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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  September 13, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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covid vaccines for 12—15—year—olds are expected to be approved shortly. giving schoolchildren the jab is likely to become part of the government's plan for coping with the virus over the winter. we've got to do everything that's right to protect the country. but the way things are going at the moment, we're very confident in the steps that we've taken. we'll get the latest details from our heath editor. from our health editor. we'll get the latest details from our health editor. also this lunchtime... nearly one in three people arriving in england and northern ireland may have broken the rules on travel quarantine at a time when the delta variant was spreading. the nhs starts trials of a revolutionary new blood test that detects more than 50 types of cancer before the patient
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has any symptoms. the bbc obtains evidence that the taliban are killing civilians in afghanistan. and what's next for emma? british tennis legends offer their advice to the teen queen emma raducanu. and coming up on the bbc news channel... a convincing win over the world number one — russian daniil medvedev with an unusual celebration after beating novak djokovic to become the us open champion. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. an announcement is expected this afternoon recommending that children aged between 12 and 15 be routinely vaccinated for covid—19. the uk's four chief medical officers have now submitted their guidance to the government.
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it's likely to form part of a wider winter plan for tackling covid in england which the prime minister will set out tomorrow. our political correspondent helen catt reports. other countries have gone ahead with vaccinating healthy 12 to 15 euros, but not yet in the uk, although that may change. but not yet in the uk, although that may change-— may change. offering “obs to teenagers * may change. offering “obs to teenagers is h may change. offering jobs to teenagers is expected - may change. offering jobs to teenagers is expected to - may change. offering jobs to teenagers is expected to be l may change. offering jobs to - teenagers is expected to be approved by the four chief medical officers as soon as today. the prime minister, on a visit to british gas, would not be drawn this morning. i think you should really wait and see, wait for what the chief medical officers have to say. it is for them to decide, much better i think for them to put out their news, rather than for politicians.— than for politicians. initially, the exerts than for politicians. initially, the exnerts on _ than for politicians. initially, the exnerts on the _ than for politicians. initially, the experts on the jcvi _ than for politicians. initially, the experts on the jcvi didn't - than for politicians. initially, the - experts on the jcvi didn't recommend experts on thejcvi didn't recommend vaccinating 12 to 15 euros because they felt that the health benefit was too marginal. but the chief medical officers are able to take
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into account other factors, like the impact of a disrupted education and the spread of the virus.— the spread of the virus. several countries have _ the spread of the virus. several countries have got _ the spread of the virus. several countries have got a _ the spread of the virus. several countries have got a higher - the spread of the virus. several- countries have got a higher vaccine vaccination — countries have got a higher vaccine vaccination level than us and that is largeiy— vaccination level than us and that is largely because they have rolled out the _ is largely because they have rolled out the vaccine to 12— to 15—year—olds faster than us. i think if we _ 15—year—olds faster than us. i think if we want — 15—year—olds faster than us. i think if we want to— 15—year—olds faster than us. i think if we want to stop the risk of a larger— if we want to stop the risk of a larger autumn if we want to stop the risk of a largerautumn and winter if we want to stop the risk of a larger autumn and winter wave, we need _ larger autumn and winter wave, we need to— larger autumn and winter wave, we need to boost immunisation. a need to boost immunisation. decision is also expected soon on which adults in the uk will get boosterjabs. vaccination will be central to the government's plan to deal with covid in england this winter. ~ �* ., ., ., , winter. we've got to do everything that's riaht winter. we've got to do everything that's right to _ winter. we've got to do everything that's right to protect _ winter. we've got to do everything that's right to protect the - winter. we've got to do everything that's right to protect the country, i that's right to protect the country, but the way things are going at the moment, we're very confident in the sticks that we've taken, i will be setting out a lot more tomorrow, giving a full update on the plans for the autumn and the winter. but serovin for the autumn and the winter. but proving you've been vaccinated won't be needed. ministers have dropped plans to require vaccine passports in england for venues such as
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nightclubs, just weeks before they were due to be introduced. but labour thinks they could have a role. ., . . labour thinks they could have a role. ,, ., role. vaccine passports should never revent role. vaccine passports should never prevent peeple _ role. vaccine passports should never prevent people getting _ role. vaccine passports should never prevent people getting essential- prevent people getting essential services, health, dentistry, the every— services, health, dentistry, the every day— services, health, dentistry, the every day essentials that people need _ every day essentials that people need. they should not stop people getting _ need. they should not stop people getting those essentials. possibly for some — getting those essentials. possibly for some events, they could be used, in conjunction with tests, but never on their— in conjunction with tests, but never on their own, so it should always be an alternative, either a double vaccination or a negative test. the government _ vaccination or a negative test. tie: government will hold the vaccination or a negative test. til: government will hold the option vaccination or a negative test. til government will hold the option of vaccine passports in reserve and it is likely that compulsory mask wearing and working from home could be reintroduced if needed. government sources stressed they are not considering more lockdowns. further details should come tomorrow. our health editor, hugh pym, is here. so, we are expected to get an announcement on vaccinating children over 12 this afternoon, but this has been quite a long and tortuous
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process, hasn't it?— been quite a long and tortuous process, hasn't it? yes, indeed, ben. process, hasn't it? yes, indeed, item the — process, hasn't it? yes, indeed, ben. the expert _ process, hasn't it? yes, indeed, ben. the expert advisory - process, hasn't it? yes, indeed, - ben. the expert advisory committee, the jcvi, ben. the expert advisory committee, thejcvi, said ten days ago that they did not think, having looked at this very carefully, that they could unequivocally say that this was a good thing to do, because the benefits, they said, two children of 12 to 15 years old would only marginally outweigh the risks, because children were at low risk anyway of getting covid and suffering ill—health. and secondly, there were some very rare side effects that have been spotted amongst those who had had vaccines, young people, a certain amount of heart information, though that is extremely rare. so, the chief medical officerss then took on the decision of saying, well, are their wider benefits beyond the immediate risk to the child? that, for example, might include disruption to education and actually stopping the spread of the virus in communities, through young people picking it up more readily than others. so, they
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are going to come up with an announcement later on today, and it is widely expected that they will give the go—ahead forjabs for 12— to 15—year—olds. and this will follow what is already happening in france and the usa and canada. there has been a bit of frustration munched some ministers and politicians that it hasn't happened sooner here. but it is a very finely balanced argument. we've got the discussion on boosterjabs as well, third doses, that is likely to be announced this week as well, all part of the strategy, it seems, in different parts of the uk, over the winter, to get as many people vaccinated as possible to build up immunity. and then there is the wider debate about vaccine supplies globally. the world health organization has already said that boosters should be halted until more in the developing world, particularly africa, can get vaccinated, less than 2% there have been fully vaccinated.— vaccinated, less than 296 there have been fully vaccinated. hugh pym, our health editor. _ been fully vaccinated. hugh pym, our health editor, thank _ been fully vaccinated. hugh pym, our health editor, thank you. _ nearly a third of people arriving in england and northern ireland
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as the coronavirus delta variant took hold may have broken quarantine rules. more than 300,000 cases were passed to investigators between march and may, according to figures seen by the bbc. our political correspondent alex forsyth joins us. alex, it looks like the quarantine rules were being pretty routinely broken? :, :, , i. broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring _ broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring of— broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring of this _ broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring of this year _ broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring of this year when - broken? you need to cast your mind back to spring of this year when we | back to spring of this year when we had just been through that winter wave of covid and the vaccine programme was being rolled out across the united kingdom. the government introduced travel rules to try to limit the spread of new variants coming into the country. it meant you could only travel if it was essential and if you went to a higher risk, red country, when you came back you had to quarantine in a hotel. most other passengers had to quarantine at home for ten days. they were subject to a series of phone calls and text messages to check they were doing so, but we have obtained figures using the freedom of information act which show that in more than 300,000 cases, there were doubts that people were following those rules. it might have been that when they were called
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they didn't answer the phone or they hung up what they refused to co—operate, orthere hung up what they refused to co—operate, or there was another signal that raised suspicion. they were then referred on for further checks, which might have been a visit from a police officer at home or a private firm which was employed ijy or a private firm which was employed by the home office to carry out these checks during that process. the home of his has told as that it did visit 99% of the cases that were referred to it, and what it has not said is how many people were found to be sticking to the rules, how have been a visit from a police officer at home or a private firm which was employed by the home office to carry out these checks during that process. the home of his has told as that it did visit 99% of the cases that were referred to it, and what it has not said is how many people were found to be sticking to the rules, how that variant to take hold more quickly. they say it is further evidence of what they call a failed border and how many people couldn't be traced at all. triage. failed border and how many people couldn't be traced at all.— couldn't be traced at all. now, this was the period _ couldn't be traced at all. now, this was the period during _ couldn't be traced at all. now, this was the period during which - couldn't be traced at all. now, this was the period during which the i was the period during which the delta variant of covid, which originated in india, took hold in the uk, and while
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the nhs is beginning trials today of a revolutionary blood test that could detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms even appear. it works by detecting chemical changes in fragments of genetic code. 140,000 volunteers aged between 50 and 77 are being recruited in england to see how well the test works over the next few years. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the sooner a cancer can be detected and treated, the greater the chances are the patient will make a good recovery. but some cancers are hard to spot in the early stages, including those in the head and neck, bowel, lung, pancreas and throat. so, now, a huge clinical trial is starting in england to see whether a new blood test can identify more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms become obvious. from today, we will be inviting people to come for blood tests in convenient locations like retail parks, and i would just say to anyone who receives a letter or receives an invitation, please do take it up and become part
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of this world first trial. this cancer blood test is the largest clinical trial of its kind. 140,000 volunteers are being asked to take part. they will be drawn from people aged 50 to 77, from a variety of backgrounds and ethnicities. if early trial results are promising, a further million people will be enrolled in 202a. there is a lot of potential here, that it could detect not only a range of different cancers but potentially some of them at an earlier stage. but it's crucial that we actually do now test the research and test on a much bigger scale, in this research trial, and work out whether it can detect cancer earlier, whether it can reduce the stage and, crucially, that it can do that without causing undue harms to people. the first volunteers have been giving blood samples this morning at a retail park in runcorn, in cheshire. it seems a good opportunity to become involved with something. sadly, most of us are touched by cancer at some time in our lives and, actually,
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early detection is one thing that's going to help in our armoury against that. scientists have been trying to develop a cancer detecting blood test for years. but previous efforts produced too many false results. researchers say if the promise of this simple test is fulfilled, it could mark the beginning of a revolution in cancer treatment. dominic hughes, bbc news. the bbc has obtained and verified footage showing civilians being killed by the taliban in afghanistan. the bbc has confirmed that more than 20 people have been killed in panjshir province, where the taliban have been fighting opposition forces. a taliban spokesperson has denied such killings are taking place. you may find some of the details in our correspondent yalda hakim's report distressing. this bazaar is famous across panjshir valley and always bustling. now, it's empty and a ghost town.
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since the taliban entered the valley, people have taken flight. it used to be the home of resistance, but this now appears futile. people have locked their doors and fled and that's not surprising, when people are being shot dead on the side of the street. the bbc has verified this video, which you may find distressing. here, a man in military clothes is dragged away. it is unclear whether he was in the army. this is common dress in the valley. voices are raised. seconds later, he is shot several times and killed. we are not showing you those images. a bystander insists the man they have just killed was not in the military. the bbc has confirmed that more than 20 people have been killed since the taliban entered panjshir province. one of them was this shopkeeper
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and father of two called abdul sami. his family want his name and story to be known. a taliban spokesperson denies civilians are being targeted. when the taliban entered the valley, they promised peace and stability. translation: they should come out, do their daily activities. _ if they are shopkeepers, they can go to their shops. if they are farmers, they can go to their farms. we are here to protect them, their lives and their families. but these pictures show that people are not waiting to see if the taliban keep their promises. with telecommunications cut in the valley, it is hard to get information out. but the international community has warned that taliban they are watching and they will be held accountable for their actions. yalda hakim, bbc news.
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a court in new york is due to hold a pre—trial hearing this afternoon in the civil case filed by a woman who claims the duke of york sexually assaulted her when she was 17. our royal correspondent jonny dymond is here. what are we expecting? i , thank you is this hearing? it , thank you is this hearing? it is important _ , thank you is this hearing? it is important because _ , thank you is this hearing? it 3 important because it's the , thank you is this hearing? it l important because it's the first and how important is this hearing? it is important because it's the first will proceed. prince andrew's team have not commented on any aspect of this case, as you say, a civil case, not a criminal case, a claim for compensation and damages against the duke and his team effectively have said there is nothing to see here, there is nothing to discuss. prince andrew of course denies the allegation of sexual assault, he says he can't remember meeting the woman. what we may get out of the case is whether or not the judge accepts that prince andrew has been formally served with the allegations against him. it might sound like a technicality, it's not, it's really important. if thejudge technicality, it's not, it's really important. if the judge says yes, the papers have been properly served, you may then say this case can go forward, and then prince
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andrew has a decision to take. is he going to have legal representation if the case goes forward or is he going to leave it and possibly have judgment made against him in his absence? :, , ,y ., ., ~ absence? jonny dymond, thank you ve much absence? jonny dymond, thank you very much indeed. _ our top story this lunchtime... covid vaccines for 12— to 15—year—olds are expected to be approved shortly. and coming up... a survey shows there was great pride in the nhs during the pandemic, but what do patients think now? coming up what do patients think now? coming up on the bbc news channel, ian poulter is one of the captain's wildcard picks for the ryder cup. he isjoined by sergio wildcard picks for the ryder cup. he is joined by sergio garcia and wildcard picks for the ryder cup. he isjoined by sergio garcia and shane lowry. rose misses out. britain's emma raducanu says she's ready for anything and can cope with her sudden rise to stardom
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after winning the us open. tennis stars past and present have continued to praise the 18—year—old's astonishing performance. she beat leylah fernandez on saturday to become the first qualifier, and first british woman for 44 years, to win a grand slam singles title. she is now predicted to become one of the biggest earners in tennis. our sports correspondent laura scott is at wimbledon. it was here at wimbledon emma by the kanoute first arrived in the spotlight and whereas she was a wild card this year next year should return a grand slam champion and her new fame could mean sw19's ffion lewis hill could get another rebrand. i won't the following report contains flashing images —— sw19's famous hill.
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by now, emma raducanu might have begun to believe this is real. she did it and her name is on the wall to prove it. she has had a few days to reflect on her historic achievement, as has the tennis world, but, still, there is a sense of shock. i am just so thrilled that somebody as good as emma has come along and take in the world by absolute storm and just been brilliant. as far as the attention and the sponsorships and that, she has got to be protected, because, yes, you say there is quite a stressful commitment, so she's got to pick and choose and, boy, she can pick and choose the best of them. raducanu ended britain's 44 year wait for a female grand slam singles champion, a moment watched by more than nine million people back home. today, she becomes the world number 23, up from 150 at the start of the tournament. all hail the queen of queens. just as she was floored by her us open victory, so was another
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first time grand slam winner daniil medvedev. he thwarted novak djokovic's hopes of a calendar sweep of the majors and denied him a record 21st slam. nicknamed the chess master medvedev outmanoeuvred and enraged djokovic. the russian producing a near flawless performance to win in straight sets. as the us open comes to a close, britain isn'tjust celebrating one win. there were four titles, two forjoe salisbury and yet more wheelchair doubles glory for alfie hewett and gordon reid but the young woman in the middle will inevitably garner the most attention. speaks mandarin. she is already generating huge global appeal with this off—the—cuff message to herfans in china. what is the message to younger athletes? and america's biggest tv shows queueing up to talk to the teenage star. raducanu has shot to fame faster than anyone could have imagined or prepared herfor. protecting her now will be key to preserving herfuture.
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it is easy to forget just it is easy to forgetjust how early on in her career emma rather cannot is, you heard concerns there from virginia wade about potential distractions to her development. rather kanoute was open about the fact everything behind—the—scenes at wimbledon, up with her and work is already under way here to make sure that she can enjoy next year and hopefully continue her meteoric rise. laura, thank you very much. the leader of the tuc says the uk must be better prepared for future economic shocks like the covid pandemic — saying it won't be a one off. frances o'grady has challenged the prime minister to deliver on his promises to level up britain. our business correspondent ben thompson is here. tell us more about what she's said. pretty stark assessment of the state of industry and how we work. some of these problems made worse by the pandemic but it has highlighted an
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covid underlining the existing problems for business. as you said the tuc saying the pandemic must be a catalyst for change and we must be prepared for future crises. she says that covid will not be a one off, she talked about climate chaos that is already here, the emissions targets, the longer we put those off the west it will get. she also talked private gains a new technology that makes free time for more but that must be shared with working people through higher pay or shorter working hours rather than just profits for business, and also some severe warnings for government as well. now ministers tell us they're going to level up britain. but levelling up means nothing if they freeze workers' pay, slash universal credit and the number of kids in poverty soars. so i have a challenge for the prime minister — if levelling up means anything,
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it must mean levelling up at work, and levelling up living standards. they went on to elaborate, talking about ministers must avoid raising taxes further for business and they want them to read ms —— reconsider the national insurance increase and they see it as another hit for working people particularly young people or those on low wages. chief sites as shortage of hgv drivers as a direct result of low pay and tough working conditions. they want a rise in capital gains tax, they say that would tax the wealthy and not the low paid and that could help pay for social care and she says it also has immediate impact on the local economy and that rather than those on high wages that may be stash their money elsewhere, low paid workers will spend it on the local high street and she says that is a direct benefit to the economy that we will all feel.— we will all feel. ben, thank you very much- _
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a bbc panorama investigation has uncovered evidence suggesting that one of britain's biggest companies paid a bribe to the former zimbabwean dictator, robert mugabe. british american tobacco is also accused of paying bribes and using illegal surveillance methods to damage its rivals in south africa. bat says it is committed to the highest standards of corporate conduct and transparency wherever it operates. richard bilton reports. these are the forests of mahikeng, in rural south africa. peter snyders lives here now but he used to have a different life. breaking the law to help british american tobacco sabotage its competitors. they said that we must tap their telephones, do physical surveillance on them, on their trucks — where the consignments are going to, and follow them all over. did bat know you were doing that? they were giving us
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money to do that. bat is one of the uk's ten biggest companies. but working with the bureau of investigativejournalism and the university of bath, we found evidence it was breaking the law to undermine rivals. documents and insiders revealed an extraordinary incident in zimbabwe. three members of a firm working on behalf of bat were arrested, suspected of spying. the document shows zimbabwe and officials wanted a payment of between 300,000 and 500,000 us dollars to mr mugabe's party to get the case dropped. effectively a bribe to a dictator. the files don't show the bride being paid, but the men were released. this man was sent in to negotiate the deal for bat. they would have to pay
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to get what they want, including these three men out of prison? that's exactly the deal that was brokered. is there a chance that, because that meeting happened, friendships were formed and they got what they wanted without paying any money? absolutely not. that's fa ntasyland. so you get what you want by paying the money. and only by paying the money. when asked by the bbc, bat didn't deny paying a bribe to a dictator. it said it emphatically rejects the mischaracterisation of its conduct and that it was helping law enforcement agencies combat the trade in illicit cigarettes. it said it fully cooperated with a serious fraud office investigation which included allegations relating to south africa and resulted in no action. what we have found is a company that stopped at nothing to sell cigarettes. richard bilton, bbc news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says the time for a second vote on scottish
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independence is approaching. delivering the closing speech at her party's virtual conference, ms sturgeon said she intended to offer a legal referendum to the scottish people by the end of 2023, if the pandemic is over. the scottish government is now restarting work to make sure that the choice about our country's future is a fully informed one. no one, no one, is saying there won't be challenges to overcome. we will set these out openly and honestly. nothing will fall into our laps. but, like all countries, we face challenges whatever path we take. the question is this, which option, becoming independent or being governed by westminster, equips us best to meet these challenges? protesters demanding government action on home insulation partially blocked severaljunctions on the m25. tens of thousands of motorists trying to use the uk's busiest motorway faced long delays while activists sat
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on the road holding banners. our chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt is here. this has been causing real chaos. they started at eight o'clock this morning and blocked up to six of the slip roads onto the m25 causing huge tailbacks, they say they want to draw attention to the issue of insulating homes, they say it is crucial for reducing carbon emissions and they say they want a significant commitment from the government to insulate the homes of the poorest people in britain first. i spoke to the aa today and they say it's an incredibly dangerous protest for the protesters and also other road users and they say that this will backfire and create delays, increases emissions and it does not the way to go about it. insulate britain say how else do we raise these important issues without causing some kind of disruption and
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attracting attention? difficult dilemma. justin, thank you very much. from clapping on the doorstep, to putting posters in windows — over the course of the pandemic, many people showed a sense of pride in the nhs. but, a new survey also indicates a sense of disappointment and frustration in the service — with one in five people saying they've been forced to go private. our home editor mark easton has more. covid has inspired a wave of love for the national health service. at the height of the pandemic, tens of millions of us stood on our doorsteps to show our appreciation. a new poll suggests the nhs makes more than three quarters of people proud to be british. i was suicidal. i came out of that appointment and said to my partner, i want to die. i've had enough of this. dee, who lives in south wales, says she loves the nhs
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but in the end she spent her life savings on private care for her endometriosis because the national health service left her feeling dismissed, disrespected and desperate. i did not want to die, ijust wanted it to be better, i wanted it to stop. you just feel like nobody believes you and nobody is listening to you. the idea of the nhs makes us proud, but research by engage britain suggests our experience of it often disappoints us. in a poll 28% of people said they had had to fight to get the treatment they needed. over a quarter of people said they felt dismissed or not taken seriously, a figure that rises to 45% among young women. we really love the nhs. this is an institution that truly is valued across this country. but that is sitting at the same time with lots of us having really quite traumatic experiences. the question raised by the research is whether public affection for the model means inadequate attention is given to what the s stands for in nhs.
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it's just the time it takes to get everything you need, and being on hold for hoursjust to get a simple question answered, or waiting forfive or six months just to get a chat with a physiotherapist, and it's just really frustrating. floss, who comes from leicestershire, was born with cerebral palsy and has been getting treatment from the nhs since she was a child. but her feelings about the service changed when she reached adulthood. when i got to the age of 18, they said, "oh, you're an adult now, so unless you need anything constantly, we're going to write you off our books." an extraordinary one in four people in today's poll say the wait for nhs treatment for themselves or a loved one has seriously damaged their mental health. and one in five people say they've
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been forced to go private because they couldn't get the nhs treatment they needed. britain is proud to have its nhs. it recognises the pressure staff are under, and applauds their sacrifice. but the evidence suggests too many patients and their families feel they are lost in an institution that often doesn't have the time to listen. mark easton, bbc news. britney spears has revealed she's engaged to her long—term boyfriend, sam asghari. the announcement comes days after the american singer's father filed court papers to end his control of her life and career. britney spears said the legal arrangement had prevented herfrom marrying mr asghari or having more children. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith—lucas. it isa it is a mixed picture around the country today, some have got some blue sky and sunshine around but
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most places are looking like this,

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