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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 15, 2021 9:00am-10:00am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. government scientists say there could be a largejump in covid hospital admissions in england if restrictions aren't tightened as the health secretary says he can't rule out the possibility of future lockdowns. i think it would be irresponsible for any health minister in the world to say that this or that is 100% ruled out, not least because i don't know whether at sometime in the future, next year or the year after all the year after that, there might be a vaccine escape variant. in the government's �*plan b', we could see vaccine passports, the return of mandatory mask—wearing
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and advice to work from home. do you think measures should be brought in? get in touch with us this morning — you can tweet me @annita—mcveigh or use the hashtag bbc your questions. also this morning... figures released this morning show the rate at which prices are rising jumped to 3.2% last month. it's the sharpest rise in inflation since records began. labour is leading a commons debate later on whether to keep the £20 a week uplift to universal credit. it's currently due to be scrapped in october. south korea has tested its own ballistic missiles after north korea fired two into the sea overnight. ip coins are being made again after a pause of two years. lockdowns means a lot of coins have been left down sofas and in pockets at home. and the first ever all—civilian space flight will take off later today with an entrepreneur, a healthcare worker, a scientist and a data analyst on board.
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the roll—out of coronavirus booster jabs for more than 30 million people across the uk is set to begin within the coming days. it's part of a wider strategy to control the virus over the winter months. plan a is designed to prevent the nhs in england being overwhelmed, and promotes vaccines and testing. but experts have warned there could be a significant rise in hospital admissions unless some restrictions are introduced. the government say its prepared a plan b, involving extra measures to be used if the nhs comes under unsustainable pressure. plan b would require nightclubs and large events to use vaccine passports. it would make mask wearing compulsory, for instance in crowded places.
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and ministers would advise people to work from home again, which scientists say makes a significant difference to infection rates. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins me from westminster. good morning to you, adam. i think this takes us back to the question of listening to the science, because a lot of eminent scientists and medical professionals are saying to the government that they should be introducing plan b now, not waiting for cases to build up further. so, what is the government saying in response to all of that?— what is the government saying in response to all of that? well, there is the potential— response to all of that? well, there is the potential i _ response to all of that? well, there is the potential i think _ response to all of that? well, there is the potential i think in _ response to all of that? well, there is the potential i think in the - response to all of that? well, there is the potential i think in the next i is the potential i think in the next few months for their to be quite a bit of tension between the politicians and the scientists over whether plan b needs to be triggered, how much of plan b is used, and whether plan b is sufficient. and it is interesting, you look at some of the documents that were published yesterday by sage, the scientific advisory group, alongside the autumn and winter plan, and they say, in a very sage
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scientist kind of way that maybe we should be using plan b now, because they say there are other countries in europe which are having these measures in place at the moment and managing to reduce the scale of their epidemic. and when it comes to triggering plan b, it is not that there is some kind of very clear, explicit scientific threshold that is crossed and then you introduce these measures, it is a matter of judgment, where the politicians will have to take into account lots of factors, as the health secretary was a plain in this morning. we factors, as the health secretary was a plain in this morning.— a plain in this morning. we don't want to get _ a plain in this morning. we don't want to get to — a plain in this morning. we don't want to get to a _ a plain in this morning. we don't want to get to a position - a plain in this morning. we don't want to get to a position ever . a plain in this morning. we don't i want to get to a position ever again where _ want to get to a position ever again where there is unsustainable pressure _ where there is unsustainable pressure on the nhs so it is not able _ pressure on the nhs so it is not able to— pressure on the nhs so it is not able to see _ pressure on the nhs so it is not able to see people in the usual way when _ able to see people in the usual way when it_ able to see people in the usual way when it needs to, particularly emergency patients. so in my mind that is_ emergency patients. so in my mind that is the — emergency patients. so in my mind that is the number one issue that we need that is the number one issue that we heed to— that is the number one issue that we need to always keep an eye on, working — need to always keep an eye on, working with our colleagues in the nhs~ _ working with our colleagues in the nhs. �* , , ., , , ., nhs. and it is 'ust worth spending a bit of time nhs. and it isjust worth spending a bit of time looking _ nhs. and it isjust worth spending a bit of time looking at _ nhs. and it isjust worth spending a bit of time looking at what - nhs. and it isjust worth spending a bit of time looking at what the - bit of time looking at what the projections are which have been made by the scientists because it is not super clear and it is a bit confusing. they are saying that under one scenario, you could see
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may be 7000 people being admitted to hospital every day, which would be enormous. but that is only, they say that scenario is very, very unlikely, that would be the virus raging completely out of control. there are other scenarios which have money fewer hospital admissions than that, and also, in the same document, the model also —— the model is also say they got quite a lot of the modelling over the summer wrong, by not really clocking what was going to happen as a result of the behaviour related to the euros, or people going into isolation, or even the warm weather. so there is an acknowledgement that this is a very uncertain period. dr katherine henderson is president of the royal college of emergency medicine. thank you very much for your time
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today, dr katherine henderson. so, the government at the moment is putting all its eggs into the plan a basket, vaccines and testing, is that enough, right now, in your opinion? irate that enough, right now, in your oinion? ~ ., ., ., , ., , that enough, right now, in your oinion? ., ., ., , ., , , _ opinion? we are already really busy in the health _ opinion? we are already really busy in the health service, _ opinion? we are already really busy in the health service, it _ opinion? we are already really busy in the health service, it is - opinion? we are already really busy in the health service, it is not - in the health service, it is not just patients with covid, we are busy with lots of other patients. emergency departments and acute units are really struggling. so, our concern is, if there is another increase in the number of covid patients coming in, that we really will not be able to do the things that we hope, which is to keep normal care going and obviously do some of the catch—up of the backlog. so, this is about getting ahead of the virus, isn't it, essentially, do you thing the government is listening to what you and other physicians are saying at the moment? i think they are listening but it is obviously a complicated picture. the situation is really pretty difficult at the moment. i think we are surprised at how bad the summer has beenin surprised at how bad the summer has been in hospitals, although covid numbers may be have been reasonably
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low, the reality in the frontline is that we are actually really struggling. that we are actually really struggling-— that we are actually really stru~lin~. . ., ., ,, ., struggling. and you are talking not onl about struggling. and you are talking not only about covid _ struggling. and you are talking not only about covid patients - struggling. and you are talking not only about covid patients but - struggling. and you are talking not| only about covid patients but about that huge backlog that has built up during the pandemic so far, along with other day—to—dayjobs that you have to do. with other day-to-day “obs that you have to do. , , with other day-to-day “obs that you have to do.— have to do. every bed that is filled b a have to do. every bed that is filled by a patient _ have to do. every bed that is filled by a patient who — have to do. every bed that is filled by a patient who has _ have to do. every bed that is filled by a patient who has covid - by a patient who has covid is essentially filled by somebody who has had a essentially a preventable disease, and is not filled by somebody who is having a procedure or diagnostic test or an elective operation. so, we are really going to increase our backlog if we don't get the infection under control, we don't get covid under control, we run the risk of increasing the backlog, but we are already seeing a lot of patients who have got unmet health needs, who didn't present during the pandemic, who are now presenting to emergency care, to their gp, presenting to emergency care, to theirgp, into
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presenting to emergency care, to their gp, into hospital, who are needing quite a lot of healthcare, that we need to be able to deliver. and my fear would be that if we end “p and my fear would be that if we end up becoming very much a covid service again, we're just going to add to the problems of the nhs, and to the population health needs. what to the population health needs. what difference would _ to the population health needs. what difference would it _ to the population health needs. what difference would it make, and how quickly do you think that difference would filter through, if some of the elements of the government's plan b were to be introduced now, for example mandatory mask wearing in crowded places, on public transport, and of course advising people where they can to work from home? 50. and of course advising people where they can to work from home? smi and of course advising people where they can to work from home? so, i am not a model— they can to work from home? so, i am rrot a model so — they can to work from home? so, i am rrot a model so i _ they can to work from home? so, i am not a model so i can't _ they can to work from home? so, i am not a model so i can't answer- not a model so i can't answer that question in terms of what percentage improvement we would see. you must have a sense. improvement we would see. you must have a sense-— have a sense. you've watched what has happened _ have a sense. you've watched what has happened in — have a sense. you've watched what has happened in the _ have a sense. you've watched what has happened in the pandemic - have a sense. you've watched what has happened in the pandemic so l have a sense. you've watched what i has happened in the pandemic so far, and what difference certain measures have made, so you must have a sense whether that would help fairly quickly or not deal with the pressures you are seeing? mr; quickly or not deal with the pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything — pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything that _ pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything that we _ pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything that we can - pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything that we can do, - pressures you are seeing? my sense is that anything that we can do, any| is that anything that we can do, any measures that we can take, to reduce
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the spread of infection and the number of patients, would be incredibly welcome and is much—needed in the health system. so, people don't need to wait for plan b to wear a mask in a crowded place, they can do that already. they can think about how they are socialising, they can think about getting tested early if they have got symptoms so that they can remove themselves from the risk of spreading to other people. they can be very careful about mixing generations, so that somebody who is young and out and about us visiting elderly, vulnerable relatives and risking them catching the infection, when they are much more likely to lead a hospital admission, which might be prolonged and could be very dangerous for them. so, might be prolonged and could be very dangerous forthem. so, i might be prolonged and could be very dangerous for them. so, i don't think society necessarily needs to wait for plan b, to look at the situation that we are in and think, what can we do to prevent as much of the spread as possible so that we can keep our health service going?
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and finally, dr katherine henderson, do you have any sense of what the threshold is for moving from planai to plan b? i threshold is for moving from planai to plan b? ., �* ~' threshold is for moving from planai to plan b? ., �* ,, ., , ., threshold is for moving from planai toplanb? .,�* ~'., i. , to plan b? i don't think any of us know what _ to plan b? i don't think any of us know what the _ to plan b? i don't think any of us know what the official _ to plan b? i don't think any of us know what the official threshold | to plan b? i don't think any of us i know what the official threshold is, and i hope it isn't the nhs being overwhelmed. we need to be doing better than that, we need the nhs to better than that, we need the nhs to be able to function in as normal a way as possible, but we are struggling at the moment to do that, which is why any further increase in the number of cases is going to be a real challenge. idr the number of cases is going to be a real challenge.— real challenge. dr katherine henderson. _ real challenge. dr katherine henderson, thank _ real challenge. dr katherine henderson, thank you - real challenge. dr katherine henderson, thank you very l real challenge. dr katherine - henderson, thank you very much for your time, henderson, thank you very much for yourtime, president henderson, thank you very much for your time, president of the royal couege your time, president of the royal college of emergency medicine. with me now is suzannah nichol, chief executive of build uk, trade body for the construction sector. thank you very much forjoining us today, and throughout the pandemic, construction has been one of the sectors that has been keeping working, i remember driving to work in the early days of the first lockdown, the streets were virtually
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deserted but there were construction workers getting on with theirjobs. where is the sector right now in terms of how busy they are and what measures are they taking to try to keep covid—secure? the measures are they taking to try to keep covid-secure?— measures are they taking to try to keep covid-secure? the industry is incredibly busy _ keep covid-secure? the industry is incredibly busy at _ keep covid-secure? the industry is incredibly busy at the _ keep covid-secure? the industry is incredibly busy at the moment, - keep covid-secure? the industry is l incredibly busy at the moment, both on the commercial front, building offices, we are still still continuing to build offices, hospitals, schools, keeping the road networks and transport networks going. and also in the home, people are having their homes refurbished, they are extending, they spend so much time there that people are spending money on construction, which is clearly great for our sector. in terms of covid we've done really well over the last 18 months, we have set up procedures that 99% of the industry have adopted on their projects, all of the things we've been talking about, the wearing of masks, social distancing, reducing people on site. since restrictions were eased couple of months ago, we are getting back to normal, with more people on site,
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but we are still maintaining safe working practices, particularly increased welfare facilities and maintaining the increased hygiene that we have all become more familiar with over the last 18 months. 50 familiar with over the last 18 months. ., ., months. so when the government talks about encouraging _ months. so when the government talks about encouraging people _ months. so when the government talks about encouraging people to _ months. so when the government talks about encouraging people to go - months. so when the government talks about encouraging people to go back i about encouraging people to go back to the office or raises the possibility of people being encouraged to work from home again, how tricky does that make planning for your sector, how tricky does that make planning foryoursector, orare how tricky does that make planning for your sector, or are those sorts of pieces of advice having a major impact? it of pieces of advice having a ma'or im act? , , , , , of pieces of advice having a ma'or imact? , ,, impact? it will be business as usual for construction. _ impact? it will be business as usual for construction. we've _ impact? it will be business as usual for construction. we've worked - impact? it will be business as usual| for construction. we've worked since that first lockdown back in march 2020 so if people are asked to go back and work from home again, construction will continue going, but possibly dial—up on their social distancing measures again, we can reintroduce bits of our safe working practices if required, but for construction, they found their groove about 12 months ago and we've been working safely ever since then. and we're going to be talking about inflation figures injust
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and we're going to be talking about inflation figures in just a second, but what impact is inflation having on your industry, the supply of goods and so on? we on your industry, the supply of goods and so on?— on your industry, the supply of goods and so on? we have all seen the rices goods and so on? we have all seen the prices of _ goods and so on? we have all seen the prices of materials _ goods and so on? we have all seen the prices of materials go - goods and so on? we have all seen the prices of materials go up, - goods and so on? we have all seen the prices of materials go up, and i the prices of materials go up, and there are a number of factors for that. that demand for construction, the reduce in supply, the global demand for construction, we've obviously got a shortage of materials at the moment as well, and there are difficulties getting them in, we are all aware of the shortage of lorry drivers, most things are delivered on the back of an hgv or a lorry of some kind, so that reduces the flow of materials to the site, which increases their price. and the same on labour as well, like many other sectors, we have a labour shortage. so overall, the costs of construction are increasing. the inflation rate jumped to 3.2%
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last month, the biggest increase since records began in 1997. inflation is the rate at which prices are rising. if the cost of a £1 jar ofjam rises by 5p, thenjam inflation is 5%. the office for national statistics said the rise from 2% injuly was driven by increasing prices in the transport sector, as well as food costs at restaurants and cafes. the rate now exceeds the bank of england's 2% inflation target again. our business presenter alice baxter is here. good morning to you, alice. let's begin by going back to basics, remind us, what exactly is inflation, and why is it so significant in our daily lives? yes, it is important _ significant in our daily lives? yes, it is important to _ significant in our daily lives? yes, it is important to go _ significant in our daily lives? yes, it is important to go back- significant in our daily lives? us: it is important to go back to basics because it is a really important number, it affects everything to do with our daily lives, from our pension, ourwages, even our
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with our daily lives, from our pension, our wages, even our rail fares are affected by the rate of inflation. simply put, it is the rate at which the prices of things that we buy goes up. you gave the example, if a jar ofjam costs £1, and it goes up by 5p, then we would say that the rate of inflation is 5%. in the uk, there is an organisation called the office for national statistics which puts together something called a basket of goods which comprises things that we buy regularly, and they look to see how much those items increase, and they update that basket regularly to reflect our lives. so, for the first time this year, it includes things like hand sanitiser is, exercise equipment, smartwatches, garden furniture, all of which we were buying so much more of which we were buying so much more of in the last year. that is how they come up with this number. and as i say, so important, it affects how much we earn or we are spending on our transport and our pensions.
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so, why, then, have we seen in the last month of the biggestjump in inflation since records began, 3.2% last month?— inflation since records began, 3.296 last month? well, in some ways, it is very simple- _ last month? well, in some ways, it is very simple. we _ last month? well, in some ways, it is very simple. we weren't - last month? well, in some ways, it| is very simple. we weren't spending much on anything last year, but in terms of the big monthlyjump between august and, from july to august, there are a few factors. globally we are seeing this huge spike in the cost of energy, particularly oil prices, which have gone up hugely, but also issues in the global supply chain, particularly in shipping. some businesses expect global shipping costs to increase by 380%, that increase has to be passed on. here increase has to be passed on. here in the uk we have very specific factors at play. your previous guest mentioned the shortage in hgv drivers, that is a huge issue which is impacting the availability of goods on shelves. also brexit is an issue putting pressure on the labour
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force, and also on borders. all of those factors combined are putting pressure on the merchants, which are putting pressure on prices, which can lead to inflation. attention will now turn to the bank of england, how are they going to react? are we going to see an increase in interest rates, which is a means by which they can try to rein in spending and encourage us to save? we will have to see. some are predicting the rate of inflation to go predicting the rate of inflation to 9° up predicting the rate of inflation to go up to li% by the end of the year, we will have to see. as you said in your introduction, we are now above that bank of england target of 2%. and that rise in interest rates if it happens will be a big shock for a lot of people. it it happens will be a big shock for a lot of people-— lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need _ lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need to _ lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need to couch _ lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need to couch in - lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need to couch in a - lot of people. it will. all of this, we do need to couch in a word i lot of people. it will. all of this, | we do need to couch in a word of caution, talking to my parents, for example, they remember interest rates much higher than we have been used to. i think there are arguments that we have got very used to very,
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very low interest rates. if we were to see an increase, it would be small, they would be incremental, but right now, the bank of england is saying, let's wait and see where we are. an 0pposition day debate will be held in parliament this afternoon on whether to keep the £20 a week uplift to universal credit, which is currently due to be scrapped at the start of october. labour will challenge conservative mps who oppose the welfare cut "to do the right thing", and vote with them in a non—binding motion. with me now laura robinson who is on universal credit and is a volunteer at her localfood bank. thank you so much forjoining us today to talk about this. tell us about yourself first of all, you are about yourself first of all, you are a mum and you work part—time? that a mum and you work part-time? that is correct. a mum and you work part-time? that is correct- i— a mum and you work part-time? that is correct. i would _ a mum and you work part—time? trust is correct. i would love to a mum and you work part—time? tryst is correct. i would love to work full time but having such a small child it is not viable for me because of the price of childcare
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and everything. 50. because of the price of childcare and everything-— because of the price of childcare and everything. so, the additional money that _ and everything. so, the additional money that you've _ and everything. so, the additional money that you've been _ and everything. so, the additional money that you've been getting i money that you've been getting during the pandemic, this £20 extra per week, what has that meant to you, what difference has it made? it has made a massive difference, it has made a massive difference, it has been a case of whether we can make sure we have got a healthy, nutritious meal, put the gas on, and it is notjust £20 a week, it works out as £86 67 per month we're losing, and people who are working full—time, if your boss said to you, they are going to take £86 off your wages, you would struggle. band wages, you would struggle. and ou've wages, you would struggle. and you've talked — wages, you would struggle. and you've talked about the choice between food and heating, and heating has not been so much of an issue over the last few months, but as we head into the autumn and winter, what sort of choices where you have to make on a reduced incomes? it you have to make on a reduced incomes?—
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you have to make on a reduced incomes? , ., ., ., ., ., ., incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do i — incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do i put _ incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do i put the _ incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do i put the heating _ incomes? it is heat or eat again, do i tour do i put the heating on? - i tour do i put the heating on? having that little bit of extra income on universal credit, i have been able to put a bit more in the gas, but that is not going to be there. i know a lot of families, not just myself, families in my community, will struggle. brute community, will struggle. we mentioned — community, will struggle. we mentioned that you volunteer at your local food mentioned that you volunteer at your localfood bank, how busy mentioned that you volunteer at your local food bank, how busy has that been lately?— local food bank, how busy has that been lately? that's been busy with eve bod been lately? that's been busy with everybody going _ been lately? that's been busy with everybody going back _ been lately? that's been busy with everybody going back to _ been lately? that's been busy with everybody going back to school, i everybody going back to school, people need uniforms and some people have already lost that £86 a month. and you anticipate it getting even busier as more people lose that? charlotte moore busy oh, because it's just before christmas, and people rely on the help to buy meals for christmas and over the winter months. —— a lot more busier. but for me, i struggle to understand why we live in 2021 and we have food banks. why can't the governmentjust
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help support the people who are on lower income so, over the period when people have been able to have this extra £20 a week, or as you say, £86 a month, have you noticed a difference in the number of people coming to the food bank, do you think the number has gone down because that extra bit of support has been in place? yes, i do think the number has gone down, but we are aware and we are prepared for the increase. we have been able to get a few more donations in than we usually would have. you few more donations in than we usually would have.— few more donations in than we usually would have. you have to plan ahead and see _ usually would have. you have to plan ahead and see where _ usually would have. you have to plan ahead and see where you _ usually would have. you have to plan ahead and see where you can - usually would have. you have to plan ahead and see where you can get - ahead and see where you can get those extra donations from. what about christmas, laura, as you say, you are not able to work more hours, the cost of childcare is prohibitive for you, and how do you plan ahead for you, and how do you plan ahead for christmas, are you trying to put some money aside or buy something is
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already? i some money aside or buy something is alread ? . , . some money aside or buy something is alread ? ., , ., ., , , ., already? i am starting to buy a coule already? i am starting to buy a coople of _ already? i am starting to buy a couple of things _ already? i am starting to buy a couple of things every - already? i am starting to buy a couple of things every month, | already? i am starting to buy a - couple of things every month, just little bits here and there. and when it comes to christmas, it is just going to be a case of, we've got what we've got and we're always grateful for what we've got. my child is not brilliant appreciates everything. child is not brilliant appreciates everything-— child is not brilliant appreciates eve hina. ., ., everything. what is your message to the government. _ everything. what is your message to the government, would _ everything. what is your message to the government, would you - everything. what is your message to the government, would you appeal. everything. what is your message to | the government, would you appeal to them to change their mind on this? as we mentioned in the introduction, there are a number of conservative mps who don't agree with what their government is proposing to do. i would want to know the real reason they are taking it off us. they've managed to give as it through the pandemic, why can't we keep it? what is the real reason? is it so we are spending less in the shops, so that money is not going into their pockets, and taxes being paid and? if we keep that money, the money is going straight back into the economy. bills are being paid on
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time, shopping is being bought, instead of scrimping and scraping relying upon local food instead of scrimping and scraping relying upon localfood banks. laura, thank you so much for talking to us, we really appreciate that and i wish you and your little one well, take care. detectives investigating the death of the journalist lyra mckee in londonderry have arrested four men. the men, aged 19, 20, 21 and 33, were all arrested this morning under the terrorism act. ms mckee, who was 29, was shot as she watched riots in derry�*s creggan area in april 2019. relatives of four men who died in a mining disaster in the swansea valley ten years ago are calling for a full inquest into their deaths. they were killed when water flooded the gleision drift mine in september 2011. the mine's manager and owners were cleared of manslaughter charges three years later.
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the two surviving miners say the tragedy had been swept under the carpet. the health and safety executive said it would be inappropriate to comment on details of the investigation. south korea has succussfully tested a ballistic missile from a submarine which is designed to help counter any attack from its neighbour north korea. the planned launch comes just hours after pyongyang fired two ballistic devices towards the sea of japan. joining me now from seoul is our correspondent laura bicker. so, laura, a planned launch by south korea, as we mentioned, but the timing of this planned launch, rather fortuitous, timing of this planned launch, ratherfortuitous, some might say, given what north korea has been doing? given what north korea has been doin: ? ~ , . doing? well, within 'ust a few hours, doing? well, within 'ust a few hours. on i doing? well, within 'ust a few hours, on this _ doing? well, within 'ust a few hours, on this one _ doing? well, within just a few hours, on this one korean - hours, on this one korean peninsular, we have two koreas making two separate launches. first of all that launch by north korea. we understand it was a short range
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ballistic, it flew around 800 kilometres, towards the sea of japan, also known as the east to see. these are ballistic weapons, so they are banned under un security council revolution resolutions, so there will be international condemnation. as opposed to south korea's launch, which came from a submarine. interestingly, this is a missile that is capable of taking a nuclear weapon, missile that is capable of taking a nuclearweapon, but missile that is capable of taking a nuclear weapon, but south korea does not have nuclear weapons. this is a first for south korea and it will become one of only seven nations able to fire a missile from a submarine. it comes as south korea has increased its budget for defence in recent years. and they do say here in seoul that it is to counter what is happening in the north. but it also has an added meaning, because here on the peninsular, in south korea, 28,000 us troops are based, and south korea more or less
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relies on the united states for defence. and it is called the nuclear umbrella because the us covers this entire region as an ally, and it is there in terms of defence. but south korea has shown increasing steps that it wants to stand on its own two feet, with this budget increase of 7%, it has just decided to build an aircraft carrier, it hasjust decided to build an aircraft carrier, it has just bought a whole bunch ofjets, so it has got brand—new military hardware. even though this is a planned launch, having those two missile launches within a few hours of one another just shows exactly what a mini arms race is going on on this korean peninsula right now. 0ne penny coins are back in circulation again, after two years of not being produced. the royal mint said the coins went back into production last year, with 88 million minted in 2020. none were made for general circulation in 2018 and 2019. pandemic lockdowns reduced the use of cash, but also meant many coins were hoarded at home.
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four amateur astronauts are going to launch into space from florida tonight on the first ever all—civilian space mission. known as the inspiration four, the trip is being funded by the us billionaire jared issacman, but his fellow crewmates come from very ordinary backgrounds. he's joined on the spacex flight by a healthcare worker, a science professor and a data analyst. jonathan amos reports. five, four, three, two, one, zero. ignition, lift off. they are four people who want to make a difference, on earth and off it. jared issacman, hayley arceneaux, sian proctor and chris sembroski. the inspiration four crew. they are all amateur astronauts. six months ago, they were pursuing everyday careers. today, they're the subject of a netflix documentary series and are preparing to climb aboard
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a spacex capsule to rocket into the sky. it's been made possible byjared issacman, a wealthy businessman with a passion for planes and some big dreams. you know, it is the first time that a global superpower hasn't sent people up into orbital space. and i think that should send a message of all the things to come, right? mr isaacman purchased the flight but then gifted the three adjacent seats to people with an inspirational story to tell. that is exemplified by 29—year—old hayley arceneaux. she overcame bone cancer as a child and as an adult, has gone back to work for the hospital that cured her. i remember getting off the phone and my hands were shaking. it was just so exhilarating. this is definitely not something i ever imagined would happen. but i think that's what makes it so fun for me. in the 60 years since the first human went into space, fewer than 600 people have ventured above 50 miles in altitude. and most of those have been
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military trained personnel. the inspiration four believe they are breaking new ground. they don't have what was famously called the right stuff. and if they can go into orbit, they say, anyone can. go nasa, go spacex, god speed. jonathan amos, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. after yesterday's washout across some eastern parts of the uk, across some eastern parts of the uk, a lot better today.— a lot better today. certainly some sunshine in _ a lot better today. certainly some sunshine in the _ a lot better today. certainly some sunshine in the forecast - a lot better today. certainly some sunshine in the forecast right - sunshine in the forecast right across the board. not completely dry, we have got a few showers, brought by this week weather front which is moving into northern ireland and western scotland. but generally speaking it is going to be a fine day as high pressure noses in from the south. this is what it looks like this afternoon, fairly overcast for northern ireland and parts of scotland, although sunny
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spells in the lowlands, for sure. the rest of us, it is a fine day, in fact the best of the sunshine will be around the irish sea, wales, the south—west. fine night, not particularly cold, and tomorrow, more sunshine around, in fact the better day across scotland. still a little cloudy across northern ireland, perhaps some rain getting in later in the day. top temperatures tomorrow, low 20s. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: government scientists say there could be a largejump in covid hospital admissions in england if restrictions aren't tightened as the health secretary says he can't rule out the possibility of future lockdowns. i think it would be irresponsible for any— i think it would be irresponsible for any health minister in the world to see _ for any health minister in the world to see that— for any health minister in the world to see that this or that is 100% ruled _ to see that this or that is 100% ruled out, _ to see that this or that is 100% ruled out, not least because ijust don't _ ruled out, not least because ijust
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don't know— ruled out, not least because ijust don't know whether at some time in the future _ don't know whether at some time in the future or next year after that they might be a escape variant. figures released this morning show the rate at which prices are rising jumped to 3.2% last month. it's the sharpest rise in inflation since records began. labour is leading a commons debate later on whether to keep the £20 a week uplift to universal credit. it's currently due to be scrapped in october. 1p coins are being made again after a pause of two years. lockdowns means a lot of coins have been left down sofas and in pockets at home and the first ever all—civilian space flight will take off later today with an entrepreneur, a healthcare worker, a scientist and a data analyst on board. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally nugent. good morning. last season's winners chelsea got off to a good start in the champions league, but despite another goal for cristiano ronaldo,
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there was a shock defeat for manchester united in switzerland. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. in bern, it's opening night... you could call him the old boy of manchester united, if you dared. in switzerland, these are definitely the young boys of bern, national champions. it would take time for cristiano ronaldo to adapt to playing for united again in the champions league. yeah, 12 minutes. cristiano ronaldo is in the middle and he scores! well of course he did. if only the game had ended then. before half—time united were down to ten men, aaron wan—bissaka shown a red card for this. defining moment, because the home team played with increasing belief. a cross, a touch and the boys were back. a famous equalising goal. the ball even obliged for selfies. there was more. with seconds left in injury time jesse lingard payday played a perfect pass...
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..forjordan siebatcheu. 2-1. a fine reminder — it's not how you start, it's how you finish. and so to the reigning champions. chelsea at home to zenit st petersburg. defender antonio rudiger decided to lead by example at the start of the second half, all the way, almost. the manager needed a goal—scorer. 20 minutes to play, it's exactly what romelu lukaku is for. there. they won the champions league without him last season. they are stronger, surely, with him. joe wilson, bbc news. it was obviously not the best start for united but they don't believe their chances of progressing are over yet. we know we have given ourselves a more _ we know we have given ourselves a more difficult — we know we have given ourselves a more difficult task— we know we have given ourselves a more difficult task than _ we know we have given ourselves a more difficult task than we - we know we have given ourselves a more difficult task than we did - we know we have given ourselves a more difficult task than we did lasti more difficult task than we did last year when — more difficult task than we did last year when everyone _ more difficult task than we did last year when everyone thought - more difficult task than we did last year when everyone thought we i more difficult task than we did last i year when everyone thought we were through— year when everyone thought we were through after— year when everyone thought we were through after two _ year when everyone thought we were through after two games _ year when everyone thought we were through after two games last - year when everyone thought we were through after two games last year. i through after two games last year. you need _ through after two games last year. you need ten — through after two games last year. you need ten or— through after two games last year. you need ten or 12 _ through after two games last year. you need ten or 12 points, - through after two games last year. you need ten or 12 points, you - through after two games last year. i you need ten or 12 points, you need to win _
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you need ten or 12 points, you need to win you _ you need ten or 12 points, you need to win you home _ you need ten or 12 points, you need to win you home games _ you need ten or 12 points, you need to win you home games and - you need ten or 12 points, you need to win you home games and win - you need ten or 12 points, you needj to win you home games and win one away— to win you home games and win one away from _ to win you home games and win one away from home _ to win you home games and win one away from home we _ to win you home games and win one away from home. we have - to win you home games and win one away from home. we have lost- to win you home games and win one away from home. we have lost an i away from home. we have lost an opportunity— away from home. we have lost an opportunity to— away from home. we have lost an opportunity to get _ away from home. we have lost an opportunity to get three _ away from home. we have lost an opportunity to get three points . away from home. we have lost an| opportunity to get three points but we have _ opportunity to get three points but we have got— opportunity to get three points but we have got two— opportunity to get three points but we have got two home _ opportunity to get three points but we have got two home games- opportunity to get three points butj we have got two home games next opportunity to get three points but - we have got two home games next and we have got two home games next and we have _ we have got two home games next and we have to _ we have got two home games next and we have to focus — we have got two home games next and we have to focus on _ we have got two home games next and we have to focus on them. _ barcelona began champions league life without lionel messi and they were thoroughly outclassed by the german giants bayern munich, losing 3—0 at home. robert lewandowski putting away two of the goals. he's now scored in 18 consecutive matches. among the sides in action tonight are last year's beaten finalists manchester city, who take on rb leipzig, and liverpool, who face the italian giants ac milan and managerjurgen klopp is relishing a big night at anfield. it's a long time ago that we had a champions league game at home. we have now the opportunity to experience again the atmosphere anfield is able to produce in the premier league. but we spoke a lot in the past, rightly so, about european nights at anfield, and i can't wait to experience that. it will be great and, erm, i'm really looking forward.
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great britain's 4 x 100 metre relay team now look very likely to be stripped of the silver medal they won at the tokyo 0lympics. one of the quartet, cj ujah, tested positive for banned substances immediately after the race, and now a second sample has confimed that result. the case has been referred to the court of arbitration for sport and if proven, all four will lose their medals. andy murray has urged british tennis to build on emma raducanu's us open victory by bringing more children into the sport. murray has been really impressed by what he's seen so far. what she did in new york was very special. it is a huge boost for british tennis. and yeah, it gives hopefully the governing body is an opportunity to capitalise on that and get more and more kids involved in the sport and everything.
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that's all the sport for now. the government has outlined it's autumn and winter plan to tackle covid and to stop the nhs in england from becoming overwhelmed. but doctors are warning that hospitals are already under pressure and summer is barely over. john maguire reports. winter is coming and we're only in september. at this gp surgery in bristol they are preparing to administer thousands of flu jabs this weekend. it will be a season like no other, with challenges for the nhs like never before. due to the lockdown last year, we had very little flu. so there is a sense that people's immunity might not be as widespread this year. so we definitely feel we will be seeing more flu—related illnesses. on top of that we will get the usual childhood respiratory viruses. again, they've not had much chance to circulate over the past year. and then we have covid also.
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and so the three of them between them are likely to make this quite a difficult winter in terms of the respiratory scenario. the advice is to get the flu and covid jabs when called, and to wear masks, wash hands and socially distance if you suffer symptoms, to limit the spread of any virus. booster jabs for over 50s are expected to start within days. the government's hope is to avoid any return to restrictions. i think we have to learn to get on to live with the virus. vaccination is clearly one of the ways ahead, but we shouldn't forget there are other measures like distancing, like washing your hands, like face masks. yeah, i think you've just got to carry on as normal now. it seems like people, unless it's hit them closer to home, they're just sick of it now.
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and they want things back to normal. everybody wants that. we all want that. of course we want those things to be back to normal. but ijust think it's maybe a bit too ambitious to get rid of everything. i don't think it's the way forward to tell you the truth, another lockdown. so ~~ _ another vaccine, another booster vaccine, yeah, but not another lockdown, no, no way. it's notjust a challenge for primary care, but also for hospitals. the royal college of emergency medicine says before winter starts, the demand is already unprecedented. we've just recorded the worst four hour target performance we've ever recorded in august. and this is the sort of thing we normally see in winter. so we're seeing winter levels of performance in summer. if we get a sustained wave of covid combined with flu, we're looking that this winter could be extremely challenging. emily burrows had decided against being vaccinated.
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she said she was sucked in by social media. she became so ill when she contracted covid, that she was placed in an induced coma in intensive care. she is urging people to accept the jab. now being treated in a community hospital in the forest of dean, she says the road to recovery will be long. my lungs aren't going to be right. i've had another lung infection from it. my one lung isn't taking in the air properly. so it's all the after effects. i've got a high heart rate. even when i was on a ventilator my heart stopped twice. so, vaccinate. just have it done. and that's what they're preparing for back at the gp surgery, both covid and a seasonaljabs. they have a well rehearsed vaccination programme and are confident that with everyone's cooperation, the nhs will be able to do its job, as long as we all help
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by doing ours. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. we are asking you today whether the government based on what many medical professionals are saying should be introducing some of the plan b measures already for example mandatory mask wearing in enclosed spaces and public transport and the idea of people working from home if they can. here are some of your comments on all of that. one says if scientific communities are predicting rises in cases than short—term restrictions on high—intensity areas would be able to curb the rate of infection. this from alan who says we should all be responsible and get passports for crowded places and get ourjabs and think of others. another one says mask wearing should be mandatory and where people can work from home they
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should do. also large events, particular care needs to be taken. this one from marcot says the lessons should be learned that fewer restrictions earlier would avoid more damage to people and the economy. a stitch in time saves nine. if you'd like to comment on this on whether you think plan a is the way to go forward or actually some of those plan b measures should be introduced i would love to hear thoughts. —— hearyour be introduced i would love to hear thoughts. —— hear your thoughts. families who fled afghanistan fearing for their lives say they have been left prisoners in quarantine hotels in the uk, unable to leave. people who were evacuated out of kabul airport, after the taliban's takeover of the country, had to isolate for 10 days after arriving in the uk. however some now say they have been left living in the restricted conditions despite the quarantine period ending, withjust 20 minutes of fresh air a day and no news of when they will be given alternative accommodation.
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joining me is andrew fox, a retired army major who served three tours in afghanistan and has been helping people leave the country. and also i'm joined by a man who we are calling �*mohammed' to protect his identity. he is an interpreter who has spent the last 20 days with his family in a quarantine hotel here in the uk. thank you both forjoining me. andrew, do you have any idea of exactly how many people are in this situation at the moment. they have fulfilled the quarantine period but have had to remain in the hotels where they first arrived in the uk? i have no idea of numbers and i don't think the home office to either which is part of the problem. a flood of people came out of kabul during the evacuation and a lot of those people are lost in the system or there is a lack of clarity about how many people are actually out
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there still in hotel rooms. you say lost in the — there still in hotel rooms. you say lost in the system _ there still in hotel rooms. you say lost in the system and _ there still in hotel rooms. you say lost in the system and you - there still in hotel rooms. you say lost in the system and you say - there still in hotel rooms. you say| lost in the system and you say you don't think the home office actually has a clear idea of how many people are in hotels in this situation. do you really think that? i are in hotels in this situation. do you really think that?— you really think that? i do. i am workin: you really think that? i do. i am working closely _ you really think that? i do. i am working closely with _ you really think that? i do. i am working closely with local - working closely with local authorities to give to their needs —— refugee donations out. it's a really fluid picture out there so some people are in the condition mohammed has been in and some people are getting moved to accommodation straight from the end of the quarantine period. it's pot luck as to how these people are being treated. i to how these people are being treated. ., ., , a, ., ., treated. i want to bring mohammed on now. thank treated. i want to bring mohammed on now- thank you — treated. i want to bring mohammed on now. thank you for _ treated. i want to bring mohammed on now. thank you forjoining _ treated. i want to bring mohammed on now. thank you forjoining us. - treated. i want to bring mohammed on now. thank you forjoining us. tell - now. thank you forjoining us. tell us about yourfamily, now. thank you forjoining us. tell us about your family, how many of you are in the hotel?— you are in the hotel? including my famil , you are in the hotel? including my family. around _ you are in the hotel? including my
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family, around six _ you are in the hotel? including my family, around six families - you are in the hotel? including my family, around six families in - you are in the hotel? including my family, around six families in this| family, around six families in this hotei~ _ family, around six families in this hotei~ we — family, around six families in this hotel. we have been in this hotel for 20 _ hotel. we have been in this hotel for 20 days. so hotel. we have been in this hotel for 20 days-— hotel. we have been in this hotel for 20 da s. , for 20 days. so well beyond the end ofthe for 20 days. so well beyond the end of the quarantine _ for 20 days. so well beyond the end of the quarantine period. _ for 20 days. so well beyond the end of the quarantine period. so - for 20 days. so well beyond the end of the quarantine period. so there i of the quarantine period. so there is you, how many children? i of the quarantine period. so there is you, how many children? i have two children- _ is you, how many children? i have two children. and _ is you, how many children? i have two children. and i _ is you, how many children? i have two children. and i have _ is you, how many children? i have two children. and i have a - is you, how many children? i have l two children. and i have a pregnant wife _ two children. and i have a pregnant wife it's_ two children. and i have a pregnant wife. it's difficult to stay in the room — wife. it's difficult to stay in the room my— wife. it's difficult to stay in the room. my children can only see outside — room. my children can only see outside from behind the windows and they can _ outside from behind the windows and they can go _ outside from behind the windows and they can go outside for 20 minutes. they have _ they can go outside for 20 minutes. they have a — they can go outside for 20 minutes. they have a walk and come back. so 20 they have a walk and come back. 20 minutes in they have a walk and come back. 6r 20 minutes in a 24—hour period? they have a walk and come back. so i 20 minutes in a 24-hour period? yes. it's the 20 minutes in a 24-hour period? yes. it's the same — 20 minutes in a 24-hour period? yes. it's the same for _ 20 minutes in a 24-hour period? yes. it's the same for all _ 20 minutes in a 24—hour period? yes. it's the same for all afghan families— it's the same for all afghan families in this hotel. the quarantine period is ten days and we have tested —
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quarantine period is ten days and we have tested negative. but we don't know _ have tested negative. but we don't know how — have tested negative. but we don't know how long we will have to stay here _ know how long we will have to stay here i _ know how long we will have to stay here. ~ ., i. . ., , here. i know your children are very small so it — here. i know your children are very small so it must _ here. i know your children are very small so it must be _ here. i know your children are very small so it must be very _ here. i know your children are very small so it must be very difficult i small so it must be very difficult to explain to them what's going on. the biggest problem for me as my children _ the biggest problem for me as my children. they want to go outside. and naturally they want to be outside and be able to run around. what do you have to occupy you while you stay in the hotel room? we what do you have to occupy you while you stay in the hotel room?— you stay in the hotel room? we have nothin: to you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do — you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do here. _ you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do here. we _ you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do here. we don't - you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do here. we don't have i you stay in the hotel room? we have nothing to do here. we don't have a | nothing to do here. we don't have a contact _ nothing to do here. we don't have a contact point from the mod about how lon- contact point from the mod about how long we _ contact point from the mod about how long we will be here. so contact point from the mod about how long we will be here.— long we will be here. so no indication _ long we will be here. so no indication at _ long we will be here. so no indication at all— long we will be here. so no indication at all of- long we will be here. so no indication at all of how - long we will be here. so no. indication at all of how much long we will be here. so no - indication at all of how much longer you might have to stay there. trio. indication at all of how much longer you might have to stay there. no. no
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indication. you might have to stay there. no. no indication- we _ you might have to stay there. no. no indication. we have _ you might have to stay there. no. no indication. we have asked _ you might have to stay there. no. no indication. we have asked that - indication. we have asked that reception _ indication. we have asked that reception and the reception said the government is looking for a solution or a place _ government is looking for a solution or a place for you but they haven't found _ or a place for you but they haven't found anywhere. so or a place for you but they haven't found anywhere.— found anywhere. so that's 'ust via the hotel reception. h found anywhere. so that's 'ust via the hotel reception. let h found anywhere. so that'sjust via the hotel reception. let me - found anywhere. so that'sjust via the hotel reception. let me bring| the hotel reception. let me bring andrew back in. we mentioned that you are working with others to try to support families who are in hotels. what kind of things have you been doing because obviously different ages of children, different ages of children, different needs, but it must be hard to be in a confined space with not much to do. it’s to be in a confined space with not much to do— much to do. it's terrible for these eo - le much to do. it's terrible for these people and _ much to do. it's terrible for these people and it's — much to do. it's terrible for these people and it's a _ much to do. it's terrible for these people and it's a violation - much to do. it's terrible for these people and it's a violation of - much to do. it's terrible for these i people and it's a violation of human rights in many ways. home office guidelines are not low so to say they have to be locked down for that period of time feels like a real bridge for me. in terms of the stuff we have been giving them, clothes.
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most of the people came from kabul with a nine kilograms bag and that's it. they need a complete outfit, nappies, toiletries, some children have infections from crawling through the sewer outside kabul airport. so we provide cream for rashes and so on. these people are coming from nothing and we are trying to give them the basics they need to make a start with the rest of their lives. bud need to make a start with the rest of their lives.— of their lives. and in terms of the lo . istics of their lives. and in terms of the logistics of _ of their lives. and in terms of the logistics of when _ of their lives. and in terms of the logistics of when they _ of their lives. and in terms of the logistics of when they might - of their lives. and in terms of the logistics of when they might get l of their lives. and in terms of the i logistics of when they might get out of the hotels, you mentioned you are working with local authorities but in terms of any more central response, have you had anything? irate response, have you had anything? - have asked repeatedly and there are liaison officers in each hotel but they are the choke point because if you ask the liaison officer and the home office haven't told them where
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people are going there is no way to find out. if they don't have the answer nobody does so there is a choke in the system at this point. i understand of course the limitation of housing in the uk and there is talk about opening up holiday camps to move refugees into, and of course there is had to be planned at short notice because of the way the evacuation worked, but it doesn't change the fact that these people are in quarantine past the ten day period. are in quarantine past the ten day eriod. a, ., ., ., period. mohammed, who have ended our period. mohammed, who have ended your quarantine _ period. mohammed, who have ended your quarantine period, _ period. mohammed, who have ended your quarantine period, you - period. mohammed, who have ended your quarantine period, you have - period. mohammed, who have ended your quarantine period, you have got| your quarantine period, you have got negative tests, you just want to be able to get out and move around a little bit more. what more action would you like from the government on that because i am sure you appreciate that clearly it is not a straightforward process at short notice to find a more permanent
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accommodation but you would at least like to get outside a bit more. i like to get outside a bit more. i would like answers from the uk government and the mod. it's a very bad situation. we are in a safe location — bad situation. we are in a safe location but we still want to know about _ location but we still want to know about our— location but we still want to know about our future. we don't want to be in _ about our future. we don't want to be in this— about our future. we don't want to be in this hotel all the time and beyond — be in this hotel all the time and beyond the government to find a solution — beyond the government to find a solution for us. we have to go outside — solution for us. we have to go outside and we have to know about our future — outside and we have to know about our future. we want somebody as a kind of— our future. we want somebody as a kind of contact so we can share of problems— kind of contact so we can share of problems with them and get them solved _ problems with them and get them solved. 20 days and nobody from the government has come. we were not
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allowed — government has come. we were not allowed to— government has come. we were not allowed to bring more than nine kilograms — allowed to bring more than nine kilograms bags. they have brought some clothes for us. ~ , y ., they have brought some clothes for us. ~ , , ., ., they have brought some clothes for us. , ., they have brought some clothes for us. we wish you and your family well. us. we wish you and your family well- thank— us. we wish you and your family well. thank you _ us. we wish you and your family well. thank you for _ us. we wish you and your family well. thank you for talking - us. we wish you and your family well. thank you for talking to i us. we wish you and your family | well. thank you for talking to us. and andrew fox as well, thank you for your time. we have had a statement from the uk government. it says: individuals who arrive in the uk from afghanistan enter quarantine to minimise the risk of new variants coming into the uk. it goes on: we are urgently working to ensure families are moved to more appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. and it says: our medical and welfare teams continue to support hotels and families are provided
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with the essential items they need. the practice of dolphin hunting in the faroe islands has come under scrutiny after more than 1,400 of the mammals were killed in what was believed to be a record catch. the pictures we are about to show of the aftermath of the hunt may be distressing to some viewers. the pod of white—sided dolphins was driven into the largest fjord in the north atlantic territory on sunday. boats herded them into shallow waters at skalabotnur beach in eysturoy, where they were killed with knives. international conservation groups rounded on the hunters to condemn the killing. hans jacob hermansen is the former president of the faroese pilot whaling association — hejoins me now. why is this practising —— practice continuing? it why is this practising -- practice continuing?—
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why is this practising -- practice continuing? it is because we take the whales _ continuing? it is because we take the whales for _ continuing? it is because we take the whales for food _ continuing? it is because we take the whales for food and - continuing? it is because we take the whales for food and we - continuing? it is because we take the whales for food and we get i continuing? it is because we take i the whales for food and we get 5396 the whales for food and we get 53% of the _ the whales for food and we get 53% of the body weight for food as well. and did _ of the body weight for food as well. and did this number of the dolphins need to be killed? 0bviously and did this number of the dolphins need to be killed? obviously there was a pod of dolphins and it seems they were all herded into an area where they were killed. was it indiscriminate to kill that number? no. we do not always control how many _ no. we do not always control how many individuals we take. in this case _ many individuals we take. in this case they— many individuals we take. in this case they were estimated to be fewer and we _ case they were estimated to be fewer and we have 22 authorised wheeling base so— and we have 22 authorised wheeling base so this was one of them. but when _ base so this was one of them. but when they— base so this was one of them. but when they realised they were so many we were _ when they realised they were so many we were about to get them up, i was not there _ we were about to get them up, i was not there myself but i heard about it, not there myself but i heard about it. and _ not there myself but i heard about it, and they chased 300 or more at
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again— it, and they chased 300 or more at again when— it, and they chased 300 or more at again when they realised they were so many _ again when they realised they were so many. these dolphins are taken for food _ so many. these dolphins are taken for food and — so many. these dolphins are taken for food and every single individual has been _ for food and every single individual has been divided to people around the island — has been divided to people around the island because this is a high number— the island because this is a high number and actually it was more than we estimated at the beginning. we do not have _ we estimated at the beginning. we do not have the control we normally do and the _ not have the control we normally do and the first people to feel sad about— and the first people to feel sad about this is us who have to evaluate _ about this is us who have to evaluate and find out if anything went _ evaluate and find out if anything went wrong and how we go on in the future _ went wrong and how we go on in the future. so_ went wrong and how we go on in the future. , ., went wrong and how we go on in the future, , ., ., went wrong and how we go on in the future. i. ., , went wrong and how we go on in the future. , ., ., , ., future. so you do believe that something — future. so you do believe that something went _ future. so you do believe that something went wrong - future. so you do believe that something went wrong with i future. so you do believe that i something went wrong with this, future. so you do believe that - something went wrong with this, that this was not handled in the way it should be? 0bviously
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this was not handled in the way it should be? obviously there are many people who are opposed to the killing of dolphins that you are saying is someone who thinks the practice is acceptable that it may not have been handled correctly? it not have been handled correctly? it may not have been handled correctly. many people speak about william the conqueror— many people speak about william the conqueror but how many people net him? _ conqueror but how many people net him? many— conqueror but how many people net him? many people talk about whaling but these _ him? many people talk about whaling but these people make the decision on what _ but these people make the decision on what they have heard or seen. let me on what they have heard or seen. me bring in on what they have heard or seen. let me bring in this thought, in many countries there are standards around the killing of animals for consumption to cause minimum distress to those creatures. the marine conservation charity sea shepherd has tweeted saying on sunday night the super pod of 1628
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atlantic dolphins was driven for many hours and for around 45 kilometres by speedboats and jet skis into the shallow water at the beach where they were killed. so driven for many hours and for around 45 kilometres. we know how intelligent dolphins are. this must have caused huge distress to this pod of dolphins. is that in any way acceptable when many charities say there is little demand for dolphin meat and that it is often contaminated? it meat and that it is often contaminated?- meat and that it is often contaminated? ., ., ,, ., ., contaminated? it would take half an hour for me — contaminated? it would take half an hour for me to _ contaminated? it would take half an hour for me to explain. _ contaminated? it would take half an hour for me to explain. i _ contaminated? it would take half an hour for me to explain. i appreciate| hour for me to explain. i appreciate ou miaht hour for me to explain. i appreciate you might have _ hour for me to explain. i appreciate you might have complex _ hour for me to explain. i appreciatej you might have complex arguments hour for me to explain. i appreciate - you might have complex arguments but i'm talking about the duty of care to ensure animals are killed humanely. to ensure animals are killed humanely-— to ensure animals are killed humanel . ~ ., ., ., humanely. we have to look at whether it was according _
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humanely. we have to look at whether it was according to _ humanely. we have to look at whether it was according to the _ humanely. we have to look at whether it was according to the regulations. i it was according to the regulations. we have _ it was according to the regulations. we have done this for hundreds of years— we have done this for hundreds of years and — we have done this for hundreds of years and we also have regulations which _ years and we also have regulations which have — years and we also have regulations which have been improved. we don't stop killing a cow because we didn't— we don't stop killing a cow because we didn't do it as we wanted to do. we are _ we didn't do it as we wanted to do. we are going to look at this and evaluate — we are going to look at this and evaluate what happened and what we can do _ evaluate what happened and what we can do better and if anything went wrong _ can do better and if anything went wrong what went wrong and how we proceed _ wrong what went wrong and how we proceed in _ wrong what went wrong and how we proceed in the future. and wrong what went wrong and how we proceed in the future.— proceed in the future. and the ractice proceed in the future. and the practice of— proceed in the future. and the practice of killing _ proceed in the future. and the practice of killing the - proceed in the future. and the practice of killing the dolphinsj practice of killing the dolphins with knives, this seems like a pretty agonising death for the dolphins doesn't it? but pretty agonising death for the dolphins doesn't it?— pretty agonising death for the dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand _ dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if _ dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if you _ dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if you go _ dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if you go to - dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if you go to iwc- dolphins doesn't it? but on the other hand if you go to iwc we | dolphins doesn't it? but on the - other hand if you go to iwc we know the killing _ other hand if you go to iwc we know the killing of oils is the fastest way of— the killing of oils is the fastest way of killing any mammal on land and at _
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way of killing any mammal on land and at sea — way of killing any mammal on land and at sea. it normally happens within— and at sea. it normally happens within less _ and at sea. it normally happens within less than a second and when we use _ within less than a second and when we use knives it was about two or three _ we use knives it was about two or three seconds. now it's even faster. when _ three seconds. now it's even faster. when one _ three seconds. now it's even faster. when one thing goes wrong once, we evaluate _ when one thing goes wrong once, we evaluate and we shouldn't stop because — evaluate and we shouldn't stop because otherwise they would be no killings _ because otherwise they would be no killings of— because otherwise they would be no killings of exam cattle and so on. we must — killings of exam cattle and so on. we must leave it there but thank you for talking to us. climate protestors have caused huge tailbacks on the m25 motorway for the second time in 3 days. members of insulate britain stopped traffic at two sections; junction 23 in hertfordshire and the carriageway between junctions 8 and 9 in surrey. surrey police officers have arrested 15 protesters for blocking sections of the motorway. broadway celebrated the return of some of its biggest musicals last night,
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after an 18—month coronavirus shutdown, a landmark moment in new york's post—pandemic recovery. fans queued up for tickets to see musicals like "chicago", "the lion king" and "hamilton", but theatre—goers had to be fully vaccinated and wear a mask. it's taken months to upgrade air filter systems and figure out how to maintain social distancing on stages. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schaffernaker. after yesterday's wash out across some eastern parts of the uk, a lot better today. certainly some sunshine in the forecast right across the board. not completely dry, we have a few showers and that is brought by this week where the front which is moving into northern ireland and western scotland. but generally speaking, it's going to be a fine day. high—pressure noses and from the south. this is what it looks like this afternoon. fairly
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overcast for northern ireland and parts of scotland. the rest of us, it's a fine day. the best of the sunshine around the irish thief, wales and the south—west. i fine night, not particularly cold. tomorrow, more sunshine around and about a day across scotland. a little on the cloudy side across northern ireland and perhaps some rain getting in late —— getting in later in the day. top temperatures tomorrow in the low 20s.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. uk government scientists say there could be a largejump in covid hospital admissions in england if restrictions aren't tightened. the government says future lockdowns can't be ruled out. i think it would be irresponsible for any health minister in the world to say that this or that is 100% ruled out, not least because i don't know whether at some time in the future, next year or the year after or the year after that, there might be a vaccine escape variant. under the government's plan b, people in the uk could see vaccine passports, mandatory mask—wearing and advice to work from home. do you think these measures should be brought in? get in touch with us this morning.

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