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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  September 9, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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hospital waiting lists in england are now the worst since records began. more than 5.5 million people are waiting for routine treatment like hip and knee replacements. we are past breaking point, it is broken. it needs to be rebuilt and i think the government, department of health need to have an honest conversation with the public. the prime minister has warned that waiting lists will get worse before they get better. also this lunchtime... migrant boats crossing the channel could be turned back at sea — but the french authorities say that would be dangerous and illegal. a report finds �*signifcant failures�* in the care of three adults with learning difficulties who died at a private hospital near norwich. it makes me feel very angry because i think that if they'd done what they should have done, if they'd have cared forjoanna as they should have done,
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she might have been alive today. the government could make it compulsory for all front line nhs staff in england to be vaccinated against covid—19. and plans in scotland that would mean you'd need a vaccine passport to get into nightclubs, major sporting events, concerts and festivals. and emma raducanu's record breaking run at the us open goes on — the first british woman in almost a0 years to make it to the semi—finals. and coming up on the bbc news channel... england name a preliminary squad for the t20 world cup — but there's no ben stokes, as he continues his breakfrom cricket for his mental well—being.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. hospital waiting lists in england are now the worst since records began. 5.6 million people were waiting for routine hospital treatment at the end ofjuly, according to the latest figures from nhs england. some of the longest waits are for people needing hip and knee replacements and cataract surgery. and ambulance waiting times continue to miss their target. our health correspondent anna collinson reports. this anna collinson reports. cctv footage shows the agonising this cctv footage shows the agonising wait for help after a man's heart stopped beating. an ambulance crew takes over half—an—hour to arrive. the target is seven minutes. shortly after, the patient passed away. his son, a doctor, believes the delay caused
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his death. , ., ., , his death. every minute of delay counts in the _ his death. every minute of delay counts in the situation _ his death. every minute of delay counts in the situation where - his death. every minute of delay| counts in the situation where you have a cardiac arrest. cpr is important, but it will not in itself save a patient. it gives you a bit of time before somebody gets a defibrillator. by the time the ambulance crew came, there was nothing to shop, it was a flat line, he had gone. nothing to shop, it was a flat line, he had gone-— he had gone. caring for 450,000 covid patient _ he had gone. caring for 450,000 covid patient has _ he had gone. caring for 450,000 covid patient has had _ he had gone. caring for 450,000 covid patient has had a _ he had gone. caring for 450,000 covid patient has had a knock-oni covid patient has had a knock—on effect on care, including ambulance response times. figures from nhs england show the average weight in august was slightly down compared to july, but higher than it has been for more than three years. the most serious category one calls average at around 8.5 minutes, above the seven minute target. the response time for category two calls, which includes heart attacks and strokes, averaged at nearly 39 minutes. the aim is 18. long waiting times are being seen across the uk but are measured differently, so cannot be
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compared. measured differently, so cannot be com ared. ., measured differently, so cannot be comared. ., ., i. measured differently, so cannot be comared. ., ., ., measured differently, so cannot be comared. ., . ., compared. how are you doing? doing reall well. compared. how are you doing? doing really well. there _ compared. how are you doing? doing really well. there is _ compared. how are you doing? doing really well. there is little _ compared. how are you doing? doing really well. there is little waiting - really well. there is little waiting around at this _ really well. there is little waiting around at this early _ really well. there is little waiting around at this early diagnosis - around at this early diagnosis centre, aimed at alleviating demands on hospitals. dedicated to patients who may be at risk from cancer, it carries out procedures like colonoscopies and as an example of the millions of extra tests the nhs has carried out over the summer. h0 has carried out over the summer. i157 polyps, no cancer. has carried out over the summer. no polyps, no cancer. nothing _ has carried out over the summer. no polyps, no cancer. nothing to - has carried out over the summer. no polyps, no cancer. nothing to worryl polyps, no cancer. nothing to worry about. polyps, no cancer. nothing to worry about during _ polyps, no cancer. nothing to worry about. during the _ polyps, no cancer. nothing to worry about. during the pandemic - polyps, no cancer. nothing to worry about. during the pandemic many l about. during the pandemic many patients failed to come to hospital because they were worried about contracting corona corona vices. this diagnosis centre is set away from emergency care. if you go straight through these doors, you go into a safe covid freezone. some patients are still staying away. it has been a priority for us to support patients to see their general practitioner, to be referred on to the hospital, to have the diagnostic test because the earlier we diagnose a condition, the better
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will be. ., , will be. the government says it is investinu will be. the government says it is investing billions of _ will be. the government says it is investing billions of pounds into l investing billions of pounds into tackling covid pressures, but it is seen as not enough. the tackling covid pressures, but it is seen as not enough.— seen as not enough. the the department _ seen as not enough. the the department of _ seen as not enough. the the department of health - seen as not enough. the the department of health has i seen as not enough. the the department of health has to i seen as not enough. the the - department of health has to have an honest_ department of health has to have an honest conversation with the general public— honest conversation with the general public that— honest conversation with the general public that the nhs is failing people, even in emergencies and we need to— people, even in emergencies and we need to have a constructive discussion on how we fix it. health officials have _ discussion on how we fix it. health officials have warned _ discussion on how we fix it. health officials have warned the _ discussion on how we fix it. health officials have warned the nhs - officials have warned the nhs will face even more challenges as we head into the difficult winter months. anna collinson, bbc news. the home secretary priti patel wants to start turning back some boats carrying migrants across the english channel. the controversial so called �*pushback�* tactics would be used in limited circumstances. but the french authorities believe it would be dangerous and a breach of international martime law. so far this week alone, more than 1500 migrants have crossed the channel by boat. jon donnison reports. watch your hands. children first. the government has pledged to stop
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the boats. but with more than 1500 migrants being intercepted and brought ashore this week, it is failing. the home secretary has been seeking greater assistance from france. but despite objections from paris, priti patel now says in limited circumstances, the uk border force will be authorised to turn migrant boats back. even some of her own mps are not convinced. it migrant boats back. even some of her own mps are not convinced.— own mps are not convinced. it sounds aood and i own mps are not convinced. it sounds good and i have _ own mps are not convinced. it sounds good and i have every _ own mps are not convinced. it sounds good and i have every sympathy - own mps are not convinced. it sounds good and i have every sympathy for l good and i have every sympathy for the home secretary, who is in an impossible position. but these flimsy boats, even with tougher made, any boat coming up alongside would capsize these boats anyway and we're looking at people getting into trouble in water and inevitably drowning. then we would be blamed for that, so it sounds good pushing them back, but it's not going to
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work in practice.— them back, but it's not going to work in practice. camped out around the beaches — work in practice. camped out around the beaches of— work in practice. camped out around the beaches of northern _ work in practice. camped out around the beaches of northern france, - the beaches of northern france, there are hundreds of migrants waiting to make the crossing in search of a better life in the uk. injuly the government agreed to pay the french an extra £54 million to step up patrols and tackle people smugglers. but france has said britain turning boats back at sea would be dangerous, foolish and illegal and for the union that represents uk border force staff, that means the government's plan is a nonstarter. the that means the government's plan is a nonstarter-— a nonstarter. the key to this, it does require — a nonstarter. the key to this, it does require that _ a nonstarter. the key to this, it does require that the _ a nonstarter. the key to this, it does require that the french i does require that the french cooperate. you can'tjust turn about bacca let it go, you have got to turnit bacca let it go, you have got to turn it back into a receiving boat from the other country. if the french will not receive them, we are not going to turn anyone back. but the government and its supporters say the uk needs to use every possible tactic available to stop people smuggling. possible tactic available to stop people smuggling-— possible tactic available to stop people smuggling. drastic action is reuuired people smuggling. drastic action is required and _ people smuggling. drastic action is required and l _ people smuggling. drastic action is required and i am _ people smuggling. drastic action is required and i am sure _ people smuggling. drastic action is required and i am sure that -
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people smuggling. drastic action is required and i am sure that home l required and i am sure that home office _ required and i am sure that home office lawyers, foreign office lawyers, _ office lawyers, foreign office lawyers, they have really looked at this carefully and they have decided that it _ this carefully and they have decided that it is _ this carefully and they have decided that it is perfectly legal. so we will see — that it is perfectly legal. so we will see what happens. whether it stops _ will see what happens. whether it stops the — will see what happens. whether it stops the flow of illegal crossings, i am stops the flow of illegal crossings, i am not _ stops the flow of illegal crossings, i am not sure it will. as stops the flow of illegal crossings, i am not sure it will.— i am not sure it will. as we head into autumn _ i am not sure it will. as we head into autumn and _ i am not sure it will. as we head into autumn and the _ i am not sure it will. as we head into autumn and the recent - i am not sure it will. as we head i into autumn and the recent period i am not sure it will. as we head - into autumn and the recent period of good weather and calm seas comes to an end, the number of migrants risking thejourney will an end, the number of migrants risking the journey will go down. but long term for the government, it appears to be a problem without an easy fix. jon donnison, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani is here. this idea of turning migrant boats back, is it legal under maritime law? �* , back, is it legal under maritime law? 3 . back, is it legal under maritime law? �* , ., ., , back, is it legal under maritime law? �*, ., , ., law? there's a reason why maritime la ers law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are — law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are so _ law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are so wealthy _ law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are so wealthy because - law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are so wealthy because it i law? there's a reason why maritime lawyers are so wealthy because it is| lawyers are so wealthy because it is so complicated. we have an obligation to protect lives. we have asylum law and obligation to take
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seriously, people who are fleeing. and on top of that there are rules of the road, avoiding collisions at sea. the uk believes it can intercept, it has the power to do that where it feels it is necessary for police and immigration purpose to protect the border. but as lawyers have pointed out today, pushback, why that might be potentially legal could quickly become a rescue operation if it goes wrong. what if the sea changes, what if somebodyjumps from a dinghy or a small boat into the channel. the border force commanders acting with the authority of the home secretary, to effectively repel a boat and send it into french waters, they have to carry out a rescue under their legal obligations. on top of that you have the international question about cooperation. there are no international waters in the straits of dover where these crossings are taking place. they need french cooperation. if the home office is not going to get french corporation, critics are saying it is a bit like
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political posturing, rather than a realistic plan that will take place. thank you very much indeed. our correspondent nick beake is in calais. sounds like they're not going to get the french cooperation? that sounds like they're not going to get the french cooperation?— the french cooperation? that is certainly the — the french cooperation? that is certainly the case. _ the french cooperation? that is certainly the case. let - the french cooperation? that is certainly the case. let me - the french cooperation? that is certainly the case. let me tell. the french cooperation? that is i certainly the case. let me tell you where we are now, on the outskirts of calais. the queues have formed, this is for a british charity that will be giving out hot drinks in the next few minutes. but talking to people today, mostly they are from sudan, somalia, some from afghanistan. if the hope from london that tough talk from downing street to change minds here, i think it has fallen on deaf ears. the indications we are getting, this will not change the desire to get to the united kingdom and it is things like the weather which is a determining factor as to whether people set off or not and crucially, if they have the money to pay the people smugglers for a place on a boat. that is the unofficial reaction on
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the ground here. in terms of the official reaction from the french government, that is from the interior minister, who met priti patel yesterday. they had this meeting and he has tweeted that france will not accept any practice that breaks maritime law, nor any financial blackmail. that relates to whatjon donnison was talking about, this £54 million the united kingdom had promised france so it could double some of its coast guard patrols along the stretch of water. the french are unhappy because they say, as far as they were concerned, it was never dependent on results. if you look at what has happened so far, the french have intercepted more than half the boats that have left trying to get to the united kingdom, they have intercepted more than 10,000 people.— than 10,000 people. thank you very much indeed. _ than 10,000 people. thank you very much indeed, nick _ than 10,000 people. thank you very much indeed, nick beake. _ an independent review has found significant failures at a private hospital in norfolk, where three adults with learning disabilities died.
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the report highlighted the "excessive use of restraint and seclusion by unqualified staff" and the "over medication" of residents at cawston park. the hospital has now closed — but relatives say their questions and distress were at the time ignored — and one mother has called her son's death a scandal. helena wilkinson reports. joanna baillie had a learning disability, autism and sleep apnoea. her parents said she was happy and fun loving. in 2018, joanna was found unresponsive at cawston park hospital. she hadn't been checked for two hours the night she died, despite 30 minute checks being in her care plan. there was no attempt to resuscitate her. it her care plan. there was no attempt to resuscitate her.— to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry- — to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry- l — to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry- lfeel— to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry- lfeel if _ to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry. i feel if they _ to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry. i feel if they had - to resuscitate her. it makes me feel very angry. i feel if they had done i very angry. i feel if they had done what they should have done, if they had cared forjoanna as they should have done, she might have been alive today. the
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have done, she might have been alive toda . ., ., ~' have done, she might have been alive toda . ., ., ~ ., today. the norfolk safeguarding adults review _ today. the norfolk safeguarding adults review found _ today. the norfolk safeguarding adults review found there - today. the norfolk safeguarding adults review found there were l adults review found there were significant failures at the hospital in the care ofjoanna and two other patients who also died. the report highlighted concerns over unsafe grouping of patients and excessive use of restraint and seclusion by unqualified staff. late use of restraint and seclusion by unqualified staff.— unqualified staff. we need more than the dismay and _ unqualified staff. we need more than the dismay and distress _ unqualified staff. we need more than the dismay and distress of _ the dismay and distress of politicians and investments and promises. we have to see a transformation that is felt by people's families, felt by families that are struggling today to manage the behaviours of their relatives, young relatives with learning disabilities.— young relatives with learning disabilities. �* ., ., disabilities. another patient at the hos - ital, disabilities. another patient at the hospital. iten _ disabilities. another patient at the hospital, ben king, _ disabilities. another patient at the hospital, ben king, who _ disabilities. another patient at the hospital, ben king, who had - disabilities. another patient at the hospital, ben king, who had down syndrome and learning difficulties died last year. his mother saw him the day before. she said he was gasping and couldn't talk. his hands and lips were blue and he was rocking back and forth. he pleaded with me to take him home. i wish i
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had put him in the car then. i drove off. that was the last time i saw ben alive. the inquest into his death heard that during his final hours he was pushed roughly and slapped. norfolk police issued this picture, showing a man they want to speak to in connection with an investigation into ill—treatment. cawston park closed in may after consistent failures in meeting standards. the owners said it was deeply sorry to the families. the spokesperson for the department of health and social care said it was focused on ensuring all patients received safe and high—quality care and that any allegations of abuse would be taken seriously. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the government is considering whether it should be compulsory for front line nhs workers in england to be vaccinated against covid—19. some unions are warning the move would lead to more staff shortages but the government believe it's
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essential to protect vulnerable patients. our health correspondent jim reed is here. jim, there's a six week consultation on whether to go ahead with this? there is, ben. it is likely to affect over 1 there is, ben. it is likely to affect over1 million nhs front line staff in england, so these staff who work with patients day in and day out. around 12% of nhs workers in trusts have not had a second doused of the covid vaccine. in some areas, it could be as high as 22%. there is a big disparity in terms of areas. the government has already said that for care workers in england, they will need to have a vaccination by november. already the law in england on that front. ministers now consulting on whether to extend that to those 1.2 million nhs staff as well, unless they have a medical exemption, but some concern about this idea. unison, the idea which ——
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the union which represents those worker says that if it goes ahead it could make it harder to retain some nhs staff at a time when there is already a shortage in parts of the nhs. as you said, this is a six—week consultation and ministers will have to make a final decision as to whether to go ahead. it is for england only. no plans to introduce mandatory vaccination in wales, scotland or northern ireland at the moment. thank you. the scottish parliament will vote this evening on plans to bring in a vaccine passport scheme for entry to nightclubs, major sporting events and concerts. if it does, scotland will be the first nation in the united kingdom to use the passports. but concerns have been raised about how the scheme would work and both labour and the liberal democrats have said they'll vote against the proposals. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. this was a big game for scotland for what it meant for the national side and in terms of numbers with more than 40,000
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football fans attending. the next time scotland play at home, though, they might need a covid passport to attend. we'll get them, we're old enough, we're double jabbed, so... people are getting covid tests etc, so why do they need a passport? i think it's a bad idea, _ because it's their choice, isn't it? i work in the nhs, i work on a covid ward and i agree with it. we need it. under the proposal, everyone over 18 who's eligible for vaccination will have to show a vaccine certificate to gain entry to nightclubs. you'll have to be double jabbed for unseated indoor events with audiences of more than 500 people, also if you are in an audience of more than 4,000 at an unseated outdoor event, or at any event with more than 10,000 people attending. backers say the scheme is a way of allowing events like this big football game to go ahead despite surging covid cases, and will help with efforts to avoid imposing further restrictions. but opponents have concerns about civil liberties. and others wonder whether it
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will actually work in practice. it's not clear what timescales clubs will be asked to work to. it's not clear what can be done for those people who don't have a smartphone to be able to download qr codes and engage with the technology. chanting other countries, including italy, ireland and france where there have been protests against vaccine passports have already introduced their own schemes. experts say it has led to an uptake in vaccinations. france brought this in when they were having a real problem with vaccine uptake. and the day after the policy was announced a million people booked theirjabs and it's estimated that around 7 million extra vaccinations have been given because of the introduction of vaccine passports. england has plans to introduce vaccine certification. wales is considering it for higher risk settings. northern ireland has not yet announced a position. holyrood will debate it later.
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the scottish government insists that vaccination certification is a limited, targeted and proportionate response to a very difficult situation. lorna gordon, bbc news. the time is 13.19. our top story this lunchtime: hospital waiting lists in england are now the worst since records began, with more than five and a half million people waiting for routine treatments. coming up... what could be the cause of the mysterious illness affecting america's spies? they call it the havana sydrome. coming up on the bbc news channel... at the us open, novak djokovic continues his bid for the calendar grand slam — winning all four majors in the year. he's into the semifinals where he'll play alexander zverev. emma raducanu was so sure she'd be
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knocked out of the us open that she booked her flight back to the uk a fortnight ago. now the teenager, who's only recently got her a level results, is into the semi finals at flushing meadows after a straight sets win against over belinda bencic of switzerland. emma becomes the first british woman to reach a us open semi final for almost 40 years. laura trott is at the bromley tennis centre where emma trained. what a story. it really is. she had already been described as a new star of british tennis before she arrived in new york and she has now ended a 38 year wait for britain to have a woman in the us open singles semifinals. that was in 1983, and she said today that it is amazing to see what emma raducanu has achieved at such a young age. it's been a surreal, sensational summerfor emma surreal, sensational summer for emma raducanu surreal, sensational summerfor emma raducanu and the teenager's fairytale of new york continues. her
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read to the quarterfinal had been majestic, and across the net, fittingly dressed in gold, the olympic champion belinda bencic. on paper, this was emma raducanu's toughest assignment, but she had the answers. , ., , toughest assignment, but she had the answers-_ five _ toughest assignment, but she had the answers._ five games i toughest assignment, but she had the answers._ five games in| answers. unbelievable! five games in answers. unbelievable! five games in a row to take — answers. unbelievable! five games in a row to take the _ answers. unbelievable! five games in a row to take the first _ answers. unbelievable! five games in a row to take the first set, _ answers. unbelievable! five games in a row to take the first set, a - a row to take the first set, a single break in the second was all she needed to seal a spot in the last four and a new status as the british number one, having started in qualifying. even for one so ambitious, this is extraordinary. i didn't expect to be here at all. i mean. — didn't expect to be here at all. i mean. i— didn't expect to be here at all. i mean, i think my flights were booked at the _ mean, i think my flights were booked at the end _ mean, i think my flights were booked at the end of qualifying, so it is a nice problem to have, but i am just really— nice problem to have, but i am just really enjoying the experience. nice problem to have, but i am 'ust really enjoying the experience. emma raducanu has — really enjoying the experience. emma raducanu has come _ really enjoying the experience. emma raducanu has come from _ really enjoying the experience. emma raducanu has come from relative - raducanu has come from relative obscurity. before wimbledon, where she reached the fourth round on her grand slam debut, she was ranked outside the world's top 300 and the tenth desperate, but there were
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signs of what was to come when she beat andy murray in a doubles match last year and she has long been highly thought of within british tennis from a young age. i think eve one tennis from a young age. i think everyone is _ tennis from a young age. i think everyone isjust _ tennis from a young age. i think everyone isjust in _ tennis from a young age. i think everyone isjust in disbelief. - everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew— everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she _ everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she was _ everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she was good, - everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she was good, but - everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she was good, but i. everyone isjust in disbelief. we all knew she was good, but i doj all knew she was good, but i do think— all knew she was good, but i do think anyone _ all knew she was good, but i do think anyone knew— all knew she was good, but i do think anyone knew quite - all knew she was good, but i do think anyone knew quite how i all knew she was good, but i do i think anyone knew quite how good. all knew she was good, but i do - think anyone knew quite how good. we expected _ think anyone knew quite how good. we expected qreat — think anyone knew quite how good. we expected great things _ think anyone knew quite how good. we expected great things from _ think anyone knew quite how good. we expected great things from her, - think anyone knew quite how good. we expected great things from her, but i expected great things from her, but not this— expected great things from her, but not this soon — expected great things from her, but not this soon. in _ expected great things from her, but not this soon-— expected great things from her, but not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not — not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that _ not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that new _ not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that new at _ not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that new at all. _ not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that new at all. she i not this soon. in her box, new coach who is not that new at all. she is i who is not that new at all. she is reunited with andrew richardson from bromley tennis centre, were today youngsters told us they had been motivated by her success. it didn't really matter— motivated by her success. it didn't really matter quite _ motivated by her success. it didn't really matter quite how _ motivated by her success. it didn't really matter quite how much i really matter quite how much experience she had, just how well you can perform on the day. it is amazin: you can perform on the day. it is amazing to _ you can perform on the day. it is amazing to think— you can perform on the day. it is amazing to think that she went to my school _ amazing to think that she went to my school i_ amazing to think that she went to my school i saw — amazing to think that she went to my school. i saw her in the corridors are now — school. i saw her in the corridors are now i — school. i saw her in the corridors are now i am _ school. i saw her in the corridors are now i am watching her on tv. raducanu — are now i am watching her on tv. raducanu says she won't change anything ahead of her semifinal. why change it when it is all going so well for her? well, anyone wanting to watch that semifinal will have to stay up late. she is not due to play
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until around 2am stay up late. she is not due to play untilaround 2am uk stay up late. she is not due to play until around 2am uk time in what is undoubtedly the biggest match of her life. she has already drawn price from schoolchildren to rock star during her rapid rise. it is clear she is already transcending tennis. thank you very much indeed. it's 20 years this weekend since the 9/11 attacks on america, and just ahead of that anniversary, the pre—trial hearing of five men accused of masterminding the attacks has resumed. it's their 42nd appearance in court and the judge is the eighth to have presided over the case, which has been bogged down for years. the hearing has been at guantanamo bay — the prison still for dozens of detainees — and from where our north america correspondent aleem maqbool has sent this report. in a tiny corner of cuba, one notorious by—product of the 9/11 attack still remains. prisoners are still being held in limbo in guantanamo bay. well, of course, the us authorities
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have allowed us to be here but they are extremely restrictive in controlling what we can show in terms of people and structures. they certainly haven't allowed us near the detention facilities where the remaining prisoners are being held. many of these original camps have been long abandoned. now, 39 prisoners remain. some were cleared for release as far back as 2010 but are still waiting to leave. others have been designated forever prisoners because of the threat they're thought to pose. but ten have been charged and are due to face military trials. they include five men accused of involvement in the 9/11 attacks. for the first time in more than 18 months, those five men were in a courtroom together. we couldn't film it, of course, but we were in the gallery behind the glass when these men appeared for their pre—trial hearing. including, at the front here,
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the man with the ginger beard, which is khalid sheikh mohammed, the man who it's believed conceived of the idea of the 9/11 attacks and took that idea to osama bin laden. the proceedings themselves were extremely slow. one of the main obstacles in terms of the arguments going forward is what evidence is admissible and what cannot be admitted because of torture. it's one of the reasons why the family members of victims of 9/11, some of whom were here in the gallery observing events, are unlikely to get a resolution in this case soon. people often ask, is there an end in sight? and for a long time there was not even a middle in sight. but now we are in the middle of the case, because wrestling on the question of the effect that torture has on admissibility of statements is the heart of the case. and so mistakes of the past are having a bearing on the search forjustice now over 9/11.
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and with no trial dates even having been set, the detention centre here looks no closer to shutting down. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in guantanamo bay. they call it havana syndrome, a mysterious illness that disproportionately affects american spies and diplomats. symptoms include hearing strange sounds and a feeling of heat or pressure. the condition was first noticed in the cuban capital, with cases amonst cia officers, but now there are reports of it all around the world. some suspect havana syndrome could be a form of attack by a foreign state using microwaves. here's our security correspondent, gordon corera. cheering and whistling in 2015, the us reopened its embassy in cuba, as relations between the countries were restored, but then something happened. diplomats and spies began to hear sounds and fall ill
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with a mysterious illness that people struggled to explain — what became known as havana syndrome. the trump administration announced friday that it is pulling more than half of its staff out of the american embassy in havana. but it wasn'tjust havana. on a trip to moscow a year later, senior cia officer marc polymeropolous says he suffered similar symptoms. it is real, we have to get our people health care and then we have to find out who's doing this because, as i have always contended, this is an act of war against us officials. the first cases were reported in havana in 2016. the next were in chinain 2018. but this year has seen a new wave including vienna and berlin. and most recently, hanoi in vietnam, affecting the us vice president's visit there. her flight was delayed for several hours because at least one us i diplomat had to be medevaced... but some have questioned
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whether the syndrome is real, suggesting that the stress caused what's called a psychogenic illness of the mind, which is now spreading. when you see mass psychogenic illnesses, there's usually some stressful situation, an underlying situation. and of course, in the case of cuba and the embassy employees, particularly the cia agents, they certainly were in a stressful situation. in the last year, new evidence has emerged. that led a panel of scientists, sponsored by the state department, to conclude that pulsed microwaves were most likely responsible in at least some of the cases. definitive evidence of what started in cuba remains elusive. some link it to electronic surveillance. others, a weapon. but with cases now emerging in every continent, the biden administration has made solving this mystery a national security priority. gordon corera, bbc news.
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now to these — if you have young children, you'll know they've been a recent toy craze on playgrounds across the country. they're a hit with kids and even some adults say they find them soothing. but where did they come from? ben king has been finding out. the idea is very simple, colourful rubber toys with bubbles you can push in and out. but this craze has been decades in the making. the original was developed in the 1970s by two israeli games designers, theo and ora coster. among other games, they designed guess who? years passed and a canadian games company called fox mind bought the idea. it was marketed as last one lost, a game for two players who try not to push out the last bubble. but it didn't sell in great numbers... ..until one arrived in the postbox of a monkey in carolina, usa, who happens to have a big social media following. somebody sent her a pop it for her birthday and it was called the last one.
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and that was the first we'd ever seen of them and i don't know if it was an original or whatnot, but then they started making all these other brands and all her fans just kept sending them and sending them and sending them. it's wild to us, i mean we never imagined that it would ever get to what it's got to. since then, the progress of pop its has been unstoppable, but many of the toys you see on shelves are made by other companies without official licences from theo, ora or fox mind. we get a fraction, a tiny fraction. sales between 500 million, a billion copies. i 99.9% of them are knock—offs, not the best quality. they do what they can to fight the pirates, through the law and by developing new products. but all the same, the brothers say they are happy that the game their parents invented did at last prove a winner. ben king, bbc news. time for a look at the weather.

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