences she has had so far, she has played some big matches. i don't think we _ has played some big matches. i don't think we quite realise how good she would _ think we quite realise how good she would be _ think we quite realise how good she would be playing in america but she takes _ would be playing in america but she takes it— would be playing in america but she takes it in— would be playing in america but she takes it in her stride. everything has been — takes it in her stride. everything has been building to this point. it's has been building to this point. it's not — has been building to this point. it's not like she has come out of nowhere — it's not like she has come out of nowhere. she has been dubbed that is one of— nowhere. she has been dubbed that is one of the _ nowhere. she has been dubbed that is one of the potential stars for the last few— one of the potential stars for the last few years. she has been on a programme with the lta for the last few years _ programme with the lta for the last few years to try to help break through— few years to try to help break through the top 100. she has had a lot of— through the top 100. she has had a lot of us— through the top 100. she has had a lot of us for— through the top 100. she has had a lot of us for support to get ready for these — lot of us for support to get ready for these months. lot of us for support to get ready forthese months. ithink lot of us for support to get ready for these months. i think she will io for these months. i think she will go out _ for these months. i think she will go out and — for these months. i think she will go out and attack it. that is a game style _ go out and attack it. that is a game style see _ go out and attack it. that is a game style. see and it is an aggressive player— style. see and it is an aggressive player and — style. see and it is an aggressive player and that is what we will see in matches — player and that is what we will see in matches to come.— player and that is what we will see in matches to come. people like me who talk about _ in matches to come. people like me who talk about tennis _ in matches to come. people like me who talk about tennis on _ in matches to come. people like me who talk about tennis on the - who talk about tennis on the television look to get very excited when we see a player like emma coming through and maybe sometimes there is a little bit too much attention on young players. how do we protect are at this point?- we protect are at this point? that's a tood we protect are at this point? that's a good question- — we protect are at this point? that's a good question. i _ we protect are at this point? that's
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a good question. i think— we protect are at this point? that's a good question. i think it - we protect are at this point? that's a good question. i think it is - a good question. i think it is difficult _ a good question. i think it is difficult. more can be done in the sport _ difficult. more can be done in the sport i_ difficult. more can be done in the sport. i know a lot of players do .et sport. i know a lot of players do get messages after, especially when they have _ get messages after, especially when they have lost. i think the players, especially— they have lost. i think the players, especially during the tournaments, it is a _ especially during the tournaments, it is a case — especially during the tournaments, it is a case of trying to avoid any distractions, any negative press. and of— distractions, any negative press. and of the — distractions, any negative press. and of the people around her will be trying _ and of the people around her will be trying to— and of the people around her will be trying to look after her. at wimbledon i know she had a lot of messages — wimbledon i know she had a lot of messages. it wasjust wimbledon i know she had a lot of messages. it was just a case wimbledon i know she had a lot of messages. it wasjust a case of park the phone. — messages. it wasjust a case of park the phone, park social media. she is quite _ the phone, park social media. she is quite good — the phone, park social media. she is quite good. she has a really good mindset — quite good. she has a really good mindset. she is focused now on the us open _ mindset. she is focused now on the us open. and getting ready for the next match. she is more worried about— next match. she is more worried about analysing the opponent, making sure her— about analysing the opponent, making sure her body is in the right place and ready— sure her body is in the right place and ready to get going again. sounds like tood and ready to get going again. sounds like good advice. _ and ready to get going again. sounds like good advice. thank— and ready to get going again. sounds like good advice. thank you - and ready to get going again. sounds like good advice. thank you very - like good advice. thank you very much indeed. just remaining calm. not getting too excited. good advice. thank you. adventurer bear grylls is no stranger to a challenge, from becoming the youngest person to summit mount everest, to crossing the atlantic ocean unassisted in an inflatable boat. his latest project may be
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slightly less extreme, but no less rewarding, as he launches a global initiative to inspire young people to reach their potential, with the help of some famous faces. let's take a look. as another school year begins, we are here to tell you something. you can become extraordinary. it's not something that happens quickly, or easily. you just have to kind of understand that it's possible to be done. all of us have potential. whatever you want in life you can achieve it if you put your mind to it. but you've probably heard that before. the truth is it's not easy. you can'tjust pluck a belief or confidence out of the air. no one owes you. you've got to make it for yourself. life is always going i to have a brick wall. you can't stop at the first roadblock. it's standing up in the moments when things are really tough that will make the difference. face the fear of failure. you can learn so much by doing something wrong. you are going to have to work to make it happen.
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there are going to be people who will tell you you are never going to achieve it. if something knocks you back, you stand up, reassess and then move forward. don't let people judge what you are capable of. because greatness isn't born, it learnt. you keep going, keep believing, reach for the stars. you never know what you might be able to achieve. you just have to have i that no limits mindset. the tougher the journey, the tougher you are. that gives you power. go as far as you can. seize the day, seize the moment. if you just keep trying you can achieve anything. so, who can you become? who indeed? bearjoins us now. you've got some friends you can call up you've got some friends you can call up and be involved. tt’s you've got some friends you can call up and be involved.— up and be involved. it's fantastic? it's been amazing _ up and be involved. it's fantastic? it's been amazing to _ up and be involved. it's fantastic? it's been amazing to see. - up and be involved. it's fantastic? it's been amazing to see. so - up and be involved. it's fantastic? | it's been amazing to see. so much up and be involved. it's fantastic? i it's been amazing to see. so much of it is about _ it's been amazing to see. so much of it is about trying to demystify for young _
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it is about trying to demystify for young people what it takes to succeed _ young people what it takes to succeed. schools do a good job, obviously. — succeed. schools do a good job, obviously, but they are focused on academics — obviously, but they are focused on academics and sport. we always hear about— academics and sport. we always hear about these _ academics and sport. we always hear about these exam grades. but actually— about these exam grades. but actually what young people need for life is _ actually what young people need for life is often very different. so we are trying — life is often very different. so we are trying to give schools a programme, a worklife programme that bridges _ programme, a worklife programme that bridges that gap and gives them that personal— bridges that gap and gives them that personal development programme. it is amazing _ personal development programme. it is amazing to see. some of the truth is amazing to see. some of the truth is these _ is amazing to see. some of the truth is these people interviewed talk about— is these people interviewed talk about is— is these people interviewed talk about is so different. they talk about — about is so different. they talk about the _ about is so different. they talk about the real failure is and how to hold on— about the real failure is and how to hold on during those storms, the struggles. — hold on during those storms, the struggles, the resilience, how they work properly on teams and that sort of stuff _ work properly on teams and that sort of stuff. some real life skills that young _ of stuff. some real life skills that young people need more than ever now _ young people need more than ever now. �* . young people need more than ever now. �* , ., ., young people need more than ever now. ., ,.., now. it's amazing, because in the item before _ now. it's amazing, because in the item before you _ now. it's amazing, because in the item before you we _ now. it's amazing, because in the item before you we were - now. it's amazing, because in the | item before you we were watching emma raducanu winning again in the us open. she went through those struggles at wimbledon and found the pressure difficult. and yet you talk about role models, there is a perfect role model for so many people watching this morning? ihthd
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people watching this morning? and the thin . s people watching this morning? and the things she has found is how to deal with— the things she has found is how to deal with the anxiety she had and setbacks — deal with the anxiety she had and setbacks. that is the sort of stuff you don't — setbacks. that is the sort of stuff you don't often get taught at schoot — you don't often get taught at schoot i— you don't often get taught at school. i think the last 18 months has been — school. i think the last 18 months has been brutal for young people and teachers _ has been brutal for young people and teachers it— has been brutal for young people and teachers. it is september. we are back— teachers. it is september. we are back to _ teachers. it is september. we are back to school. it is trying to help and inspire — back to school. it is trying to help and inspire and motivate young people — and inspire and motivate young people that they can do this stuff, they can _ people that they can do this stuff, they can go for their dreams, they can do— they can go for their dreams, they can do that — they can go for their dreams, they can do that emma raducanu. but the skills they— can do that emma raducanu. but the skills they need might be different from just— skills they need might be different from just the stuff they get taught at schoot — from just the stuff they get taught at school. ~ .. .. from just the stuff they get taught at school. . ., ., , ,~ from just the stuff they get taught at school. . ., ., , so at school. what are these skills? so much. we at school. what are these skills? so much- we talk— at school. what are these skills? so much. we talk a _ at school. what are these skills? so much. we talk a lot _ at school. what are these skills? so much. we talk a lot about _ at school. what are these skills? so much. we talk a lot about being - at school. what are these skills? so | much. we talk a lot about being able to communicate properly. about being able to— to communicate properly. about being able to problem solve. about how you develop _ able to problem solve. about how you develop winning attitudes. about dealing _ develop winning attitudes. about dealing with failure. about developing resilience. these are the sort of— developing resilience. these are the sort of skills i have lent on more in my— sort of skills i have lent on more in my life — sort of skills i have lent on more in my life i—
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sort of skills i have lent on more in my life. i never had a class about— in my life. i never had a class about it _ in my life. i never had a class about it. the digital platform has 150 lessons that teachers can do in workshops — 150 lessons that teachers can do in workshops and assemblies, making it simple _ workshops and assemblies, making it simple i_ workshops and assemblies, making it simple. ithink workshops and assemblies, making it simple. i think schools understand this _ simple. i think schools understand this but _ simple. i think schools understand this. but they don't often have access— this. but they don't often have access to — this. but they don't often have access to world—class programmes. so access to world—class programmes. sc it would access to world—class programmes. it would sit access to world—class programmes. if it would sit alongside access to world—class programmes. sr it would sit alongside the curriculum and work with other subjects? curriculum and work with other sub'ects? ~ , ,., , , , subjects? absolutely. it is 'ust lessons that i subjects? absolutely. it is 'ust lessons that schools �* subjects? absolutely. it is 'ust lessons that schools can h subjects? absolutely. it isjust lessons that schools can take i subjects? absolutely. it isjust. lessons that schools can take and fit into _ lessons that schools can take and fit into their programme. and teachers _ fit into their programme. and teachers get a face. they want to empower— teachers get a face. they want to empower their students. they understand. they need real life skills. — understand. they need real life skills. not— understand. they need real life skills, notjust the understand. they need real life skills, not just the academics, understand. they need real life skills, notjust the academics, but often _ skills, notjust the academics, but often don't — skills, notjust the academics, but often don't know where to go for it. we have _ often don't know where to go for it. we have had incredible support. if you look— we have had incredible support. if you look at— we have had incredible support. if you look at the people we have had giving _ you look at the people we have had giving these very sort of intimate in-depth— giving these very sort of intimate in—depth interviews about their lives. _ in—depth interviews about their lives, whether it is astronauts or oscar—winning actors or gold medallists, olympians, humanitarians, their stories are really— humanitarians, their stories are really inspiring and we wanted to put them — really inspiring and we wanted to put them out of there. people can
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download — put them out of there. people can download them, watch them and hopefully give themselves or their kids that _ hopefully give themselves or their kids that little edge, that leg up at a time — kids that little edge, that leg up at a time when they really needed. you do _ at a time when they really needed. you do lots — at a time when they really needed. you do lots of brave things, there is something that as well, there? being able to put yourself —— what might push yourself to the edge. what has been the scariest thing? t what has been the scariest thing? i think one thing i have learned in life is— think one thing i have learned in life is how— think one thing i have learned in life is how to deal with fear. i find _ life is how to deal with fear. i find as— life is how to deal with fear. i find as i— life is how to deal with fear. i find as i get older i get more scared — find as i get older i get more scared of— find as i get older i get more scared of things. but i've learnt in my life _ scared of things. but i've learnt in my life how— scared of things. but i've learnt in my life how to deal with it. just to keep— my life how to deal with it. just to keep moving towards the scary stuff and don't _ keep moving towards the scary stuff and don't run from it. so often we avoid _ and don't run from it. so often we avoid the — and don't run from it. so often we avoid the things we are scared of. i still find _ avoid the things we are scared of. i still find a — avoid the things we are scared of. i still find a skydiving really hard. i still find a skydiving really hard. i broke — still find a skydiving really hard. i broke my— still find a skydiving really hard. i broke my back whilst i was in the military— i broke my back whilst i was in the military and — i broke my back whilst i was in the military and spent a year in rehab. yet i_ military and spent a year in rehab. yet i have — military and spent a year in rehab. yet i have to— military and spent a year in rehab. yet i have to skydive all the time now _ yet i have to skydive all the time now there — yet i have to skydive all the time now. there is a hand on my shoulder when _ now. there is a hand on my shoulder when that— now. there is a hand on my shoulder when that dooropens and i know the best way— when that dooropens and i know the best way to — when that dooropens and i know the best way to get through my fears is straight _ best way to get through my fears is straight through the middle. do you still tet straight through the middle. do you still get sweaty _ straight through the middle. do you still get sweaty palms? _ straight through the middle. do you still get sweaty palms? when - straight through the middle. do you still get sweaty palms? when the i still get sweaty palms? when the dooro ens still get sweaty palms? when the dooropens it _ still get sweaty palms? when the dooropens it is _ still get sweaty palms? when the
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dooropens it is raw _ still get sweaty palms? when the dooropens it is raw fear _ still get sweaty palms? when the dooropens it is raw fear for - still get sweaty palms? when the dooropens it is raw fear for me. i | dooropens it is raw fear for me. i have _ dooropens it is raw fear for me. i have that — dooropens it is raw fear for me. i have that about many things. it is what _ have that about many things. it is what being — have that about many things. it is what being a team is about. it is one of— what being a team is about. it is one of these key becoming x lessons. how to— one of these key becoming x lessons. how to deal— one of these key becoming x lessons. how to deal with the scary stuff. you don't — how to deal with the scary stuff. you don't see that stuff on the school — you don't see that stuff on the school curriculum.— you don't see that stuff on the school curriculum. once you've “um ted school curriculum. once you've jumped insult— school curriculum. once you've jumped insult too _ school curriculum. once you've jumped insult too late! - school curriculum. once you've jumped insult too late! once i school curriculum. once you've i jumped insult too late! once you school curriculum. once you've - jumped insult too late! once you are out of the door _ jumped insult too late! once you are out of the door there _ jumped insult too late! once you are out of the door there is _ jumped insult too late! once you are out of the door there is no _ jumped insult too late! once you are out of the door there is no going - out of the door there is no going back _ out of the door there is no going back that— out of the door there is no going back. that is a good motto for life! you got _ back. that is a good motto for life! you got another netflix programme. is it where viewers can have some control over what you do? idate is it where viewers can have some control over what you do?- control over what you do? we are launchint control over what you do? we are launching next — control over what you do? we are launching next week _ control over what you do? we are launching next week a _ control over what you do? we are launching next week a second - control over what you do? we are i launching next week a second netflix interactive _ launching next week a second netflix interactive movie called out cold, where _ interactive movie called out cold, where the — interactive movie called out cold, where the viewer gets to decide what i do. where the viewer gets to decide what i do it— where the viewer gets to decide what i do it is— where the viewer gets to decide what i do. it is the first of its kind where — i do. it is the first of its kind where you _ i do. it is the first of its kind where you are in control. it's like, 0k, where you are in control. it's like, ok. planes— where you are in control. it's like, 0k, planes crash, we are hanging up ona tree _ ok, planes crash, we are hanging up ona tree in— 0k, planes crash, we are hanging up on a tree. in this one i have lost my memory— on a tree. in this one i have lost my memory after the plane crash. it is all— my memory after the plane crash. it is all up _ my memory after the plane crash. it is all up to— my memory after the plane crash. it
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is all up to my to help me. i have lost a _ is all up to my to help me. i have lost a lot— is all up to my to help me. i have lost a lot of— is all up to my to help me. i have lost a lot of my skills. i have lost a lot _ lost a lot of my skills. i have lost a lot of— lost a lot of my skills. i have lost a lot of my — lost a lot of my skills. i have lost a lot of my knowledge. you have to help me _ a lot of my knowledge. you have to help me. the first one we did, animals— help me. the first one we did, animals on— help me. the first one we did, animals on the loose, was a big success — animals on the loose, was a big success it _ animals on the loose, was a big success. it has been fun to take it up success. it has been fun to take it up a _ success. it has been fun to take it up a level— success. it has been fun to take it up a level and do this one. you talk a bit about — up a level and do this one. you talk a bit about role _ up a level and do this one. you talk a bit about role models _ up a level and do this one. you talk a bit about role models this - a bit about role models this morning. he says somebody that you always go back to —— is there somebody that you always go back to if you need a little pep talk? melt. if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running _ if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running wild _ if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running wild has _ if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running wild has been - if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running wild has been a - if you need a little pep talk? well, i think running wild has been a huge privilege _ i think running wild has been a huge privilege i— i think running wild has been a huge privilege. i have met some of the best from — privilege. i have met some of the best from president obama, prime minister— best from president obama, prime minister modi, julia roberts and all of that _ minister modi, julia roberts and all of that i_ minister modi, julia roberts and all of that. i am a huge tennis fan. it is great _ of that. i am a huge tennis fan. it is great seeing ms massing it. roger federer— is great seeing ms massing it. roger federer is _ is great seeing ms massing it. roger federer is one of our interviewees. inspirational guy. i love the fact his first—ever tennis match, age 13, he lost _ his first—ever tennis match, age 13, he lost 6-0. — his first—ever tennis match, age 13, he lost 6—0, 6—0. never gave up. what _
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he lost 6—0, 6—0. never gave up. what a _ he lost 6—0, 6—0. never gave up. what a great _ he lost 6—0, 6—0. never gave up. what a great guy. i did play in one ping-pong — what a great guy. i did play in one ping—pong match. took a little mini table _ ping—pong match. took a little mini table to— ping—pong match. took a little mini table to the — ping—pong match. took a little mini table to the top of the mountain and whipped _ table to the top of the mountain and whipped it _ table to the top of the mountain and whipped it out. i got it to 9—9. there — whipped it out. i got it to 9—9. there was— whipped it out. i got it to 9—9. there was no warm up. straight in. and then _ there was no warm up. straight in. and then i — there was no warm up. straight in. and then i got the yips! then i got taken _ and then i got the yips! then i got taken down hard.— and then i got the yips! then i got taken down hard. thank you so much for comint taken down hard. thank you so much for coming in- _ taken down hard. thank you so much for coming in. lovely _ taken down hard. thank you so much for coming in. lovely to _ taken down hard. thank you so much for coming in. lovely to see - taken down hard. thank you so much for coming in. lovely to see you. - for coming in. lovely to see you. headlines _ for coming in. lovely to see you. headlines coming _ for coming in. lovely to see you. headlines coming up. _
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in good m in orning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... boris johnson's plan to fix the catastrophic cost of social care in england but there's mounting anger from his mps over how to pay for it. a lasting legacy — we catch up with rob burrow�*s family as they back a campaign to build a specialist mnd centre. to have a purpose—built centre, i was totally blown away. to bring the family somewhere they want to come and feel at ease, it affects the whole family. she's won an amazing 17 gold medals. i'll be chatting to great britain's most successful paralympian, dame sarah storey. and yesterday was the hottest day across the uk since latejuly. tt across the uk since late july. tt had even hotter today. i have come
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to water perry gardens to bring you the latest forecast on breakfast. good morning, it's tuesday 7th september. our top story. the prime minister will set out his plan for social care in england today — saying it will fix a broken system in which people face catastrophic costs. he is expected to announce a rise in national insurance of about 1.25%, despite criticism from conservative mps and peers — as well as from labour, who say the increase is unfair to working families. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. it has plagued previous governments. plans for reforming social care in england have often come unstuck. but on the very day in 2019 he became prime minister, borisjohnson made this bold pledge. we will fix the crisis in social care once and for all with a clear plan we have prepared. six months later, during the election campaign, he made another bold pledge.
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we can do all these things without raising income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that's our guarantee. now it seems he can't keep both promises and is on the brink of breaking the pledge not to increase national insurance rates. labour leader keir starmer says this would be unfair as it would hit working people hard, including low earners and young people. perhaps more worryingly for the prime minister, many of his own conservative mps seem to agree. i don't want to see national insurance raised for people of all ages. i think many youngsters have paid enough as a result of this pandemic. if we want people to be able to retain their homes, those people should have the bulk of the cost perhaps by buying their own insurance policy against the catastrophe of potentially losing all their money on care. initially, the extra cash raised is not expected to be earmarked for social care but to clear the backlog in the nhs in england,
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which has been pummelled by the pandemic and increase hospital capacity. there are concerns that social care could still be left as a poor relation. we're really hoping there will be something, not only for the long—term sustainable future for social care but we do need something immediately now because most care providers are at breaking point at this moment in time. the problem of paying for care predates the pandemic. borisjohnson says he will not duck tough decisions and he will end the catastrophic costs of care. ultimately, those costs will be capped. even some of his own mps wonder if it will be able completely to prevent some people selling their own homes to pay for a care home. iain watson, bbc news. let's speak now to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming.
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you are outside number 10 this morning whether cabinet meeting will take place later. i am sure you are listening to the vaccine minister. louise was trying her best to get details about what was happening later today but not many answers. evaluate effort from louise. cabinet ministers are starting to arrive for the first in—person cabinet meeting since the start of the pandemic. they will be having the plans laid out to them by the prime minister, the chancellor and the health secretary and then there will be a statement in parliament later and a tv press conference laying out all the details. what we have had till now is the critics coming out and saying things like, increasing national insurance me to get young, working people paying for older people getting their care or employers saying we're going to have to pay more to employ workers as a result of this. now the government is making the case for why they are
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doing this. they are pointing to a and growing backlog in the nhs. 7 million people could still be to come forward for treatment they did not the pandemic. there was talk about the revolutionary changes to social care. the about the revolutionary changes to social care-— social care. the social care system has been unfair. _ social care. the social care system has been unfair. if— social care. the social care system has been unfair. if you _ social care. the social care system has been unfair. if you have - social care. the social care system | has been unfair. if you have assets over £20,000 you suffer. in my view than nettle _ over £20,000 you suffer. in my view than nettle has to be grasped and this prime — than nettle has to be grasped and this prime minister will not shirk that responsibility and we will hear from him _ that responsibility and we will hear from him later as to how we will deal— from him later as to how we will deal with— from him later as to how we will deal with the broken social care system — deal with the broken social care system over the long—term. here deal with the broken social care system over the long-term. here are the thints system over the long-term. here are the things to — system over the long-term. here are the things to look _ system over the long-term. here are the things to look out _ system over the long-term. here are the things to look out for _ system over the long-term. here are the things to look out for later. - the things to look out for later. what is the level of the cap on an individual�*s lifetime care cost? what is the level of the means test
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below which people will get subsidised care from the state? how much will national insurance go up by? are there any other ways they can raise money from pensioners who are still working? at the moment pensioners who were do not have to pay national insurance and will not be affected by this. lots of the criticism we have seen, does it start to die away after the rationale has been explained? t start to die away after the rationale has been explained? i know it is a busy one- _ rationale has been explained? i know it is a busy one. thank— rationale has been explained? i know it is a busy one. thank you _ rationale has been explained? i know it is a busy one. thank you for - it is a busy one. thank you for that. a baby and several young children were among hundreds of migrants brought ashore on monday, after trying to cross the english channel. a steady stream of crossings is believed to have taken place yesterday, due to the calm waters and good weather conditions. simonjones is in doverfor us now with the latest. bring us right to date. i have had in the past _ bring us right to date. i have had in the past few _ bring us right to date. i have had in the past few minutes - bring us right to date. i have had in the past few minutes the - bring us right to date. i have had i in the past few minutes the number of migrants he made it across the channel by boat yesterday was around
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740, channel by boat yesterday was around 7a0, making it one of the busiest days on record for the border force. you could see that in the channel. they seemed at times to be overwhelmed. they had to call in the lifeboat to bring in a group of migrants back to shore at dungeness. others were brought here at dover. there were long queues for processing. one person at the port said it was disorganised chaos. why the big increase in numbers yesterday? it is down largely to one thing, the weather. like today it was really warm and calm in the channel. forthe was really warm and calm in the channel. for the past few weeks it has been quite gusty. opportunities to make it across the channel by boat have been pretty limited. given the conditions today, we're hearing about has been spotted midway across the channel by the border force is on its way. home secretary priti
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patel held a meeting with angry mps last night. she is said to be frustrated by the number of people who are getting three. she told mps the £54 who are getting three. she told mps the £5a million britain has promised to give to france to try to stop the crossings is dependent on them making progress on that. she has not ruled out not giving them the entire money. she said it was performance —related. today will be another busy day for the border force, likely the coastguard and lifeboat as we are going to see more crossings while the good weather continues. thank ou for the good weather continues. thank you for that- _ a public inquiry into controversial plans for the uk's first deep coal mine for 30 years will begin later today. the site near whitehaven on the cumbrian coast was originally approved by the communities secretary robert jenrick, but the decision is now being reviewed. supporters say the mine will create hundreds ofjobs, but critics argue opening the mine will harm the government's commitment to cut carbon emissions.
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scotland's first minister will set out her government's plan for the coming year later today. nicola sturgeon's statement at holyrood is likely to focus on pandemic recovery but she has also made clear her determination to pursue another independence referendum in the nearfuture. opposition parties will also have a chance to set out their proposals for the year to come, with two days of debate scheduled. actor michael k williams, best known for starring in drama series "the wire", has been found dead in his new york apartment, aged 5a. mr williams played popular character omar little across all five seasons of the wire, with former us president barack obama previously speaking of his fondness for the character. reports suggest that he died from a suspected drug overdose, but this has not been officially confirmed. here on breakfast, we've been following the story of former leeds rhino player rob burrow, and the challenges he has faced since being diagnosed with motor neurone disease. this morning, sally is here
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with another update. we are going to talk a lot more about this, aren't we? right start, the three men said they did not typically want to talk about themselves on the television all the time, what they wanted was to help others who had potentially had a life changing diagnosis. rob burrow has been determined to raise awareness of his condition and to help others living with motor neurone disease. now, he and his family are leading an appeal to raise £5 million to build a state of the art centre in leeds dedicated to caring for mnd patients, which will be named after rob. i've been finding out more. it's a long way from the car park to the motor neurone disease clinic at seacroft hospital in leeds, a building which is almost a0 years old and is now showing its age.
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for rob burrow and his family, it is another challenge, one of so many they have taken on since he was diagnosed with mnd nearly two years ago. but it's also a challenge they would like other patients and their families to avoid. that's why they are backing an appeal to raise £5 million for a new centre, purpose built for mnd patients, and named after rob. i'm honoured to have a motor neurone disease centre named after me. when the doctor asked me if i would back the project, i immediately wanted to be involved. to have a purpose—built centre in my name, i was totally blown away. to bring the family to a new building with wheelchair access and to have a place where the kids want to come
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and feel at ease. it affects the whole family, so they all feel appreciated. it's nice to know their loved one is in the best place possible. it is to be a safe haven, a sanctuary where people could come in. what i want to create is this really beautiful building, bespoke, suited to the needs of the motor neurone disease patients. where the rooms are wide enough. maybe we can showcase the latest tech for voice banking, different speech gadgets that can be used. technology is changing all the time. a place where arts, science, sport all come together, a place where, no matter who you are from any social economic straighter, any ethnicity, everybody is welcome there. the appeal is off to a flying start. leeds rhinos, who rob served for 16 years, has already pledged £50,000
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through its charity foundation. the club has stood by rob since his diagnosis in 2019, and it's notjust money they raised, its awareness. there are patients who come to me and say, i've got rob burrow's disease. i had one yesterday. people look at the documentary, or look at him on a video clip, and they are able to relate it to themselves. he is inspirational to me. his courage, love, kindness, you name it. to be able to go out and expose your life out there to everybody, that his courage at a different level. —— that is courage. i think the positivity, the focus, i think that's really great. love will be at the heart of the new centre. family support is invaluable to people with mnd.
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our vision is it is a centre of hope and optimism, a centre that feels quite homely and family friendly, that people can bring their children and bring relatives in and not feel like you are coming to a hospital. you want to come rather than you have to come to that environment. it's hugely important. the name rob burrow has become a byword for courage, honesty and good humour in the face of this cruel disease. now if this appeal succeeds, those values will stand in bricks and mortar, helping people with motor neurone disease for generations to come. let's speak to two people now at the heart of those plans. we'rejoined by rob's dad geoff and esther wakeman — the chief executive of leeds hospitals charity.
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thank you for coming in this morning. we are talking about the hospital and the campaign. can you give us an update? so many of our viewers love rob and want to know how he is getting on. how is he at the moment?— the moment? very well. he has stabilised over _ the moment? very well. he has stabilised over the _ the moment? very well. he has stabilised over the last - the moment? very well. he has stabilised over the last six - the moment? very well. he has i stabilised over the last six months, which is very strange. it's strange. he is as positive as ever, smiling as ever. he is very excited about this potential new clinic. notjust because it is in his name, that is secondary. it is mnd. if he can help it, he wants to do. idate secondary. it is mnd. if he can help it, he wants to do.— it, he wants to do. we will come to the new clinic _ it, he wants to do. we will come to the new clinic in _ it, he wants to do. we will come to the new clinic in a _ it, he wants to do. we will come to the new clinic in a second. - it, he wants to do. we will come to the new clinic in a second. the - the new clinic in a second. the other clinic, what is it like? tt is other clinic, what is it like? it is old. other clinic, what is it like? it is old- once _ other clinic, what is it like? it is old- once you — other clinic, what is it like? it is old. once you get _ other clinic, what is it like? it is old. once you get in, _ other clinic, what is it like? tt 3 old. once you get in, and he meet the doctor and the staff, absolutely wonderful. —— and you meet. even when you are in the offices where
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you go, they are not purpose—built. last time there was no window. when you come out, getting back to the car, especially with somebody in a wheelchair, genuinely it doesn't reflect the treatment that you get when you get there. tt is reflect the treatment that you get when you get there.— when you get there. it is no criticism — when you get there. it is no criticism of _ when you get there. it is no criticism of the _ when you get there. it is no criticism of the treatment, | when you get there. it is nol criticism of the treatment, is when you get there. it is no - criticism of the treatment, is it? he couldn't criticise it. if there is anywhere better, i would love to see it. �* .. is anywhere better, i would love to see it. . ., , .,, is anywhere better, i would love to see it. . ., , ., ~' see it. amazing people work in the nhs and do _ see it. amazing people work in the nhs and do incredible _ see it. amazing people work in the nhs and do incredible jobs. - see it. amazing people work in the nhs and do incredible jobs. in - see it. amazing people work in the nhs and do incredible jobs. in a i see it. amazing people work in the | nhs and do incredible jobs. in a lot nhs and do incrediblejobs. in a lot of cases the facilities do not impact the standard of care. some of them are having a really difficult time in hospital when they get a diagnosis or talk about treatment. absolutely. that is why charities like leaves hospital charity is so important. we have amazing nhs heroes _ important. we have amazing nhs heroes in— important. we have amazing nhs heroes. in leeds particularly every person— heroes. in leeds particularly every person i_ heroes. in leeds particularly every person i speak to in the nhs is so
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passionate — person i speak to in the nhs is so passionate about patients, wanting to do— passionate about patients, wanting to do the _ passionate about patients, wanting to do the for patients. we are always— to do the for patients. we are always being asked to fund things to make _ always being asked to fund things to make the _ always being asked to fund things to make the patient experience better. it is make the patient experience better. it is about _ make the patient experience better. it is about improving what the nhs can fund. _ it is about improving what the nhs can fund, doing bits over and above, trying _ can fund, doing bits over and above, trying to— can fund, doing bits over and above, trying to make someone feel more like a _ trying to make someone feel more like a home and less like a hospital so it is— like a home and less like a hospital so it is a _ like a home and less like a hospital so it is a little bit less scary. not — so it is a little bit less scary. notjust_ so it is a little bit less scary. notjust patients. he both hinted at this. it is families as well because families need to come into these places and spaces as well. that is one of the — places and spaces as well. that is one of the key — places and spaces as well. that is one of the key things. _ places and spaces as well. that is one of the key things. if - places and spaces as well. that is one of the key things. if you - places and spaces as well. that is i one of the key things. if you coming without— one of the key things. if you coming without childcare, the last thing you want— without childcare, the last thing you want to do is worry about what your children are doing and having an actual— your children are doing and having an actual space where they can go and play— an actual space where they can go and play and it is safe, an outdoor space _ and play and it is safe, an outdoor space to _ and play and it is safe, an outdoor space to run — and play and it is safe, an outdoor space to run around that is secure, those _ space to run around that is secure, those things — space to run around that is secure, those things are over and above what the nhs _ those things are over and above what the nhs facility can provide and where _ the nhs facility can provide and where donations to leave hospital charity—
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where donations to leave hospital charity could really help and make a hi i charity could really help and make a big difference with the new centre. talking _ big difference with the new centre. talking to — big difference with the new centre. talking to grills, he was talking about role models and inspiration. the plan would be to have the inspiration wall. what would that mean to you?— inspiration wall. what would that meanto ou? ., ., , . mean to you? having quotes and such like. when people _ mean to you? having quotes and such like. when people are _ mean to you? having quotes and such like. when people are sitting - mean to you? having quotes and such like. when people are sitting there i like. when people are sitting there waiting _ like. when people are sitting there waiting to — like. when people are sitting there waiting to see the doctors and their staff. _ waiting to see the doctors and their staff. for— waiting to see the doctors and their staff, for them to look and see and .et staff, for them to look and see and get people — staff, for them to look and see and get people maybe to write on it or anybody _ get people maybe to write on it or anybody who has been there like rob or other— anybody who has been there like rob or other people, just said they can see they— or other people, just said they can see they are not alone. it is normally— see they are not alone. it is normally for people who do not have a profile _ normally for people who do not have a profile of— normally for people who do not have a profile of these three, it must be a profile of these three, it must be a really— a profile of these three, it must be a really lonely life.— a really lonely life. they are very much not — a really lonely life. they are very much not alone. _ a really lonely life. they are very much not alone. talking - a really lonely life. they are very much not alone. talking about i a really lonely life. they are very i much not alone. talking about how this is. it will be quite a challenge. we know how fundraising goes. it is quite a lot of money,
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isn't it? ~ ., ., , ., isn't it? we need to raise 5 million to create a — isn't it? we need to raise 5 million to create a really _ isn't it? we need to raise 5 million to create a really amazing - isn't it? we need to raise 5 million to create a really amazing centre. | isn't it? we need to raise 5 million | to create a really amazing centre. i have spoken to a doctor who has a very long wish list of what they would like. to have the best for her patients. patients like rob who have families and being able to create a really nice environment. that people want to come into. if you are coming into hospital regularly committees different to coming in, being made better and going home again, you want a really nice space. t better and going home again, you want a really nice space.— better and going home again, you want a really nice space. i know you have spoken — want a really nice space. i know you have spoken a _ want a really nice space. i know you have spoken a bit _ want a really nice space. i know you have spoken a bit about _ want a really nice space. i know you have spoken a bit about impact. - want a really nice space. i know you| have spoken a bit about impact. you say that rob has had a plateaued six months. how has it been for you and the rest of the family? has months. how has it been for you and the rest of the family?— the rest of the family? has it brou . ht the rest of the family? has it brought you _ the rest of the family? has it brought you together? - the rest of the family? has it brought you together? i - the rest of the family? has it brought you together? i do i the rest of the family? has it i brought you together? i do not the rest of the family? has it - brought you together? i do not think they could have been any more together. t they could have been any more totether. ~ ., they could have been any more totether. ~' ., , they could have been any more totether. ~ ., , ., together. i think we have seen that. when we see _ together. i think we have seen that. when we see him _ together. i think we have seen that. when we see him stabilising, - together. i think we have seen that. when we see him stabilising, it - together. i think we have seen that. | when we see him stabilising, it does give you hope. you start, i research
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all the time, i do my own, to research. it gives you hope. i keep saying to rob, we're going to get there, we can, we well and i saying to rob, we're going to get there, we can, we welland i i saying to rob, we're going to get there, we can, we well and i i will. rob has said facts are facts. i said they are the old facts, we want to make new backs. rob is as determined as he was in his sporting career. watching you and your family, i feel like one of the viewers, it is about how proud you are of him. idate like one of the viewers, it is about how proud you are of him.- how proud you are of him. we are troud of how proud you are of him. we are proud of everybody, _ how proud you are of him. we are proud of everybody, lindsay, - how proud you are of him. we are proud of everybody, lindsay, the | proud of everybody, lindsay, the kids, the grandkids, everybody. that is the type of family we are. for rob too had done what he has done in his career and for him to be saying it isjust bad his career and for him to be saying it is just bad luck, his career and for him to be saying it isjust bad luck, we are going to get through this. as long as he believes me and i believe him, i
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think we will do. i know it is an outside chance but it was an outside chance that rob would ever play rugby league. tt is chance that rob would ever play rugby league-— rugby league. it is potentially a bit week rugby league. it is potentially a big week for — rugby league. it is potentially a big week for rob _ rugby league. it is potentially a big week for rob as _ rugby league. it is potentially a big week for rob as well. - rugby league. it is potentially a big week for rob as well. i - rugby league. it is potentially a| big week for rob as well. i know that that is doing incredibly well and he made the documentary with the bbc which so many people have watched and gay people a real window into his world and what he is going through at the moment. that is at full at the award at the moment. its]!!! full at the award at the moment. all the full at the award at the moment. fill the nominations are fabulous and they all deserve to win. i have said this to the family. if i could get a box whether rob wins or loses or does not win, if i could get a box with his trophies, medals and awards and swap it for him to be healthy, i would do it tomorrow, i would do it today. t would do it tomorrow, i would do it toda . .. . would do it tomorrow, i would do it toda . ., , would do it tomorrow, i would do it toda. ., , ., would do it tomorrow, i would do it toda . ., , ., ., today. i am sure you would. for others on _ today. i am sure you would. for others on the _ today. i am sure you would. for others on the same _ today. i am sure you would. for others on the same journey - today. i am sure you would. for others on the same journey as i today. i am sure you would. for - others on the same journey as rob, he has been such an inspiration, hasn't he? does that give you comfort? .
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hasn't he? does that give you comfort? , ., , hasn't he? does that give you comfort?— hasn't he? does that give you comfort? , ., , ., comfort? yes, it does. i have said every opportunity _ comfort? yes, it does. i have said every opportunity without - comfort? yes, it does. i have said every opportunity without these i every opportunity without these profiles he must be so lonely. at least in something like this, it breaks it up a little bit. it does not alter the news of the facts but i think working together, with this clinic to help and inspire, i am confident. i am clinic to help and inspire, i am confident. iam notjust clinic to help and inspire, i am confident. i am notjust falsely confident, confident. iam notjust falsely confident, i'm confident. i am notjust falsely confident, i'm confident we will get rob and other sorted. at least they can live with it if we cannot hear it. live with it first and then curate as soon as possible. tt is curate as soon as possible. it is we curate as soon as possible. it is huge. the _ curate as soon as possible. it is huge, the difference _ curate as soon as possible. it is huge, the difference that rob and others have made, the high profile people who are willing to talk about their experiences. it has never been about rob or stephen darby or duddy where, it is about helping others
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who might be watching yesterday and feeling desperate, feeling there is no forward. t feeling desperate, feeling there is no forward. ~ .. feeling desperate, feeling there is no forward. ~ ., ., , no forward. i think that documentary was amazing — no forward. i think that documentary was amazing in _ no forward. i think that documentary was amazing in raising _ no forward. i think that documentary was amazing in raising awareness. i was amazing in raising awareness. one of— was amazing in raising awareness. one of the — was amazing in raising awareness. one of the key things is getting an early— one of the key things is getting an early diagnosis. if we can raise awareness _ early diagnosis. if we can raise awareness and having a centre specifically for patients with motor neurone _ specifically for patients with motor neurone disease on the leeds hospital— neurone disease on the leeds hospital site is another way of raising — hospital site is another way of raising awareness and actually it is really— raising awareness and actually it is really important that every one of the patients, rob... there are about 5000 _ the patients, rob... there are about 5000 people at the moment living in the uk _ 5000 people at the moment living in the uk with motor neurone disease. everyone _ the uk with motor neurone disease. everyone deserves the best possible treatment _ everyone deserves the best possible treatment and the best quality of life. treatment and the best quality of life they— treatment and the best quality of life. they have families, they want to spend _ life. they have families, they want to spend time with and talk to. creating — to spend time with and talk to. creating the safe space i think is absolutely crucial. | creating the safe space i think is absolutely crucial.— creating the safe space i think is absolutely crucial. i assume all the details are on _ absolutely crucial. i assume all the details are on your _ absolutely crucial. i assume all the details are on your hospital- details are on your hospital website. tt details are on your hospital website. , ., ., ., ~'
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details are on your hospital website. y., ., ., ~ ., , website. if you look for leeds hos . ital website. if you look for leeds hospital charity, _ website. if you look for leeds hospital charity, you - website. if you look for leeds hospital charity, you can - website. if you look for leeds hospital charity, you can click| hospital charity, you can click through — hospital charity, you can click through or make a donation and fundraisen _ through or make a donation and fundraiser. if you want to run, walk. — fundraiser. if you want to run, walk, whatever you want to do to try to help _ walk, whatever you want to do to try to help us _ walk, whatever you want to do to try to help us to— walk, whatever you want to do to try to help us to this in the name of rob. _ to help us to this in the name of rob. i_ to help us to this in the name of rob. ithink— to help us to this in the name of rob, i think it to help us to this in the name of rob, ithink it will to help us to this in the name of rob, i think it will be amazing. i rob, i think it will be amazing! do rob, i think it will be amazing. do not rob, i think it will be amazing. i do not think you can make it to rob, i think it will be amazing. t do not think you can make it to the red carpet. all the dresses and the rest of it. i know you said you are nervous. as ever you have done a brilliantjob. really great. lovely to see brilliant job. really great. lovely to see you brilliantjob. really great. lovely to see you on brilliant job. really great. lovely to see you on the sofa. great to have you in. pass on our love to the family as well. matt has been ad and about all morning. it looks like something from a movie set to be honest with you, absolutely stunning. even more special to be here. they arejust stunning. even more special to be here. they are just outside oxford. these gardens are famous for this, herbaceous border, classical herbaceous border, classical herbaceous border, classical herbaceous border, thought to be one of the largest in the uk, if not the
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world but at the astor is making a very popular appearance. i believe they will do the same at the chelsea flower show. the colours coming to life in the sunshine. plenty of that to come. let's take a look at the forecast for the next few days. it will be hot and sunny in england and wales and then into parts of scotland and northern ireland. we have a mist and fog patches around which were cleared during the next hour or two. always cloudy across some parts of scotland and northern ireland. compared with yesterday will see more sunshine coming through. blue skies in england and wales from dawn to dusk. yesterday close to 29 in wheelchair. today it could be above 30 celsius in the south of england. —— in wheelchair. this evening and overnight we will be dry and clearfor many and this evening and overnight we will be dry and clear for many and there will be mist and fog patches around.
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late tonight into to my one or two heavy and thundery showers in the south—west. quite a humid and sticky night uk wide with temperatures in their teens as we start tomorrow morning once again. any mist and fog patches should clear. in the far north may be some rain. we will see more cloud towards the channel islands for south—west england, south and west wales with heavy and thundery showers developing. not as hot but pretty hot in the sunshine but at 27 the high in scotland, 29 or 30 in parts of england and north—east wales. from then on we will see thunderstorms for the end of the week and it will feel cooler. another full cut in half an of the week and it will feel cooler. anotherfull cut in half an hour. back to dan and louise. —— another forecast. it really it really does it really does look it really does look lovely it really does look lovely there. it really does look lovely there. thank you for your lovely messages
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this morning, particularly about the interview with rob's dad, that really connects the same many of our viewers. people care passionately about rob and his family. lovely to have him on the sofa. we feel like we had no him because we have seen him so much. because of the pandemic we have not been able to have many guests with us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new london refugee response fund is being launched by the mayor of london today. it will go towards helping refugees build a new life in london, including support with learning english and finding work. city hall is working with the charity, the london community foundation, to provide a way for more people to donate to help refugees arriving from afghanistan. social workers are being placed within schools in eight london
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boroughs as part of a new trial. the aim is to see whether identifying abuse and neglect early — and supporting pupils at risk — can reduce referrals of children into care. they see that she's warm and friendly and are genuinely here to support, and i think it takes away a lot of the fear that can be attached to the idea of a social worker becoming involved with a family. if every school had a social worker in school it would transform the way we are able to safeguard our children and young people. jim henson, the creator of the muppets, has been honoured with a blue plaque at his former home in north london. english heritage has unveiled the plaque ahead of what would have been his 85th birthday. he bought his house in hampstead in 1979, after the muppet show was commissioned for british tv, and made the uk his creative home for many of his subsequent projects. let's take a look at the travel situation now then. there are severe delays on the the district line. the piccadilly line and tfl rail all have minor delays too.
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so it's worth checking before you travel. it was the busiest rush hour on the tube since the first lockdown yesterday. to find out what's happening on the roads, and for all the other travel news, you can tune into your bbc local radio station details there now, for regular updates. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another warm, dry and sunny day of weather today across the capital. very similar to how it was yesterday. another mild start to the morning. temperatures in the mid teens in celsius for many of us, and there is poor visibility on many of the roads for a time as well. lots of mist and fog, plenty of moisture in the air. and of course it's all condensed into that mist and fog with lowering temperatures last night. so that's all set to lift into cloud. plenty of high cloud about this morning. that will turn the sunshine rather hazy again, but lots more blue sky and sunshine breaking through, particularly through the afternoon. temperatures could be a bit higher than they were yesterday. certainly the high 20s in celsius, 29, even 30 celsius for a few spots. just a very light south
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easterly breeze too. that will pick up times throughout the day. overnight tonight, we do the whole thing all over again. so, clear skies, temperatures dropping, perhaps the mid—teens in celsius, more mist and fog developing into the start of the day on wednesday. on wednesday, rinse and repeat — the heat and the sunshine will continue again. temperatures reaching the high 20s quite widely in celsius, but by the time we get to wednesday night, there's a weather front pushing eastwards that will bring outbreaks of rain on thursday. plenty more on our website, facebook and instagram. now though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store from gethin and janette.
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morning to you both. morning. coming up on morning live, eight million people in the uk take daily statins for high cholesterol, but today we'll hear how a new revolutionaryjab could change all of that, dr rupy has the latest. and where do you stand on this? should children as young as 12 be - given the power to decide themselves whether they have the covid vaccine, | regardless of their parents' wishes?| one health expert thinks so, but what do you think? - get in touch and let us know. plus, nearly half a million start—ups were launched during lockdown and we're about to meet some of the inspirational entrepreneurs behind them about how they use their experience of living with a disability to help create million—pound businesses. also today, he's the historian turned detective, _ uncovering the secrets hidden in buildings in the bbc's - a house through time. david olusoga reveals howl you can uncover the history of your home.
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and demand for pasta—making kits soared in lockdown, but michela chiappa says all you need is two ingredients and ten minutes to make the italian classic from home. plus, we'll need carbs- for energy to tackle pilates in today's strictly fitness. i've got an all— over body work—out to improve your balance _ and calm your mind. and we're adding extra strictly sparkle, as we meet two of the new pros set to shimmy onto the dance floor injust11 days' time. 11 days, dan. iwas 11 days, dan. i was listening to bear grylls earlier and what he said was you face your fear and run into it. that is what i am going to do! i'd tune into watch that! see it. that is what i am going to do! i'd tune into watch that!- i'd tune into watch that! see you later. i'd tune into watch that! see you later- thank _ i'd tune into watch that! see you later. thank you. _ it's been a busy morning in breakfast�*s paralympics corner. already we've heard from seven times
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gold medallist hannah cockroft, and now sally's got another very special guest with her. as a 10—year—old swimmer, dame sarah storey was told she'd started training too late to be good at anything. four years later, at her first paralympic games, she won six medals — two of them gold. then, after swapping goggles for pedals in beijing, she added 12 more gold medals to her tally. today, she's britain's most successful paralympian of all time. she's with me now. wow! that is quite a thing? i am slowly starting — wow! that is quite a thing? i am slowly starting to _ wow! that is quite a thing? i am slowly starting to get _ wow! that is quite a thing? i am slowly starting to get used to it. it's amazing to think the toady are good _ it's amazing to think the toady are good games happen, we went, we competed — good games happen, we went, we competed and everything went so brilliant — competed and everything went so brilliant. it competed and everything went so brilliant. ., , �* ., brilliant. it doesn't feel real, does it? _ brilliant. it doesn't feel real, does it? no, _ brilliant. it doesn't feel real, does it? no, doesn't. - brilliant. it doesn't feel real, does it? no, doesn't. there| brilliant. it doesn't feel real, - does it? no, doesn't. there was an extra year— does it? no, doesn't. there was an extra year of _ does it? no, doesn't. there was an extra year of build-up _ does it? no, doesn't. there was an extra year of build-up preparation i extra year of build—up preparation but also _ extra year of build—up preparation but also the uncertainty of the pandemic and of the virus and how we
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should _ pandemic and of the virus and how we should interact around training and if we _ should interact around training and if we got _ should interact around training and if we got the virus what would it do to us? _ if we got the virus what would it do to us? it— if we got the virus what would it do to us? it has— if we got the virus what would it do to us? it has been very difficult. and actually, it couldn't have gone better for you? and actually, it couldn't have gone betterforyou? h0. and actually, it couldn't have gone better for you?— better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying _ better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to _ better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to take _ better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to take each _ better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to take each race - better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to take each race as i better for you? no, it wouldn't. i was trying to take each race as it| was trying to take each race as it comes — was trying to take each race as it comes not _ was trying to take each race as it comes. not look too far ahead. it's really— comes. not look too far ahead. it's really important to make sure you don't _ really important to make sure you don't miss— really important to make sure you don't miss anything that is important in the preparation for that race — important in the preparation for that race. that is what i did. first of all— that race. that is what i did. first of all in _ that race. that is what i did. first of all in the — that race. that is what i did. first of all in the velodrome for the individual— of all in the velodrome for the individual pursuit, just laying down a really— individual pursuit, just laying down a really strong market in the qualification. i surprised myself. i'm qualification. i surprised myself. i'm not— qualification. i surprised myself. i'm not 43 _ qualification. i surprised myself. i'm not 4.3 seconds off the world record _ i'm not 4.3 seconds off the world record. where did that come from? i have been— record. where did that come from? i have been in— record. where did that come from? i have been in such good shape. although — have been in such good shape. although i haven't raised and didn't feel quite _ although i haven't raised and didn't feel quite so well prepared from doing _ feel quite so well prepared from doing road racing, i managed to fill the training time so brilliantly and are busy— the training time so brilliantly and are busy with the support of bernie, the kids— are busy with the support of bernie, the kids and my parents. you mention barne and the kids and my parents. you mention barney and the _ the kids and my parents. you mention barney and the kids. _ the kids and my parents. you mention barney and the kids. we _ the kids and my parents. you mention barney and the kids. we spoke - the kids and my parents. you mention barney and the kids. we spoke to - barney and the kids. we spoke to them and hughjust barney and the kids. we spoke to them and hugh just after you barney and the kids. we spoke to them and hughjust after you had won your 17th medal. they werejust them and hughjust after you had won your 17th medal. they were just so brilliant to talk to on the programme. bernie seemed so relaxed.
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and of a see the kids just taking it in their stride. what was that like having to talk to them on facetime? how would support could they give you? how would support could they give ou? , ., how would support could they give ou? ,., . , , ,., you? oh, so much in support. the time zone — you? oh, so much in support. the time zone was _ you? oh, so much in support. the time zone was difficult, _ you? oh, so much in support. the time zone was difficult, more - time zone was difficult, more difficult — time zone was difficult, more difficult than we imagined. the kids were busy— difficult than we imagined. the kids were busy in the mornings. we didn't want to— were busy in the mornings. we didn't want to say. — were busy in the mornings. we didn't want to say, mum there is pining for you when_ want to say, mum there is pining for you when they were doing really welt _ you when they were doing really welt we — you when they were doing really well. we managed it well. it's so strange — well. we managed it well. it's so strange for— well. we managed it well. it's so strange for me because i'm used to having _ strange for me because i'm used to having them straight there and helping — having them straight there and helping. although they obviously don't _ helping. although they obviously don't help you physically in the race. _ don't help you physically in the race. they— don't help you physically in the race, they are there supporting from the side. _ race, they are there supporting from the side, cheering, helping me to prepare _ the side, cheering, helping me to prepare the bottles, the bikes etc. so to— prepare the bottles, the bikes etc. so to be _ prepare the bottles, the bikes etc. so to be doing just me as an athlete felt very— so to be doing just me as an athlete felt very strange. you so to be doing just me as an athlete felt very strange.— felt very strange. you say you didn't let _ felt very strange. you say you didn't let yourself _ felt very strange. you say you didn't let yourself think - felt very strange. you say you didn't let yourself think too i felt very strange. you say you | didn't let yourself think too far ahead. how difficult was it knowing that you had the possibility to become the greatest paralympian for great britain of all time? how difficult was it to notjust imagine that moment? t difficult was it to not 'ust imagine that momehtth difficult was it to not 'ust imagine
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that moment? , , , that moment? i suppose because the races were so — that moment? i suppose because the races were so different. _ that moment? i suppose because the races were so different. the - races were so different. the individual pursuit is three and a half minutes, the individual road time _ half minutes, the individual road time trial— half minutes, the individual road time trial are such different races, there _ time trial are such different races, there was— time trial are such different races, there was a — time trial are such different races, there was a lot to make sure that each _ there was a lot to make sure that each of— there was a lot to make sure that each of those races went well. you don't _ each of those races went well. you don't think— each of those races went well. you don't think about it until it's finished _ don't think about it until it's finished. as i came 200 metres towards — finished. as i came 200 metres towards the finish that incredibly wet race — towards the finish that incredibly wet race |— towards the finish that incredibly wet race i started to think, i have done _ wet race i started to think, i have done this. — wet race i started to think, i have done this, this is number 17. it was literativ— done this, this is number 17. it was literally 200 — done this, this is number 17. it was literally 200 metres to the line. i was thinking, one more look back, this is— was thinking, one more look back, this is mine — was thinking, one more look back, this is mine i— was thinking, one more look back, this is mine. i need to get to the finish _ this is mine. i need to get to the finish line — this is mine. i need to get to the finish line. thank goodness for that _ finish line. thank goodness for that. conditions were absolutely horrendous. i was riding around one of the _ horrendous. i was riding around one of the corners that was particularly guick. _ of the corners that was particularly guick. it _ of the corners that was particularly quick, it was in excess of 35 mph around _ quick, it was in excess of 35 mph around the — quick, it was in excess of 35 mph around the corner, but the rain was sideways _ around the corner, but the rain was sideways. because of the speed you are riding _ sideways. because of the speed you are riding as well it was like hail stones— are riding as well it was like hail stones in— are riding as well it was like hail stones in your eyes. it was dark as welt _ stones in your eyes. it was dark as welt the — stones in your eyes. it was dark as well. the visibility was dreadful. i don't _ well. the visibility was dreadful. i don't know— well. the visibility was dreadful. i don't know what the pictures look like on _ don't know what the pictures look like on tv— don't know what the pictures look like on tv but it was as dreadful as it looked — like on tv but it was as dreadful as it looked |t— like on tv but it was as dreadful as it looked. ., ., ~' like on tv but it was as dreadful as it looked. ., ., ~ .., ., it looked. it looked cold and miserable — it looked. it looked cold and miserable at _ it looked. it looked cold and miserable at times - it looked. it looked cold and miserable at times what - it looked. it looked cold and j miserable at times what you it looked. it looked cold and - miserable at times what you did it?
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yes, it was cold. it was 17 degrees. we had _ yes, it was cold. it was 17 degrees. we had been — yes, it was cold. it was 17 degrees. we had been preparing for an excess of 30 _ we had been preparing for an excess of 30 degrees with 80% to 90% humidity. so to have 70 degrees and feel cold. _ humidity. so to have 70 degrees and feel cold, you are talking about heat _ feel cold, you are talking about heat packs at the end and trying to .et heat packs at the end and trying to get warm — heat packs at the end and trying to get warm. it was so surreal to think. _ get warm. it was so surreal to think. i— get warm. it was so surreal to think. i am — get warm. it was so surreal to think, lam injapan here. get warm. it was so surreal to think, i am in japan here. what was it like when — think, i am in japan here. what was it like when you _ think, i am in japan here. what was it like when you got _ think, i am in japan here. what was it like when you got back— think, i am in japan here. what was it like when you got back and - think, i am in japan here. what was it like when you got back and had i it like when you got back and had that moment when you were reunited with the kids? filth. that moment when you were reunited with the kids?— with the kids? oh, that was the bit test with the kids? oh, that was the biggest relief. _ with the kids? oh, that was the biggest relief. to _ with the kids? oh, that was the biggest relief. to come - with the kids? oh, that was the biggest relief. to come through with the kids? oh, that was the - biggest relief. to come through the airport _ biggest relief. to come through the airport. there was a slight delay on the flight. — airport. there was a slight delay on the flight. a — airport. there was a slight delay on the flight, a slight delay on the bags. _ the flight, a slight delay on the bags, and i was like, come on! i spotted — bags, and i was like, come on! i spotted them through the glass. then theyjust _ spotted them through the glass. then theyjust ran over. it was right outside — theyjust ran over. it was right outside the airport.— theyjust ran over. it was right outside the airport. both charlie and luisa have _ outside the airport. both charlie and luisa have been _ outside the airport. both charlie and luisa have been such - outside the airport. both charlie and luisa have been such stars. | and luisa have been such stars. luisa is maybe going to outperform you one day. she luisa is maybe going to outperform you one day-— luisa is maybe going to outperform ouoneda. ,, ., , ., ,, you one day. she has ambitions? she is absolutely — you one day. she has ambitions? she is absolutely brilliant _ you one day. she has ambitions? she is absolutely brilliant at _ you one day. she has ambitions? she is absolutely brilliant at swimming. i is absolutely brilliant at swimming. she loves _ is absolutely brilliant at swimming. she loves it. she keeps asking me if she can _ she loves it. she keeps asking me if she can compete in paris. i think
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she can compete in paris. i think she may— she can compete in paris. i think she may be _ she can compete in paris. i think she may be a bit young. she is drawn into the _ she may be a bit young. she is drawn into the whole experience. when you talk about _ into the whole experience. when you talk about children being really inspired — talk about children being really inspired by the games, to have that on your— inspired by the games, to have that on your own — inspired by the games, to have that on your own sulphur at home isjust incredible — on your own sulphur at home isjust incredible. so yeah, it has been really— incredible. so yeah, it has been really cool— incredible. so yeah, it has been really cool and i really hope that things _ really cool and i really hope that things come back to kind of normality so that when the games come _ normality so that when the games come around next time, more people can go— come around next time, more people can go and _ come around next time, more people can go and watch and actually take in what _ can go and watch and actually take in what they may stay in japan because — in what they may stay in japan because without those spectators, without _ because without those spectators, without that opportunity to enjoy it from the _ without that opportunity to enjoy it from the spectator stands, although we missed _ from the spectator stands, although we missed out on having the support there _ we missed out on having the support there in— we missed out on having the support there in the — we missed out on having the support there in the stands, people are missing — there in the stands, people are missing out enjoying it in real life _ missing out en'oying it in real life. .. ~' missing out en'oying it in real life. ., ~ ,., missing out en'oying it in real life. ., ~ ., missing out en'oying it in real life. ., ., ., life. thank you for coming and sittint life. thank you for coming and sitting on _ life. thank you for coming and sitting on our— life. thank you for coming and sitting on our silver— life. thank you for coming and sitting on our silver this - life. thank you for coming and i sitting on our silver this morning. it is such a delight to have you and have your back, and welcome you home with that brilliant success. dame sarah storey, thank you. back to you.— sarah storey, thank you. _ back to you._ absolutely back to you. thank you. absolutely brilliant. it is— back to you. thank you. absolutely brilliant. it is 20 _ back to you. thank you. absolutely brilliant. it is 20 minutes _ back to you. thank you. absolutely brilliant. it is 20 minutes to - back to you. thank you. absolutely brilliant. it is 20 minutes to nine. i brilliant. it is 20 minutes to nine. you are watching breakfast from the bbc. "you are not alone" — that's the message from a family
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who lost both a daughter and a father to suicide, within eight months of each other. after struggling with their grief, the family wanted to help others who have lost loved ones to suicide, and now have set up a charity, focused on giving advice and support. jayne mccubbin has been to meet them. you have that feeling constantly in your stomach of, is it real? has it really happened? it's like a visceral contraction of things. somebody punches you in the stomach and you go, "oof!" the devastationjust... you think once—in—a—lifetime, that's enough. but twice... just... it's life changing. in november 2019, angela's daughter katrina took her own life.
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eight months later, her husband damian, katrina's stepdad, also took his own. we live in waddington, the perfect english village. very happy. one day in november, life changed. she just was so magnetic. she was beautiful. and funny. and damien, the same. now theyjust...shone so brightly, they were mesmerising. theyjust loved, loved people and people loved them. they made the decision to leave waddington and rebuild their lives on the north—west coast. their focus now is a new charity. this is a bag for strife... obviously we've got some
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tissues because you're going to need a lot of those. ..to be handed out by police in cases of suicide. it's a small bag of kindness, along with practical information on what to do when you are faced with the very worst. there's nothing in there that is extraordinary but we want people to feel they don't need to feel alone. how alone did you feel in that moment? because that's your motivation here, isn't it? yeah, i think alone and just a lack of direction. you just look at each other and you say, "is that it?" we didn't know who to go to or where to go. there's no signposts. there aren't, or they're not the right ones. it's a journey none of us wanted to start upon. but you need to start taking the first few steps and that's what this bag will help you do.
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do you want to read it out? do you want me to read the whole thing? we are so very sorry for your loss. at this time of inexplicable shock and sadness, you may have many questions. you may feel there is so much to do but no idea where to start. at least that's how we felt. so we hope that within this bag you receive some support and direction. you will get through this, even though at the moment you have no idea how. you are not alone. with kindest thoughts and wishes from all of us at bags for strife. for angela, their dogs have been a lifeline. for tash, it's been running. i lived in leeds and my friends over there were completely the reason i was able to get through. they were the most supportive, lovely, generous. and running with people and having conversations whilst running, that was it for me, that really, really helped, yeah. now you're going
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to be doing a lot more? yes. yes, we are. and slightly dreading it. yes. equal levels of nervous and terrified. today, tash will start a 100—mile charity run from her home in leeds to lake windermere. money raised will go towards bags for strife. lancashire police say they will distribute to those in need and the family hope this will roll out nationwide. this was the last family holiday together, just two months before everything changed for ever. that was the last time i saw kat, i think. there was this one night. we sat down for three hours and watched her dance. all of us were crying, laughing. it was one of those where we are so grateful to have had that. so we are rebuilding.
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we'll never get used to life without her. but we are learning to live with that. to raise money in memory her sister katrina, natasha, who we just heard from in that film, and herfriend caroline, are running 100 miles from yorkshire to cumbria to coincide with world suicide prevention day. they're just about to set off and join us now. goodness me. both of you, thank you so much forjoining us. what an undertaking. just tell us a little bit about it? 100 miles is quite a way. would you really want to do this, don't you?— this, don't you? oh, yeah, absolutely. _
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this, don't you? oh, yeah, absolutely. it _ this, don't you? oh, yeah, absolutely. it was - this, don't you? oh, yeah, absolutely. it was kaz's i this, don't you? oh, yeah, i absolutely. it was kaz's idea this, don't you? oh, yeah, - absolutely. it was kaz's idea to run from _ absolutely. it was kaz's idea to run from leeds— absolutely. it was kaz's idea to run from leeds to the lake district. we really— from leeds to the lake district. we really want — from leeds to the lake district. we really want to promote our new charity — really want to promote our new charity. the charity is in its infancy _ charity. the charity is in its infancy. we have got a long way to id infancy. we have got a long way to go and _ infancy. we have got a long way to go and a _ infancy. we have got a long way to go and a lot — infancy. we have got a long way to go and a lot of people to help. so doing _ go and a lot of people to help. so doing something a bit mental it is kinda _ doing something a bit mental it is kinda fitting for both of us. and we are really— kinda fitting for both of us. and we are really hoping to promote bags for strife — are really hoping to promote bags for strife and reach as many people who were _ for strife and reach as many people who were in — for strife and reach as many people who were in their situation as we can _ who were in their situation as we can. .. who were in their situation as we can. ., ., who were in their situation as we can, ., ., ., who were in their situation as we can. ., ., ., ,., who were in their situation as we can. kaz, how are you feeling? it was all your— can. kaz, how are you feeling? it was all your idea. _ can. kaz, how are you feeling? it was all your idea. how— can. kaz, how are you feeling? it was all your idea. how do - can. kaz, how are you feeling? it was all your idea. how do you i can. kaz, how are you feeling? it| was all your idea. how do you feel about to set off?— was all your idea. how do you feel about to set off? well, i would like to sa it about to set off? well, i would like to say it was _ about to set off? well, i would like to say it was actually _ about to set off? well, i would like to say it was actually natasha's - to say it was actually natasha's idea! _ to say it was actually natasha's idea! i— to say it was actually natasha's idea! ithink— to say it was actually natasha's idea! i think we _ to say it was actually natasha's idea! i think we are _ to say it was actually natasha's idea! i think we are taking - to say it was actually natasha's idea! i think we are taking it i to say it was actually natasha's idea! i think we are taking it in| idea! i think we are taking it in turns— idea! i think we are taking it in turns to— idea! i think we are taking it in turns to be— idea! i think we are taking it in turns to be incredibly- idea! i think we are taking it in turns to be incredibly nervousl idea! i think we are taking it in i turns to be incredibly nervous and incredibly— turns to be incredibly nervous and incredibly excited. _ turns to be incredibly nervous and incredibly excited. all— turns to be incredibly nervous and incredibly excited. all our- turns to be incredibly nervous and incredibly excited. all our friendsl incredibly excited. all our friends are over — incredibly excited. all our friends are overthere. _ incredibly excited. all our friends are over there. having _ incredibly excited. all our friends are over there. having all- incredibly excited. all our friends are over there. having all of- incredibly excited. all our friends are over there. having all of ourl are over there. having all of our friends — are over there. having all of our friends is — are over there. having all of our friends is helping _ are over there. having all of our friends is helping to— are over there. having all of our friends is helping to stave - are over there. having all of our friends is helping to stave off. are over there. having all of ourl friends is helping to stave off the worst _ friends is helping to stave off the worst of— friends is helping to stave off the worst of the _ friends is helping to stave off the worst of the nerves. _ friends is helping to stave off the worst of the nerves. the - friends is helping to stave off the worst of the nerves.— friends is helping to stave off the worst of the nerves. the pair of you obviously very _ worst of the nerves. the pair of you obviously very close _ worst of the nerves. the pair of you obviously very close friends. - worst of the nerves. the pair of you obviously very close friends. kaz, i | obviously very close friends. kaz, i know many people watching this
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morning we'll watch this anything, what do you say to somebody who has been through natasha and the rest of the family have been, but you are supporting her and helping her and doing this run alongside her, which is making a huge difference? yeah. is making a huge difference? yeah, absolutely- — is making a huge difference? yeah, absolutely. there's _ is making a huge difference? yeah, absolutely. there's not _ is making a huge difference? yeah, absolutely. there's not enough - is making a huge difference? yeah, absolutely. there's not enough words in the _ absolutely. there's not enough words in the world — absolutely. there's not enough words inthe world i— absolutely. there's not enough words in the world. ithink— absolutely. there's not enough words in the world. i think —— _ absolutely. there's not enough words in the world. i think —— and _ absolutely. there's not enough words in the world. i think —— and i- absolutely. there's not enough words in the world. i think —— and i have - in the world. i think —— and i have often _ in the world. i think —— and i have often said — in the world. i think —— and i have often said that _ in the world. i think —— and i have often said that when _ in the world. i think —— and i have often said that when you - in the world. i think —— and i have often said that when you have - in the world. i think —— and i have often said that when you have no| often said that when you have no words. _ often said that when you have no words. a — often said that when you have no words. a hug _ often said that when you have no words. a hug is— often said that when you have no words, a hug isjust— often said that when you have no words, a hug isjust as— often said that when you have no words, a hug isjust as good. - words, a hug isjust as good. failing — words, a hug isjust as good. failing that. _ words, a hug isjust as good. failing that, take _ words, a hug isjust as good. failing that, take them - words, a hug isjust as good. i failing that, take them outside words, a hug isjust as good. - failing that, take them outside and .et failing that, take them outside and get some _ failing that, take them outside and get some out— failing that, take them outside and get some out there _ failing that, take them outside and get some out there a _ failing that, take them outside and get some out there a therapy. - failing that, take them outside and get some out there a therapy. thatj get some out there a therapy. that is what _ get some out there a therapy. that is what we — get some out there a therapy. that is what we did _ get some out there a therapy. that is what we did. we _ get some out there a therapy. that is what we did. we just _ get some out there a therapy. that is what we did. we just went - get some out there a therapy. that. is what we did. we just went outside and went— is what we did. we just went outside and went running. _ is what we did. we just went outside and went running. this— is what we did. we just went outside and went running. this is— is what we did. we just went outside and went running. this is the - and went running. this is the natural— and went running. this is the natural continuation - and went running. this is the natural continuation of - and went running. this is the natural continuation of that. i and went running. this is the i natural continuation of that. we and went running. this is the - natural continuation of that. we may have taken _ natural continuation of that. we may have taken it — natural continuation of that. we may have taken it a — natural continuation of that. we may have taken it a bit _ natural continuation of that. we may have taken it a bit far! _ natural continuation of that. we may have taken it a bit far! i— natural continuation of that. we may have taken it a bit far!— have taken it a bit far! i was going to sa , have taken it a bit far! i was going to say. 100 _ have taken it a bit far! i was going to say, 100 miles _ have taken it a bit far! i was going to say, 100 miles is _ have taken it a bit far! i was going to say, 100 miles is a _ have taken it a bit far! i was going to say, 100 miles is a bit - have taken it a bit far! i was going to say, 100 miles is a bit far. - have taken it a bit far! i was going| to say, 100 miles is a bit far. what is your running technique like it? we saw you running with the dog in the film. are you natural runners? what is your history of running? t what is your history of running? i would not call myself a natural runner~ — would not call myself a natural runner~ i— would not call myself a natural runner. i would _ would not call myself a natural runner. ! would call— would not call myself a natural runner. ! would call myself- runner. i would call myself stubborn. _ runner. i would call myself stubborn, and _ runner. i would call myself stubborn, and i— runner. ! would call myself stubborn, and i think- runner. i would call myself. stubborn, and i think natasha runner. i would call myself- stubborn, and i think natasha is in the same — stubborn, and i think natasha is in the same camp~ _ stubborn, and i think natasha is in the same camp. we _ stubborn, and i think natasha is in the same camp. we are _
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stubborn, and i think natasha is in the same camp. we are definitelyl the same camp. we are definitely aiming _ the same camp. we are definitely aiming for— the same camp. we are definitely aiming for the _ the same camp. we are definitely aiming for the torches _ the same camp. we are definitely aiming for the torches approach i aiming for the torches approach rather— aiming for the torches approach rather than _ aiming for the torches approach rather than the _ aiming for the torches approach rather than the hair. _ aiming for the torches approach rather than the hair. slow - aiming for the torches approach rather than the hair. slow and i rather than the hair. slow and steady. — rather than the hair. slow and steady. take _ rather than the hair. slow and steady, take in— rather than the hair. slow and steady, take in the _ rather than the hair. slow and steady, take in the view- rather than the hair. slow and steady, take in the view and i rather than the hair. slow and - steady, take in the view and make it there _ steady, take in the view and make it there in— steady, take in the view and make it there in one — steady, take in the view and make it there in one piece. _ steady, take in the view and make it there in one piece. find _ steady, take in the view and make it there in one piece.— there in one piece. and it gives us an excuse — there in one piece. and it gives us an excuse to _ there in one piece. and it gives us an excuse to eat _ there in one piece. and it gives us an excuse to eat more _ there in one piece. and it gives us an excuse to eat more chocolate! | there in one piece. and it gives us - an excuse to eat more chocolate! you talk when you — an excuse to eat more chocolate! tm. talk when you run as well. how important has it been to be able to get out and run and chat to your friends? ., , , ., ., , friends? oh, honestly, kaz was absolutely _ friends? oh, honestly, kaz was absolutely my _ friends? oh, honestly, kaz was absolutely my rock _ friends? oh, honestly, kaz was absolutely my rock when - friends? oh, honestly, kaz was absolutely my rock when we i friends? oh, honestly, kaz wasl absolutely my rock when we lost friends? oh, honestly, kaz was - absolutely my rock when we lost my sister _ absolutely my rock when we lost my sister and _ absolutely my rock when we lost my sister and my stepdad. some of the conversations we had along the way, it is a _ conversations we had along the way, it is a therapy and it helped me no end _ it is a therapy and it helped me no end it _ it is a therapy and it helped me no end it is — it is a therapy and it helped me no end it is so — it is a therapy and it helped me no end. it is so nice we have got a few people _ end. it is so nice we have got a few people running with us today and we are hoping _ people running with us today and we are hoping to continue that theme of open conversations and exercise. yeah. _ open conversations and exercise. yeah. it— open conversations and exercise. yeah. it has— open conversations and exercise. yeah, it has been a life changer for me, yeah, it has been a life changer for me. for— yeah, it has been a life changer for me. for sure — yeah, it has been a life changer for me, for sure. it yeah, it has been a life changer for me. for sure-— me, for sure. it is all for the charity iitags _ me, for sure. it is all for the charity bags for _ me, for sure. it is all for the charity bags for strife. - me, for sure. it is all for the charity bags for strife. i - me, for sure. it is all for the charity bags for strife. i am | me, for sure. it is all for the - charity bags for strife. i am struck by what the bag stands for. it is really meaningful?— by what the bag stands for. it is really meaningful? yeah. we are
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ho-itn really meaningful? yeah. we are hoping that _ really meaningful? yeah. we are hoping that in — really meaningful? yeah. we are hoping that in those _ really meaningful? yeah. we are hoping that in those moments i really meaningful? yeah. we are hoping that in those moments atj really meaningful? yeah. we are - hoping that in those moments at the hospital. _ hoping that in those moments at the hospital. or— hoping that in those moments at the hospital, orwherever hoping that in those moments at the hospital, or wherever you are when you get— hospital, or wherever you are when you get the — hospital, or wherever you are when you get the news, you are kind of left. _ you get the news, you are kind of left. you — you get the news, you are kind of left, you just don't really know what _ left, you just don't really know what to — left, you just don't really know what to do. you have no direction. you walk— what to do. you have no direction. you walk away from that situation, completely changed but also completely changed but also completely sort of, you just don't know— completely sort of, you just don't know what's ahead of you. and so having _ know what's ahead of you. and so having something physical that we can give _ having something physical that we can give to families and give to people. — can give to families and give to people, that they can hold onto and look at _ people, that they can hold onto and look at whenever they are ready, hopefully — look at whenever they are ready, hopefully that just extract sort of, yeah. _ hopefully that just extract sort of, yeah, physicality of some sort of help will— yeah, physicality of some sort of help will provide support. it is kind _ help will provide support. it is kind of— help will provide support. it is kind of that reminder, even if you see it _ kind of that reminder, even if you see it six — kind of that reminder, even if you see it six months later, it is that reminder— see it six months later, it is that reminder there see it six months later, it is that reminderthere are other see it six months later, it is that reminder there are other people out there _ reminder there are other people out there who _ reminder there are other people out there who can help and have empathy for how— there who can help and have empathy for how you _ there who can help and have empathy for how you feel. it is there who can help and have empathy for how you feel.— for how you feel. it is a lovely thint to for how you feel. it is a lovely thing to do- — for how you feel. it is a lovely thing to do. how _ for how you feel. it is a lovely thing to do. how many - for how you feel. it is a lovely thing to do. how many miles| for how you feel. it is a lovely - thing to do. how many miles today, briefly? thing to do. how many miles today, briefl ? . ,., thing to do. how many miles today, briefl ? . ' ~' thing to do. how many miles today, briefly?— itest - thing to do. how many miles today, briefly?_ best of i briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck. it is
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briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck- it is a _ briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck. it is a lovely _ briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck. it is a lovely day _ briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck. it is a lovely day for - briefly? about 21, i think. best of luck. it is a lovely day for it. - luck. it is a lovely day for it. enjoy. i hope you get there safely. have a nice chat on the way. and thank your friends for all have a nice chat on the way. and thank yourfriends for all their thank your friends for all their support thank yourfriends for all their support in the background as thank your friends for all their support in the background as well. take care. if you've been affected by any of the issues raised, you can contact the bbc action line. you can see how gorgeous the weather was there in leeds. matt has been out and about as well. matt is in oxford. what is the weather like for the next few days? good morning. looking good. lovely reflections on the surface of the mini canal at waterperry gardens. established in 1932. the site is just on the outskirts of oxford extends to eight acres, for gardens, parkland is. it will be another hot
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and sunny day today. let's look at the forecast. plenty of sunshine in england and wales. even hotter than yesterday. we will see more cloud across parts of scotland and northern ireland. even here it will break up relative to yesterday and temperatures will rise. 25 degrees on the west of northern ireland later. anywhere you have mist and fog at the moment, that should clear in the next hour. other than that it is a dry day for most. the best of the sons or a england and wales, extending into southern scotland and northern ireland. 2a degrees in northern ireland. 2a degrees in northern ireland, 25 in scotland, 29, 30 degrees northern ireland, 25 in scotland, 29,30 degrees in northern ireland, 25 in scotland, 29, 30 degrees in parts of england and wales. quite a sultry night. most will be dry. some mist and fog patches before the north you are. more cloud in scotland. by the end of the night we will see more cloud arrive in the south—west with heavy showers and thunderstorms. once again tomorrow as a warm start. a greater risk of showers and thunderstorms tomorrow across
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channel islands, south—west england, parts of wales. maybe the yard shower in northern ireland. these areas cooler than today. across much of england and north—east wales, good part of scotland, dry, sunny and hot. 25 the high in scotland, 29 or 30 across parts of england. rain in shetland. on wednesday after a cooler night with storms, things turned cooler and shall refer the rest of the week. from the wonderful surroundings here, have a lovely day. back to dan and louise. it really does look glorious. enjoy the rest of your tuesday. thank you. sorry. just mending _ of your tuesday. thank you. sorry. just mending things. _ of your tuesday. thank you. sorry. just mending things. i've _ of your tuesday. thank you. sorry. just mending things. i've mended l of your tuesday. thank you. sorry. i just mending things. i've mended it. she is always mending things. they've been performing for over aa years, and are one of the longest surviving bands from the uk punk scene. now, the stranglers are releasing their latest album. but, following the loss of their bandmate dave greenfield, who died after contracting covid last year, while the album was being recorded, this release is extremely poignant
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for the group. after his death, they vowed to complete the album as a tribute to his life and work. let's take a listen to their single from the album — written in tribute to dave. # and if you should see dave, say hello # i was meant to meet him here see dave, say hello # before the great beyond see dave, say hello # and if you should see my friend, say hello my friend, say hello. ..#
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jj burnel and baz warne are with us now. lovely to see you. thank you for comint lovely to see you. thank you for coming in- _ lovely to see you. thank you for coming in. there _ lovely to see you. thank you for coming in. there is _ lovely to see you. thank you for coming in. there is quite - lovely to see you. thank you for coming in. there is quite a - lovely to see you. thank you for coming in. there is quite a storyj coming in. there is quite a story behind this _ coming in. there is quite a story behind this album. _ coming in. there is quite a story behind this album. who - coming in. there is quite a story behind this album. who wants i coming in. there is quite a story| behind this album. who wants to start? i will nominate my friend! idate start? i will nominate my friend! we started writing at about nine years a-o. started writing at about nine years ago the _ started writing at about nine years ago. the opening track is about the arab spring. then we got too busy. and so— arab spring. then we got too busy. and so we — arab spring. then we got too busy. and so we finally got round to completing most of it, 90% of it, 'ust completing most of it, 90% of it, just before — completing most of it, 90% of it, just before the lockdown. and then a few weeks— just before the lockdown. and then a few weeks later, dave passed away. with covid—19. so few weeks later, dave passed away. with covid-itt— few weeks later, dave passed away. with covid-19. so you had done most of it until that _ with covid-19. so you had done most of it until that point. _ with covid-19. so you had done most of it until that point. did _ with covid-19. so you had done most of it until that point. did you - with covid-19. so you had done most of it until that point. did you will - of it until that point. did you will feel together as part of a tribute to dave and his life and work, we've got to finish this? {3t
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to dave and his life and work, we've got to finish this?— got to finish this? of course, that was the only _ got to finish this? of course, that was the only thought _ got to finish this? of course, that was the only thought in _ got to finish this? of course, that was the only thought in our - got to finish this? of course, that| was the only thought in our minds then _ was the only thought in our minds then we — was the only thought in our minds then. we forgot about touring and 'ust then. we forgot about touring and just completed it. it then. we forgot about touring and just completed it.— just completed it. it took quite a while before _ just completed it. it took quite a while before either— just completed it. it took quite a while before either of _ just completed it. it took quite a while before either of us - just completed it. it took quite a while before either of us could i just completed it. it took quite a i while before either of us could even contemplate — while before either of us could even contemplate today. _ while before either of us could even contemplate today. you _ while before either of us could even contemplate today.— contemplate today. you have been totether contemplate today. you have been together such _ contemplate today. you have been together such a _ contemplate today. you have been together such a long _ contemplate today. you have been together such a long time, - contemplate today. you have been together such a long time, haven'tj together such a long time, haven't you? {lift together such a long time, haven't ou? , .. . ~ �* together such a long time, haven't ou? , ., , ., you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with — you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with dave _ you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with dave and _ you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with dave and all— you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with dave and all that - you? 45 years. i think i'd had five rows with dave and all that time! | rows with dave and all that time! they— rows with dave and all that time! they lasted no longer than 24 hours. we were _ they lasted no longer than 24 hours. we were fortunate that once we have the strength. — we were fortunate that once we have the strength. i— we were fortunate that once we have the strength, i suppose, _ we were fortunate that once we have the strength, i suppose, because - we were fortunate that once we have the strength, i suppose, because it i the strength, i suppose, because it really— the strength, i suppose, because it really did _ the strength, i suppose, because it really did not— the strength, i suppose, because it really did not close _ the strength, i suppose, because it really did not close for _ the strength, i suppose, because it really did not close for six. - the strength, i suppose, because it really did not close for six. but - the strength, i suppose, because it really did not close for six. but wei really did not close for six. but we were _ really did not close for six. but we were fortunate _ really did not close for six. but we were fortunate we _ really did not close for six. but we were fortunate we have _ really did not close for six. but we were fortunate we have got - really did not close for six. but we were fortunate we have got the i were fortunate we have got the technology— were fortunate we have got the technology now _ were fortunate we have got the technology now to _ were fortunate we have got the technology now to finish - were fortunate we have got the technology now to finish it - were fortunate we have got the technology now to finish it off. were fortunate we have got the - technology now to finish it off from various _ technology now to finish it off from various bases— technology now to finish it off from various bases around _ technology now to finish it off from various bases around europe. - technology now to finish it off from various bases around europe. so. technology now to finish it off from| various bases around europe. so as it turned _ various bases around europe. so as it turned out. — various bases around europe. so as it turned out. we _ various bases around europe. so as it turned out, we didn't _ various bases around europe. so as it turned out, we didn't really- various bases around europe. so as it turned out, we didn't really havel it turned out, we didn't really have to be _ it turned out, we didn't really have to be together— it turned out, we didn't really have to be together that _ it turned out, we didn't really have to be together that much- it turned out, we didn't really have to be together that much to - it turned out, we didn't really have i to be together that much to complete it. it to be together that much to complete it it was _ to be together that much to complete it it was not — to be together that much to complete it it was not the _ to be together that much to complete it. it was not the way _ to be together that much to complete it. it was not the way that _ to be together that much to complete it. it was not the way that we - it. it was not the way that we normally _ it. it was not the way that we normally do— it. it was not the way that we normally do things. - it. it was not the way that we normally do things. it - it. it was not the way that we normally do things. it was i it. it was not the way that we normally do things. it was a i it. it was not the way that we - normally do things. it was a strange way to— normally do things. it was a strange way to work — normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj _ normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj done _ normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj done in _ normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj done in the - normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj done in the south i normally do things. it was a strange way to work. jj done in the south of| way to work. jj done in the south of france. _ way to work. jj done in the south of france. me — way to work. jj done in the south of france. me in— way to work. jj done in the south of france, me in yorkshire, _ way to work. jj done in the south of france, me in yorkshire, sending. france, me in yorkshire, sending stuff— france, me in yorkshire, sending stuff to— france, me in yorkshire, sending stuff to each _ france, me in yorkshire, sending
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stuff to each other. _ france, me in yorkshire, sending stuff to each other.— stuff to each other. that is the benefit of _ stuff to each other. that is the benefit of technology - stuff to each other. that is the benefit of technology these i stuff to each other. that is the i benefit of technology these days. also, when you have been together a5 years, you've shared so much with each other. you talk about a couple of rows over the years. that must take a little bit of time, for you all to come to terms that you're not around any more... all to come to terms that you're not around any more. . .— around any more... well, you are totin to around any more... well, you are going to be _ around any more... well, you are going to be losing _ around any more... well, you are going to be losing this _ around any more... well, you are going to be losing this lady - around any more... well, you are going to be losing this lady at - around any more... well, you are i going to be losing this lady at some point _ going to be losing this lady at some point is _ going to be losing this lady at some point. is this really your last day? no, point. is this really your last day? no. not _ point. is this really your last day? no, not today. as far as i know, not! tell us a little bit about dave? you described him as a wacky older uncle? he dave? you described him as a wacky older uncle?— older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle. _ older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle, yeah. _ older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle, yeah. he _ older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle, yeah. he was - older uncle? he was like my wacky older uncle, yeah. he was a - older uncle? he was like my wackyj older uncle, yeah. he was a classic english _ older uncle, yeah. he was a classic english eccentric. _ older uncle, yeah. he was a classic english eccentric. no _ older uncle, yeah. he was a classic english eccentric. no one - older uncle, yeah. he was a classic english eccentric. no one could - older uncle, yeah. he was a classicl english eccentric. no one could play like him _ english eccentric. no one could play like him no— english eccentric. no one could play like him. no one _ english eccentric. no one could play like him. no one thought— english eccentric. no one could play like him. no one thought like - english eccentric. no one could play like him. no one thought like him. i like him. no one thought like him. his thought— like him. no one thought like him. his thought process, _ like him. no one thought like him. his thought process, and - like him. no one thought like him. his thought process, and indeed i like him. no one thought like him. i his thought process, and indeed with me as _ his thought process, and indeed with me as the _ his thought process, and indeed with me as the guitar— his thought process, and indeed with me as the guitar player— his thought process, and indeed with me as the guitar player i _ his thought process, and indeed with me as the guitar player i would - me as the guitar player i would stand _ me as the guitar player i would stand right _ me as the guitar player i would stand right next _ me as the guitar player i would
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stand right next to _ me as the guitar player i would stand right next to him - me as the guitar player i would i stand right next to him watching me as the guitar player i would - stand right next to him watching in working _ stand right next to him watching in working stuff— stand right next to him watching in working stuff out _ stand right next to him watching in working stuff out and _ stand right next to him watching in working stuff out and thinking, - stand right next to him watching in| working stuff out and thinking, how on earth _ working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is — working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is he — working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is he doing _ working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is he doing that? - working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is he doing that? he- working stuff out and thinking, how on earth is he doing that?— on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. _ on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. i _ on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. i think— on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. i think there - on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. i think there is - on earth is he doing that? he was very eccentric. i think there is a i very eccentric. i think there is a word _ very eccentric. ! think there is a word for— very eccentric. i think there is a word for it _ very eccentric. i think there is a word for it now. and over the years we've _ word for it now. and over the years we've realised that he was special. ithink— we've realised that he was special. i think they— we've realised that he was special. i think they call it autistic now. is i think they call it autistic now. is there — i think they call it autistic now. is there one song all about him? yeah, about dave, because he wasn't on that— yeah, about dave, because he wasn't on that track — yeah, about dave, because he wasn't on that track. and of course there no keyboards on the track. specifically as a nod to him. what else have you _ specifically as a nod to him. what else have you poured _ specifically as a nod to him. what else have you poured into - specifically as a nod to him. transit else have you poured into it? you said you started writing at nine years ago about the arab spring. what other influences can we see and hear through the album? melt. what other influences can we see and hear through the album?— hear through the album? well, you know, we tried _ hear through the album? well, you know, we tried to _ hear through the album? well, you know, we tried to write _ hear through the album? well, you know, we tried to write about - hear through the album? well, you know, we tried to write about the i know, we tried to write about the zeitgeist. — know, we tried to write about the zeitgeist, whatever is happening around _ zeitgeist, whatever is happening around us. we've never been very good _ around us. we've never been very good with— around us. we've never been very good with love songs. why around us. we've never been very good with love songs.— around us. we've never been very good with love songs. why is that?! it's overrated. _ good with love songs. why is that?! it's overrated. it's _ good with love songs. why is that?! it's overrated. it's too _ good with love songs. why is that?! it's overrated. it's too hard. - good with love songs. why is that?! it's overrated. it's too hard. so - it's overrated. it's too hard. so the world — it's overrated. it's too hard. so the world around us is the
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inspiration most of the time. you will have those _ inspiration most of the time. tm. will have those loyal fans from all those years ago, do you get a new audience at this stage?— those years ago, do you get a new audience at this stage? yeah. they are producing _ audience at this stage? yeah. they are producing kids! _ audience at this stage? yeah. they are producing kids! each _ audience at this stage? yeah. they i are producing kids! each subsequent tour i can think _ are producing kids! each subsequent tour i can think straightaway - are producing kids! each subsequent tour i can think straightaway off- tour i can think straightaway off the top — tour i can think straightaway off the top of— tour i can think straightaway off the top of my— tour i can think straightaway off the top of my head _ tour i can think straightaway off the top of my head of _ tour i can think straightaway off the top of my head of at - tour i can think straightaway off the top of my head of at least i tour i can think straightaway off. the top of my head of at least half a dozen _ the top of my head of at least half a dozen kids. _ the top of my head of at least half a dozen kids, kids, _ the top of my head of at least half a dozen kids, kids, kids, - the top of my head of at least half a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, - the top of my head of at least half| a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of— a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all ofa _ a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of a sudden _ a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of a sudden they— a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of a sudden they are _ a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of a sudden they are not - a dozen kids, kids, kids, kids, and all of a sudden they are not kids i all of a sudden they are not kids any more — all of a sudden they are not kids any more they— all of a sudden they are not kids any more. they are _ all of a sudden they are not kids any more. they are talking - all of a sudden they are not kids any more. they are talking like i any more. they are talking like this _ any more. they are talking like this it — any more. they are talking like this. it never— any more. they are talking like this. it never ceases _ any more. they are talking like this. it never ceases to - any more. they are talking like this. it never ceases to amaze i any more. they are talking like i this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually. — this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually. the — this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually, the cross— this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually, the cross section. - this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually, the cross section. hoist. this. it never ceases to amaze us, actually, the cross section. how do ou sta actually, the cross section. how do you stay together _ actually, the cross section. how do you stay together as _ actually, the cross section. how do you stay together as a _ actually, the cross section. how do you stay together as a band - actually, the cross section. how do you stay together as a band for - actually, the cross section. how do you stay together as a band for all| you stay together as a band for all those years? idate you stay together as a band for all those years?— you stay together as a band for all. those years?_ we those years? we love each other. we tractice those years? we love each other. we practice love- — those years? we love each other. we practice love. probably _ those years? we love each other. we practice love. probably the _ those years? we love each other. we practice love. probably the single - practice love. probably the single most _ practice love. probably the single most important factor was you start out as— most important factor was you start out as maids. so the dynamic is relatively— out as maids. so the dynamic is relatively equal. and then one person— relatively equal. and then one person has the talent for writing the songs. so they get a bit more
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attention— the songs. so they get a bit more attention and they get more money. so there _ attention and they get more money. so there is— attention and they get more money. so there is an inequality which arises — so there is an inequality which arises i— so there is an inequality which arises. i think we eliminated that from _ arises. ! think we eliminated that from day— arises. i think we eliminated that from day one. whoever writes the song _ from day one. whoever writes the song it's _ from day one. whoever writes the song it's still shared evenly. are failures— song it's still shared evenly. are failures and successes are shared equally — failures and successes are shared etuall . . .. failures and successes are shared etuall . , ., failures and successes are shared etuall. , ., ., ., equally. great way of doing it. otherwise _ equally. great way of doing it. otherwise it _ equally. great way of doing it. otherwise it is _ equally. great way of doing it. otherwise it is the _ equally. great way of doing it. otherwise it is the tail - equally. great way of doing it. | otherwise it is the tail wagging equally. great way of doing it. - otherwise it is the tail wagging the do-. otherwise it is the tail wagging the dog you _ otherwise it is the tail wagging the dog. you want to stay maids, don't you? _ dog. you want to stay maids, don't ou? ~ ., ~ dog. you want to stay maids, don't ou? . ., . ., dog. you want to stay maids, don't ou? l ., l ., ., dog. you want to stay maids, don't ou? . ., l ., ., ., dog. you want to stay maids, don't ou? l ., l ., ., ., ., you? well done. we are going to have to leave it there. _ you? well done. we are going to have to leave it there. lovely _ you? well done. we are going to have to leave it there. lovely to _ you? well done. we are going to have to leave it there. lovely to see - to leave it there. lovely to see above. dark matters will be released on friday. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the long—awaited plan to pay for the growing cost of social care in england will be set out by the prime minister today. there's tory unease at the expected breaking of borisjohnson's pre—election pledge not to increase national insurance contributions. ministers say nobody wants to break manifesto promises. the to break manifesto promises. social care system h. broken the social care system has been broken for many decades, many successive governments have talked about this, have consulted but never really delivered. this playlist is determined to deliver. —— this prime minister is determined. what's your experience of navigating the social care system and what reforms do you think money
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needs to be spent on?

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