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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 13, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning and welcome to monday and to bbc news. here are your headlines. boris johnson is finalising the details of the government's strategy for tackling coronavirus in england this winter nearly a third of people arriving in england and northern ireland as the delta variant took off may have broken quarantine rules. what next for new teenage tennis sensation, emma raducanu? she says she's ready for anything, and can cope with her rise to stardom after winning the us open. what will her win do for tennis? how does it make you feel to have a good news story for once? you can message us on twitter or instagram. the other headlines... north korea claims to have successfully test fired two new long—range cruise missiles — capable of hitting japan.
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a new blood test trial, designed to detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear, begins today. and britney spears gets engaged to her long—term boyfriend — days after the star's father filed court papers to end his 13—year control of her affairs. the prime minister is finalising the government's strategy for tackling coronavirus in england over the autumn and winter months — ahead of a press conference tomorrow. boris johnson will announce a decision on whether booster jabs are to be given. he is expected to repeal some emergency covid powers. downing street says vaccines will remain the "first line of defence" as the autumn and winter will bring renewed challenges.
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it's also emerged that nearly a third of people arriving in england and northern ireland as the coronavirus delta variant took off may have broken quarantine rules. more than 300,000 cases were passed to investigators between march and may, according to figures seen by the bbc. the government was not able to say how many of these were found to have broken the rules or could not be traced. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. nearly 90% of those of us aged over 16 in the uk have now had a first dose of covid vaccine. and 80% of us have had both jabs. the prime minister will say this is what has allowed so much of a normal life to return, and so soon it will be time for older people to get a third jab. borisjohnson will also announce plans to get rid of any covid related powers the government no longer needs, but to keep others.
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the legal authority via the coronavirus act to close schools and some businesses in england will be ditched, but other elements of the coronavirus act will be kept such as the requirement to self—isolate having testing positive, and the provision of sick pay from day one to those self—isolating. final decisions await on making it easier to travel abroad, and vaccinating healthy 12 to 15—year—olds. it's a delicate balancing act for ministers to try and strike here. health secretary sajid javid acknowledging that covid and other viruses "like autumn and winter," as he put it. cases could go up. and the nhs is already under significant pressure. chris mason, bbc news.
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those coming from amber countries were required to self—isolate for ten days and require evidence of self covered tests. people arrived from a number of countries and figures show a total of 300,000 cases were referred to investigators for checks on whether they actually were self isolating. let's speak to the shadow home secretary, hello to you. good morning. what do you think of the fact that 300,000 cases were passed investigators? i’m of the fact that 300,000 cases were passed investigators?— passed investigators? i'm afraid this simply _ passed investigators? i'm afraid this simply confirms _ passed investigators? i'm afraid this simply confirms our - passed investigators? i'm afraid this simply confirms our worst l this simply confirms our worst fears. the government's approach to our borders during the pandemic was lax, i have argued that throughout and i argue that the government should do better. now it seems that there were 300,000 people who referred on to investigators, we
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don't know exactly what happened in those cases. and the period we are talking about, victoria, between march and may is when the delta variant took hold in this country. we know borisjohnson delayed and now we know we have over 300,000 cases but the government can't actually say what precisely has happened. the british people stepped up happened. the british people stepped up during the pandemic but i'm afraid the government didn't. if aw; afraid the government didn't. if any of those cases _ afraid the government didn't. if any of those cases were _ afraid the government didn't. if any of those cases were found - afraid the government didn't. if any of those cases were found to - afraid the government didn't. if any of those cases were found to be people who weren't self isolating, but the government can't tell us how many did actually break the rules, what are the implications of that? the implications are huge, because we know that the delta variant taking hold of this country, if it had been delayed, the relaxation of the restrictions in england, we know that, we know the difficulties that the delta variant is causing, so yet
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again here we have an example where real government incompetence and government failure has caused huge issues for the british people. i am afraid this just confirms the worst fears that we have had throughout. the problems of the government in terms of its approach to the border would lead to such adverse consequences.— would lead to such adverse conseuuences. , ., consequences. are you shocked that so many peeple _ consequences. are you shocked that so many people potentially - consequences. are you shocked that so many people potentially decidedl so many people potentially decided to just not to follow the rules when they came to the uk?— they came to the uk? well, look, i think potentially, _ they came to the uk? well, look, i think potentially, of— they came to the uk? well, look, i think potentially, of course, - they came to the uk? well, look, i think potentially, of course, if- think potentially, of course, if thatis think potentially, of course, if that is the case, then i am shocked by that, but we also have to take into account the context here. these were people who either couldn't be contacted or they were people who when they were contacted gave answers that suggested that they might not be complying with the rules. but the government, we are
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told, i held a debate and vote in parliament back on the 1st of february where i tried to get the government to introduce a comprehensive hotel system, the government didn't follow that advice, continued with the system that they had and they continued with the system that clearly wasn't working. with the system that clearly wasn't workinu. ., ~ ,, with the system that clearly wasn't workinu. . ~ ,, ., with the system that clearly wasn't workinu. ., ~' ., ., ~ with the system that clearly wasn't workinu. ., ~ ., ., ~ ., working. thank you for talking to us. the working. thank you for talking to us- the home — working. thank you for talking to us. the home office _ working. thank you for talking to us. the home office has - working. thank you for talking to us. the home office has said - working. thank you for talking to us. the home office has said it | us. the home office has said it aimed to pay, it aims to pay home visits to travellers suspected of not following the rules. thank you for your time today. teenage tennis star emma raducanu says she's ready for anything and can cope with her rise to stardom after winning the us open. the 18—year—old is expected to do a round of interviews today with american television networks and is predicted to become one of the sport's biggest earners. —— stars. 0ur correspondent james reynolds has more. just a warning, his report contains flash photography. some new eras are born slowly but others start all in one go.
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emma raducanu comes away from the us open with a trophy, a £1.8 million cheque, and a message of congratulations from the queen. i've got no idea what's going on, not at all. i've got no clue. but anything that comes my way, i'm ready to deal with it and i've got great people around me to take me through these moments and they got me here, and, yeah, i'm very excited to celebrate with them later and also go home and to see everyone back home. now we rest, recover, and then we go again. that's what we do. she's given uk customs fair warning of the kind of silverware she'll have to declare on her return home. where she might find herself doing more of this. this summer, she was photographed by vogue magazine. she'd just come out of wimbledon and was just a ray of sunshine, really, and incredibly confident, very poised, it really felt
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like nothing could really faze her. speaks mandarin. after her victory in new york, emma raducanu greeted fans in mandarin. raising her profile in her mother's country of origin. but fame doesn't win matches. oh, my god! so, how far can her tennis skills take her? champions do look like they belong from the get go, right? they're not overwhelmed by the occasion. when they have a big win, they follow it up the next day because they're not done. they're just getting started. so they always look like they belong. but she took it to a whole new level, again, with her emotions and her poise. she's got a long way to go, she's just getting started. so hold your horses, hall of famer, of course, and the only question is how many majors will she win. she'll be number one in the world, most likely. for now, though, emma raducanu will have to settle with being world number 23.
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a summit to the very top comes in stages. james reynolds, bbc news. alan blount was emma's headteacher at newstead wood school in 0rpington, where she was a student until only a few months ago. she finished her a levels and got an a in maths and an a in economics. miss, alan, hello to you. how are you feeling? the pupils must be buzzing. it’s you feeling? the pupils must be buzzinu. v ., , . buzzing. it's really exciting here. s-ueakin buzzing. it's really exciting here. speaking on _ buzzing. it's really exciting here. speaking on behalf _ buzzing. it's really exciting here. speaking on behalf of _ buzzing. it's really exciting here. speaking on behalf of all - buzzing. it's really exciting here. i speaking on behalf of all students, past present and future, we are also proud of emma, so proud and wisher a massive congratulations for our whole community. find massive congratulations for our whole community.— massive congratulations for our whole community. and what a lovely erson she whole community. and what a lovely person she seems _ whole community. and what a lovely person she seems to _ whole community. and what a lovely person she seems to be, _ whole community. and what a lovely person she seems to be, as - whole community. and what a lovelyl person she seems to be, as obviously been a completely and absolutely talented tennis player. what been a completely and absolutely talented tennis player.— been a completely and absolutely talented tennis player. what we she like? what you _ talented tennis player. what we she like? what you see _ talented tennis player. what we she like? what you see is _ talented tennis player. what we she like? what you see is what - talented tennis player. what we she like? what you see is what you - talented tennis player. what we she like? what you see is what you get. like? what you see is what you get with her, she is that amazing individual. she is an amazingly individual. she is an amazingly individual person and she is living her dream and that comes across on the camera, with that great big
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beaming smile and through her eyes and that is who she is. she beaming smile and through her eyes and that is who she is.— and that is who she is. she seemed really normal- _ and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and _ and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and i _ and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and i mean - and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and i mean that - and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and i mean that as l and that is who she is. she seemed really normal. and i mean that as a massive compliment. _ really normal. and i mean that as a massive compliment. yes. - really normal. and i mean that as a massive compliment. yes. and - really normal. and i mean that as a i massive compliment. yes. and hugely grounded. when you look at the interview she has done and she is talking about living in the moment and keeping focused on taking one step at a time, that is exactly what we would expect of her and that is what we are seeing. and i have every confidence that that is what she is going to do over the next few weeks and months as she loves where she has got herself to with her tennis. did you know, i mean, she has been with you since year seven, did you know that she could achieve something like this? she know that she could achieve something like this? know that she could achieve somethin: like this? ,, ., , something like this? she was always ti ed for something like this? she was always tipped for great _ something like this? she was always tipped for great things _ something like this? she was always tipped for great things and _ something like this? she was always tipped for great things and you - something like this? she was always tipped for great things and you just i tipped for great things and you just never know whether it is all really going to come good, but every sign was there. the tennis centre that we have on site was speaking very highly of her, we knew she was competing at top level as a junior, but was it all going to come good?
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well, it did. it did. i wonder what something does like for your school, something does like for your school, something like this, and until recently a former pupil who was achieving such success as a young age. achieving such success as a young ace. ~ ., achieving such success as a young ace.~ . ,. achieving such success as a young ae. ., . ., . age. we have plastic -- fantastic --uils age. we have plastic -- fantastic popils here _ age. we have plastic -- fantastic popils here and _ age. we have plastic -- fantastic pupils here and it's _ age. we have plastic -- fantastic pupils here and it's great - age. we have plastic -- fantastic pupils here and it's great to - pupils here and it's great to celebrate all of them but i think about emma is a she was just here a few weeks ago, she was here and collecting her a—levels and it makes it that much more realfor the students that are here now. they can do this because somebody who was here just a couple of weeks ago is now doing it and making memories and writing the history books. it's a fantastic achievement and something which our students now there is no excuse. you can live your dreams and work hard and play hard.— work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't know — work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't know if— work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't know if you _ work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't know if you saw _ work hard and play hard. absolutely. i don't know if you saw the _ i don't know if you saw the conversation on social media which was about her background. her own twitter bio says she london— slash
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shenyang — bucharest. she arrived as a two—year—old and lives in bromley, her mum is from china, her dad is from romania, what does this say about her background and the reality of being british? i about her background and the reality of being british?— of being british? i think it 'ust shows what i of being british? i think it 'ust shows what a i of being british? i think it 'ust shows what a global �* of being british? i think itjust shows what a global society . of being british? i think itjustl shows what a global society we of being british? i think itjust - shows what a global society we live in and it epitomises that. all of those experiences from travelling around the world, different cultures, different experiences, and her lived experiences added to her being the person she is. and look at what she exemplifies there in front of us each and every day.— what she exemplifies there in front of us each and every day. thank you very much — of us each and every day. thank you very much for— of us each and every day. thank you very much for your _ of us each and every day. thank you very much for your time _ of us each and every day. thank you very much for your time today. - of us each and every day. thank you very much for your time today. i - very much for your time today. i hope the excitement lasts for days and weeks at your school. thank you very much. alan is the head teacher of emma ruddock can or�*s former secondary school.
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the bbc�*s tim muffett is at the lta's national tennis centre in roehampton with scott lloyd, who's the chief executive of the lawn tennis association. i was watching that match and i thought i would love to get back on the court and have look around and then i found out that i was going to come here and interview the chief executive of the lta who must be a very happy man because this is like your dreams come true. yes. very happy man because this is like your dreams come true.— your dreams come true. yes, for tennis, your dreams come true. yes, for tennis. it's _ your dreams come true. yes, for tennis, it's such _ your dreams come true. yes, for tennis, it's such a _ your dreams come true. yes, for tennis, it's such a great - tennis, it's such a great opportunity but who couldn't be inspired by what emma did on saturday night? we are all very proud and excited and it was such an inspirational moment. she proud and excited and it was such an inspirational moment.— inspirational moment. she is ambassador _ inspirational moment. she is ambassador of _ inspirational moment. she is ambassador of the _ inspirational moment. she is ambassador of the new - inspirational moment. she is| ambassador of the new tennis programme. ambassador of the new tennis programme-— ambassador of the new tennis programme. ambassador of the new tennis rouramme. , ., ., ,, programme. tell us about that. she is the ambassador _ programme. tell us about that. she is the ambassador for _ programme. tell us about that. she is the ambassador for lta _ programme. tell us about that. she is the ambassador for lta youth, i is the ambassador for lta youth, which is our overarching... we are working through the local park with a local club just the same. it's the
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first national curriculum for tennis and focuses on physical literacy and skills for tennis that applies to any boy or girl in the country. some local school— any boy or girl in the country. some local school pupils _ any boy or girl in the country. some local school pupils have _ any boy or girl in the country. some local school pupils have come - any boy or girl in the country. some local school pupils have come along here, they have been inspired, we will chat to some of them in a second but this is what it's about, getting more people interested in the game. getting more people interested in the name. ~ , getting more people interested in the name. , , ~ getting more people interested in theuame. , ~ , . the game. absolutely. and since we launched it at _ the game. absolutely. and since we launched it at the _ the game. absolutely. and since we launched it at the beginning - the game. absolutely. and since we launched it at the beginning of- the game. absolutely. and since we launched it at the beginning of the l launched it at the beginning of the year, we have had over 10,000 pupils in primary school register their interest and now they are training kids to play tennis in a school environment. this is very much about what it is about and i have no doubt emma can be an inspiration for these kids and others.— kids and others. thanks ever so much. kids and others. thanks ever so much- leo. _ kids and others. thanks ever so much. leo, you _ kids and others. thanks ever so much. leo, you watch - kids and others. thanks ever so much. leo, you watch the - kids and others. thanks ever so l much. leo, you watch the game, kids and others. thanks ever so - much. leo, you watch the game, what did you think? it much. leo, you watch the game, what did you think?— did you think? it was amazing. she made history _ did you think? it was amazing. she made history after— did you think? it was amazing. she made history after what, _ did you think? it was amazing. she made history after what, almost i did you think? it was amazing. she | made history after what, almost 50 years? amazing. how inspirational is that? very inspirational because before i watched the match and so she won, i was planning on applying
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tennis any more. but since she won she has inspired me to continue playing tennis and getting better at game. playing tennis and getting better at came. ~ , ., . playing tennis and getting better at came. ~ ,, ., ., ., playing tennis and getting better at came. ~ ., ., ., , game. while you are doing a very aood 'ob game. while you are doing a very good job this _ game. while you are doing a very good job this morning, _ game. while you are doing a very good job this morning, i - game. while you are doing a very good job this morning, i have - good job this morning, i have seen your shots. what you think of amazing victory? i your shots. what you think of amazing victory?— your shots. what you think of amazing victory? i think she did very well. _ amazing victory? i think she did very well. like _ amazing victory? i think she did very well, like a _ amazing victory? i think she did very well, like a lot _ amazing victory? i think she did very well, like a lot of - amazing victory? i think she did very well, like a lot of well - amazing victory? i think she did | very well, like a lot of well done is to her. i think she must have been very proud because she has done something that nobody has done in the world and i think she should have a nice life. i’m the world and i think she should have a nice life.— the world and i think she should have a nice life. i'm sure she will. what is it — have a nice life. i'm sure she will. what is it about _ have a nice life. i'm sure she will. what is it about tennis _ have a nice life. i'm sure she will. what is it about tennis that - have a nice life. i'm sure she will. what is it about tennis that you i what is it about tennis that you love? i what is it about tennis that you love? ~ , , what is it about tennis that you love? ~' , , ., love? i think tennis is more entertaining _ love? i think tennis is more entertaining to _ love? i think tennis is more entertaining to me - love? i think tennis is more | entertaining to me because, love? i think tennis is more - entertaining to me because, like, it's not something that you wish to win every time but you a one to remember when you go to heaven. getting pretty deep now. but you had some amazing shots this morning and carry on with your amazing tennis
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shots and i have one more chat. did you watch the match? and what did you watch the match? and what did you think of it?— you think of it? yes, i think the match is very — you think of it? yes, i think the match is very inspiring - you think of it? yes, i think the match is very inspiring as - you think of it? yes, i think the match is very inspiring as she l you think of it? yes, i think the | match is very inspiring as she is only 18 in the last time a british one young woman one was in 1977, which was like a0 years ago and that over half a century and so that's amazing to see that emma could do such wonderful things and now she is a great role model for younger peers. a great role model for younger eers. ~ ., , a great role model for younger eers. . ., , ., a great role model for younger eers. ~ ., , . ., a great role model for younger eers, . ., , ., ., ,., peers. what is it about the game you like so much? _ peers. what is it about the game you like so much? i _ peers. what is it about the game you like so much? i love _ peers. what is it about the game you like so much? i love tennis _ peers. what is it about the game you like so much? i love tennis because i like so much? i love tennis because ou have like so much? i love tennis because you have to — like so much? i love tennis because you have to be _ like so much? i love tennis because you have to be swift, _ like so much? i love tennis because you have to be swift, you _ like so much? i love tennis because you have to be swift, you have - like so much? i love tennis because you have to be swift, you have to i like so much? i love tennis because| you have to be swift, you have to be fast, you have to have control over the ball, so there are lots of things required, but once you get the hang of it, it's like very easy to handle. the hang of it, it's like very easy to handle-— to handle. really impressive trainina to handle. really impressive training in — to handle. really impressive training in shots _ to handle. really impressive training in shots going - to handle. really impressive training in shots going on i to handle. really impressivel training in shots going on this morning and i let you carry on. so nice to see a lot of young people inspired what they have seen and it's a positive and good news story and certainly the lta are delighted as you can imagine, but aren't we all? it came as a surprise, it is
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inspirational and this is the result. you have a smile on your face as a result of what emma has done. thank you very much. the trial of a new blood test, designed to detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear, begins today. the trial of a new blood test, designed to detect more than 50 more than 1a0,000 volunteers aged between 50 and 77 will be offered the tests, which work by spotting chemical changes in genetic code. researchers say if the trial is a success, it could mark the beginning of a revolution in cancer treatment. the nhs chief executive says this is an exciting development. from today, we'll be inviting people to come for blood testing at convenient locations like retail parks and i would say to anyone who receives a letter or invitation to please take it up and come part of this world first trial. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughesjoins me now.
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it does seem extraordinary that it may be able to detect up to 50 cancers before any symptoms. haifa cancers before any symptoms. how does it work? _ cancers before any symptoms. how does it work? the _ cancers before any symptoms. firm" does it work? the big cancers before any symptoms. finn" does it work? the big thing about cancers is that the sooner you diagnose them, the better the chances are you will have of the patient making a good recovery, but there are some cancers that have proven stubbornly resistant to early detection, so cancers of the head and neck, bowel, lung, pancreas and throat. so for years, scientists have been trying to create a blood test that can detect those cancers in particular and many others as well. but the problem is that those blood tests often get too many false positives or too many false negatives. the way this blood test works is by spotting chemical changes in fragments of genetic code that leak from changes in fragments of genetic code that leakfrom tumours changes in fragments of genetic code that leak from tumours into the bloodstream and using that test, bacon, the development of ——
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developers of this so they can spot up developers of this so they can spot up to 50 or more than 50 types of cancer. so what is happening today as letters are being sent out to 1a0,000 volunteers across england, in fact, some of those blood tests are taking place today around the corner in cheshire and not very far from where i am speaking to you and those blood tests will be followed up those blood tests will be followed up in 12 months�* time and again in two years time. and if that is successful, we make get those early results of this massive, massive clinical trial in 2023, and if that is promising, then the plan is to roll it out to a further million volunteers in 202a. ii roll it out to a further million volunteers in 2024.- roll it out to a further million volunteers in 2024. if you are a volunteer _ volunteers in 2024. if you are a volunteer in — volunteers in 2024. if you are a volunteer in this _ volunteers in 2024. if you are a volunteer in this particular - volunteers in 2024. if you are a volunteer in this particular bit l volunteers in 2024. if you are a| volunteer in this particular bit of the trial, and researchers do detect a chemical change, what happens to you? does that mean you are going to get a cancer in the future? i think ou will get a cancer in the future? i think you will then _ get a cancer in the future? i think you will then be _ get a cancer in the future? i think you will then be called _ get a cancer in the future? i think you will then be called back- get a cancer in the future? i think you will then be called back by i get a cancer in the future? i think. you will then be called back by your gp, you will be notified and then
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further tests will be carried out to confirm what the blood test has found. as i said, the problem has bedevilled scientists for years that these blood tests like this have either been too sensitive or not sensitive enough. that is why they are having a clinical trial on this scale, to try, so the nhs in england is cooperating with the matte manufacturers of this blood test to see if they can provide this breakthrough and if it does work as they believe it does, as they hope it might, then that could be a massive game changer in the detection of these cancers that have been very difficult to detect in the past. been very difficult to detect in the ast, �* . ., , been very difficult to detect in the ast. �* , ., , been very difficult to detect in the ast, �* , ., , ., “ past. because if it does work it means that _ past. because if it does work it means that people _ past. because if it does work it means that people will- past. because if it does work it means that people will be i past. because if it does work it means that people will be ablej past. because if it does work it i means that people will be able to detect a cancer much earlier and this increases an earlier individual chances of survival.— chances of survival. yes, so the sooner you _ chances of survival. yes, so the sooner you spot _ chances of survival. yes, so the sooner you spot cancer, - chances of survival. yes, so the sooner you spot cancer, the i chances of survival. yes, so the i sooner you spot cancer, the sooner you can treated and the better a chance someone has of making a full recovery. chance someone has of making a full recove . ., ~' chance someone has of making a full recove . . ~ , ., y
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chance someone has of making a full recove . . ~ , ., , . north korea claims it has successfully tested a new long—range cruise missile, capable of hitting much ofjapan. these pictures have been released by the north korean state media — accompanying reports that two missiles were launched over the weekend — both travelling as far as 1500 kilometres. the us military said the test showed north korea�*s "threat to its neighbours and the international community". we speak to our seoul correspondent, laura bicker. tell us more about what north korea�*s state media have said about these long—range missile tests. $5 these long-range missile tests. as ou these long—range missile tests. is you mentioned, they these long—range missile tests. sis you mentioned, they say they flew 1500 kilometres, it was a strategic weapon of great important and that is the key, strategic. that is north korean speak of saying it is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. what analysts don�*t know is whether north
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korea has the capability to shrink a nuclear warhead and put it on a cruise missile, however, north korea claims that this cruise missile could be nuclear capable and that is why so many people are making a big deal. normally, when it comes to cruise missiles, analysts shrug their shoulders. they are not banned under un security council rate resolutions. the current north korean president wasn�*t even present at the launch and it was on page two of the state paper, but analysts believe that they have been the first time it has had a capable cruise missile. and despite the fact that it cruise missile. and despite the fact thatitis cruise missile. and despite the fact that it is undergoing an economic crisis, it is still capable of developing a strategic missile and thatis developing a strategic missile and that is the key when it comes to realising what a peon young has
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achieved here. in realising what a peon young has achieved here.— realising what a peon young has achieved here. in reaction to other countries around _ achieved here. in reaction to other countries around the _ achieved here. in reaction to other countries around the world? i achieved here. in reaction to other countries around the world? you l achieved here. in reaction to other. countries around the world? you have mentioned there _ countries around the world? you have mentioned there the _ countries around the world? you have mentioned there the united _ countries around the world? you have mentioned there the united states i mentioned there the united states and pacific command says that shows the threat north korea poses to its neighbours and wider international community and it is continuing to develop weapons and develop its arsenal. just last month we saw their main nuclear complex that there was renewed activity there and many analysts believe that north korea may be restarting making nuclear material for nuclear weapons. so that is also a worry. north korea has been incredibly quiet for the last 18 months, especially since that deal fell apart between the american and north korean presidents. but it doesn�*t mean that north korea hasn�*t been busy. yes, the borders have been closed due to the covid—19 pandemic and it has been a strict closure. it means very little is very getting in
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from china but it does seem that there is nuclear scientist have been busy. there is nuclear scientist have been bus . ., ~' , ., , there is nuclear scientist have been bus. . , . the first foreign commercial flight since the taliban takeover has landed in kabul. the pakistani international airlines flight arrived in the afghan capital from islamabad with a handful of people on board. it�*ll carry passengers — with valid travel documents — back to islamabad. flights were suspended after the previous government fell. last week, the first qatar airlines flight left kabul with a number of american citizens on board. a us court will hold a pre—trial hearing today, in the civil case filed by a woman who claims the duke of york sexually assaulted her when she was 17. last week, lawyers for virginia giuffre claimed they had successfully served prince andrew with legal papers. a judge will decide if those papers were issued correctly. the duke of york has always strongly denied the accusations and says he has no recollection of meeting ms giuffre.
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fierce wildfires continue to burn out of control in southern spain. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes — as the authorities try to fight the flames. it�*s believed around six—thousand hectares of land have been affected — in a region popular with holiday—makers. tim allman has more. with little warning, and little time to prepare, people flee the towns and villages of andalusia. this gymnasium, now a makeshift shelter, local residents told to move as the flames got ever closer. translation. i thought it was never going to happen but there was such a big cloud over the village it was scary. this is inhuman, nothing like this has ever— this is inhuman, nothing like this has ever been seen. the flames of the fire _ has ever been seen. the flames of the fire as — has ever been seen. the flames of the fire as they ran through the mountains, it was amazing. for days
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now, the mountains, it was amazing. for days now. the fires _ mountains, it was amazing. for days now, the fires have _ mountains, it was amazing. for days now, the fires have raged. _ mountains, it was amazing. for days now, the fires have raged. thick i now, the fires have raged. thick clouds of smoke visible amidst the hills and mountains near malaga. this blaze, said to have an unusual power and strength, is advancing in several directions. the country�*s military has been asked to help out as strong winds fanned the flames and a nightmare for those who had to leave their homes. but everyone is chipping in to help as best they can. translation...— can. translation... there is no shock because _ can. translation... there is no shock because what _ can. translation... there is no shock because what is - can. translation... there is no i shock because what is happening around _ shock because what is happening around us — shock because what is happening around us but _ shock because what is happening around us but there _ shock because what is happening around us but there has- shock because what is happening around us but there has been. shock because what is happening around us but there has been an| around us but there has been an immense — around us but there has been an immense wave _ around us but there has been an immense wave of— around us but there has been an immense wave of solidarity i around us but there has been an i immense wave of solidarity around us to help _ immense wave of solidarity around us to help these — immense wave of solidarity around us to help these people _ immense wave of solidarity around us to help these people who _ immense wave of solidarity around us to help these people who have - immense wave of solidarity around us to help these people who have left i to help these people who have left their home — to help these people who have left their home so _ to help these people who have left their home so quickly. _ to help these people who have left their home so quickly. the- their home so quickly. the speculation _ their home so quickly. the speculation these - their home so quickly. the speculation these fires their home so quickly.- speculation these fires may their home so quickly— speculation these fires may have been started deliberately. the flames burn on, the battle to contain them continues. bbc news. bbc news. nicola sturgeon will address the snp conference later and says a second independence referendum won�*t take place until all restrictions
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on daily life are lifted. but in her speech to members, the snp leader will insist the timing on another vote should be decided in scotland. she wants to hold one by the end of 2023 — provided the covid crisis is over. but uk ministers have so far refused to agree. britney spears has revealed that she is engaged to sam asghari, an iranian—born fitness instructor she met on the set of a music video more than four years ago. the american singer appeared on instagram wearing a diamond ring. she recently celebrated a legal victory in the conservatorship that controls her life and career. she has been married twice before. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. thank you very much. good morning to you all. it is a great and uninspiring day out there for many of us but there is some nice weather and eastern scotland and eastern england, but in there will be
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outbreaks of rain in the west with heavy bursts and could turn damp at a time for northern ireland and southern scotland, and towards eastern half in england but it should stay dry there. highs of 22 degrees in any brighter spots in the south east. this evening and overnight, ringgit heavier at times especially over england and wales and some showers and parts of scotland. but it does make for a pretty mild and humid night where we could see heavy bursts in the channel islands with a rumble of thunder. but tomorrow, outbreaks of rain extensively through england and the midlands and towards lincolnshire and yorkshire and we could see as much of 30 or a0 mil metres of rain. writer today in wales and some sunshine in scotland and a bit of showers also. best day of the week tomorrow but it will be thursday when more comes.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: boris johnson is finalising the details of the government�*s strategy for tackling coronavirus in england this winter. nearly a third of people arriving in england and northern ireland as the delta variant took off may have broken quarantine rules. north korea claims to have successfully test fired two new long—range cruise missiles — capable of hitting japan. a new blood test trial,
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designed to detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear, begins today. britney spears has announced her engagement to her long—term boyfriend — days after the star�*s father filed court papers to end his 13—year control of her affairs. and coming up — a welcome home for team gb�*s paralympians — who topped the the podium more than 120 times in tokyo. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s jane dougal. good morning. novak djokovic wasn�*t able to win a record calendar grand slam, after he was beaten in straight sets in the us open final by daniil medvedev. djokovic had won this year�*s three other major tournaments, but looked completely lost at times, particularly when he was on the way to losing the second set. the end wasn�*t long in coming and medvedev
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completed an emphatic victory to win his first grand slam. he was going for huge history. and knowing that i managed to stop him definitely makes it sweeter. and brings me confidence for what is to come. i wasjust below par, you know, with my game. my legs were not there. i was trying. i did my best. but, yeah, i made a lot of unforced errors. i didn't have no serve. it was a bittersweet victory for liverpool against leeds united to maintain their unbeaten start to the season. liverpool won 3—0 at elland road — mo salah with their first — his 100th premier league goal, but the match was overshadowed by a horrible injury to harvey elliot — whose ankle was dislocated.
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he�*ll have surgery in the coming days. he is in hospital. not good. he is in hospital. not nood. bad he is in hospital. not good. bad ankle in'ury. it looked like the ankle injury. it looked like the ankle injury. it looked like the ankle was dislocated. massive pain. shock. hearts and hibs blew the chance to reclaim top spot in the scottish premiership with a 0—0 draw in the edinburgh derby. both goalkeepers pulled off great saves as the sides maintained their unbeaten starts to the league season. women�*s super league champions chelsea beat everton a—0 at kingsmeadow. the goal of the game came from fran kirby as chelsea bounced back from their opening day defeat to arsenal. tottenham came from behind to beat manchester city 2—1. angela addison scored the winner,
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although there were claims for a handball in the build up. elsewhere, there were wins for arsenal, manchester united and brighton. max verstappen has been given a three—place grid penalty for the next grand prix, after crashing into championship rival lewis hamilton at the italian grand prix. the pair collided at the first corner of the monza circuit as they battled to top the drivers�* standings. the safety halo prevented any serious injury to hamilton and the drivers walked away. the race was won for mclaren by daniel ricciardo. i made sure i left a car�*s width on the outside and i was ahead going into the corner. and the next thing i know, erm... ..i guess max went over the second curb or something. he obviously knew at that point he wasn�*t going to make the corner and he drove into me. so, eh... ..and the next thing you know, he�*s just on top of me,
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so definitely unfortunate. as soon as i was next to him he kept on squeezing me more and more to the left. i still thought, i will make it into turn two. unfortunately, he ran me a bit too much out of road. i clipped the curb and that is why we touched. lee westwood will make a record—equalling 11th appearance for europe in golf�*s ryder cup later this month. he just did enough at the pga championship at wentworth to qualify automatically to compete for europe against the united states. the tournament was won by america�*s billy horschel. shane lowry didn�*t play himself into the team automatically, but was last night named as a wildcard, as were ian poulter and sergio garcia. justin rose misses out. of course you want to bring these plays with passion, but only if they are playing well.
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and both of them were playing great. poulter�*s best ball striking of his life, and sergio consistently delivers. he�*s great. and then shane. right at the top of the pile. it is amazing. you never really sure and tell— it is amazing. you never really sure and tell are — it is amazing. you never really sure and tell are sharing to have that firmed _ and tell are sharing to have that firmed up — and tell are sharing to have that firmed up was great. to know you are going _ firmed up was great. to know you are going to _ firmed up was great. to know you are going to he _ firmed up was great. to know you are going to be part of your seventh ryder— going to be part of your seventh ryder cup — going to be part of your seventh ryder cup team, a team travelling to away soil, _ ryder cup team, a team travelling to away soil, a — ryder cup team, a team travelling to away soil, a team on paper which looks— away soil, a team on paper which looks very— away soil, a team on paper which looks very strong, up against a very strong _ looks very strong, up against a very strong us— looks very strong, up against a very strong us team. after three days in the leader�*s jersey, ethan hayter was denied overall victory on the final stage of the tour of britain. after more than four hours of racing, it culminated with a sprint finish in aberdeen. belgium�*s wout van art won it to overturn a four—second deficit. that�*s all the sport for now.
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let�*s talk more about what could be part of the government�*s strategy for tackling coronavirus in england over the autumn and winter months — ahead of a the prime minister�*s press conference tomorrow. 0ur political correspondent is nick eardley. borisjohnson boris johnson wants to borisjohnson wants to do away with some of the parents he has had over the last few months to shut down huge parts of the economy, to impose those nationwide lockdowns and we council yesterday. that those nationwide lockdowns and we council yesterday.— council yesterday. at least ten with a few options. _ council yesterday. at least ten with a few options, things _ council yesterday. at least ten with a few options, things like - council yesterday. at least ten with a few options, things like masks, l a few options, things like masks, telling people to work from home, potentially some other restrictions as well. one thing we know the government is not going to do at the moment which we had been expecting as vaccine passports. we had that yesterday from the health secretary. although we have had ministers suggesting for the last week but that was going to go ahead in england that we have had confirmation will go ahead in scotland it is not now going to happen south of the border. listen
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to the work and pensions secretary. we we re we were due to make a decision in septemher— we were due to make a decision in september about whether we would formally _ september about whether we would formally introduce them by the end of the _ formally introduce them by the end of the month, in effect mandate areas _ of the month, in effect mandate areas and — of the month, in effect mandate areas and certain working at other environments. as sajid javid set out yesterday. — environments. as sajid javid set out yesterday, the consideration, although— yesterday, the consideration, although the formal decision has yet to be made, that having reflected and looked at the different details of the _ and looked at the different details of the proposal, it is not deemed necessary— of the proposal, it is not deemed necessary at this moment in time but they have _ necessary at this moment in time but they have not been ruled out forever~ _ they have not been ruled out forever. it is reflecting a fact a lot of— forever. it is reflecting a fact a lot of young people have come forward — lot of young people have come forward and got their vaccinations over the _ forward and got their vaccinations overthe summer forward and got their vaccinations over the summer which is great news. at the moment no vaccine passports in england and new powers to impose national lockdowns. we are expecting the prime minister to give the press
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conference tomorrow. it will be interesting to see what restrictions he is prepared to leave on the table. the government is going to keep some powers over telling people they still have to self—isolate if it is positive start but will be a legal requirement. the government will keep powers to demand that school stay open even if there is an outbreak of the virus and some schools. questions in the past whether individual skill should take that individual decisions. the government wants to hold on to the power to tell them what to do. labour are unconvinced by the messaging, quite frankly, i don�*t think the government has been clear enough, particularly on that idea of vaccine passports. listen to the deputy leader. a government minister came last week and said _ a government minister came last week and said they would have vaccine passports — and said they would have vaccine passports for large venues and over the weekend the health secretary seemed _ the weekend the health secretary seemed to u—turn on that so this is chaotic— seemed to u—turn on that so this is
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chaotic for— seemed to u—turn on that so this is chaotic for people who want certainty. we have both always said tests should be able to prove people do not _ tests should be able to prove people do not have covid because when she had been _ do not have covid because when she had been vaccinated you can still .et had been vaccinated you can still get covid — had been vaccinated you can still get covid so we felt tests should be part of— get covid so we felt tests should be part of that as well so the government have messed up and ibm very confusing which adds to the problem — that is the political context. the health context as we are getting into the winter months. we are always challenging. you have the usual seasonal pressures of flu, of other diseases that circulate more in winter, out into the next the first full winter without lockdown restrictions and there is a feeling within the governance across the uk that winter could be tough. nicola sturgeon said on friday she thinks the health service there is under more pressure than it has ever been,
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so the next few weeks and months are not going to be plain sailing, but the message we are getting from the uk government when it comes to england as they think the vaccines are still the rest of my best form of defence. are still the rest of my best form of defence-— of defence. where are we on the issue of booster _ of defence. where are we on the issue of boosterjabs? _ of defence. where are we on the issue of boosterjabs? we i of defence. where are we on the issue of boosterjabs? we are i issue of booster “abs? we are waitin: issue of booster “abs? we are waiting for_ issue of booster “abs? we are waiting for the i issue of boosterjabs? we are waiting for the jcvi _ issue of boosterjabs? we are waiting for the jcvi to - issue of boosterjabs? we are waiting for the jcvi to give i issue of boosterjabs? we are l waiting for the jcvi to give their waiting for thejcvi to give their final decision on boosterjabs. we expect that to come in the next day or two. expect that to come in the next day ortwo. it expect that to come in the next day or two. it seems to be something that they are signing off on potentially today. there is also the question of vaccines for 12 to 15—year—olds. the jcvi question of vaccines for 12 to 15—year—olds. thejcvi evidence said the benefits would be marginal so they were not seeing lights go ahead yet. that decision was passed on to the chief medical officers from england, scotland, wales and northern ireland and i am hearing that decision could be pretty imminent to, so within the next 2aa8 hrs i think we will have a much better idea of the government�*s
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strategy for england when it comes to autumn and winter but there is a good chance we will also know whether we are all going to be told to get a third jab over the next few weeks to give us a boost of immunity and whether 12 to 15—year—olds are going to be givenjabs as and whether 12 to 15—year—olds are going to be given jabs as well. thank you very much. paul hunter is a professor of medicine at the university of east anglia and joins me now. i want to ask you about vaccine passports. we are not getting them in england according to the health secretary yesterday although only a week ago the vaccines minister was making a case for them. who is right? making a case for them. who is riuht? ~ .,, , making a case for them. who is riuht? , ., ., right? most things have some value. the issue with _ right? most things have some value. the issue with vaccine _ right? most things have some value. the issue with vaccine passports i right? most things have some value. the issue with vaccine passports is i the issue with vaccine passports is the value that they bring worth the effort? and actually when you consider that vaccination, double vaccination, does not mean you are not infectious, does not mean you cannot spread the infection or get sick yourself, and along with that a
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lot of people who have not been vaccinated have already had the infection and recovered, the difference in risk between the unvaccinated and the vaccinated is somewhat less than it was even a few months ago and in many ways it is difficult to see whether a vaccine passports would be the thing that would make all the difference this year, so i am actually quite happy that they are not going to be progressed in england at least. {lin progressed in england at least. 0n scientific grounds you say it is almost irrelevant if i am putting that word into your mouth... maybe not irrelevant _ that word into your mouth... maybe not irrelevant but _ that word into your mouth... maybe not irrelevant but certainly - that word into your mouth... maybe not irrelevant but certainly the i not irrelevant but certainly the value is probably not worth the downsides of having the vaccine passport. downsides of having the vaccine --assort. ., downsides of having the vaccine --assort. . ., , ., passport. fair enough. if there is a surue passport. fair enough. if there is a surge winter _ passport. fair enough. if there is a surge winter infections _ passport. fair enough. if there is a surge winter infections of - passport. fair enough. if there is a surge winter infections of covid, i passport. fair enough. if there is a surge winter infections of covid, of flu, other respiratory illnesses,
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and the nhs looks vulnerable to potentially being overwhelmed, what would you like to the government bring an to try to stop that happening?— bring an to try to stop that happening? bring an to try to stop that haueninu? . ,., happening? the first thing is are we auoin to happening? the first thing is are we going to see — happening? the first thing is are we going to see a _ happening? the first thing is are we going to see a surge _ happening? the first thing is are we going to see a surge in _ happening? the first thing is are we going to see a surge in cases i happening? the first thing is are we going to see a surge in cases this i going to see a surge in cases this winter? it is difficult to predict. at the moment case numbers in england and indeed probably in scotland are starting to fall and we hope that trend continues and if it does restrictions will not be necessary. we are getting to the point where we are coming into equilibria with this infection and once we have achieved that individual restrictions do not actually have that much impact in totality. it is still important that people who are positive and infectious self—isolate is currently. beyond that it is difficult to know what else we can do that would actually make a big
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difference in the long term. a lot of things that we could do but have a short—term impact butultimately not much impact on the epidemic as a whole. i certainly think it would be inappropriate to close schools, like they were doing last autumn, i don�*t think that would have any great benefit, and in fact the evidence from scotland is that schools did not really contribute to their search in the summer, so i do not think we will be needing to do that. the booster vaccination campaign i think is going to be important, not as wide as some people are suggesting, but i think wider than what we currently know, certainly including more people with underlying medical conditions and probably people over 80 as well.
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booster vaccines for people with other medical conditions and the elderly, but not all over 50s? ida. elderly, but not all over 50s? no, the evidence _ elderly, but not all over 505? iifr. the evidence actually is that the vaccines are still holding up really well in terms of protection against severe disease, but there are people who will not have responded as well as we would have liked to their first—round. the older people, people with obesity, people with other underlying conditions that can reduce the impact of vaccines, not just covid vaccines but many other infectious disease vaccines as well are often less effective in these groups and i think we should be offering boosters to those, but not more widely than that.— offering boosters to those, but not more widely than that. where are you on 'abs for more widely than that. where are you on jabs for a — more widely than that. where are you on jabs for a healthy _ more widely than that. where are you on jabs for a healthy 12 _ more widely than that. where are you on jabs for a healthy 12 to _ on jabs for a healthy 12 to 15—year—olds? the mood music seems to be the government is going to go for it in england but the vaccine
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advisory body has suggested the health benefits are absolutely marginal. health benefits are absolutely mar: inal. ., health benefits are absolutely maruinal. . ., , , health benefits are absolutely maruinal. . . , , . marginal. yeah, absolutely, and miaht marginal. yeah, absolutely, and might even _ marginal. yeah, absolutely, and might even be — marginal. yeah, absolutely, and might even be against _ marginal. yeah, absolutely, and. might even be against vaccination marginal. yeah, absolutely, and i might even be against vaccination in that age group. there was a preprint that age group. there was a preprint that came out a few days ago which suggested that the risk of myocarditis in teenage boys, not girls, but teenage boys, may have been higher than was originally suspected cop. been higher than was originally suspected cop-— been higher than was originally susected co., . ., ., , ., ., ., suspected cop. what does that mean a --rerint? a suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper— suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper that _ suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper that has _ suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper that has yet - suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper that has yet to i suspected cop. what does that mean a preprint? a paper that has yet to go i preprint? a paper that has yet to go throu~h preprint? a paper that has yet to go through peer _ preprint? a paper that has yet to go through peer review. _ preprint? a paper that has yet to go through peer review. other- preprint? a paper that has yet to go through peer review. other experts| through peer review. other experts have not read _ through peer review. other experts have not read it _ through peer review. other experts have not read it and _ through peer review. other experts have not read it and said _ through peer review. other experts have not read it and said it - through peer review. other experts have not read it and said it is i through peer review. other experts have not read it and said it is ok? i have not read it and said it is ok? absolutely. so one has to be a little bit cautious about that. having read it myself i suspect it will get through peer review reasonably easily. given that already a large proportion of
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children, certainly teenagers, younger teenagers, children, certainly teenagers, youngerteenagers, have children, certainly teenagers, younger teenagers, have almost certainly had the infection and recovered, the benefits against the disadvantages are quite difficult to judge. i personally would not advocate for vaccinating that age group. advocate for vaccinating that age urou -. . advocate for vaccinating that age i rou . _ , ., ~' advocate for vaccinating that age irou, , ., , group. interesting. thank you very much for talking _ group. interesting. thank you very much for talking to _ group. interesting. thank you very much for talking to us. _ group. interesting. thank you very much for talking to us. professori group. interesting. thank you very | much for talking to us. professor of medicine from the university of east anglia. former footballer ashley cain is urging men dealing with depression to talk and seek help — months after his baby daughter died of leukaemia. in an emotional interview with the bbc, cain and his partner safiyya vorajee spoke about their experiences of dealing with grief and bereavement. they have started a charity in their daughter�*s name and are raising awareness of the signs of leukaemia. the couple spoke to bbc reporter ashleyjohn—baptiste. we grieve because we love the person we have lost. she is the person i am
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most read about in my life and i believe speaking with people about her and being vocal... to all the guys out there suffering loss or who are stressed or depressed, talk about it. it is fine. we�*ll go through it. it is not rare or weak, is common. through it. it is not rare or weak, is common-— through it. it is not rare or weak, i is common._ ashley is common. tell me about her. ashley would be around _ is common. tell me about her. ashley would be around her— is common. tell me about her. ashley would be around her all— is common. tell me about her. ashley would be around her all the _ is common. tell me about her. ashley would be around her all the time. - would be around her all the time. she would — would be around her all the time. she would say, stop kissing her! she brought out the best in me. she changed my life. she made me a better person. she changed my life. she made me a better person-— better person. she was an incredible, _ better person. she was an incredible, beautiful, - better person. she was an incredible, beautiful, so i better person. she was an - incredible, beautiful, so strong, she was— incredible, beautiful, so strong, she was so_ incredible, beautiful, so strong, she was so much fun and brought so much _ she was so much fun and brought so much weight to our life. —— light to our life _ much weight to our life. -- light to our life. . , much weight to our life. -- light to our life. ., , ., . our life. there was not much we could do but _ our life. there was not much we could do but we _ our life. there was not much we could do but we never— our life. there was not much we could do but we never let - our life. there was not much we could do but we never let her i our life. there was not much we. could do but we never let her see our life. there was not much we - could do but we never let her see us cry because it was not about us. we
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never let her see we were sad. one thing i wanted her to feel was her daddy always believed in her and that was what was important for us there a way, to bring her the best time to make sure she was looked after and the funny thing is, we thought we were the ones that were creating the energy for our daughter, and very quickly it turned out that she was the one keeping our energy hi. as soon as we raised the money, the next day we found out that azaylia had tumours in her brain and not only in her brain, she had tumours in her lungs, her kidneys, her
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spleen. and at that point we got told there is nothing more that they can do. and i do not know what was worse. getting the news that my baby has leukaemia or getting the news that we have to take her home. the full interview with ashley cain and his partner is on the bbc news website now. and if you've been affected by bereavement, go to bbc.co.uk/actionline for details of organisations offering information and support, or you can call forfree, at any time, to hear recorded
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information on 0800 066 066. -- 077 077. the sporting stars of this year's paralympic games topped the podium more than 120 times and finished second on the medal table behind china. last night, around 200 athletes across 19 sports were welcomed home with a special concert, to celebrate their achievements. our reporter matt graveling was there. higher, come on! i am so excited today. i think it's going to be absolutely phenomenal. i haven't actually seen my parents yet, so they're coming down to go to the arena with me. and i can't wait to see them. they haven't seen the medals yet. and it's just so exciting to be able to let our hair down and to celebrate as a team. to actually have the opportunity to come out here and celebrate, not only with our friends and family but with everybody else supporting us, it's actually awesome. yeah, it's a really good opportunity. move away from sort of like being in a bubble, being in a hotel room,
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just go and see people a little bit and just be almost normal again. paralympics gb did phenomenally well in tokyo, bagging 124 medals. so, they need a party. 7,000 lucky national lottery players, as well as the athletes�* friends and family, are now converging right here at wembley arena. my sleep pattern was absolutely all over the place, but i wouldn't have missed it. and to be here today is an absolute privilege to thank the athletes. just to see them work through these past 18 months, for it to work so well and come home, i think it'sjust absolutely fabulous. there we go. we watched everything that they done and theyjust inspire us. just amazing. so, we thought we'd come down and support them. but hang on a minute, these are elite athletes. surely they are on a strict diet? i think the second i crossed the line for my last race, i've definitely not been watching what i eat. i probably do have to now though, because the belly is starting to just grow outwards. just treat yourself. i've literally got two kilos of pick n mix at home that are waiting for me!
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so, yeah, the diet is totally gone out of the window! cheering. # so you want to be a boxer, want to be the champ...#. this homecoming event marked a day of returns, but notjust for the athletes. well, this is the first time we've performed as a band in, i don't even know, almost two years. it's crazy. but it's such an amazing honour and privilege to be invited. we were quite shocked. and, yeah, we arejust so excited to do it. today's arena was jumping, but in tokyo it was a different story. with fans forced to watch at home, social media videos sent thejoy to japan. cheering. it'sjust so nice to see all the support, because when i was there i didn't realise the amount of support i was getting. so, after the race i watched all of this and then, seeing andy get emotional, it kind of gave me a sense of pride to know they are all helping me and cheering me on as well. it's just, yeah, lovely to watch. while maisie picked up
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herfirst two golds, another athlete made history, claiming her 17th. the games were completely different to any games i'd been to, not least because i was there without any family and friends, and my parents are almost the founder members of the paralympics gb supporters' club. so, it was a very different games, but i think it's coming home, celebrating these medals, that have meant those memories will always be held high in my list of achievements. # welcome to the house of fun...# while dame sarah will now- turn her attention to paris, for other paralympic stars today's event will also be a farewell party. i knew going into it it was going to be my last games. to have a paralympics homecoming is something so special. we also bring ourfriends, ourfamilies, our loved ones, to come for a party, because they missed out at the games. a they couldn't go to tokyo. they couldn't be there to cheer us on. and to have a thing today
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where everyone comes, it's a whole celebration, it's so exciting. matt graveling, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. we have had a bit of sunshine through the scottish borders. cloudy skies dominate _ through the scottish borders. cloudy skies dominate for— through the scottish borders. cloudy skies dominate for many _ through the scottish borders. cloudy skies dominate for many with - through the scottish borders. cloudy skies dominate for many with scenes like this captured in snowdonia assured by level go. across wales we have seen some of the wettest weather so far today. this clump of cloud has been slowly nudging northwards and continues to produce some rain and drizzle across western areas. wales where the wettest of the weather has been. the rain starting to pick up as it pushes further north but for north west england and approaching the south—west is where we are going to be damp on and off throughout the day. it could be done per two eastern parts of northern ireland and southern scotland. the north—east is where we will see some
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of the best of today's sunshine. temperatures at the highest in the sunny moments towards east anglia and the south—east. 22 degrees possible and not far off that in the channel islands. not much in the way of praise. this evening and overnight we are going to see patchy rain and drizzle to begin with. some thunder spreading up towards the channel islands and the english channel islands and the english channel as we go through into tomorrow morning. it will not be a cold night. 15, i6 tomorrow morning. it will not be a cold night. 15, 16 degrees, humid and muggy across the south. across western areas that should brighten up western areas that should brighten up tomorrow compared to today but very heavy rain pushing northwards across parts of england. particularly through the midlands and parts of yorkshire could see as much as 30 or a0 millimetres and the odd rumble of thunder and flash of lightning whereas the north and west you will see afternoon sunshine. the
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rain clears through tuesday night but wednesday morning we have done ground and light winds. misty and murky in places. maybe some of the overnight rain may be close to eastern coasts of england first thing and a few spots of rain towards western scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere we will see some sunny spells across wales, north—western england and eastern scotland and a bit warmer than tuesday. thursday a ridge of high pressure but as we go to friday we start to see whether france push on from the west which means weather—wise as we see the week out thursday as potentially the driest and brightest are uk wide of the week with some sunshine and highs around the high teens are low 20s but by friday cloud and rain will arrive in the west.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. nearly a third of people arriving in england and northern ireland as the delta variant took off may have broken travel quarantine rules. what next for new teenage tennis sensation, emma raducanu? she says she's ready for anything, and can cope with her rise to stardom after winning the us open. north korea claims to have successfully test fired two new long—range cruise missiles — capable of hitting japan. the world's biggest trial of a blood test that can detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear starts in the uk today. the first commercial flight since the taliban takeover of afghanistan has left the capital — flying out people
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with valid travel documents.

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