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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 9, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. our top stories — the uk's border force bring more migrants on shore today. france accuses britain of blackmail in a row over who should stop them crossing the channel. meanwhile, in the next hour, president biden will unveil a new strategy for trying to wrestle covid—19 back under control as his own political fortunes are slipping. the usjustice department says it's taking legal action against the state of texas over its new abortion law. plus, 20 years on from 9/11 — we look back at the moment that changed all our lives forever.
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the british government has authorised the border force to turn back small boats carrying migrants across the english channel from france. it marks a new approach by the home secretary, priti patel. up to this point, migrants found in english waters have been brought back to the uk mainland to be processed. she has also threatened to withold £54 mllion of funding which the uk pays to france to patrol their side of the channel. the french interior minister said his country would not be blackmailed and uk plans to return boats were in breach of maritime law. this is the english channel, the stretch of water separating the uk from the continent. in the past week alone, over 1500 people have crossed on small boats and dinghies. that brings the total making the journey so far this year to 12,500, far surpassing last year's total of almost 8500. while the uk continues to see far fewer arrivals and asylum claims than many of its european
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counterparts, the numbers are increasing. there are even reports people—traffickers are now promoting their service on facebook, instagram and tiktok. tim loughton is a conservative mp. hejoins me now from his sussex constituency, which itself is on the english channel. he's also a member of the home affairs select committee. good to have you with us. do you support this idea of pushing the boat back toward france? 1 support this idea of pushing the boat back toward france? i support an hinu boat back toward france? i support anything we _ boat back toward france? i support anything we can — boat back toward france? i support anything we can do _ boat back toward france? i support anything we can do to _ boat back toward france? i support anything we can do to get - boat back toward france? i support anything we can do to get over- boat back toward france? i support anything we can do to get over thisi anything we can do to get over this crisis that we have got at the moment. i'm afraid it's a crisis were ultimately the solution is in the hand of the french government but they are reluctant to take necessary steps. my concerns are that i'm glad the home secretary who has limited powers to really do something about this is trying everything she possibly can. but for all practical purposes turning around really frail, inadequate boats loaded with people in the
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middle of the channel is not a very safe thing to do which is why they have given the caveat it will only be used in very limited circumstances. so as a contribution that i don't think frankly you will have a huge effect. in the last of the ball is for it to end up with capsize boats and people drowning in the channel and had to come back to the channel and had to come back to the home office and the blame will be with the british government. before we talk solutions let's talk politics. what is the truth behind it? is at the margate refugee problem on the french side is beyond the capabilities of the french police and the border patrol? 0r the capabilities of the french police and the border patrol? or is this the french applying only a light touch to the problem and perhaps a way to apply some pressure to the uk government? what do you think is going on? it is to the uk government? what do you think is going on?— think is going on? it is certainly not be on _ think is going on? it is certainly not be on the _ think is going on? it is certainly not be on the french _ think is going on? it is certainly l not be on the french authorities's control. there is one very clear way of stopping this. people are flocking to calais the moment and
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coming to other european countries through france because i think there's a decent chance they can get across the channel at that pace but was to get across with attorney and get into the uk illegally because of the vast majority do not have any legitimate claim for residency in the uk and many of them and we met the uk and many of them and we met the home of virgil kemeny when we went down to visit dover and the barracks, many of them have had their asylum claim presented in france and other european countries. so they are trying to uk as a last resort. if the french were to agree to intercept the boats in the water and bring the occupants back to french territory so they will paid three or £4000 to smugglers for a dangerous journey three or £4000 to smugglers for a dangerousjourney that three or £4000 to smugglers for a dangerous journey that ends up back where they started, or if they would allow the border force if they were picking up migrants in british voters to take them back to calais or french territory wherever they started, that was stock them stone dead. but why would you pay up to smugglers allotment of money for a journey that is going to end up
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where you started. the french need to do that and they refuse to do that and they are allowed to do that under international maritime law and indeed they are obliged to do that under international maritime law because crimes are being committed but they won't. and it's the french playing a lot of politics that's at the real basis of this crisis. well, the real basis of this crisis. well, the want the real basis of this crisis. well, they want because _ the real basis of this crisis. well, they want because of _ the real basis of this crisis. well, they want because of course - the real basis of this crisis. well, they want because of course it i they want because of course it migrants will still be in france and they then have to take responsibility for them. and so much easierfrom responsibility for them. and so much easier from their perspective let them go where they want to go out of them go where they want to go out of the country. them go where they want to go out of the country-— the country. shifting the problem to the country. shifting the problem to the british coast _ the country. shifting the problem to the british coast does _ the country. shifting the problem to the british coast does not _ the country. shifting the problem to the british coast does not solve - the country. shifting the problem to the british coast does not solve the| the british coast does not solve the problem. under eu law, anybody coming into the eu should have their claims processed at their first country of origin. and that clearly is not happening and it was not happening probably when we were members of the eu as well. if they have failed to have asylum applications accepted in france, french authorities should not be allowed them to be at liberty. they should be then put on a plane and wherever possible flown back to
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their country of origin. instead the french won't detain them and they allow them to move north to calais and try and make it a problem for the uk because we havejust and try and make it a problem for the uk because we have just to be at the end of the line. that is not solve the problem and is creating an additional problem for the french because now they have got large what is people living rough and difficult and dangerous conditions particularly with our young people around calais which is causing a lot of problems for the authorities and people living around calais itself. so there is a mutual interest for the french actually to take tougher action. really capable of doing that and capable of detecting these boats we give them all sorts of technology and assistance and resources to do that. but they won't enforce the law and that is the crux of this problem. and that is the crux of this problem-— and that is the crux of this roblem. ., ~ ,, , . ., problem. thank you very much for that. let's bring injames turner qc, a barrister at one king's bench walk specialising in shipping law. the uk border for say the uk borderfor say they the uk border for say they are the uk borderfor say they are in the final stages of training, training the people how to push
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these boats back across the median line towards france. what are the laws that apply here?— line towards france. what are the laws that apply here? good evening. can i “ust laws that apply here? good evening. can i just correct you _ laws that apply here? good evening. can i just correct you on _ laws that apply here? good evening. can i just correct you on the - laws that apply here? good evening. can ijust correct you on the one - can ijust correct you on the one thing _ can ijust correct you on the one thing that— can ijust correct you on the one thing that you muddled meet with the otherjames turner, i practice out of quadrate — otherjames turner, i practice out of quadrate chambers and far for the first person — of quadrate chambers and far for the first person to make that mistake. unimportant modification and i do apologise but thank you for correcting me.— apologise but thank you for correcting me. there are three rinci al correcting me. there are three principal areas _ correcting me. there are three principal areas of law - correcting me. there are three principal areas of law that - correcting me. there are three principal areas of law that are l principal areas of law that are applying _ principal areas of law that are applying here. the first is search and rescue _ applying here. the first is search and rescue. anyone in distress at sea have — and rescue. anyone in distress at sea have to — and rescue. anyone in distress at sea have to be rescued and disembarked at a place of safety. no matter_ disembarked at a place of safety. no matter what their intention and what they were _ matter what their intention and what they were up to before they became distressed. the second is asylum law and — distressed. the second is asylum law. and the problem there is the european — law. and the problem there is the european court of human rights for instance _ european court of human rights for instance is— european court of human rights for instance is made very clear that you cannot _ instance is made very clear that you cannot have — instance is made very clear that you
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cannot have a blanket policy once someone — cannot have a blanket policy once someone is injurisdiction of saving them _ someone is injurisdiction of saving them back— someone is injurisdiction of saving them back to anotherjurisdiction because — them back to anotherjurisdiction because that infringes a fundamental problem _ because that infringes a fundamental problem of asylum law known as which means— problem of asylum law known as which means you _ problem of asylum law known as which means you have to investigate each asylum—seekers's risk of indirect persecution. you cannot simply take a broom _ persecution. you cannot simply take a broom as — persecution. you cannot simply take a broom as it— persecution. you cannot simply take a broom as it were and sweep them all back _ a broom as it were and sweep them all back so — a broom as it were and sweep them all back. ., , ., all back. so even though they are not lucky to _ all back. so even though they are not lucky to be — all back. so even though they are not lucky to be persecuted - all back. so even though they are not lucky to be persecuted in - not lucky to be persecuted in france, let's be honest, you cannot have a 1—size—fits—all solution for everybody on that boat? have a 1-size-fits-all solution for everybody on that boat?- everybody on that boat? that's riuht. everybody on that boat? that's right- and _ everybody on that boat? that's right. and the _ everybody on that boat? that's right. and the risk— everybody on that boat? that's right. and the risk is _ everybody on that boat? that's right. and the risk is not - everybody on that boat? that's right. and the risk is not then i right. and the risk is not then being — right. and the risk is not then being persecuted in france, the risk is that— being persecuted in france, the risk is that they— being persecuted in france, the risk is that they might be sent by france to another— is that they might be sent by france to another country where they could be persecuted. in that assessment has he _ be persecuted. in that assessment has he made in a person by person basis _ has he made in a person by person basis. so— has he made in a person by person basis. has he made in a person by person basis, has he made in a person by person basis. ., , has he made in a person by person basis. . , ., basis. so tim said a number of the --eole basis. so tim said a number of the peeple have _ basis. so tim said a number of the people have already _ basis. so tim said a number of the people have already been - people have already been processed and failed their asylum claim in france so all the french in breach of international law?— france so all the french in breach of international law? know, if they have been that _ of international law? know, if they have been that assessment - of international law? know, if they have been that assessment in - of international law? know, if they i have been that assessment in france, they are _
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have been that assessment in france, they are not _ have been that assessment in france, they are not a breach. what they have _ they are not a breach. what they have not— they are not a breach. what they have not done is carry through and deport _ have not done is carry through and deport them. but the home office is hardly— deport them. but the home office is hardly in_ deport them. but the home office is hardly in a _ deport them. but the home office is hardly in a position to waive the finger— hardly in a position to waive the finger at— hardly in a position to waive the finger at the french for that because _ finger at the french for that because the slow process of deportation here is in itself a matter— deportation here is in itself a matter of— deportation here is in itself a matter of almost legend. what about the other loss — matter of almost legend. what about the other loss because _ matter of almost legend. what about the other loss because there - matter of almost legend. what about the other loss because there is - matter of almost legend. what about the other loss because there is none | the other loss because there is none of the law and that is the international regulations for prevention of collisions at sea? which strikes me would be possible infringement here because you are effectively trying to force boats back across this line in one of the busiest shipping channels in the world? ., �* , busiest shipping channels in the world? . �*, , . ., world? that's right. the prospect of the border force _ world? that's right. the prospect of the border force vessel _ world? that's right. the prospect of the border force vessel coming - world? that's right. the prospect of the border force vessel coming into | the border force vessel coming into contact _ the border force vessel coming into contact with a migrant vessel and is fervently— contact with a migrant vessel and is fervently possible for domestic law to permit _ fervently possible for domestic law to permit that. but the difficulty is there — to permit that. but the difficulty is there a — to permit that. but the difficulty is there a many other vessels using nesters— is there a many other vessels using nesters of— is there a many other vessels using nesters of water for navigation. and the risk— nesters of water for navigation. and the risk is _ nesters of water for navigation. and the risk is that although no doubt the risk is that although no doubt the first— the risk is that although no doubt the first time pushback was attempted it we prayerfully safe,
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the second time it might be a bit less safe — the second time it might be a bit less safe and as he pushed back vessel thenjust drive to less safe and as he pushed back vessel then just drive to come back again— vessel then just drive to come back again into — vessel then just drive to come back again into uk territorial waters, one can — again into uk territorial waters, one can imagine individuals getting a bit stressed, should we say? and the making — a bit stressed, should we say? and the making of the maritime disaster as with _ the making of the maritime disaster as with any— the making of the maritime disaster as with any other is the erosion of safety— as with any other is the erosion of safety margins and that is what would — safety margins and that is what would he — safety margins and that is what would be the riskier that eventually margins _ would be the riskier that eventually margins would be eroded and there would _ margins would be eroded and there would he _ margins would be eroded and there would be quite a serious maritime casualty— would be quite a serious maritime casualty involving probably a commercial vessel and either a lrorder— commercial vessel and either a border force or a migrant vessel. a border force or a migrant vessel. difficult issue. james turner, from quadrate chambers, thank you very much indeed for being on the programme, thank you. in the next hour, joe biden will set out a new six—point plan to tackle the covid pandemic. the roll—out of the vaccine has hit a wall, with 75 million americans still not protected. the president's chief medical adviser, anthony fauci, said the effect of that is that americans are catching the virus at ten times the rate needed
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to bring the virus under control. so, the president is planning to tackle that by bringing in vaccine mandates for federal workers and government contractors. no doubt he will welcome a decision taken by the los angeles school board, the second—biggest in the country, to mandate vaccines for all children over the age of 12. that said, there is already a fairly high take—up of the vaccine among teenagers in los angeles county, with 60.8% of the 12—15 age group having had at least one dose, though still a fair bit lower than the number of parents vaccinated. 73% of 30—49—year—olds in la have now had at least one dose. let's bring in our senior north america reporter anthony zurcher. good to see you. is this perhaps part of a pattern? does that big a school board introduced a mandate and others follow? i school board introduced a mandate and others follow?— and others follow? i think that definitely could _ and others follow? i think that definitely could be _ and others follow? i think that definitely could be the - and others follow? i think that definitely could be the case. i and others follow? i think that - definitely could be the case. there have and other school districts such as one in virginia, fairfax county,
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that was requiring vaccination people participating in high school athletics but this is the logical next step. many school districts require all sorts of different vaccines, los angeles is simply adding the covid—19 vaccine to it but i think we see los angeles go you are going to see other school districts follow. so i think across the board you are seeing more and more requirements for vaccinations. you mentioned joe biden with this mandate for government workers to be vaccinated. reportedly another part of this plan is to require any us employer with more than 100 employees to either mandate their workforce be vaccinated or have weekly testing. that is a significant step up in the pressure on the private sector to have vaccinations, notjust the ones that are directly government employees underjoe biden positive control. so if we are sitting across the board now. b. if we are sitting across the board now. �* ., if we are sitting across the board now. . . ., , ., ., now. a quarter of the population ad'usted now. a quarter of the population adjusted to _ now. a quarter of the population adjusted to vaccines _ now. a quarter of the population adjusted to vaccines is _ now. a quarter of the population adjusted to vaccines is difficult l adjusted to vaccines is difficult for the president because no doubt there are good many of the people who don't want to listen to the president on anything. they're from the other side so to speak. so he is
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limited in what he could do. what about the six—point plan? will be the thrust of it be? i about the six-point plan? will be the thrust of it be?— the thrust of it be? i think the thrust of it — the thrust of it be? i think the thrust of it will _ the thrust of it be? i think the thrust of it will be _ the thrust of it be? i think the thrust of it will be trying - the thrust of it be? i think the thrust of it will be trying to i the thrust of it be? i think the l thrust of it will be trying to use the thrust of it be? i think the i thrust of it will be trying to use a private sector workforce, the employers to pressure individuals to get vaccinated. you are right, the government can only go so much telling people that need to show them the benefits of being vaccinated, but what the body administration is going to do is use workplace regulation, city regulations to get these employers to mandate that their employees get vaccinated. and they cite in the report this going to be released soon that tyson foods which is a large employer in the country, they did not require vaccinations in about half of their workforce was vaccinated but is and is a set of acquiring vaccinations, that went up to 70 or 80% so there is very real changes when these vaccines become mandated in that gets people to get off the fence and get vaccinated. some other important news in the
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last few hours out of washington and i will get your thoughts on the attorney general just announcing that there will be a legal challenge to the new abortion laws in texas. the us government orjust a saying it is suing texas and will sue other states that take similar action. have a look. today, after a careful assessment of the facts and the law, the justice department has filed a lawsuit against the state of texas. our position is set out in detail in our complaint. its basis is as follows. sb8 bans nearly all abortions in the state after six weeks of pregnancy, before many women even know they are pregnant and months before a pregnancy is viable. it does so even in cases of rape, sexual abuse or incest. and it further prohibits any effort to aid the doctors who provide pre—viability abortions or the women who seek them. the act is clearly unconstitutional
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under long—standing supreme court precedent. it isa it is a wedge issue, this, in the us and the democrats clearly very angry about it. they are limited in what they can do but from a political perspective, does this play well for them going up to the midterm was in 2022? ~ , ., them going up to the midterm was in 2022? ~ _, ., ~ ., 2022? when you talk to democrats, the feel 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like _ 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like they _ 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like they have _ 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like they have been - 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like they have been a i 2022? when you talk to democrats, they feel like they have been a gift i they feel like they have been a gift in a way by this texas law which had no exceptions for rape or incest, had very severe limitations on when you can get an abortion and most women would not even know they were pregnant before those six weeks past. so i think they see this as making abortion a political issue, a ballot box issue that they can run on for the midterm elections. and people are going to care about it and turn up the bow on it. it's going to activate their base and we talk about midterm elections, who wins, who loses and a lot of it
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depends on getting your base or core voters motivated to come out of the polls. so they hate this texas law and are very afraid of what these abortion resources giving women, they also see this as a political opportunity that they can take advantage of.— opportunity that they can take advantae of. r ., , . ., advantage of. anthony in washington, thank ou advantage of. anthony in washington, thank you very — advantage of. anthony in washington, thank you very much. _ stay with us on bbc news. still to come, 20 years on from 9/11, we look at the attacks lasting impact. the scottish parliament has voted to introduce a domestic "vaccine passport" scheme in the country. it means only people who've been fully vaccinated will be allowed into nightclubs, major sporting events, and many concerts and festivals. so, any certification scheme cannot be based on a guarantee of no transmission, but is about allowing some of our higher—risk settings to operate more safely when the potential alternative would be closure. furthermore, this will help to protect those who are more vulnerable.
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for example, those who either cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons or who because of underlying medical conditions did not respond effectively to the vaccine. in addition, we believe that certification will encourage a proportion of the eligible population who remain unvaccinated to get vaccinated. that is something we've seen in otherjurisdictions. of course, like any covid measure, we should not use it for a moment longer than is needed. you're watching bbc news 24 and our business coverage which we can go to now and they show us that one of the world's tallest buildings in the heart of the business district of manhattan, the world trade center, appears to be on fire. music. there
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is a further- -- _ appears to be on fire. music. there is a further... there _ appears to be on fire. music. there is a further... there is _ appears to be on fire. music. there is a further... there is a _ appears to be on fire. music. there is a further... there is a further i is a further... there is a further dramatic explosion we are just witnessing here. dramatic explosion we are “ust witnessing here.i dramatic explosion we are “ust witnessing here. jesus, lord jesus! peole are witnessing here. jesus, lord jesus! people are standing _ witnessing here. jesus, lord jesus! people are standing around - people are standing around talking to each _ people are standing around talking to each other — people are standing around talking to each other and _ people are standing around talking to each other and nodding - people are standing around talking to each other and nodding their. to each other and nodding their headsm — to each other and nodding their heads... , , ., , ., to each other and nodding their heads... , ., , ., ., heads... just to update you, that latest picture _ heads... just to update you, that latest picture that _ heads... just to update you, that latest picture that we _ heads... just to update you, that latest picture that we have i heads... just to update you, that latest picture that we have seen | heads... just to update you, that | latest picture that we have seen is one of the world trade center towers collapsing. these are truly extraordinary and horrific scenes, and we have seen an explosion at the pentagon in washington, dc. also we believe hijacked in the boston area. make no mistake, the united states will hunt down and punish those responsible for these cowardly acts. music.
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anybody old enough to remember 9/11 knows exactly where they were that day, the moment the second plane hit the south tower and what we felt in the immediate aftermath. and in the space of those two moments, in those terrifying few seconds, the world changed. so, ahead of saturday's anniversary, we are going to spend tonight's programme looking back, notjust at the day, 9/11 itself, but everything that followed, right up to today�* events and the chaotic us withdrawal from afghanistan, which is quite ambitious in the short time we have available, but we do have five terrific guests whose stories you will want to listen to. we will begin with ron christie, who was in the west wing that day as a legal adviser to the president, george w bush, and also with us, samantha ravich, former deputy national security adviser to vice president dick cheney. welcome to you both. ron, i want to
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start with you because i know this is tough for you to talk about. we met each other for a number of years and you very rarely talk about it. take us back to that day. what was it like? but was your experience? good evening to you and just a point of clarification on 9/11, i was actually the deputy domestic policy adviser to vice president dick cheney with my good calling samantha, but i can tell you it was a beautiful morning. and it was a crisp day and there was not a cloud in the sky. and we brief the vice president on domestic policy at nine a:m.. i was sitting at my desk and my boss, domestic policy adviser, said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? i said said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? isaid no said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? i said no and said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? isaid no and i said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? i said no and i turned said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? isaid no and i turned it said hey, ronnie, are you watching tv? i said no and i turned it on and use of this plane just repeatedly lying in the sky and hitting the world trade center. when i thought there is no way this could happen. it's a beautiful day here. it's a beatable day in new york. and then he saw the second plane hit the
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second tower. and he realised that this was an act of terrorism. and i ran down the hall and the secret service has eight desk right in front of the vice president's ceremonial office and i asked the agent if he knew what was going on. and at that point, christian, the vice president's secret service detail came running out of the core door and they had all sorts of heavy artillery. and theyjust ran out past me and they ran downstairs. and the agent told me, he sent him a rock, we think there is a plane that's headed the white house. and stay away from the windows and give your staff out and we think you've got about two minutes. and that's when it strikes you that where you are, you cannot leave that building. not into minutes and get out. and i ran down and i told my staff or my colleagues to get out and then i called my parents and i told them, i say, i'm not sure if you're watching what's going on, but we have been
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told there is a plane that might be coming our way and we might not make it out and coming our way and we might not make it outandi coming our way and we might not make it out and i just wanted to say goodbye if this does not work. nothing more horrific, christian, that reaching out to your family and thinking you might perish and i yet feel guilty for this reflection because there are so many people whose loved ones did not come home that day. but i was fortunate that nothing happened to us. but it's as raw and as rare and unexposed nerve 20 years on now as it was then and on december the 11th, 2001. ads, on december the 11th, 2001. a landscape of emotions from ron. fear, naturally, guilt, obviously but anger as well. where were you at that moment? 0r but anger as well. where were you at that moment? or even the same building? that moment? or even the same buildin: ? ., , . building? yet, i was in the white house complex. _ building? yet, i was in the white house complex. i _ building? yet, i was in the white house complex. i was _ building? yet, i was in the white house complex. i was working i building? yet, i was in the white | house complex. i was working on the national— house complex. i was working on the national security staff for vice president dick cheney. and i was upstairs— president dick cheney. and i was upstairs when one of my colleagues
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who worked for the president. and we are talking _ who worked for the president. and we are talking about north korea or china _ are talking about north korea or china because those were the big issues _ china because those were the big issues of— china because those were the big issues of the day. this was only a few months— issues of the day. this was only a few months past when china forced down _ few months past when china forced down on _ few months past when china forced down on a — few months past when china forced down on a p3 plan we really thought that the _ down on a p3 plan we really thought that the big issue were going to have _ that the big issue were going to have to — that the big issue were going to have to deal with was china. we were at the _ have to deal with was china. we were at the tv— have to deal with was china. we were at the tv on— have to deal with was china. we were at the tv on and on the first plane hit at _ at the tv on and on the first plane hit at our— at the tv on and on the first plane hit at our first reaction was that's awful. _ hit at our first reaction was that's awful. i_ hit at our first reaction was that's awful, i plane hit the world trade center! _ awful, i plane hit the world trade center! we do national security. and it was— center! we do national security. and it was still— center! we do national security. and it was still kind of incomprehensible. i went downstairs to my— incomprehensible. i went downstairs to my office, the second plane hit. the secret — to my office, the second plane hit. the secret service like ron said, we were behind — the secret service like ron said, we were behind closed and locked doors because _ were behind closed and locked doors because of— were behind closed and locked doors because of national security reasons, _ because of national security reasons, but they burst in and they said get— reasons, but they burst in and they said get out— reasons, but they burst in and they said get out of the building, a plane — said get out of the building, a plane is— said get out of the building, a plane is headed in your direction! and we _ plane is headed in your direction! and we were instructed to immediately take home classify material— immediately take home classify material that was on our desks and put it— material that was on our desks and put it in_ material that was on our desks and put it in the — material that was on our desks and put it in the heavy safes. kind of
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yelling against every fibre in our body— yelling against every fibre in our lrody to— yelling against every fibre in our body tojust run yelling against every fibre in our body to just run from that building, but we _ body to just run from that building, but we had — body to just run from that building, but we had to secure our information and we _ but we had to secure our information and we did _ but we had to secure our information and we did so. and then i was one of the few— and we did so. and then i was one of the few civilians in our office. a wonderful— the few civilians in our office. a wonderful marine who worked for us kind of gathered us all and most of the civilians because we did not know _ the civilians because we did not know what we were doing, pushed us down _ know what we were doing, pushed us down the _ know what we were doing, pushed us down the stairs, pushed us out on 17th st. _ down the stairs, pushed us out on 17th st, found a concrete column behind _ 17th st, found a concrete column behind which we could shelter away from glass. and we stood there, we stood _ from glass. and we stood there, we stood there. — from glass. and we stood there, we stood there, you know, feeling like the world _ stood there, you know, feeling like the world had begun to shift under our feet _ the world had begun to shift under our feet l — the world had begun to shift under our feet. ., ., ., , . ., our feet. i want to review a section from your — our feet. i want to review a section from your boss's _ our feet. i want to review a section from your boss's book, _ our feet. i want to review a section from your boss's book, ron. i our feet. i want to review a section | from your boss's book, ron. around 10:15 a:m., from your boss's book, ron. around 10:15a:m., uniform military from your boss's book, ron. around 10:15 a:m., uniform military and came 10:15a:m., uniform military and came in the 10:15 a:m., uniform military and came in the room 10:15a:m., uniform military and came in the room and 10:15 a:m., uniform military and came in the room and determine a plane believe hijacked was 80 miles out and headed for dc. did our fighter pilots have authority to shoot down an american commercial airliner believed to have been
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hijacked? yes, isaid, without hesitation. that's an extraordinary decision for any leader to have to take. ., , , decision for any leader to have to take. . , , ,. decision for any leader to have to take. ., , , ., .,, take. undoubtedly so and as samantha knows uuite take. undoubtedly so and as samantha knows quite well _ take. undoubtedly so and as samantha knows quite well the _ take. undoubtedly so and as samantha knows quite well the vice president i knows quite well the vice president is such a remarkable and humble and feeling person. and from his stint from having been a member of congress, or have in the white house he was staff and then vice president of the united states, i cannot imagine the emotions that had to of been going through his head to unequivocally say, yes, we should take down that airliner. recognising that there could have been hundreds of innocent civilians on that plane but not recognising whether or not they have been taken over by terrorists. and for those of us who worked in the white house on that day and for those of us who were in government thereafter, these are the raw things that we speak about, christian, of how difficult it was to try to get america back on track but those are some terrible
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decisions that no one should ever have to account for and it ever have to make the final call of, yes, let's bring it down.— to make the final call of, yes, let's bring it down. rhonda smith will stay with _ let's bring it down. rhonda smith will stay with us _ let's bring it down. rhonda smith will stay with us we _ let's bring it down. rhonda smith will stay with us we will _ let's bring it down. rhonda smith will stay with us we will talk i let's bring it down. rhonda smith| will stay with us we will talk plane more about this. do stay with us. —— —— want samantha. hello there. we've seen two things happening today, a drop in temperature and also some heavy rain falling, too. now, as expected, the best of the weather was across the south east of england, here in east anglia and also into lincolnshire. temperatures in cambridge were 25 degrees. it was 26 celsius this afternoon in norwich and 24 celsius in hull. further west, temperatures have been lower, and charterhall there on the scottish borders at 29 celsius yesterday. a significant drop in temperature today because of the rain clouds that we've seen, some storms that have been affecting the uk. most of those have been across northern and western areas. now, there'll still be some heavy showers around as we head further into the night, particularly across scotland, the heavier rain moving northwards and continuing to be pretty wet in the north east of scotland.
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a few showers elsewhere across some parts of england and wales. many places turning dry, but it's quite muggy air that we've got, so there will be some mist and fog around perhaps in the morning from the midlands northwards where the winds are light. that will tend to lift, there's not going to be a huge amount of sunshine tomorrow. once again, we'll see those showers developing more widely. this time, though, we shouldn't see as many showers across wales and the south west, but we'll see many more showers across eastern parts of england. again, those are going to be heavy and could well be thundery, too. but still some decent enough temperatures of the year, 23—24 degrees in eastern england before those showers get going, 20—21 celsius for many other parts of the uk. all the showers have been courtesy of this area of low pressure. that's going to start to run away as we head further into the weekend, so things are going to turn drier. but as the low pressure moves away, we're going to start to draw in a north—westerly breeze, and that will drop the temperatures as we head through the weekend. now, we've still got some
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rain around on saturday across northernmost parts of scotland, but away from here, fewer showers, lighter showers, many places will be dry, perhaps not huge amounts of sunshine, mind you, and the winds for many will be light. and temperatures are dropping away, though, in scotland and northern ireland, only around 17 celsius, a bit warmer, though, as you head south and east across england into wales. for the second half of the weekend, the rain is gone from northern scotland, and again, there are very few showers. many places will be dry. there's still a fair bit of cloud around on sunday. this rain looks like it's going to stay away from most areas, but that cooler air is starting to arrive even across england and wales, where we're seeing a top temperature of 20—21 celsius in the south east and east anglia.
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i was at the trade union of congress, was about to get my speech to it. i was in my hotel room in brighton, you know, iwas to it. i was in my hotel room in brighton, you know, i was preparing my speech, then i was interrupted by one of my press people who came in and said to me, there is something on the —— you'd take neck tv, and you have to watch it. so i went there to read the tv was in the sitting room, the first plane had hit, just didn't know what to do. we weren't sure whether she did speech or not, i decided i would carry on with the speech, then i went back and preparing again and i was called backin and preparing again and i was called back in again, and this time the second plane had hit, and it was obvious this was a major terrorist attack. really, from that moment on,
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the whole of my premiership changed. global policy change from that moment. it all changed — for him — and for the president with whom he built such an unlikely relationship. but at that moment tony blair was in brighton, somewhat remote from what was now unfolding. while in london a number of senior civil servants and diplomats were being plunged into a situation they could never have rehearsed. here is the map on 9/11 of the air traffic over the united states and over the atlantic. moments before the decision is taken to close the air space. which of these planes posed a threat? the only way to find out was to ground them all. the only plane left in the sky was air force one. ron christie and samantha ravich are still with us. i also want to welcome ashley prime, a very good friend of mine, who was at the time manning the us desk at the foreign and commonwealth office, which on 9/11 had just four other members of staff.
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so that you are, this little team of five in the fco, how did you find out what was unfolding?- out what was unfolding? well, christian, _ out what was unfolding? well, christian, good _ out what was unfolding? well, christian, good evening, i out what was unfolding? well, christian, good evening, like l out what was unfolding? -ii christian, good evening, like around him it was a beautiful day and london is welcome and it was lunch time for us, i got a phone call saying a plane had gone into the world trade center, my first reaction was coming out, it was a small light aircraft perhaps, and in those days for me didn't have the luxury of logging onto the internet and getting a mobile phone to find out what's going on. we found a television in our office that we didn't actually have an aerial socket to fire, so our first priority apart from wringing our consulate in new york was to make in aerial out of an old coat hanger, which we did pretty successfully and it worked. so that's how we found out that the first plane had gone
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down. we watched the second thing going in and at that point, the fun wasjust ringing off going in and at that point, the fun was just ringing off the hook. going in and at that point, the fun wasjust ringing off the hook. what wasjust ringing off the hook. what were our wasjust ringing off the hook. what were your priorities? _ wasjust ringing off the hook. what were your priorities? who are you trying to get hold of at that moment? i trying to get hold of at that moment?— trying to get hold of at that moment? , , ,.,, ., moment? i suppose there were a number of — moment? i suppose there were a number of things. _ moment? i suppose there were a number of things. firstly, - moment? i suppose there were a number of things. firstly, we i number of things. firstly, we wanted to find out what was going on, and at best, it was confusing. 0ur to find out what was going on, and at best, it was confusing. our team in the consulate in new york and the embassy in washington themselves by trying to find out, you know, exactly what had happened. when of my colleagues in the consulate in new york you might remember he got on a bicycle somewhere in midtown manhattan and he went on his bicycle after the first plane hit and cycled down. he didn't get very far, and he went back to the office, but by the time you get back to the office and i don't know how he did it, but somehow, he managed to procure a complete set at the passenger manifest list from the first two aircraft. so he was giving dictation
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to myself and my colleagues about the names of the people on board. we at that point need the names but didn't know nationalities and you know come in response to question, who is ringing i sob, cabinet office, numberten, members of parliament, what's going on, what can we do, can be held because mike is this a terrorist attack is making many pretty citizens are involved because mike the focus for us was on the terrorist side on the counterterrorism side, but then equally how many prints were involved. wejust equally how many prints were involved. we just didn't know at that time. involved. we “ust didn't know at that time. , ,., , involved. we 'ust didn't know at that time.— involved. we “ust didn't know at that time.— that time. everybody wants a statement. _ that time. everybody wants a statement, and _ that time. everybody wants a statement, and suddenly i that time. everybody wants a j statement, and suddenly you that time. everybody wants a i statement, and suddenly you are asked to draught the first comments by the queen, i imagine in the situation normally went something like this unfolds it does to the top level and is draughted over several hours, but they were just five of you. hours, but they were “ust five of ou. , ., ., ., you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had — you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had to _ you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had to get _ you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had to get something - you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had to get something out i you. the statement for the queen, we knew we had to get something out and
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get it out quick, so ijust sat at my desk and on my computer i sort of bash to paragraph out, which i thought was you know, at that time appropriate. actjudgment the third plane hadn't gone in at that point. it hadn't crashed into the pentagon, so the story was... you know, i sent an e—mail over to buckingham palace and said, you know, this is a statement we wanted to get close to the american people to show our solidarity and understanding, and sent a note overthrew the palace signed by the cream to do president bush and to the american people. let's stop there for a second then fast forward to this. on my orders from the united states not to— on my orders from the united states not to as _ on my orders from the united states not to as big and strikes against al-anda — not to as big and strikes against al-qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the taliban— and military installations of the taliban regime in afghanistan. let's talk to two people who saw first hand the impact of that decision to invade.
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bilal sarwary, is an afghan journalist, a former bbc colleague who covered that war and was forced to leave afghanistan in recent weeks, and lila crouse—lipscomb whose son sgt. michael pedersen was killed while on tour with us forces in iraq. i want to start with you if i could, what did you feel on 9/11? like everybody _ what did you feel on 9/11? like everybody else. _ what did you feel on 9/11? i age: everybody else, disbelief. this can't be happening to america, and i was at work. i was basically in charge of the company at the time because the senior staff was gone, and when the first one had we automatically went to the television. the second one hit and it's like, 0k, we are government funded agency, what do we do? by the time that third one hit the pentagon, we where closed down
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completely, the entire country was basically closing down. everybody just went home and for days, even wherejust just went home and for days, even where just stuck watching the television, knowing... has where just stuck watching the television, knowing... has had a hute television, knowing... has had a huge impact _ television, knowing... has had a huge impact on _ television, knowing... has had a huge impact on your— television, knowing... has had a huge impact on your son, i television, knowing... has had a l huge impact on your son, clearly, because what he already in the military? he because what he already in the milita ? ., , because what he already in the milita ? . , ., ., , military? he was already in the milita , military? he was already in the military. and — military? he was already in the military, and he _ military? he was already in the military, and he was _ military? he was already in the military, and he was stationed| military? he was already in the i military, and he was stationed in savannah georgia. that was the beginning of the english, the pride, knowing that my son was going to keep us safe, knowing that i was fearful because at a time like that, you know what the bottom line could be, you could lose your loved one. so there was just a lot of up—and—down emotions and it was just a really difficult, difficult time for us. �* �* , for us. but it didn't end up in afghanistan, _ for us. but it didn't end up in afghanistan, he _ for us. but it didn't end up in afghanistan, he ended i for us. but it didn't end up in afghanistan, he ended up. for us. but it didn't end up in afghanistan, he ended up in| for us. but it didn't end up in i afghanistan, he ended up in iraq. now, exactly. 50 afghanistan, he ended up in iraq. now. exactly-— afghanistan, he ended up in iraq. now, exactly. so how do you feel?
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how do you — now, exactly. so how do you feel? how do you feel — now, exactly. so how do you feel? how do you feel about _ now, exactly. so how do you feel? how do you feel about the - now, exactly. so how do you feel? | how do you feel about the exercise to invade afghanistan, given the fact that your son died in a country that had nothing to do with the terrorist attacks?— terrorist attacks? when i got first of all, terrorist attacks? when i got first of all. before _ terrorist attacks? when i got first of all, before my _ terrorist attacks? when i got first of all, before my son _ terrorist attacks? when i got first of all, before my son went i terrorist attacks? when i got first of all, before my son went to i terrorist attacks? when i got first | of all, before my son went to iraq, he came home for christmas and that was the last time we got to see him, but he pulled me aside and he shared with me that he was given strict orders that he wasn't supposed to say anything to anybody, but that when he went back to savannah he would be shipped to iraq because the president was sending them there, supposedly, to get bin laden. but he knew that bin laden was in afghanistan and he was confused as to why he was being sent to iraq. we will come back to that in a second. i want to bring in, i will come back to that in a second. iwant to bring in, i beg will come back to that in a second. i want to bring in, i beg your iwant to bring in, i beg your pardon, i want to bring in, i beg your
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pardon, lila, buti i want to bring in, i beg your pardon, lila, but i think i remember you telling you some time ago when interviewed you that at the time of 9/11, you where in pakistan. but where you doing there? i was working at a shop selling _ where you doing there? i was working at a shop selling rather fake _ at a shop selling rather fake antiques, actually i must admit, and carpets, _ antiques, actually i must admit, and carpets, and — antiques, actually i must admit, and carpets, and i had very little hope for my— carpets, and i had very little hope for my future, for the future of my family— for my future, for the future of my family in_ for my future, for the future of my family in afghanistan, and on that day, we _ family in afghanistan, and on that day, we had a lot of people from japan, _ day, we had a lot of people from japan, and — day, we had a lot of people from japan, and remember it very clearly, tourists— japan, and remember it very clearly, tourists you — japan, and remember it very clearly, tourists you know, who would come and buy— tourists you know, who would come and buy stuff from the shops in that hotel. _ and buy stuff from the shops in that hotel, when i suddenly looked at the tv, the _ hotel, when i suddenly looked at the tv, the first — hotel, when i suddenly looked at the tv, the first plane hit the buildings in new york and everybody thought— buildings in new york and everybody thought that perhaps it is an accident. _ thought that perhaps it is an accident, a terrible one. the second when _ accident, a terrible one. the second when everyone knew what was coming, and later— when everyone knew what was coming, and later they, the next time i like you know. — and later they, the next time i like you know, 12 hours, everything changed — you know, 12 hours, everything changed. suddenly you know, the lobby— changed. suddenly you know, the lobby of— changed. suddenly you know, the lobby of the hotel was followed,
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packed — lobby of the hotel was followed, packed with reporters from all over the world, — packed with reporters from all over the world, and i was straightaway offered _ the world, and i was straightaway offered a — the world, and i was straightaway offered a job with abu dhabi tb from the united _ offered a job with abu dhabi tb from the united arab emirates and for a very short — the united arab emirates and for a very short time, i worked with them in some _ very short time, i worked with them in some memberas very short time, i worked with them in some member as of the anti—caliban for status, and then i crossed _ anti—caliban for status, and then i crossed into — anti—caliban for status, and then i crossed into afghanistan under the taliban— crossed into afghanistan under the taliban when the americans where carrying _ taliban when the americans where carrying out air strikes against them, — carrying out air strikes against them, so _ carrying out air strikes against them, so in many ways, i became the accidental— them, so in many ways, i became the accidentaljournalist because of accidental journalist because of that, _ accidental journalist because of that, you — accidentaljournalist because of that, you know, attack, and everything changed. the americans toppled _ everything changed. the americans toppled the taliban, obviously, and i toppled the taliban, obviously, and i never— toppled the taliban, obviously, and i never even imagined that i would basically— i never even imagined that i would basically end up being a reporter or everyone _ basically end up being a reporter or everyone thought that be a strike and that— everyone thought that be a strike and that would be over, we have to remember, — and that would be over, we have to remember, in 98, the americans did carry— remember, in 98, the americans did carry out— remember, in 98, the americans did carry out you — remember, in 98, the americans did carry out you know, strikes using
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air strikes— carry out you know, strikes using air strikes against al-qaeda as well _ air strikes against al-qaeda as well. ., . ,, well. you are right. the us did tuickl well. you are right. the us did quickly move _ well. you are right. the us did quickly move to _ well. you are right. the us did quickly move to drive - well. you are right. the us did quickly move to drive that i well. you are right. the us did i quickly move to drive that taliban from power. very shortly afterwards, they had set up military bases near other major cities in afghanistan. the most senior members that had not been captured had already escaped to neighbouring pakistan. america's attention had turned to another part of george bush's mission. nation—building. today we focus on afghanistan, but the battle is broader. - every nation has a choice to make in this conflict, i there is no neutral ground. if any government sponsors the outlaws and killers i of innocents, they have become i outlaws and murderers themselves. and they will take that lonely path at their own peril. - let me pick up with you, because obviously you have not lived in afghanistan for many years, post 9/11, he went back as a journalist.
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what happened in those next few years such that the americans lost the trust of the afghan people? i remember covering the fighting when the americans where looking for a bin laden— the americans where looking for a bin laden and other al-qaeda operatives, and i remember members of the _ operatives, and i remember members of the us— operatives, and i remember members of the us special forces and perhaps members _ of the us special forces and perhaps members of the central intelligence agency— members of the central intelligence agency really bringing in a lot of cash _ agency really bringing in a lot of cash in — agency really bringing in a lot of cash in does oreo cookie boxes and distributing — cash in does oreo cookie boxes and distributing it amongst various warlords — distributing it amongst various warlords that commit was one of those _ warlords that commit was one of those scenes that we thought, ok, that's— those scenes that we thought, ok, that's kind — those scenes that we thought, ok, that's kind of things happened, but is, the _ that's kind of things happened, but is, the consequences of such a relationship that the united states had wet _ relationship that the united states had wet those warlords and commanders really, you know, drove the afghan— commanders really, you know, drove the afghan people away from the government. these have the same character is — government. these have the same character is who brought shame and misery— character is who brought shame and misery on _ character is who brought shame and misery on afghanistan during the 1990s _ misery on afghanistan during the 1990s. they wear a massive
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impairment to the afghan government to the _ impairment to the afghan government to the central government, they went keep coming you know, taxes, they were _ keep coming you know, taxes, they were taking — keep coming you know, taxes, they were taking expressions, many of them _ were taking expressions, many of them had — were taking expressions, many of them had clear links to criminal networks— them had clear links to criminal networks as well as to the lucrative heroin _ networks as well as to the lucrative heroin trade. i would also like to think— heroin trade. i would also like to think that — heroin trade. i would also like to think that shutting the window immediately, you know, not allowing the taliban— immediately, you know, not allowing the taliban to come and negotiate while _ the taliban to come and negotiate while they where willing was another misstep _ while they where willing was another misstep. let while they where willing was another misste -. , ., ., misstep. let me bring in lila at this point. _ misstep. let me bring in lila at this point. lila. _ misstep. let me bring in lila at this point, lila, your— misstep. let me bring in lila at this point, lila, your son i misstep. let me bring in lila at this point, lila, your son died i misstep. let me bring in lila at. this point, lila, your son died on april two, 2003 while in iraq. it was very clear, wasn't dead, not many years after 9/11, that the attempt to nation failed in these countries is going awry, did you get that as a mother watching from home? i dead, a day because you have to think that first of all, why are we trying to build and when we are not
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building ourselves? this is what you are thinking, and then you are thinking, 0k, well, we have to do peace treaties, we have to help people, but it was clear that those in charge where basically getting rich off of the war, so many of us are still thinking like, 0k, well, they keep talking but afghanistan, then how come we are still all over in iraq. why are we so focused on saddam hussein, and now! in iraq. why are we so focused on saddam hussein, and now i can see, hearing about the cash and the 0reo boxes, come on,... hearing about the cash and the oreo boxes, come on,...— boxes, come on,... before i let you to, lila, boxes, come on,... before i let you go. lila. when _ boxes, come on,... before i let you go. lila. when you _ boxes, come on,... before i let you go, lila, when you look— boxes, come on,... before i let you go, lila, when you look back - boxes, come on,... before i let you go, lila, when you look back on i go, lila, when you look back on 9/11, this weekend, 20 years on, it does its colour the way it that you remember what happened? ida. does its colour the way it that you remember what happened? no, because the way remember _ remember what happened? no, because the way remember it _ remember what happened? no, because the way remember it happening - remember what happened? no, because the way remember it happening is i remember what happened? no, because the way remember it happening is the i the way remember it happening is the last i think about it today. i still
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don't have real answers. what caused the terrorists to attack us. and i believe it's because we think that we are all that in a can of coke in america when basically we are that in a can of coke, but we aren't better than anybody else, unfortunately, like all around the world, greed steps in and greed runs things, and we have so many fake politicians in a world today that are just on the coat hangers about the people that have the money that are running the country and that's the way it has been for the last 20 years, and unfortunately, it continues today.— years, and unfortunately, it continues today. lila, for the moment. _ continues today. lila, for the moment, thank— continues today. lila, for the moment, thank you - continues today. lila, for the moment, thank you very i continues today. lila, for the i moment, thank you very much. in the decade that followed, there were many attempts made by the united states government to locate 0sama bin laden. the crucial bit of information came from prisoners in guantanamo bay who gave the intelligence officers the pseudonym of an al-qaeda courrier. in 2009, us officials they discovered that courier, known as al—kuwaiti,
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lived in abbottabad in northern pakistan. and in 2010 they followed him to a compound. tonight, i can report to the american people into the world that the united states has conducted an that killed osama bin laden — the leader of al-qaeda — and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. ron and samantha are back with us. samantha, did you think on that night that the wire on terror had come to an end? and do you think that in a way close that chapter for the american people in afghanistan because mike did it change from that moment on the way people viewed the war in afghanistan? i moment on the way people viewed the war in afghanistan?— war in afghanistan? i think for many dead. i war in afghanistan? i think for many dead- lthink— war in afghanistan? i think for many dead. i think for _ war in afghanistan? i think for many dead. i think for many, _ war in afghanistan? i think for many dead. i think for many, it _ war in afghanistan? i think for many dead. i think for many, it was, i dead. i think for many, it was, you know, long in coming and that kind of for those of us who are still
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actively engaged on many different parts of fighting the war on terror, which, remember, we called the global war on terror, we knew it wasn't over. it was, we needed to do that, he needed to be taken out, but the situation and had metastasized and it continued to continue to be attached to the homeland. and if i may, if i canjust got back attached to the homeland. and if i may, if i can just got back you know, to those days after we were attacked on the homeland on 9/11, because, you know, has ransacked some of the emotions that came to the fore that they, fear, terror, angen the fore that they, fear, terror, anger, anger that people had come into our house, killed our people all, ifelt into our house, killed our people all, i felt very close at hand. when i got to the white house, six a:m.,
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september 12, i got to the white house, six a:m., september12, one i got to the white house, six a:m., september 12, one of the jobs i got to the white house, six a:m., september 12, one of thejobs i was given by the vice president was to be that daily threat matrix which had hundreds and hundreds of plots against different parts of the united states and americans overseas. you know, it rarely does something to your head as a wife, daughter, a sibling, a mother at that point of two children under five. reading all the different ways that people around the world wanted kill them. and going home at night and realising that this may be the last night, i kiss my children. it got very personal, and it hasn't ended. it hasn't ended. i got very personal, and it hasn't ended. it hasn't ended.- got very personal, and it hasn't ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking _ ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to _ ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to all— ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to all of _ ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to all of you, - ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to all of you, in i ended. it hasn't ended. i can hear that talking to all of you, in fact, i that talking to all of you, in fact, clearly the emotions are still rock, as you stay committed the death of bin laden heal any wounds for you? it was apparent victory, christian. obviously. — it was apparent victory, christian. obviously, as samantha sat commit was something that needed to be
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done, _ was something that needed to be done, it— was something that needed to be done, it was something that the united _ done, it was something that the united states military with a great training _ united states military with a great training and discipline carried anodes, _ training and discipline carried anodes, but at the same time, those of us _ anodes, but at the same time, those of us have _ anodes, but at the same time, those of us have been involved in government service for many years recognised — government service for many years recognised wasjust the beginning, this was— recognised wasjust the beginning, this was not a closing of a chapter, but an— this was not a closing of a chapter, but an opening of another. it's one that remains with us to this day, and let— that remains with us to this day, and let me — that remains with us to this day, and let me underscore what samantha said, because i think it's so important, for those of us who reported — important, for those of us who reported to work on september 12, i think that _ reported to work on september 12, i think that south was in many ways far more _ think that south was in many ways far more difficult than showing up to work— far more difficult than showing up to work on— far more difficult than showing up to work on the 11th. because we shifted — to work on the 11th. because we shifted from domestic priorities to domestic— shifted from domestic priorities to domestic consequences, what do we do to make _ domestic consequences, what do we do to make sure _ domestic consequences, what do we do to make sure that we don't get hit again? _ to make sure that we don't get hit again? what do we deal with the commercial aviation that has been shut down? maritime fleet shut down? everything _ shut down? maritime fleet shut down? everything in the country let's shut down, _ everything in the country let's shut down, and — everything in the country let's shut down, and we wanted to ensure that the vice _ down, and we wanted to ensure that the vice president, the vice president at all the information that they— president at all the information that they could to reassure the american — that they could to reassure the american people that as badly as we
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had been _ american people that as badly as we had been hit the day before that we would _ had been hit the day before that we would find — had been hit the day before that we would find a way to reopen and regain — would find a way to reopen and regain our— would find a way to reopen and regain our sense of democracy and freedom. — regain our sense of democracy and freedom, and those days and samantha knows _ freedom, and those days and samantha knows this— freedom, and those days and samantha knows this very well and weeks and months _ knows this very well and weeks and months and years that followed were very difficult to fire many of us who _ very difficult to fire many of us who had — very difficult to fire many of us who had the privilege and opportunity to serve the american people _ opportunity to serve the american people l — opportunity to serve the american --eole. , ., opportunity to serve the american eo le. , . ., , opportunity to serve the american eo le, , ., ., , , opportunity to serve the american --eole. , t, ., , , ., people. i set it at the outset up to 90's programme _ people. i set it at the outset up to 90's programme that _ people. i set it at the outset up to 90's programme that i _ people. i set it at the outset up to 90's programme that i am - people. i set it at the outset up to 90's programme that i am taking | 90's programme that i am taking everything that unfolded his too much going programme, but at some point you look back at some of it because i think in many basic kinds of people will review the interest rate is taken. so in the final few minutes that we have to may want to look back at that day in the context of what has just unfolded in afghanistan. ron, samantha, ashley is back with us as well. samantha, worth it? ~ ., , is back with us as well. samantha, worth it? ~ . , ., is back with us as well. samantha, worth it? . ., k, , . worth it? was whiteware effect? olivet, afghanistan, _ worth it? was whiteware effect? olivet, afghanistan, chasing i worth it? was whiteware effect? i olivet, afghanistan, chasing down 0livet, afghanistan, chasing down bin laden, the wear and iraq, 0livet, afghanistan, chasing down bin laden, the wearand iraq, it 0livet, afghanistan, chasing down bin laden, the wear and iraq, it all flowed from that day, was it worth
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that's crazy lol when you say was it worth it, it it sound as, you know, as if it were an option, right? we were attacked on our homeland, they struck us in new york and in washington, if they could have struck us more they would. we had no choice but to you know, to... lots of different frames and choice but to you know, to... lots of different frames— of different frames and from ways this could have _ of different frames and from ways this could have proceeded, i of different frames and from ways this could have proceeded, if i of different frames and from ways this could have proceeded, if you| this could have proceeded, if you break it, you own it, right? the pottery barn theory, so to speak him out of international relationships that we somehow had to own and nation belt, there was an alternative theory which is, coming up alternative theory which is, coming up to me a break it, you own it. i could have gone in, taken atop off of a terrorist and unleash the fury and wrap and left you know, we decided not to do that because they
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are aware, you know, afghans suffering under taliban rule and you know, we wanted to be there to get a hand and help them as well. it became something that we became mired in. their instincts not to lead the people underneath that role and have more of a chance that it was going to come back again, you know, was something that led us to that the session, but there was an alternative, which is you know, we break it, you own it. and i don't know whether that is going to be utmost in peoples minds going forward are not. fin utmost in peoples minds going forward are not.— utmost in peoples minds going forward are not. on a two or three minutes left. _ forward are not. on a two or three minutes left, but _ forward are not. on a two or three minutes left, but i _ forward are not. on a two or three minutes left, but i want _ forward are not. on a two or three minutes left, but i want to - forward are not. on a two or three minutes left, but i want to get i minutes left, but i want to get ashley and ran in as well. actually, we talked today about how this all worked out for the uk. obviously we went into afghanistan under article five of the nato convention, we went in together, not necessarily certain that we came out together and what we really knew about the peace deal, but where does that leave the
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relationship, do you think, between the uk in the united states today on this anniversary? first the uk in the united states today on this anniversary?— this anniversary? first of all, we alwa s this anniversary? first of all, we always start _ this anniversary? first of all, we always start with _ this anniversary? first of all, we always start with the _ this anniversary? first of all, we always start with the plaintive i always start with the plaintive thing — always start with the plaintive thing that the special relationship at the _ thing that the special relationship at the us, and i think that has probably— at the us, and i think that has probably changed over the last 20 years. _ probably changed over the last 20 years, primarily because the world has changed, america's foreign policy, — has changed, america's foreign policy, strategic policy noise last year up — policy, strategic policy noise last year up and much more china. you now, _ year up and much more china. you now. anyhow, _ year up and much more china. you now, anyhow, the relationship that we have _ now, anyhow, the relationship that we have had has added and flowed, there _ we have had has added and flowed, there were — we have had has added and flowed, there were times that if you go back to the _ there were times that if you go back to the 60s _ there were times that if you go back to the 60s when we wouldn't commit to the 60s when we wouldn't commit tojoin_ to the 60s when we wouldn't commit tojoin the _ to the 60s when we wouldn't commit tojoin the us to the 60s when we wouldn't commit to join the us and vietnam, to the 60s when we wouldn't commit tojoin the us and vietnam, and we -ot tojoin the us and vietnam, and we got over— tojoin the us and vietnam, and we got over that, equally, a small minor— got over that, equally, a small minor one _ got over that, equally, a small minor one in the 80s when the united states— minor one in the 80s when the united states rolled up the beaches and grenade — states rolled up the beaches and grenade out which is a commonwealth country— grenade out which is a commonwealth country without consulting the uk. we kind _ country without consulting the uk. we kind of— country without consulting the uk. we kind of get over that, and there are plenty— we kind of get over that, and there are plenty of other world leaders who do— are plenty of other world leaders who do you have heard them say it, there _ who do you have heard them say it, there is— who do you have heard them say it, there is no— who do you have heard them say it, there is no stronger relationship between — there is no stronger relationship between canada and the united states or israel— between canada and the united states or israel and united states are fans in the _ or israel and united states are fans in the united states, so plenty of
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other— in the united states, so plenty of other countries believe that they have _ other countries believe that they have a _ other countries believe that they have a special relationship with the us, but. _ have a special relationship with the us, but, you know, ithink no doubt that it _ us, but, you know, ithink no doubt that it has _ us, but, you know, ithink no doubt that it has changed because, as he said the _ that it has changed because, as he said the web has changed dramatically.— said the web has changed dramatically. said the web has changed dramaticall . . , ., , ., dramatically. ran, before i let you to, talk dramatically. ran, before i let you go. talk to — dramatically. ran, before i let you go. talk to me _ dramatically. ran, before i let you go, talk to me about _ dramatically. ran, before i let you go, talk to me about the - dramatically. ran, before i let you go, talk to me about the lapel, i dramatically. ran, before i let you| go, talk to me about the lapel, the badge on your lapel, what is at the clay this was the really the commemoration one year on of september 11, those of us who worked in the white house received this pain in the white house received this ai ., in the white house received this -ai . , in the white house received this -ai ., , , ., in the white house received this ai ., , , ., ., in the white house received this ai ., , t, pain and it reminds you of something that the president _ pain and it reminds you of something that the president said _ pain and it reminds you of something that the president said after- pain and it reminds you of something that the president said after we i pain and it reminds you of something that the president said after we had i that the president said after we had been attacked — that the president said after we had been attacked when _ that the president said after we had been attacked when he _ that the president said after we had been attacked when he said, - that the president said after we had been attacked when he said, we i that the president said after we had| been attacked when he said, we will not tire, _ been attacked when he said, we will not tire, we — been attacked when he said, we will not tire, we will— been attacked when he said, we will not tire, we will not _ been attacked when he said, we will not tire, we will not falter, - been attacked when he said, we will not tire, we will not falter, we - not tire, we will not falter, we will not — not tire, we will not falter, we will not fail _ not tire, we will not falter, we will not fail. and _ not tire, we will not falter, we will not fail. and this - not tire, we will not falter, we will not fail. and this was the| will not fail. and this was the unfurling _ will not fail. and this was the unfurling of— will not fail. and this was the unfurling of a _ will not fail. and this was the unfurling of a giant _ will not fail. and this was the unfurling of a giant americani will not fail. and this was the i unfurling of a giant american flag at the _ unfurling of a giant american flag at the pentagon _ unfurling of a giant american flag at the pentagon to _ unfurling of a giant american flag at the pentagon to show - unfurling of a giant american flag at the pentagon to show the i unfurling of a giant american flagl at the pentagon to show the world that in_ at the pentagon to show the world that in the — at the pentagon to show the world that in the deepest _ at the pentagon to show the world that in the deepest days _ at the pentagon to show the world that in the deepest days after i at the pentagon to show the world that in the deepest days after a i that in the deepest days after a terrorist — that in the deepest days after a terrorist attack— that in the deepest days after a terrorist attack that _ that in the deepest days after a terrorist attack that we - that in the deepest days after a terrorist attack that we stand i terrorist attack that we stand strong, — terrorist attack that we stand strong, resolute _ terrorist attack that we stand strong, resolute as _ terrorist attack that we stand i strong, resolute as americans and terrorist attack that we stand - strong, resolute as americans and we will come _ strong, resolute as americans and we will come back— strong, resolute as americans and we will come back stronger— strong, resolute as americans and we will come back stronger and - strong, resolute as americans and we will come back stronger and more i will come back stronger and more resolute _ will come back stronger and more resolute in— will come back stronger and more resolute in the _ will come back stronger and more resolute in the face _ will come back stronger and more resolute in the face of— will come back stronger and more resolute in the face of terrorism, i resolute in the face of terrorism, and they— resolute in the face of terrorism, and they only _ resolute in the face of terrorism, and they only wear _ resolute in the face of terrorism, and they only wear this - resolute in the face of terrorism, and they only wear this pendant i resolute in the face of terrorism, i and they only wear this pendant and i guarantee — and they only wear this pendant and i guarantee you _ and they only wear this pendant and i guarantee you samantha _
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and they only wear this pendant and i guarantee you samantha does- i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome — i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome i— i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome i only— i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome i only wear— i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome i only wear this - i guarantee you samantha does this is welcome i only wear this on - is welcome i only wear this on september— is welcome i only wear this on september 11, _ is welcome i only wear this on september", i— is welcome i only wear this on september 11, i wanted - is welcome i only wear this on september 11, i wanted to- is welcome i only wear this on september 11, i wanted to add is welcome i only wear this on - september 11, i wanted to add this to show— september 11, i wanted to add this to show your— september 11, i wanted to add this to show your viewers _ september 11, i wanted to add this to show your viewers around - september 11, i wanted to add this to show your viewers around the l to show your viewers around the world _ to show your viewers around the world a — to show your viewers around the world a very _ to show your viewers around the world a very small— to show your viewers around the world a very small token, - to show your viewers around the world a very small token, but i to show your viewers around the world a very small token, but a i to show your viewers around the - world a very small token, but a very powerful— world a very small token, but a very powerful symbol _ world a very small token, but a very powerful symbol that _ world a very small token, but a very powerful symbol that means - world a very small token, but a very powerful symbol that means so - world a very small token, but a very. powerful symbol that means so much to me _ powerful symbol that means so much to me and _ powerful symbol that means so much to me and marry— powerful symbol that means so much to me and many others _ powerful symbol that means so much to me and many others who - powerful symbol that means so much to me and many others who are - to me and many others who are privilege — to me and many others who are privilege to _ to me and many others who are privilege to work _ to me and many others who are privilege to work for _ to me and many others who are privilege to work for the - to me and many others who are . privilege to work for the american government— privilege to work for the american government 20 _ privilege to work for the american government 20 years _ privilege to work for the american government 20 years on. - privilege to work for the american government 20 years on.- privilege to work for the american government 20 years on. thanks for watchinu. hello. temperatures were five to ten degrees lower on thursday. quite the change, especially in scotland where, on wednesday, scotland had its highest september temperature in over 100 years. the change coming with some rain as well may not be a bad thing where it has been so dry, from an area of low pressure which is sitting right across us during friday. the day could well start still from it — some intense downpours towards the north and north—east of scotland. elsewhere, plenty of cloud to begin the day, it's misty, it's murky. there will be a few showers from the word go, but a few more will get going as we go on through the day, and if you catch one, it could well be heavy and perhaps thundery. there will be some sunny spells developing too, more especially across central
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and eastern parts of the uk, and temperatures quite widely still creeping into the low 20s, but something cooler is just around the corner. that's as this area of low pressure moves away into the weekend, and the flow of air around it comes down from the north, and so it will turn cooler and fresher, more than it has already across scotland, northern ireland and northern england in particular as we go on through the weekend, though it will be a gradual process. so let's take a look at saturday. from that area of low pressure moving away, there is still a trailing weather front close to scotland. so more likely in northern scotland there'll be some outbreaks of rain, scattered showers elsewhere, not as many as on previous days. it means more places will stay dry, variable cloud, sunny spells. we're talking high teens and low 20s. now, going into sunday, behind that area of low pressure, a ridge of high pressure is building in. we will need to watch this weather front approaching from the south—west. it's not nailed on, but it's not out of the question that could come
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close enough to deliver some outbreaks of rain towards south—western areas on sunday, whereas elsewhere, there will be a few showers around but also some sunny spells too. but notice how temperatures have sunk away a bit further in belfast, glasgow and newcastle — down towards mid—teens in some spots. so high pressure for a time moving in, but how long will it last? well, not very long. it looks as if this weather front out towards the west may actually develop into an area of low pressure. that is not guaranteed, but it does mean more likely that western areas could will see some wet weather during monday, but it may not be in exactly that position. there is a lot to play for in the detail of how next week's weather is going to play out. if you are away from that area of rain, you'll get variable load, sunny spells, the chance for a shower. so an approaching weather front willjust maintain the chance of seeing some outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland, northern ireland on tuesday and then we need to look to the south and an area of low pressure drifting up towards southern england, and that may begin to bring some outbreaks of heavy, thundery rain. away from the two areas, it could well stay dry,
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variable cloud, sunny spells, the chance for a shower. so this area of low pressure maintains the chance of seeing some thundery rain on wednesday and then we look to the atlantic as low pressure starts to feed in a weather front with its rain, but uncertainty here about how much of that rain will move across us and perhaps be blocked before it does so by high pressure in scandinavia. so there's a lot to work out how these weather patterns are going to interact and influence over our weather into next week. so there is uncertainty. overall, it looks like low pressure will be close by, so there will be some rain at times, either coming up from the south or approaching from the west. temperatures close to average but still the potential for some warmth, especially across southern areas for a time. a lot to work out, and we will on weather for the week ahead.
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tonight at ten, a damning report into a private hospital where three people with learning difficulties died. cawston park hospital in norfolk is now closed, but the report says other similar facilities should no longer receive public money. 36—year—old joanna bailey had learning difficulties. she should have been checked on every 30 minutes. on the night she died she'd been left alone for two hours. it makes me feel very angry because i think if they'd done what they should have done, if they'd cared forjoanna as they should have done, she might have been alive today. the report hightlighted an excessive use of restraint and overmedication. also tonight, a new record for the number of people in england
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waiting for hospital treatment — more than 5.6 million amid warnings

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