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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 16, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm martine croxall. the headlines: the covid boosterjab programme is under way — as some healthcare workers and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout, as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact — the prime minster denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site — accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob.
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the first minister considers drafting in the military to help the scottish ambulance delays — after average wait for an ambulance reached six hours last week. and the top 100 most influential people on the planet: time magazine puts harry and meghan on its list for 2021. the programme of third, booster, covid jabs has got underway in england and wales — with some vulnerable people and health workers receiving their dose this morning. eligible people who had their second vaccine at least six months ago will be invited for the extra dose — the full rollout begins next week. everyone aged 50 and over across the uk is eligible, as well as frontline healthcare workers and vulnerable groups — about 30 million people in all. but as some people are now receiving their third jab —
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there are still more than five million adults across the uk who are yet to have one. here's our health correspondent katherine da costa. come along, let's see you. on the front line and among the first in line to receive a covid booster shot. here we go. role reversal. health staff at croydon university hospital have been rolling up their sleeves to top up their protection this winter. i came for it because i'm very keen to ensure that at all times i maintain as much protection not only for myself but also for the patients i work with. we were all vaccinated back. in december so obviously our immunity is waning somewhat so it's important we all get the booster- dose as soon as possible, really. on tuesday, the government's advisory body on vaccines recommended giving booster doses to care home residents, health and care workers, the over—50s, 16 to a9—year—olds with underlying health care conditions and household contacts
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of people with a weakened immune system. those groups should receive a jab at least six months after their second shot and the preference is a pfizer vaccine, or half dose of moderna. when the nhs contacts you, please come forward and have your vaccine. it might be a text message, it might be a letter, it might be a phone call from your local gp practice, but when you get asked, do come forward because it's the best protection as you go into winter. the aim is to offer all care home residents in england a vaccine before the start of november, but experts say even among the elderly protection against severe disease is still high, while the under—50s may not need a booster at all. separately, half a million people with a weakened immune system, including those with blood cancer, hiv or organ donor recipients, have been advised to get a third dose as part of their primary schedule, but more than two weeks on, some are still waiting to be contacted. it's really important
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for people with blood cancer and other people with compromised immunity to get the third dose. for some that might be the start of their antibody response. we are starting to see that in some studies so we really urge people to get it. we are hearing a lot, maybe 90% of the calls on our support line, are from people who haven't heard yet and haven't been called for their third dose and that is creating anxiety. nhs england says people who are immunosuppressed have started to by their doctor to discuss timing. meanwhile the booster campaign is due to be rolled out more widely across england, scotland and wales next week and later this month in northern ireland. katharine da costa, bbc news. let's speak now to paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. what is the thinking behind this roll—out of a third boosterjab
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question that might?. it is roll-out of a third booster “ab question that might?. it is for --eole question that might?. it is for peeple who — question that might?. it is for people who have _ question that might?. it is for people who have not - question that might?. it is for i people who have not responded question that might?. it is for - people who have not responded to the first doses as well as we would have liked. the call went out last week people got certain of cancer, hiv are organ transplants and that is critical and we need to get on to that pretty quickly. there are others i think you want to have responded as well to the initial roll—out of the vaccine and i think particularly older people, people with severe obesity, don't respond to vaccines as well as we would like and they need a booster. beyond that we are seeing some decline in ineffectiveness against infection although so far not dramatic evidence of reduction in the ability to prevent severe disease but nevertheless i think there is no
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doubt that people over 80, people in care homes, really need the booster quite quickly. beyond that, the importance declines to a certain extent, although boosters will always provide additional protection. the issue, of course, it's whether that initial protection, the vaccines would be better used elsewhere in the world where many vulnerable people are yet to receive any vaccines. we where many vulnerable people are yet to receive any vaccines.— to receive any vaccines. we will talk about _ to receive any vaccines. we will talk about the _ to receive any vaccines. we will talk about the ethics _ to receive any vaccines. we will talk about the ethics of - to receive any vaccines. we will talk about the ethics of that - to receive any vaccines. we will talk about the ethics of that in l to receive any vaccines. we will| talk about the ethics of that in a minute if we can. in terms of how important it is the booster are given before the winter, to try to protect the health service again, i am guessing?— protect the health service again, i am guessing? protect the health service again, i am auuessin? ~ , ~ ., am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we _ am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we will _ am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we will see _ am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we will see a _ am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we will see a very - am guessing? absolutely. although i don't think we will see a very big - don't think we will see a very big surge of infections over the winter, schools are back and actually infections are falling rather than rising at the moment but i think the thing that does worry me more than a
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surge in covid cases as a an in influenza infections at the same times because not only would that apply additional pressure on the health service at a time where we've still got quite a lot of pressure from covid but covid an influence at the same time is far more serious thanjust covid at the same time is far more serious than just covid at the same time and also the influenza campaign, you can't afford not to progress with the flu campaign this autumn. you mention the _ the flu campaign this autumn. you mention the fact _ the flu campaign this autumn. you mention the fact there are many people overseas who haven't had any covid vaccinations whatsoever. how can we justify the third boosterjab in this country when there are others going without? i in this country when there are others going without?- in this country when there are others going without? i think that is difficult. i — others going without? i think that is difficult. i think _ others going without? i think that is difficult. i think there _ others going without? i think that is difficult. i think there are - is difficult. i think there are people and groups in this country when i don't think there is any debate we should be giving booster vaccines were still high—res. beyond
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that, i think globally many of the people will be being offered vaccines over the coming months. those vaccines would probably be better used in parts of the world where people have had theirfirst doors despite being highly vulnerable. iii doors despite being highly vulnerable.— doors despite being highly vulnerable. ., ., ., , vulnerable. if one of the arguments as we iive vulnerable. if one of the arguments as we give a — vulnerable. if one of the arguments as we give a third _ vulnerable. if one of the arguments as we give a third booster— vulnerable. if one of the arguments as we give a third booster because l as we give a third booster because thatis as we give a third booster because that is a decline and protection from the first two, how likely is it we are going to see teenagers offered a third dose, even at the moment of that seems unimaginable, because the science is there? some scientists have said that 12 to 15—year—olds don't need to be is—year—olds don't need to be vaccinated but they are going to be. —— mike because the science still is not there. mike i think there is some very strong divisions in both sides of the debate —— mike opinions on both sides of the debate. with teenagers we are at present offering a single shot on our proposals and
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one of the reasons is evidence at the moment is the risk of myocarditis in teenage boys is primarily around the second shot of the vaccine so i think the logic for just giving teenagers one shot of the boxing at the moment at least is that carries with it a very, very low risk of myocarditis whereas for the we started rolling out the second shot and maybe even issues around a third shot would be increasing their risk of side—effects and is group so i think we need to see what happens over the coming months before those sorts of decisions are made. thank you very much. a diplomatic row has broken out following the announcement of a new security and defence partnership between the uk, the us and australia. the prime minister says the deal isn't intended to be adversarial
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towards any other power. but china has called the pact �*extremely irresponsible' and france says the decision to scrap its submarine deal with australia is �*a stab in the back�*. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports. silent and stealthy. a nuclear—powered submarine on patrol, 0nly only six countries have them but now the uk and united states be helping australia build one of its own. they won't be carrying nuclear weapons. western nations have been stepping up their naval presence in the indo pacific region, concerned about what they see as aggressive actions by china. the new pact, called aukus, is being called one of the most significant security partnerships in decades. one of the great prizes of this project is
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the uk, australia and the us will become inseperable partners ina partners in a project that will last for decades. today we take another historic step to deepen cooperation between our nations, because we all recognise the imperative of ensuring peace and stability in the end or specific over the long term. we need to be able to address the current strategic environment in the region and how it may evolve. freedom of navigation in the south china sea has become a source of tension after china build bases on artificial reefs and claimed large parts of the ocean has its own, but today its officials were quick to condemn the aukus pact. translation: cooperation between the us, uk under strain of clearance brings her seriously undermined regional peace and stability. intensify the arms race
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and undermined international nuclear nonproliferation efforts. british industry is likely to benefit from the deal which could see large contracts for engineering and technology firms. but australia's decision to opt for a nuclear powered submarines means cancelling a contract with france to build a diesel electric ones and the french have called it a betrayal. translation: it is a stab in the back, we had established a relationship of trust with a string of about trust has been broken. there's a lot of bitterness about the cancellation on this matter is not over. the backdrop to all of this is a massive military build—up by china. it has invested billions of dollars in expanding its navy, by china. it has invested billions of dollars in expanding its navy, our beijing correspondent, stephen mcdonell, told us there had been a furious reaction to the pact from china.
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the chinese government has slammed this new part, the foreign ministry spokesman said all three countries had severely undermined regional peace and stability answered all three of them had fuelled the arms race. this shows the level of tension in this part of the world, following perceived threats from a more strident china, which seems to have pretty much given up on sourced power diplomacy. but spokesman today had especially strong words for a strenuous aim of the international community to question that country's sincerity. the speed of the collapse in relations between canberra and beijing has been quite spectacular. around a year ago xijinping went to a football match
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and now you have australia developing nuclear powered submarines to counter its number one trading partner. and our paris correspondent, hugh schofield, says the deal has also angered france. first of all the resource of the contract worth billions of years and jobs and then there is the manner in which they found out, it was only a press conference yesterday that the french discover the australians were pulling out but much more important, business and strategic and diplomatic a body blow for the french and several commentators called it into specific trafalgar, france trying to play its role in this emerging important area for june is alliance, acting for europe and all of french and several commentators called it into specific trafalgar, june's alliance, acting for europe and all of that is rendered null and _ void by a pact dreamt up not only by the accepted security for nato but
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in the club of the anglosphere and that is why this is really resented and it has been taken like this indeed. today is the last day that care home staff in england can receive their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob. mps voted in favour of requiring all care workers to be fully vaccinated by 11th november, unless they're medically exempt. but as zoe conway reports, the new rules have been criticised by some in the sector. st cecilia's need heroes. st cecilia's care homes are so desperate for staff, they've taken to blasting the airwaves in scarborough with job ads. at a local hotel, the company has just offered one lucky applicant a job on the spot. but that's not all, she'll also get £500 in cash and a mealfor two at a local restaurant. for the recruitment team, it's hard going. the five of them have been here for hours. they've only managed to interview three people. one of the reasons why they're finding it so difficult is that the hourly wage for one of their care workers is £9.50 per hour. some of scarborough's restaurants are offering £11, even £12 an hour. managing director mike padgham is trying to lift his staff's spirits. everyone in the room has been vaccinated, but other staff haven't. under the compulsory vaccination policy, they'll lose theirjobs. sam, what do you think
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about compulsory vaccination for care workers? well, i'm happy to have had it done, but those people who choose not to are going to lose theirjobs. because they're scared. why should they have to lose theirjobs, because the care homes have to have it done, and other sectors aren't? staff here have been working overtime to cover for ten unfilled posts. now they're about to become even more stretched. this company says it's about to lose four of its best carers. four women who are refusing to be vaccinated. so the company is going to have to let them go. the women say that they're genuinely frightened of the vaccine. frightened of possible side effects. i have to respect what they say. they don't want me to arrange any counselling or see experts, they've made their mind up and i think i have to respect that i cannot keep trying to persuade them. i have to give them space. i've even thought, as some providers are, should we just go ahead and keep them and see what happens?
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are you really saying that you're prepared to defy the government and keep these four unvaccinated staff members on? i'm considering what i might do in the future, because to my mind there's a risk of not having sufficient staff as well. but i'm not saying i'm going to do it. it's in my thought processes at the moment. st cecilia's is hardly alone in facing a staffing crisis. across north yorkshire, there are 1000 care worker vacancies. the government says it's working with local authorities and providers to ensure there are the right number of staff with the skills to deliver high quality care. zoe conway, bbc news. our social affairs correspondent alison holt told us more about the staffing pressure facing the care sector. care homes were really hard hit
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by covid and at the start of the vaccine will not, take up by staff or slow, but it is a sector that has real problems when it comes to staffing. it entered the pandemic with 112,000 vacancies in england and it is now having the same troubles as other areas like retail or hospitalityjust for recruiting people. wages tend not to be very high, you have to be the right sort of person to do the job, it is difficult to recruit the right people and whilst most people have now had their first dose of the vaccine, there are still 10% who have not and replacing those 10% will be very difficult. from a care provider described it yesterday as being a perfect storm, the mandatory vaccinations add another layer of difficulty. government guidance that came out yesterday has said that for a short period, 12 weeks, people will be able to self certify medical exemptions — that may delay the date for a few people, but it will not solve problems
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and the care sector says they really need help when it comes to staffing, even if they want all their staff to be fully vaccinated, they also need to make sure they have the right number of people there to ensure that people are cared for properly and safely. the pandemic has a big impact on how millions of people now work in the uk — and new polling suggests a majority of managers and workers believe office staff will never return to the workplace full—time. last year, 37% of workers did some home—working, according to the office for national statistics, and in a yougov survey, exclusive to the bbc, 70% of those polled said they believe staff won't be back in the office as much as they were before the pandemic. and more than three quarters of businesses which allow home—working say they will continue to offer it in some way. while this shift has been welcomed by many — some people feel they're missing out, as sarah corker explains. at talktalk�*s headquarters, here in the north west, staff can choose when they come into the office and when they work from home and most like to do a bit of both.
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when i am at home, i do catch up on a lot of admin, but i do hate having teams calls, i would rather have face to face chats, because i get so much more out of them. i think the 9—5 in my opinion is gone now, for the majority of businesses, you know, i was up working last night, just because i enjoy working in the evening, even just to relax and do my admin and things like that. i think sometimes it is difficult at home, because i still dressl the same, but i will be wearing my slippers, l so i don't think there is the same level of, | like, professionalism as i do in the office. i do you know what? i think it levels the playing field. i think it makes it ok to want to leave at three to pick up your dog, because you got a new dog in lockdown, or leave at three to pick up the kids or leave at three just because you like doing yoga. in a bbc survey, almost two thirds of workers said they would like to work remotely at least some of the time, but not many of us, 22%, want to be at home every day. this telecoms firm not only had to sort out home—working for their own staff, they also had to do the same for their business
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and domestic customers. i think certainly the first lockdown sort of triggered people to action stations around, where they were not able to support their own customers, because of the fact that there are technical solutions meant that they had technical solutions meant that they had to work from an office. any sort of office culture that is, i suppose, established by presenteeism can always fail. flexible working was here before and i think that what this has done has accelerated it. the trust needed to set staff up to embrace home—working and, done right, it can help people to get a better work life balance. of course, not everyone can work from home and not everyone wants to either. there are lots of drawbacks for young people who find i themselves working from home. they might be in a shared property, the wi—fi might not be so great, . and to top it all, they might feel quite isolated. -
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so, being in the office presents them with lots more benefits . to absorb the company culture, learn by observation, _ make social connections and itjust gives them a far better boost - to their career as they start out. before coronavirus, working from home was often seen as a perk on a friday. that has now radically changed. sarah corker, bbc news, in salford. and we'll be getting more on this later with our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. john lewis is chartering a fleet of extra ships, along with a number of other businesses, to make sure it has christmas stock on time. sharon white, chair of the staff—owned department store and supermarket chain, said the business was throwing everything at the issues to make sure christmas won't be disrupted. we've raised wages for hgv drivers and we're really beginning to see the results of that. we're hiring 7000 seasonal workers, that's 2000 up on last year, we're providing free food and drink
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to partners and new seasonal workers coming into the business and we're chartering coming into the business and we're chartering additional space in ships so that your christmas baubles and christmas trees and all those toys and that fantastic product arrives in the uk on time. the scottish government is considering seeking help from the ministry of defence to deal with a crisis in the scottish ambulance service. the situation was brought to light at first ministers questions, when let's get more on this from our scotland reporter, james shaw. this is a case reported in one of the newspaper and talked about by douglas ross, this is gerald brown, 65 years old who waited li0 hours for an ambulance in glasgow. by the time
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it arrived he had already died and his son says he was told by his gp that if the ambulance had arrived in time his father would have survived. that was the headline case brought up that was the headline case brought up by that was the headline case brought up by the conservatives and the scottish parliament at first ministers questions today at an indication of how bad things are and indication of how bad things are and in fact douglas ross, the leader of the conservatives put up what you have to call a crisis in the scottish ambulance service last week when he pointed out that the average waiting time for an ambulance was six hours. of course that is an enormous variation in that average of six hours, some even longer and some very much shorter when they are extremely critical cases. but he said it was a crisis, he asked nicola sturgeon, the first minister, to respond to that and part of her answer included additional measures to help the ambulance service and that includes calling on the ministry of defence to provide support. she said after that session in the parliament she would be going
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straight back to her office and finalising the details of that request. it is worth bearing in mind that similar things have happened in different parts of england where the military has been called in over the course of the summer to support and billing services but as nicola sturgeon herself pointed out it looks now as if this is going to be very challenging when baton winter season notjust very challenging when baton winter season not just for the very challenging when baton winter season notjust for the ambulance service but for the whole of the nhs in scotland, possibly the most challenging winter it is experienced since its founding after the second world war. surely this will not be a permanent solution? something else long—term needs to be thought of. it has been pointed out that we understand the military was brought in during the first wave of the pandemic in the early months of last year when there was an emergency need for testing and other services they could provide at short notice but it has been pointed out that we are of course months into the crisis
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now and many people have said that there needs to be a longer term solution, not the least the unions who have talked about the need for more staff, the need for more awards, essentiallyjust the need for more capacity to cope with this increase in cases that we have seen increase in cases that we have seen in scotland in recent weeks. the mother of a five—year—old boy has won a court case against the environment agency, about noxious gases from a staffordshire landfill site. lawyers for rebecca currie say hydrogen sulphide gas from the site, near her home, has worsened her son's matthew's underlying health issues. thousands of residents near the walleys quarry have complained of breathing difficulties, as kathryn stanczyszyn reports. five—year—old matthew richards was born prematurely and has had breathing difficulties since birth, but his family say the noxious gases released from the landfill site he lives next to risks shortening his life. they have taken the environment
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agency to court, saying the body wasn't doing enough to prevent it, and today a high courtjudge ruled in the family's favour, saying that real and significant change is needed as a matter of urgency. it's come as a shock, it really has come as a shock. i didn't expect to go to the high court in london to fight the environment agency and matthew to come out winning it. it's been horrendous, really, watching your son coughing, choking, vomiting, you go in his bedroom in the morning and it's like you're hit with a brick wall, this toxic gas. people living in the village of silverdale in staffordshire have been raising issues for years about the smell of hydrogen sulphide emanating from walley�*s quarry. they say the eggy stench is destroying notjust quality of life but health as well. today a judge ruled the environment agency must act to reduce levels of hydrogen sulphide in the area, saying pressing and ongoing action would improve the air matthew
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and his community breathes. it's been such a long haul with the environment agency not listening to us and then finally we get a judgment that yes, the smell is unacceptable and it has to stop. we are over the moon. the environment agency has released a statement saying it has every sympathy with residents and will require the operator to make improvements but it's pleased the court didn't find it had breached its legal obligations. solicitors for matthew's family have described this as a david and goliath case and say if things don't change, they won't hesitate to take further legal action. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. for most of you the afternoon is looking fine and dry with long spells of sunshine to look forward to. that is away for scotland and england and wales but for northern ireland cloud will continue to thicken this afternoon with patch
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outbreaks of rain particular towards evening. temperatures high teens the low 20s. in the september sunshine that will feel pleasantly warm and the winds stay light. tonight rain moves from northern ireland to scotland and maybe a few spots getting into westernmost areas of england and wales but otherwise dry with mist and fog farming across the south. temperatures 10 degrees to m degrees. what i will start to friday. on friday the weather front in the west slow—moving saw rain in northern ireland for most of the and rain in scotland. eventually rain getting into the westernmost areas of england and wales. east wales and central england and eastern scotland should stay dry and continue with sunny spells with temperatures again into the low 20s for many. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the covid boosterjab programme is under way — as some healthcare workers
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and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact. the prime minister denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob. the first minister considers drafting in the military to help the scottish ambulance delays after average wait for an ambulance reached six hours last week. sport now, and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. we have some good pictures coming up.
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five days after making tennis history, britain's emma raducanu has arrived home. the new us open champion was reunited with her parents after arriving back in south east london. on saturday she became the first british woman in a4 years to win a grand slam singles title — and she's since had a whirlwind week in new york with appearances on american tv and at the met gala. the new british number one, and world number 23, now says she's ready to get back to training for more grand slam wins. i hope they let her go through the front door eventually come up those camera crews. she'sjust waiting outside to go in. to football, and west ham manager david moyes says he hopes his side can still be competing in europe after the new year. the hammers begin their first ever europa league group stage campaign with an away match against croatian champions dinamo zagreb at 5.45 this afternoon. it's a proud moment for club captain mark noble who is beginning his 18th and final season at the club. it's been three or four months of excitement, of looking forward to who we drew in the group stages. we're here now and as the boss said
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we have a full squad, no injuries, everyone ready to go and play, we have four or five new signings that i could say are used to this part of the world, used to this football, so we're well prepared and we're really excited about everything. the other english club in europa league action are leicester. they host napoli at 8pm, and their manager is expecting a tough match against a side he feels would be at home in the champions league. i believe they are a champions league club. got great experience, james over these last number of years in the competition so they arrived in the europa league is one of the few brits to do well in it so very good side full of experience and quality but it's such an exciting game for us to start the competition and we are excited by it. here's a check on the british
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teams in action today. celtic are away at real betis, while rangers host lyon at 8pm. in the new europa conference league, tottenham are away at rennes. england's women will welcome three of the world's top sides next february for the first staging of a new annual invitational women's tournament. the lionesses will be joined by germany and spain, both also ranked in fifa's top ten — with the fourth competing nation to be announced soon. there'll be three double—header matches played across seven days in a round—robin format. meanwhile england's men are up to third in fifa's world rankings, equalling their highest ever position since rankings were introduced in 1992. england made it to the final of euro 2020 injuly, and beat hungary and andorra in world cup qualifying earlier this month before drawing with poland. belgium remain in the top ranked spot, while brazil are second. wales are 19th, scotland 45th and northern ireland 47th. we may only be seven games into the new championship season, but nottingham forest are now looking for a new manager. afterjust 11 months in charge, manager chris hughton has been
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sacked this morning. forest are bottom of the league, with just one point from their first seven games — their worst start to a season for 108 years. england's women are batting after being put in by new zealand in the first one day international in bristol. it's the first of five matches, and england have made a solid start. a few moments ago they were 109—1 in the 24th over. they lost lauren winfield—hill after she was caught by katey martin, but heather knight and tammy beaumont keeping the scoreboard ticking along nicely. you can follow that on the bbc sport website but that is all the support for now. back to you, martin. changes to periods and unexpected vaginal bleeding after having a covid vaccine should be investigated to reassure women. writing in the bmj, dr victoria male, from imperial college london, said the body's immune response was the likely cause, not something in the vaccines. there's no evidence they have any
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impact on pregnancy or fertility. the uk's regulator has received more than 30,000 reports of period problems. i'm nowjoined by dr victoria male, who is a lecturer of reproductive immunology at imperial college london. thank you. just explain if you would what women are reporting. indie thank you. just explain if you would what women are reporting. we have had more than _ what women are reporting. we have had more than 30,000 _ what women are reporting. we have had more than 30,000 reports - what women are reporting. we have i had more than 30,000 reports through the government's mhra yellow card scheme and most people making a report say their period is either later or heavier than usual and most people say it goes back to normal quite quickly and we know from other research there is no impact on your ability to get pregnant but because of the weight this data is collected we don't yet know for sure if this is something caused by the vaccine orjust something that might have happened anyway that people are noticing because we are conscious of their bodies around the time they get the vaccine and i'm arguing that
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even though it doesn't seem to be a serious problem and it doesn't have an impact on fertility, we should look into it and try to find out for sure if there is a link and if so, how common it is to experience less. what might be the explanation? i can think of at least two plausible things that might be going on. the first is we know the immune system can impact sex hormones and sex hormones are what drive our menstrual cycle so if we give the body in a big immune shock with which the vaccine is and also which covid is and people notice changes to their periods with that, that could alter sex hormones for one cycle and impact your period. the other possibility is we have loads of immune cells in the lining of the uterus and these help to build up and break down the lining of the uterus and you can imagine if those cells get a shot because you have given the person a vaccine or have
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an infection, that could affect periods. an infection, that could affect eriods. ., ., . periods. how long does it affect seem to last? — periods. how long does it affect seem to last? is _ periods. how long does it affect seem to last? is it _ periods. how long does it affect seem to last? is itjust - periods. how long does it affect seem to last? is itjust the - periods. how long does it affect seem to last? is itjust the first| seem to last? is itjust the first cycle after getting the vaccine? the ma'ori of cycle after getting the vaccine? tue: majority of people cycle after getting the vaccine? tte: majority of people seem cycle after getting the vaccine? tt2 majority of people seem to be seen this happen to them for one cycle and then they went back to normal, some people say two cycles and there were a few cases first people seem to have taken longer but the majority of people seem to go back to normal quickly. you majority of people seem to go back to normal quickly.— majority of people seem to go back to normal quickly. you say you don't feel especially _ to normal quickly. you say you don't feel especially concerned _ to normal quickly. you say you don't feel especially concerned about - to normal quickly. you say you don't feel especially concerned about this| feel especially concerned about this but other than reassuring women, why do you want to know? tt’s but other than reassuring women, why do you want to know?— do you want to know? it's important artl do you want to know? it's important partly because _ do you want to know? it's important partly because it's _ do you want to know? it's important partly because it's important - do you want to know? it's important partly because it's important we - partly because it's important we take people's concerns about vaccine safety seriously but it's also important for people to be able to plan so i've had people getting in touch because their period came late after the vaccine and they spent five days worrying they were pregnant. if we knew this was a common side effect we could say 5% of people get a late period, the
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same as we say 15% of people get a fee high fever and if that happens you don't need to worry. some people rely on the wing about their menstrual cycles and especially if they are ovulating, either because they are ovulating, either because they want to become pregnant or they don't, and for those people if there is a change, it's important we say may beat this month don't rely on your prediction of when you are populating for that important life changing thing of having a baby or not. ., ., , ., ., , not. how regularly are women being warned that — not. how regularly are women being warned that there _ not. how regularly are women being warned that there might _ not. how regularly are women being warned that there might be - not. how regularly are women being warned that there might be some i warned that there might be some impact? fist warned that there might be some im act? �* ., warned that there might be some imact? �* ., .,' . ., impact? at the moment the official source of information _ impact? at the moment the official source of information on _ impact? at the moment the official source of information on this - impact? at the moment the official source of information on this says i source of information on this says the mhra is closely monitoring it but at the moment they don't consider there is enough data to say there is a firm link and until they do they will not put that on the official list of side effects so the official list of side effects so the official documentation will not tell you about this until we know for certain that there is a link. dr
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victoria male from imperial college london, thank you. poor quality housing is causing thousands of deaths every year in england, according to a new report from the centre for ageing better. the charity says a focus on building new houses has led to millions of homes falling below decent living standards. michael buchanan reports. frustrated at his housing association's refusal to repair his flat, this man showed its condition on social media. i was horrified, embarrassed. the family had been complaining for months about the various problems, even as his father lay dying of cancer. he had nurses coming in and feeding through a tube through his stomach in a place that was infected with cockroaches, mice, rodents, asbestos everywhere. it'sjust cockroaches, mice, rodents, asbestos everywhere. it's just beyond words. it made a bad experience much worse. he shamed the housing association clarion into renovating his home, but that is not enough
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for the 22—year—old student. inundated by other clarion residents with similar problems, he is on a mission to improve every dilapidated home owned by the housing association. these people are living in environments that go completely and break every single health and safety standard going and still they are being ignored. i don't know, at that point i'm thinking, what are they waiting for? is it someone to die in these properties until something is done? today's report says poor quality housing is killing people. i told them! trips and falls, respiratory diseases and homes that cannot be heated properly. england, they say, has some of europe's most dilapidated housing stock. we absolutely need new homes to be built. even if we get to 250,000 homes a year it's dwarfed by the homes we
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already have. 80% of the homes we will be living in in 30 years' time we already have and they are already, many of them, poor quality. you are also the chairman of clarion housing association as well. what has gone wrong? we have been publicly shamed. the homes that have been featured are part of a major regeneration project and because we have been focusing on the regeneration, we've been less concerned about the quality of the homes on a day—to—day basis and we got that wrong and have taken huge steps to change it. most poor housing is owner—occupied and the report praises an innovative scheme that provides low—cost loans to those who cannot afford repairs. we work with a lot of people who are asset rich and cash poor so we can make the payments over a longer timescale so we're not giving anything away, people are borrowing the money and paying it back. repairing england's four million poor quality homes plays a crucial part in solving the country's housing shortage. michael buchanan, bbc news.
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four amateur astronauts have blasted off from florida in the first ever civilian—manned space mission. the group, led by us billionaire jared isaacman, will spend three days orbiting the earth. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh. a night—time launch by the private company spacex. just like nasa, but with more audience participation. chanting: three, two, one! ignition, we have lift off. on board, one billionaire and three ordinary american citizens. we're through the period of maximum dynamic pressure. looks like a smooth ride for the crew. the powerful engines accelerate them into earth orbit. 3gs acceleration, everything continues to look nominal. and now one of the riskiest parts of the launch. cheering. the separation of the first stage of the rocket.
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the inspirationli crew had six months of intensive training with spacex but on—board computer systems will be in control as zero gravity kicks in. and it looks like it is a little golden retriever. the flight was funded by billionaire jared isaacman and he gave the three remaining seats to people who had inspirational stories. they include hayley arceneaux, who had cancer as a child. i'm definitely excited . to represent those that aren't physically perfect. | i want to bring this experience back| and share with everyone i encounter and just what this represents i for the new age in space travel and who can be an astronaut. the capsule has been fitted with a larger than normal window so the crew can enjoy spectacular views from space before coming back down to earth in three days' time. pallab ghosh, bbc news.
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let's return to the news about work. most workers do not believe people will fully return to the office after the coronavirus pandemic, an exclusive survey for the bbc suggests. about 70% of those polled predicted that people would "never return to offices at the same rate". joining me now is senior reporter ramzan karmarli. i'm glad you are back in the building. i'm glad you are back in the buildini. �* i'm glad you are back in the building-— i'm glad you are back in the buildini. �* ., ., , i] building. i'm glad to be here. i would not _ building. i'm glad to be here. i would not have _ building. i'm glad to be here. i would not have liked _ building. i'm glad to be here. i would not have liked to - building. i'm glad to be here. i would not have liked to have i building. i'm glad to be here. i i would not have liked to have work from home and i wasn't given that choice because it's hard to be on the telly from your living room but a lot of people like it.— a lot of people like it. about a fifth of people _ a lot of people like it. about a fifth of people would - a lot of people like it. about a fifth of people would want - a lot of people like it. about a fifth of people would want to l a lot of people like it. about a - fifth of people would want to work full—time from home, around two for the site they would do a part—time hybrid model and businesses in general are open to more of a hybrid model but some of the banks have said we prefer you in the office,
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people like goldman sachs and a boss in february called it an aberration for people to work from home. jp morgan and barclays have similar thinking, maybe not a strongly worded but lloyds surprisingly are going to reduce office space by 20% over the next three years, saving a lot of money. over the next three years, saving a lot of money-— lot of money. which of course they will ass lot of money. which of course they will pass on _ lot of money. which of course they will pass on to _ lot of money. which of course they will pass on to customers! - lot of money. which of course they will pass on to customers! we - lot of money. which of course they| will pass on to customers! we hope so, so will pass on to customers! we hope so. so not — will pass on to customers! we hope so, so not everyone _ will pass on to customers! we hope so, so not everyone is _ will pass on to customers! we hope so, so not everyone is in _ will pass on to customers! we hope so, so not everyone is in favour- will pass on to customers! we hope so, so not everyone is in favour of. so, so not everyone is in favour of this but some businesses are more suited for you to work at home and we can speak to the boss of one, phil bray, from nottingham. the founder of the yardstick agency, a financial marketing agency in nottingham. it doesn't matter to you so much whether people are in the office. everyone went home in march last year and _ everyone went home in march last year and we had a gradual reprint back— year and we had a gradual reprint back to _
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year and we had a gradual reprint back to work for some team members but we _ back to work for some team members but we took_ back to work for some team members but we took the step in night of surveying — but we took the step in night of surveying the team and seeing what they wanted to do and that informed our policy— they wanted to do and that informed our policy and we introduced a flexible — our policy and we introduced a flexible working policy —— in may. you are _ flexible working policy —— in may. you are a — flexible working policy —— in may. you are a growing business, if someonejoins your you are a growing business, if someone joins your business, surely it's harder tojoin if you have never met a newjoiner face—to—face. that is one of the key challenges we face with_ that is one of the key challenges we face with flexible working, over the course _ face with flexible working, over the course of _ face with flexible working, over the course of the various lockdowns we have recruited an extra 40% to our team _ have recruited an extra 40% to our team and _ have recruited an extra 40% to our team and one of the advantages is that it _ team and one of the advantages is that it has — team and one of the advantages is that it has allowed us to open up that it has allowed us to open up that talent pool and recruit from different — that talent pool and recruit from different areas of the country, we had people joining us from london and birmingham and we even recruited someone _ and birmingham and we even recruited someone from malta recently that it's harder— someone from malta recently that it's harder to integrate them into the team — it's harder to integrate them into the team. we have put measures in place _ the team. we have put measures in place to— the team. we have put measures in place to do— the team. we have put measures in place to do that but it's one of the
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challenges — place to do that but it's one of the challenges of flexible working presents. challenges of flexible working resents. . . challenges of flexible working resents. ., , ., ., presents. that is the good thing, the technology. _ presents. that is the good thing, the technology. is _ presents. that is the good thing, the technology. is that _ presents. that is the good thing, the technology. is that there - presents. that is the good thing, the technology. is that there are | the technology. is that there are for people to continue hiring people from malta, is that something foreseeable in the long term? absolutely, you couldn't do it without — absolutely, you couldn't do it without the technology unlike most businesses we have learnt to do with over the _ businesses we have learnt to do with over the past 15 months, we sent everyone — over the past 15 months, we sent everyone home in march last year relied _ everyone home in march last year relied heavily on video conferencing, instant messaging, etc. conferencing, instant messaging, etc we _ conferencing, instant messaging, etc. we still do some face—to—face meetings — etc. we still do some face—to—face meetings and about 15 or 20% of the staff come _ meetings and about 15 or 20% of the staff come into the office and work flexibly— staff come into the office and work flexibly in — staff come into the office and work flexibly in that way but technology is essential. if you cannot harness the power— is essential. if you cannot harness the power of technology it's difficult _ the power of technology it's difficult to introduce flexible working successfully. it difficult to introduce flexible working successfully. it sounds like ou will working successfully. it sounds like you will not — working successfully. it sounds like you will not be _ working successfully. it sounds like you will not be very _ working successfully. it sounds like you will not be very prescriptive - you will not be very prescriptive about making people come in even it fits for one or two days or a certain type of people turn up at the office. ~ , ,., ,
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certain type of people turn up at the office-— certain type of people turn up at the office. ~ , ,., , ., ., the office. absolutely, we have a small percentage _ the office. absolutely, we have a small percentage of _ the office. absolutely, we have a small percentage of the - the office. absolutely, we have a l small percentage of the workforce who want — small percentage of the workforce who want to work in the office permanently, we have quite a large percentage of 55% who want to work permanently from home and the balance — permanently from home and the balance want flexibility so we are lucky _ balance want flexibility so we are lucky enough that each of them can have a _ lucky enough that each of them can have a desk— lucky enough that each of them can have a desk in the office, it's their— have a desk in the office, it's their own _ have a desk in the office, it's their own deaths, we are not hot desk— their own deaths, we are not hot desk can — their own deaths, we are not hot desk can come and go as they please so it is— desk can come and go as they please so it is quite — desk can come and go as they please so it is quite nice of a morning, you don't— so it is quite nice of a morning, you don't necessarily know who will come _ you don't necessarily know who will come into _ you don't necessarily know who will come into the office and it's lovely to see _ come into the office and it's lovely to see their— come into the office and it's lovely to see their faces when they walk in but its— to see their faces when they walk in but it's working for us. -- to see their faces when they walk in but it's working for us.— but it's working for us. -- their own desks- _ but it's working for us. -- their own desks. in _ but it's working for us. -- their own desks. in terms _ but it's working for us. -- their own desks. in terms of- but it's working for us. -- their - own desks. in terms of productivity, who are more productive? t own desks. in terms of productivity, who are more productive?— who are more productive? i think the are who are more productive? i think they are equally _ who are more productive? i think they are equally productive, - who are more productive? i think they are equally productive, i - they are equally productive, i believe — they are equally productive, i believe as a marketing agency we measure — believe as a marketing agency we measure output and there is no difference — measure output and there is no difference between productivity between those who work at home and those _ between those who work at home and those who _ between those who work at home and those who work in the office. phil
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bra , those who work in the office. phil bray. thank _ those who work in the office. phil bray. thank you. _ those who work in the office. tirt l bray, thank you, and i will have more on this in the next hour as well. if you throw out more food than you think you should, then you are not alone. food waste is now seen as a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and a project is under way in ayrshire run by the prince's foundation to try to change that, as aileen clarke has been finding out. how long is the gestation of a pig? jimmy doherty, the tv presenter passionate about farming and food, extolling the virtues of the rare breed to tamworth pigs. he says getting school pupils on side is key to turning round our wasteful habits. we can't go on wasting so much food. we can't afford to do that, the planet can't afford to do it. it's estimated something like 50% of the food we grow is wasted at various stages and we need this next generation, these are going to be the movers and shakers, these are the guys that are going to help save the planet and food waste is one of the biggest polluters and we need to combat that. that's what this project at the dumfries house estate is trying to highlight and the charity's president, prince charles, dropped
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in to see how it was going. we made some pies that they are going to taste after this. made of what? we did seasonal vegetables. courgette. kale. not pork? no! whether from field orjust the cupboard, use it up, all of it, is the challenge here. whether that's the type of bread you buy, make sure you use every piece of the loaf, or whether it's actually looking at the vegetables and making them into a soup with every piece of the carrot and notjust peeling and wasting the carrot peelingss, it can be done at every level so you don't need lots of money to make food changes. among those on the course, some pupils from just up the road in cumnick. their grandparents would be very familiar with the waste—not—wa nt—not approach. what do they make of it? i feel kind of selfish for wasting so much food that people could actually use for eating like an actual meal. i'm a picky eater but knowing all this i will probably learn to try more foods. i'll think more, i'll think more about what i'm eating - and what is on my plate.
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the hope is that once people start thinking about where their food comes from, then they might make even small changes when it comes to food waste. and that in turn, further down the line, could lead to a change in our food culture. the van gogh museum has discovered new work by the artist vincent van gogh from 1882. it's the study for the drawing worn out — considered to be one of the most powerful figure drawings from van gogh's period in the hague. the artist described how the drawing came about in detail in letters to his brother theo and to his friend anthon van rappard. the museum say the discovery offers an insight into van gogh's working process at the time. the duke and duchess of sussex have
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been named among the top 100 most influential people in the world by time magazine. harry and meghan, who formally stepped back from royal duties last year, feature on one of seven special magazine covers. jonny dymond reports. a power pose for a power couple. they may no longer be working royals but time magazine reckons they are amongst the 100 most influential people in the world. why? the head of a charity they support explains. they are in some exalted company. also on the list, teen angst singer—songwriter billie eilish, us presidentjoe biden, and former president donald trump. the couple may be far from these shores but they remain busy. most recently, meghan wrote and published a children's book, the bench.
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and that includes you, harry. and harry has been rubbing shoulders, virtually at least, with the first lady of the united states, jill biden, talking about military veterans. the couple are, says time magazine, part of a community that in a year of crisis have leapt into the fray. jonny dymond, bbc news. with millions of visitors each year, national parks are among the most popular tourist destinations in the uk. but competition to be awarded the special status of national park can be fierce, because of the investment that comes with the title. now, campaigners behind one unsuccessful bid — the south pennines — say a new system of recognition is needed. judy hobson reports. in the hills above burnley, it's obvious to see why this area was once in the running to become a national park. this rich landscape is steeped in cultural and industrial heritage.
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but what the south pennines doesn't have is a brand. above us is burnley, pendle hill. sweeping across you've got the yorkshire dales in the background. helen noble is on a mission to change that. she wants the south pennines to be recognised as a national landscape which she believes will help protect it. it would certainly give everyone a sense of place, somewhere that's well known. but for us, it's very much bringing that investment into the area. this deserves being looked after. it deserves that investment and for us, the community and the landscape has great diversity and we think that should be celebrated. the south pennines park covers 460 square miles, cutting across greater manchester, lancashire and yorkshire, and it's home to 450,000 people. why notjust have this area designated a national park? very simply, we don't want to be bound by the legislation that might bring us. what we want is a park that's agile,
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that can adapt to the challenges that it faces, and we think that this new approach, doing things differently, will help us to achieve that. this is a local landmark, the singing ringing tree. walkers here told us why they think the area is so special. it'sjust stunning — everywhere you look you've got magnificent views. it's like everything, the amount of money that you can spend on it, the better it's going to be. i it's just a really lovely placel to walk, just look at the view. where else would you go? it's on your doorstep. it's that sense of place, the stunning uplands that we are currently at, but also that intermix with the urban areas and the mill towns and the wonderful people that live here. many local councils and businesses are behind the campaign, which aims to protect this landscape for everyone to enjoy.
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judy hobson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. for most of us through the rest of the day we will keep the dry weather with some decent spells of sunshine in england, scotland and wales. for northern ireland it turns cloudier and there will be some rain working in later but to the west of the uk we have low pressure lurking and these weather fronts will come our way in the next few days to bring some outbreaks of rain. through the rest of the day, scotland, england, wales, a lovely afternoon, plenty of sunshine for most, northern ireland turning cloudier with some patchy rain in here and temperatures high teens to low 20s and should feel pleasantly warm. overnight tonight the rain in northern ireland will slowly spread into scotland, western fringes of wales, turning a bit cloudy.
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might see some rain, the odd spot and fog patch, temperatures overnight about 15 degrees so relatively mild. on friday these weather fronts bring rain into western areas of the uk but they're very slow moving so we have rain to start the day in northern ireland, the rain will stay here into the afternoon but it will extend into parts of scotland, wales and western england could see a few spots of rain whereas the further east you are, eastern scotland, eastern wales should stay dry with sunny spells and warm in the sunshine, temperatures in the low 20s. this weather front�*s still on the chart through saturday, bringing cloud and a few areas of rain but not much left on it, it is a dying front, there will be some brighter weather pushing into northern ireland and staying dry with some sunshine across central and eastern england but this weather front is like a zombie weather front, not much activity throughout saturday afternoon but like frankenstein's monster it will come back to life and the reason is the jet stream out in the atlantic.
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this trough gets closer to that old weather front and as it does so, ultimately it will revive it so saturday night and into sunday, outbreaks of rain become more extensive across from wales northwards, some of the rain will be quite heavy and into sunday we will still see those bursts of rain gradually extend east through the day from that revived weather front. temperatures are about 17—20 degrees on sunday so sunday seeing the wetter of the two days of the weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the covid boosterjab programme is underway — as some healthcare workers and patients receive their dose. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob. diplomatic fallout, as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact — the prime minster denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site — accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. tennis's newest star — emma raducanu — arrives back home in bromley to continue the celebrations of her us open win. a new, early work by dutch
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master vincent van gogh has been discovered. experts say it offers an exceptional insight into his working process. good afternoon. the programme of third booster covid jabs is under way in england and wales, with some vulnerable people and healthworkers receiving their dose this morning. eligible people who had their second vaccine at least six months ago will be invited for the extra dose — the full roll—out begins next week. everyone aged 50 and over across the uk is eligible, as well as front line health care workers and vulnerable groups — about 30 million people in all. but as some people are now receiving their third jab, there are still more than five million adults across the uk who are yet to have one. here's our health correspondent
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katharine da costa. come along, let's see you. on the front line and among the first in line to receive a covid booster shot. here we go. role reversal. health staff at croydon university hospital have been rolling up their sleeves to top up their protection this winter. i came for it because i'm very keen to ensure that at all times i maintain as much protection not only for myself but also for the patients i work with. we were all vaccinated back. in december so obviously our immunity is waning somewhat, so it's important we all get the booster- dose as soon as possible, really. on tuesday the government's advisory body on vaccines recommended giving booster doses to care home residents, health and care workers, the over—50s, 16 to a9—year—olds with underlying health conditions and household contacts of people with a weakened immune system. those groups should receive a jab at least six months after their second shot and the preference is a pfizer vaccine,
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or half dose of moderna. when the nhs contacts you, please come forward and have your vaccine. it might be a text message, it might be a letter, it might be a phone call from your local gp practice, but when you get asked, do come forward, because it's the best protection as you go into winter. the aim is to offer all care home residents in england a vaccine before the start of november, but experts say even among the elderly protection against severe disease is still high, while the under—50s may not need a booster at all. separately, half a million people with a weakened immune system, including those with blood cancer, hiv, or organ donor recipients, have been advised to get a third dose as part of their primary schedule, but more than two weeks on some are still waiting to be contacted. it's really important for people with blood cancer and other people with compromised immunity to get the third dose. for some that might be
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the start of their antibody response. we are starting to see that in some studies. so we really urge people to get it. we are hearing a lot, maybe 90% of the calls and our support line, are from people who haven't heard yet and haven't been called for their third dose and that is creating anxiety. nhs england says people who are immunosuppressed have started to receive a third dose and all those eligible will be contacted by their doctor to discuss the timing of when they should have it. meanwhile, the booster campaign is due to be rolled out more widely across england, scotland and wales next week and later this month in northern ireland. katharine da costa, bbc news. earlier i spoke to paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia, who told me why the boosters are so important for certain groups. the first priority is people who wouldn't have responded as well to just two doses as we would have liked and the announcement a couple of weeks ago of people who have got
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cancer or certain types of cancer, hiv, or organ transplants, that is absolutely critical and we need to get on with that pretty quickly. beyond that initial group of people, there are others i think that won't have responded as well to the initial rollout of the vaccine. and i think particularly older people, people with severe obesity, don't respond as well to vaccines as we would like and they need a booster. beyond that, i think we are seeing some decline in the effectiveness against infection, although so far not dramatic evidence of reduction in the ability to prevent severe disease, but nevertheless i think there is no doubt that people over 80, people in care homes and really need the booster quite quickly.
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beyond that, the importance declines to a certain extent, although boosters will always provide additional protection. the issue of course is whether that additional protection, the vaccines would be better used elsewhere in the world, where many vulnerable people have yet to receive any vaccines. let's talk about the ethics of that in a minute, if we can. in terms of how important it is that this all, the boosters, are given before the winter to try and protect the health service again, i'm guessing? absolutely. and although i don't think we are going to see a very big surge of infections over the winter, schools are back and actually infections are falling rather than rising at the moment. but i think the thing that does worry me more than actually a surge in covid cases is a surge in influenza at the same time, because not only would that apply
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additional pressure on the health service, at a time where we have still got quite a lot of pressure from covid, but covid and influenza at the same time is far more serious than just covid by itself. so, yes, i think we need to get on with this and also the influenza campaign as well. we can't afford not to progress with the flu campaign this autumn. a diplomatic row has broken out following the announcement of a new security and defence partnership between the uk, the us, and australia. the prime minister says the deal isn't intended to be adversarial towards any other power. but china has called the pact "extremely irresponsible" and france says the decision to scrap its submarine deal with australia is "a stab in the back". our security correspondent frank gardner reports. silent and stealthy. a nuclear—powered submarine on patrol. only six countries in
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the world have them — but now, under a new pact, britain and the us will help australia build its own fleet of them. they won't be carrying nuclear weapons. western nations have been stepping up their naval presence in the indo—pacific region — concerned about what they see as aggressive actions by china. the new pact, called aukus, is being called one of the most significant security partnerships in decades. one of the great prizes of this enterprise is that australia, the uk, and the us will become involved in a project that will last for decades. today, we're taking another historic step to deepen cooperation among all three of our nations. because we all recognise the imperative of ensuring peace and stability in the indo—pacific over the long term. we need to be able to address both the current strategic environment in the region and how it may evolve.
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freedom of navigation in the south china sea has become a source of tension after china has built bases on artificial reefs and claimed large parts of the ocean as its own. but today, its officials were quick to condemn their aukus party. translation: cooperation - between the united states, uk, and australia over nuclear submarines has seriously undermined regional peace and stability, intensified the arms race, and undermined international nuclear nonproliferation efforts. british industry is likely to benefit from the deal, which could see large contracts for engineering and technology firms. but australia's decision to opt for nuclear—powered subs means cancelling their contract with france to build a diesel electric ones. the french have called it a betrayal. translation: it's a stab in the back. j we had established a relationship of trust with australia, but that trust has been broken. there's a lot of bitterness about the cancellation. this matter is not over.
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the backdrop to all of this is a massive military build—up by china. it's invested billions of dollars in expanding its navy, its nuclear arsenal, and hypersonic weapons that can sink a warship. frank gardner, bbc news. eu foreign policy leaders have been meeting and have been reacting to this new development. our correspondentjessica parker is in brussels. what is their reaction then? well, look, ithink— what is their reaction then? well, look, i think there _ what is their reaction then? well, look, i think there are _ what is their reaction then? well, look, i think there are questions i look, i think there are questions for the eu, particularly did they know that this was going to be announced? it emerged they did not know it was going to be announced. there is probably a bit of face—saving for the eu going forward on this deal and it is bad timing for them as well, because the eu's representative of foreign policy has
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been presenting the eu's own strategy. he admitted in a press briefing he wasn't necessarily glad of the timing of the two things being announced at the same time, the strategy talks about more trade co—operation, climate change co—operation, climate change co—operation and nothing along the lines of aukus pact and there is a diplomatic balancing act for the eu, france are furious about this. he said while what happened didn't weaken relations between the eu and australia, he understood french disappointment and he highlighted the importance of region and acting in the region, trying to suggest rather than the announcement weakening the eu strategy, it reinforced the need to pay more attention to that region. but
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members such as france are furious. thank you very much. in the last hour, the bbc has spoken to ambassadorjohn bolton, who was former president trump's national security adviser, as well as a military adviser to president george w bush. he said the new security deal was a positive step. australia, the uk, and the us are reacting to china. they didn't put it that way, but there aren't many other threats in the indo—pacific we have to worry about. and i think putting australia in the position where it has nuclear submarines is a big step forward. this obviously isn't something that started yesterday or the day after we withdrew from afghanistan. and i think you have to see it as part of the larger picture that has begun to emerge in the context of the so—called quad — india, japan, australia, and the united states. there'll be another virtual summit
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meeting of the four quad leaders here in a few days. and i think bringing great britain into this makes all the sense in the world, and i think when the french think about it a little bit, they'll want to be part of it, too. this deal is the first significant us defence initiative since pulling out of afghanistan last month. ambassador bolton was also asked if the two things are related and how the taliban's takeover of afghanistan has impacted global security. i think the withdrawal decision from afghanistan was a catastrophic mistake. i mean, the actual execution of the withdrawal was almost humiliating, but the underlying strategic question of whether the us and nato should have kept a military presence in afghanistan i think was clear. i think it's a big win for china, russia, pakistan and iran, a setback for the us and its friends. but i think this initiative helps to show that even in the biden administration — which i don't think has the stomach required for a lot of steps we need to take — but even in the biden administration, this important forward initiative is going forward.
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and i think it's important for others to know that — we're going to have a very significant debate in the united states about how to deal with the belligerent attitude china is demonstrating, notjust in the military field, but in politics and economic matters, as well. i said in my book, published injune of 2020, not knowing what would happen that if in fact there was a deal with the taliban, whatever administration carried it out, it would still be trump's fault. but the idea that biden was hamstrung by what trump had done is laughable, too. trump quite correctly withdrew from the 2015 iran nuclear deal — that hasn't stopped biden trying to get back into it. it hasn't stopped biden from acquiescing to the nord stream ii pipeline — i could go on at some length here. they're both wrong — they were both wrong to think that american military forces should have been withdrawn from afghanistan, and sadly, i'm afraid we will all pay for it for quite some time to come.
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today is the last day that care home staff in england can receive their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob. mps voted in favour of requiring all care workers to be fully vaccinated by 11 november, unless they're medically exempt. but as zoe conway reports, the new rules have been criticised by some in the sector. st cecilia's need heroes. st cecilia's care homes are so desperate for staff, they've taken to blasting the airwaves in scarborough with job ads. at a local hotel, the company has just offered one lucky applicant a job on the spot. but that's not all, she'll also get £500 in cash and a mealfor two at a local restaurant. for the recruitment team, it's hard going. the five of them have been here for hours. they've only managed to interview three people. one of the reasons why they're finding it so difficult is that the hourly wage for one of their care workers
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is £9.50 per hour. some of scarborough's restaurants are offering £11, even £12 an hour. managing director mike padgham is trying to lift his staff's spirits. everyone in the room has been vaccinated, but other staff haven't. under the compulsory vaccination policy, they'll lose theirjobs. sam, what do you think about compulsory vaccination for care workers? well, i'm happy to have had it done, but those people who choose not to are going to lose theirjobs. because they're scared. why should they have to lose theirjobs, because the care homes have to have it done, and other sectors aren't? staff here have been working overtime to cover for ten unfilled posts. now they're about to become even more stretched. this company says it's about to lose four of its best carers. four women who are refusing to be vaccinated. so the company is going to have to let them go. the women say that they're genuinely frightened of the vaccine.
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frightened of possible side effects. i have to respect what they say. they don't want me to arrange any counselling or see experts, they've made their mind up and i think i have to respect that i cannot keep trying to persuade them. i have to give them space. i've even thought, as some providers are, should we just go ahead and keep them and see what happens? are you really saying that you're prepared to defy the government and keep these four unvaccinated staff members on? i'm considering what i might do in the future, because to my mind there's a risk of not having sufficient staff as well. but i'm not saying i'm going to do it. it's in my thought processes at the moment. st cecilia's is hardly alone in facing a staffing crisis. across north yorkshire, there are 1000 care worker vacancies. the government says it's working with local authorities and providers to ensure there are the right number of staff with the skills to deliver high quality care. zoe conway, bbc news. joining me now is lauranna michaels, who is a carer for the elderly
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and people with complex needs. thank you forjoining us. what is your view on the importance and the imperative now of having people vaccinated if they want to work in the care sector? t vaccinated if they want to work in the care sector?— the care sector? i do believe that it's really port — the care sector? i do believe that it's really port for _ the care sector? i do believe that it's really port for carers - the care sector? i do believe that it's really port for carers to - the care sector? i do believe that it's really port for carers to be . it's really port for carers to be vaccinated. we, as carers, we take on this role to look after other people. to put their needs first. to make sure that they're safe. and i believe that this vaccine is part of that. a lot of care homes are hepatitis vaccination requirements, a lot of care homes have flu vaccination requirements, so i don't see why this should be any different. see why this should be any different-— see why this should be any different. ~ ., ., ., different. what would you say to somebody who _ different. what would you say to somebody who says _ different. what would you say to somebody who says this - different. what would you say to somebody who says this is - different. what would you say to - somebody who says this is different, this is a relatively new vaccine, we have only been giving it to people for under a year and they do have genuine fears? trio. for under a year and they do have
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genuine fears?— for under a year and they do have genuine fears? no, of course, that is iuite genuine fears? no, of course, that is quite all — genuine fears? no, of course, that is quite all right _ genuine fears? no, of course, that is quite all right to _ genuine fears? no, of course, that is quite all right to be _ genuine fears? no, of course, that is quite all right to be fearful. - is quite all right to be fearful. you know, but! is quite all right to be fearful. you know, but i think it is our duty as people to go and question that. go and speak to the relevant people that know what they're talking about. so that know what they're talking about. , ., that know what they're talking about, , ., ., that know what they're talking about. i. ., .,, that know what they're talking about. ,, ., .,, ., that know what they're talking about. ., ., , about. so you are hoping to be able to return to — about. so you are hoping to be able to return to the _ about. so you are hoping to be able to return to the care _ about. so you are hoping to be able to return to the care sector, - about. so you are hoping to be able to return to the care sector, you've| to return to the care sector, you've worked in it in the past and you have experience for caring for your families, how is that care sector going to cope then if they're already struggling to recruit staff and there is this extra obstacle? tt and there is this extra obstacle? tt is going to cause a lot of ripples in the care industry, but i believe there are people out there that are willing to be double vaccinated and do want to do what they can for our elderly people and the people that aren't as fortunate as we are. you know so i think it is time that we step up, as... as a nation to look after the people that have looked after the people that have looked after us and have got us to where we are today.
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after us and have got us to where we are toda . ~ ., , .., are today. where though is the care industry going _ are today. where though is the care industry going to — are today. where though is the care industry going to get _ are today. where though is the care industry going to get these - are today. where though is the care industry going to get these staff- industry going to get these staff from? what is going to need to change in your view, you're attracted back to it, despite the challenges, and despite the often poor rates of pay.— poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shockin: poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in _ poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a _ poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a lot _ poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a lot of— poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a lot of places. - poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a lot of places. but i poor rates of pay. yes, the pay is shocking in a lot of places. but it| shocking in a lot of places. but it is not about that for somebody like me. it is about the care that can i provide for someone else and it's about being able to give back what those people might have given to me over the years. we have hundreds and hundreds of agencies that take on people and they never contact them. there needs to be a restructure in the way agencies recruit and the way they put people out into care homes, because there is a huge failing there as well. we because there is a huge failing there as well.— because there is a huge failing there as well. ~ ., ., ., ., there as well. we have also now got there as well. we have also now got the boosters. _ there as well. we have also now got the boosters, haven't— there as well. we have also now got the boosters, haven't we, _ there as well. we have also now got the boosters, haven't we, to - the boosters, haven't we, to administer to people, many of those people in the, in care homes are
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going to qualify as people to receive them early on. how important is it that that gets rolled out before the winter sets in? t is it that that gets rolled out before the winter sets in? i can it is really important. _ before the winter sets in? i can it is really important. my _ before the winter sets in? i can it is really important. my mum, - before the winter sets in? i can it | is really important. my mum, she works in the nhs, and there was talk of the booster a the flu vaccine being given at the same time. which seems a bit... a bit much, considering that there has been so side effects from the covid vaccine. but do i think that it is important that before the flu season and the cold season come in, that we are boostered and that we are ready to take on this winter period and to protect the people that need it the most. . ~ protect the people that need it the most. ., ,, , ., protect the people that need it the most. ., ~' , ., , protect the people that need it the most. ., ,, i. , . the pandemic has a big impact on how millions of people now work in the uk — and new polling suggests a majority of managers and workers believe office staff will never return to the workplace full—time.
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last year, 37% of workers did some home—working, according to the office for national statistics. and in a yougov survey, exclusive to the bbc, 70% of those polled said they believe staff won't be back in the office as much as they were before the pandemic. and more than three quarters of businesses which allow home—working say they will continue to offer it in some way. while this shift has been welcomed by many, some people feel they're missing out — as sarah corker explains. at talktalk�*s headquarters, here in the north west, staff can choose when they come into the office and when they work from home and most like to do a bit of both. when i am at home, i do catch up on a lot of admin, but i do hate having teams calls, i would rather have face to face chats, because i get so much more out of them. i think the 9—5 in my opinion is gone now, for the majority of businesses, you know, i was up working last night, just because i enjoy working in the evening, even just to relax and do my admin and things like that. i think sometimes it is difficult at home, because i still dressl
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the same, but i will be wearing my slippers, i so i don't think there is the same level of, | like, professionalism as i do in the office. i do you know what? i think it levels the playing field. i think it makes it ok to want to leave at three to pick up your dog, because you got a new dog in lockdown, or leave at three to pick up the kids or leave at three just because you like doing yoga. in a bbc survey, almost two thirds of workers said they would like to work remotely at least some of the time, but not many of us, 22%, want to be at home every day. this telecoms firm not only had to sort out home—working for their own staff, they also had to do the same for their business and domestic customers. i think certainly the first lockdown sort of triggered people to action stations around, where they were not able to support their own customers, because of the fact that there are technical solutions meant that they had technical solutions meant that they had to work from an office. any sort of office culture that is, i suppose, established by presenteeism can always fail. flexible working was here before and i think that what this has done has accelerated it.
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the pandemic has forced many businesses to adopt technology and it can help people to get a better work/life balance. not everyone with work/life balance. not everyone with work from home and not everyone wants to either. there are lots of drawbacks for young people who find i themselves working from home. they might be in a shared property, the wi—fi might not be so great, . and to top it all, they might feel quite isolated. - so, being in the office presents them with lots more benefits . to absorb the company culture, learn by observation, _ make social connections and itjust gives them a far better boost - to their career as they start out. before coronavirus, working from home was often seen as a perk on a friday. that has now radically changed. sarah corker, bbc news, in salford. and we'll be getting more on this later with our business correspondent ramzan karmali.
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the mother of a five—year—old boy has won a court case against the environment agency, about noxious gases from a staffordshire landfill site. lawyers for rebecca currie say hydrogen sulphide gas from the site near her home has worsened her son's matthew's underlying health issues. thousands of residents near the walleys quarry have complained of breathing difficulties — as kathryn stanczyszyn reports. five—year—old matthew richards was born prematurely and has had breathing difficulties since birth, but his family say the noxious gases released from the landfill site he lives next to risks shortening his life. they have taken the environment agency to court, saying the body wasn't doing enough to prevent it, and today a high courtjudge ruled in the family's favour, saying that real and significant change is needed as a matter of urgency. it's come as a shock, it really has come as a shock. i didn't expect to go to the high court in london to fight the environment agency and matthew
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to come out winning it. it's been horrendous, really, watching your son coughing, choking, vomiting, you go in his bedroom in the morning and it's like you're hit with a brick wall, this toxic gas. people living in the village of silverdale in staffordshire have been raising issues for years about the smell of hydrogen sulphide emanating from walley�*s quarry. they say the eggy stench is destroying notjust quality of life but health as well. today a judge ruled the environment agency must act to reduce levels of hydrogen sulphide in the area, saying pressing and ongoing action would improve the air matthew and his community breathes. it's been such a long haul with the environment agency not listening to us and then finally we get a judgment that yes, the smell is unacceptable and it has to stop. we are over the moon. the environment agency has released a statement saying it has every sympathy with residents
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and will require the operator to make improvements but it's pleased the court didn't find it had breached its legal obligations. solicitors for matthew's family have described this as a david and goliath case and say if things don't change, they won't hesitate to take further legal action. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. news uk, the publisher of the sun and the times, will launch a new channel talktv early next year. the channel's bosses say it will feature news, entertainment and sports programming and will be available for free across the country. the launch comes after gb news began broadcasting earlier this year. former good morning britain presenter piers morgan will be joining the channel in their primetime slot. john lewis is chartering a fleet of extra ships, along with a number of other businesses, to make sure it has christmas stock on time. sharon white, chair of the staff—owned department store and supermarket chain, said the business was throwing everything at the issues to make sure christmas won't be
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disrupted. we have raised wages for hgv drivers and we are beginning to see the results of that. we are hiring 7,000 seasonal workers, that is 2,000 up on last year. we are providing free food and drink to partners and seasonal workers and we are chartering additional space in ships over your christmas trees and those toys and the fantastic products, arrives in the uk on time. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. hello there. for most of you, the afternoon is looking fine and dry with some long spells of sunshine to look forward to. certainly that's the way of things for scotland, england, and wales. further west for northern ireland, cloud will continue to thicken this afternoon with some patchy outbreaks of rain arriving here, particularly towards the evening time. temperatures, high teens and low 20s — in the september sunshine,
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that'll feel pleasantly warm. the winds stay light today. overnight tonight, rain moves from northern ireland into scotland. might see a few spots getting into westernmost areas of england and wales, but otherwise dry with some mist and fog patches probably forming across parts of the south. temperatures 10—14 celsius, quite a mild start to the day on friday. now friday, our whether front to the west very slow—moving, so rain with you for much of the day in northern ireland, wet weather in scotland, and eventually again some patchy areas of rain getting into westernmost areas of wales and england. east wales, central and eastern england, eastern areas of scotland should stay dry, continuing with some sunny spells. temperatures again into the low 20s for many. that's your weather.
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hello, this is bbc news. i martine croxall. the headlines... the covid boosterjab programme is under way, as some health care workers and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact — the prime minister denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site, accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine, if they want to keep theirjob. the scottish government considers draughting in the military to help ambulance delays, after the average wait for an ambulance reached
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six hours last week. tennis's newest star, emma raducanu, arrives back home in bromley to continue the celebrations of her us open win. a new, early work by dutch master vincent van gogh has been discovered. experts say it offers an exceptional insight into his working process. sport now, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. good afternoon. you mentioned in the head —— in the headlines there. five days after making tennis history, britains emma raducanu has arrived home. the new us open champion was reunited with her parents after arriving back in south east london. on saturday, she became the first british woman in 41! years to win a grand slam singles title — and she's since had a whirlwind week in new york, with appearances on american tv and at the met gala.
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the new british number one, and world number 23, now says she's ready to get back to training for more grand slam wins. there she is with her father. to football, and west ham manager david moyes says he hopes his side can still be competing in europe after the new year. the hammers begin theirfirst—ever europa league group stage campaign with an away match against croatian champions dinamo zagreb at 5.45pm this afternoon. it's a proud moment for club captain mark noble, who is beginning his 18th and final season at the club. it's been 3—4 months of excitement, of looking forward to who we drew in the group stages. we're here now and as the boss said we have a full squad, no injuries, everyone ready to go and play, we have li—5 new signings that i could say are used to this part of the world, used to this football, so we're well prepared and we're
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really excited about everything. the other english club in europa league action are leicester. they host napoli at 8pm, and their manager is expecting a tough match against a side he feels would be at home in the champions league. i believe they are a champions league club. got great experience, james, over these last number of years in the competition, so they arrived in the europa league as one of the few brits to do well in it, so very good side full of experience and quality, but it's such an exciting game for us to start the competition and we are excited by it. here's a check on the british teams in action today. celtic are away at real betis, while rangers host lyon at 8pm. in the new europa conference league, tottenham are away at rennes. the chelsea and england star reece james has appealed to fans to help find his playing medals after they were stolen on tuesday. james was involved in chelsea's game against zenit st petersburg
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in the champions league when he says thieves broke into home and stole his champions league and super cup winners medals, and his runners—up medalfrom euro 2020. in a post on social media, james appealed for help saying... england's women will welcome three of the world's top sides next february for the first staging of a new annual invitational women's tournament. the lionesses will be joined by germany and spain, both also ranked in fifa's top ten, with the fourth competing nation to be announced soon. there'll be three double—header matches played across seven days in a round—robin format. england's cricketers are batting after being put in by new zealand in the first one day international in bristol.
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it's the first of five matches, and england are going well. a few moments ago they were 161—5 with just 13 overs remaining. heather knight has reached her half century — that's the 22nd 50 in odi's in her career. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you. the scottish government is considering seeking help from the ministry of defence to deal with a crisis in the scottish ambulance service. the situation was brought to light at first minister's questions, when the leader of the conservatives, douglas ross, highlighted the case of a man reported to have waited li0 hours for an ambulance. earlier, i spoke to our scotland reporterjames shaw, who gave us this update. to give you an example, this is a case reported in one of the newspaper and talked about by douglas ross — this is gerald brown, 65 years old who waited li0 hours for an ambulance in glasgow.
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by the time it arrived, he had already died, and his son says he was told by his gp that if the ambulance had arrived in time, his father would have survived. that was the headline case brought up by the conservatives and the scottish parliament at first minister's questions today at an indication of how bad things are — and in fact douglas ross, the leader of the conservatives put up what you have to call a crisis in the scottish ambulance service last week when he pointed out that the average waiting time for an ambulance was six hours. of course, there is enormous variation in that average of six hours, some even longer and some very much shorter when they are extremely critical cases. but he said it was a crisis, he asked nicola sturgeon, the first minister, to respond to that, and part of her answer included additional measures to help the ambulance service and that includes calling on the ministry of defence to provide support. she said after that session in the parliament, she would be going straight back to her office
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and finalising the details of that request. it's worth bearing in mind that similar things have happened in different parts of england, where the military has been called in over the course of the summer to support ambulance services. but, as nicola sturgeon herself pointed out, it looks now as if this is going to be very challenging winter season — notjust for the ambulance service but for the whole of the nhs in scotland, possibly the most challenging winter it is experienced since its founding after the second world war. surely this will not be a permanent solution? something else long—term needs to be thought of. it has been pointed out that we understand the military was brought in during the first wave of the pandemic in the early months of last year, when there was an emergency need for testing and other services they could provide at short notice. but it has been pointed out that we are months into the crisis now,
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and many people have said that there needs to be a longer—term solution, not the least the unions who have talked about the need for more staff, the need for more wards — essentiallyjust the need for more capacity to cope with this increase in cases that we have seen in scotland in recent weeks. james shaw. poor quality housing is causing thousands of deaths every year in england, according to a new report from the centre for ageing better. the charity says a focus on building new houses has led to millions of homes falling below decent living standards. michael buchanan reports. frustrated at his housing association's refusal to repair his flat, this man showed its condition on social media. i was horrified, embarrassed. the family had been complaining for months about the various problems, even as his father lay dying of cancer. he had nurses coming in and feeding through a tube through his stomach in a place that was infected with cockroaches, mice, rodents, asbestos everywhere. it's just beyond words.
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it made a bad experience much worse. he shamed the housing association clarion into renovating his home, but that is not enough for the 22—year—old student. inundated by other clarion residents with similar problems, he is on a mission to improve every dilapidated home owned by the housing association. these people are living in environments that go completely and break every single health and safety standard going, and still they�* re being ignored. i don't know — at that point i'm thinking, what are they waiting for? is it someone to die in these properties until something is done? i told them! today's report says poor quality housing is killing people. trips and falls, respiratory diseases and homes that cannot be heated properly. england, they say, has some of europe's most dilapidated housing stock.
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we absolutely need new homes to be built. even if we get to 250,000 homes a year it's dwarfed by the homes we already have. —— 24 —— 21i million homes we already have. 80% of the homes we will be living in in 30 years' time we already have, and they are already, many of them, poor quality. you are also the chairman of clarion housing association, as well. what has gone wrong? we have been publicly shamed. the homes that have been featured are part of a major regeneration project and, because we have been focusing on the regeneration, we've been less concerned about the quality of the homes on a day—to—day basis. and we got that wrong and have taken huge steps to change it. most poor housing is owner—occupied, and the report praises an innovative scheme that provides low—cost loans to those who cannot afford repairs. we work with a lot of people who are asset rich and cash poor so we can make the payments over a longer timescale so we're not
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giving anything away, people are borrowing the money and paying it back. repairing england's four million poor—quality homes plays a crucial part in solving the country's housing shortage. michael buchanan, bbc news. a british woman found guilty of lying about being raped in cyprus has began the appeal against her conviction. the woman was found guilty of "public mischief" and given a four—month sentence — suspended for three years, after recanting a claim she'd been attacked by a group of israeli men. her lawyers say that statement was inadmissable. anna holligan reports. singing. their message was clear — gathered outside the supreme court, they came to show faith, solidarity and support, which they believe the british teenager was denied by the cypriotjustice system. inside, her legal team presented these two key arguments. the retraction statement,
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which was taken after over six hours in custody, with no lawyer, from the young lady who was suffering with ptsd, should never have been admitted into those proceedings. we also argued that the trialjudge misapplied the burden and standard of proof, in that he started from a position after saying the rape didn't take place and refused to hear evidence which showed that it did. cypriot police have denied any wrong doing. this young woman's story reverberated around the world. a british tourist taking time out before university, who went to police for help after she had allegedly been raped by up to 12 young men at this hotel — ended up being accused of lying and ultimately convicted for public mischief, or wasting police time, after she retracted the original gang rape allegation. she wasn't here at court, she is at home concentrating on securing her degree. her lawyer says this experience has
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been deeply harrowing, humiliating, and personally intrusive, and yet she had risen above it with grit and determination and courageousley resolved to continue to fight this case to the end, where she believes justice will be done. these women believe she was a victim of a broken justice system, and that her experience could deter other victims from coming forward. our wish is that her conviction is overturned, that is why we are here today demanding that this conviction is overturned and she will be able to put the pieces of her life back together and fully recover. the verdict is due within six months. if the appeal hearing in cyprus fails, her lawyers plan to take her battle to clear her name to the european court of human rights. anna holligan, bbc news. four amateur astronauts have blasted off from florida,
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in the first—ever space mission for civilians. the group, led bya us billionaire jared isaacman, will spend three days orbiting the earth. here's our science correspondent pallab ghosh. a night—time launch by the private company spacex. just like nasa, but with more audience participation. chanting: three, two, one! ignition, we have lift off. on board, one billionaire and three ordinary american citizens. we're through the period of maximum dynamic pressure. looks like a smooth ride for the crew. the powerful engines accelerate them into earth orbit. 3gs acceleration, everything continues to look nominal. and now one of the riskiest parts of the launch. cheering the separation of the first stage of the rocket. the inspiration4 crew had six months
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of intensive training with spacex but on—board computer systems will be in control as zero gravity kicks in. and it looks like it is a little golden retriever. the flight was funded by billionaire jared isaacman and he gave the three remaining seats to people who had inspirational stories. they include hayley arceneaux, who had cancer as a child. i'm definitely excited . to represent those that aren't physically perfect. | i want to bring this experience back| and share with everyone i encounter and just what this represents i for the new age in space travel and who can be an astronaut. the capsule has been fitted with a larger than normal window so the crew can enjoy spectacular views from space before coming back down to earth in three days' time. pallab ghosh, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news...
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the covid boosterjab programme is under way, as some health care workers and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact. the prime minister denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site — accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. with millions of visitors each year, national parks are among the most popular tourist destinations in the uk. but competition to be awarded the special status of national park can be fierce, because of the investment that comes with the title. now, campaigners behind one unsuccessful bid — the south pennines — say a new system of recognition is needed. judy hobson reports.
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in the hills above burnley, it's obvious to see why this area was once in the running to become a national park. this rich landscape is steeped in cultural and industrial heritage. but what the south pennines doesn't have is a brand. above us is burnley, pendle hill. sweeping across you've got the yorkshire dales in the background. helen noble is on a mission to change that. she wants the south pennines to be recognised as a national landscape which she believes will help protect it. it would certainly give everyone a sense of place, somewhere that's well known. but for us, it's very much bringing that investment into the area. this deserves being looked after. it deserves that investment and for us, the community and the landscape has great diversity and we think that should be celebrated. the south pennines park covers 460 square miles, cutting across greater manchester, lancashire and yorkshire, and it's home to 450,000 people.
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why notjust have this area designated a national park? very simply, we don't want to be bound by the legislation that might bring us. what we want is a park that's agile, that can adapt to the challenges that it faces, and we think that this new approach, doing things differently, will help us to achieve that. this is a local landmark, the singing ringing tree. walkers here told us why they think the area is so special. it's just stunning, everywhere you look you've got magnificent views. it's like everything, the amount of money that you can spend on it, the better it's going to be. i it's just a really lovely placel to walk, just look at the view. where else would you go? it's on your doorstep. it's that sense of place, the stunning uplands that we are currently at, but also that intermixed with the urban areas and the mill towns and the wonderful people that live here.
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many local councils and businesses are behind the campaign, which aims to protect this landscape for everyone to enjoy. judy hobson, bbc news. most workers do not believe people will fully return to the office after the coronavirus pandemic, an exclusive survey for the bbc suggests. about 70% of those polled predicted that people would "never return to offices at the same rate". the majority said that they would prefer to work from home either full—time or at least some of the time. but bosses raised concerns that creativity in the workplace would be affected. with me now is our business presenter ramzan karmali. it does depend on the kind of industry that you're in. completely, and the people _ industry that you're in. completely, and the people that _ industry that you're in. completely, and the people that are _ industry that you're in. completely, and the people that are - _ industry that you're in. completely, and the people that are - we - industry that you're in. completely, and the people that are - we spoke | and the people that are — we spoke to a guy at last hour at a marketing firm, it's easierfor to a guy at last hour at a marketing firm, it's easier for his firm for people to work at home. but if you
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work at a supermarket, you have to be there, don't you? if you work in construction, you have to be there. so it's a tricky one — some banks want you back in the office, the bossin want you back in the office, the boss in goldman sachs back in february called it an aberration, people working at home, which is a bit strong. but other banks also agreed with him. but lloyd's and hbc say they'll reduce their office space by about 20% over the next three years, so they are obviously looking at a hybrid model. but one thing that really affects people working at home is your mental health. here with me now is victoria short, who is the ceo of recruiter randstad uk. you recruit in all areas, victoria. you recruit in all areas, victoria. you are particularly concerned about mental health, aren't you, and the impact it's having on people working at home? ~ , impact it's having on people working athome? ~ , , ., impact it's having on people working athome? , ,~ . at home? absolutely, yeah. we surveyed. _
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at home? absolutely, yeah. we surveyed. last _ at home? absolutely, yeah. we surveyed, last year, _ at home? absolutely, yeah. we surveyed, last year, actually, i at home? absolutely, yeah. we - surveyed, last year, actually, about 27% of— surveyed, last year, actually, about 27% of people we surveyed said that working _ 27% of people we surveyed said that working from home had had a negative impact _ working from home had had a negative impact on _ working from home had had a negative impact on their mental health. now undoubtedly part of that was down to bein- undoubtedly part of that was down to being forced to work from home during _ being forced to work from home during the — being forced to work from home during the pandemic. and we do believe — during the pandemic. and we do believe in — during the pandemic. and we do believe in the long term, some form of balance _ believe in the long term, some form of balance of working at home, being in the _ of balance of working at home, being in the office _ of balance of working at home, being in the office will undoubtedly bring its benefits to people's mental health — its benefits to people's mental health. but it's certainly something we should — health. but it's certainly something we should watch out for in terms of some _ we should watch out for in terms of some people feeling very isolated and struggling to work from home. but for— and struggling to work from home. but for some businesses, they see this is a bit of an opportunity, this is a bit of an opportunity, this pandemic, in terms of getting their stuff to work at home and don't have to pay for office space. so why is it so important that they look after those staff that are working at home and their mental health? t working at home and their mental health? ~ . working at home and their mental health? ~' , ., health? i think, in terms of their productivity. _ health? i think, in terms of their productivity. as _ health? i think, in terms of their productivity, as an _ health? i think, in terms of their productivity, as an employer- health? i think, in terms of their productivity, as an employer if. productivity, as an employer if you want _ productivity, as an employer if you want to— productivity, as an employer if you want to be — productivity, as an employer if you want to be attractive, you need to be looking — want to be attractive, you need to be looking at the whole person and their well—being. be looking at the whole person and theirwell—being. but be looking at the whole person and their well—being. but actually, people — their well—being. but actually, people are struggling from a mental
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health— people are struggling from a mental health point of view, then there is activity— health point of view, then there is activity could be impacted, it could impact _ activity could be impacted, it could impact other people there working with, _ impact other people there working with. and — impact other people there working with, and it's also retention rates - they— with, and it's also retention rates - they may— with, and it's also retention rates — they may end up losing really good talent _ — they may end up losing really good talent if— — they may end up losing really good talent if they don't look after people's mental health. you talked earlier about _ people's mental health. you talked earlier about a _ people's mental health. you talked earlier about a hybrid _ people's mental health. you talked earlier about a hybrid model, - people's mental health. you talked earlier about a hybrid model, partl earlier about a hybrid model, part working at home and part working at the office — how do you suggest firms go about organising that? because that seems to be the biggest barrier, organising your workforce so you can have that split between home and the office.— so you can have that split between home and the office. yes, and there is no 1-size-fits-all _ home and the office. yes, and there is no 1-size-fits-all to _ home and the office. yes, and there is no 1-size-fits-all to that. - home and the office. yes, and there is no 1-size-fits-all to that. and - home and the office. yes, and there is no 1-size-fits-all to that. and i i is no 1—size—fits—all to that. and i would _ is no 1—size—fits—all to that. and i would actually remarked to your colleague, it depends on your business _ colleague, it depends on your business model and the type of organisation you are. but you can consult _ organisation you are. but you can consult with your workforce to look at what _ consult with your workforce to look at what will work for your organisation, and particular teams within— organisation, and particular teams within the — organisation, and particular teams within the organisation — we see certain— within the organisation — we see certain segments of the community in the talent _ certain segments of the community in the talent pool who are really struggling with working from home.
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younger— struggling with working from home. younger people who may struggle from a training _ younger people who may struggle from a training perspective might lose out on _ a training perspective might lose out on that learning from more experienced colleagues in the workplace. i think certainly for employers, consulting with their workforce, looking at having the flexible — workforce, looking at having the flexible approach but not a 1—size—fits—all approach that could still drive — 1—size—fits—all approach that could still drive the productivity outputs they are _ still drive the productivity outputs they are looking to achieve, to look at their— they are looking to achieve, to look at their employer branding in the market so— at their employer branding in the market so they can attract bright talent _ market so they can attract bright talent and retain that talent, get the productivity they want, and look after people's well—being in terms of offering them that flexibility, whilst _ of offering them that flexibility, whilst also creating a sense of community that you do get when you are in— community that you do get when you are in the _ community that you do get when you are in the office that organisations during _ are in the office that organisations during lockdown and the pandemic have struggled to achieve with people — have struggled to achieve with people forced to work from home. victoria, _ people forced to work from home. victoria, we — people forced to work from home. victoria, we would be remiss not to ask you — this week we got some data about thejobs ask you — this week we got some data about the jobs market and record
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numbers of vacancies. which industries are really struggling to fill positions, and which have too many, perhaps? fill positions, and which have too many. perhaps?— fill positions, and which have too many, perhaps? that's a really good iuestion, many, perhaps? that's a really good question, actually. _ many, perhaps? that's a really good question, actually. a _ many, perhaps? that's a really good question, actually. a lot _ many, perhaps? that's a really good question, actually. a lot of - many, perhaps? that's a really good question, actually. a lot of people i question, actually. a lot of people have blamed the struggle of the labour— have blamed the struggle of the labour shortage on breaks it, but what _ labour shortage on breaks it, but what we've — labour shortage on breaks it, but what we've actually seen as a huge spike _ what we've actually seen as a huge spike in _ what we've actually seen as a huge spike in vacancies, a record number of upwards— spike in vacancies, a record number of upwards of a million vacancies in the market — of upwards of a million vacancies in the market. that's increased by over 750.000 _ the market. that's increased by over 750.000 in — the market. that's increased by over 750,000 in the last three months — and what's — 750,000 in the last three months — and what's that has driven is a lack of people _ and what's that has driven is a lack of people applying forjobs. last year on — of people applying forjobs. last year on average we saw 14 applicants for every— year on average we saw 14 applicants for everyjob vacancy — now the average — for everyjob vacancy — now the average is _ for everyjob vacancy — now the average is only eight applicants per 'ob average is only eight applicants per job vacancy. but we've seen a real difference — job vacancy. but we've seen a real difference there, your business support— difference there, your business support type roles, secretarial administration where the shift isn't as dramatic — it's gone from 19
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applicants— as dramatic — it's gone from 19 applicants to nine — or actually engineering, where there is a skills shortage, _ engineering, where there is a skills shortage, that significant. from 17 applicants— shortage, that significant. from 17 applicants per vacancy last year to only for— applicants per vacancy last year to only for now. so real competition in the engineering market.— the engineering market. victoria, thanks for your _ the engineering market. victoria, thanks for your time. _ the engineering market. victoria, thanks for your time. will - the engineering market. victoria, thanks for your time. will we i the engineering market. victoria, thanks for your time. will we see | thanks for your time. will we see ou next thanks for your time. will we see you next hour? _ thanks for your time. will we see you next hour? i _ thanks for your time. will we see you next hour? i don't _ thanks for your time. will we see you next hour? i don't think- thanks for your time. will we see you next hour? i don't think so. i you next hour? i don't think so. oh dear, you next hour? i don't think so. oh dear. that's — you next hour? i don't think so. oh dear, that's upsetting. _ you next hour? i don't think so. oh dear, that's upsetting. at - you next hour? i don't think so. oh dear, that's upsetting. at least i i dear, that's upsetting. at least i have caroline for company. the duke and duchess of sussex have been named among the top 100 most influential people in the world, by time magazine. harry and meghan, who formally stepped back from royal duties last year, feature on one of seven special magazine covers. jonny dymond reports. a power pose for a power couple. they may no longer be working royals, but time magazine reckons they are amongst the 100 most influential people in the world. why? the head of a charity they support explains.
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they are in some exalted company. also on the list, teen angst singer—songwriter billie eilish, us presidentjoe biden, and former president donald trump. the couple may be far from these shores, but they remain busy. most recently, meghan wrote and published a children's book, the bench. and that includes you, harry. and harry has been rubbing shoulders, virtually at least, with the first lady of the united states, jill biden, talking about military veterans. the couple are, says time magazine, part of a community that in a year of crisis have leapt into the fray. jonny dymond, bbc news. the van gogh museum has discovered new work by the artist vincent van gogh from 1882.
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it's the study for the drawing "worn out", considered to be one of the most powerful figure drawings from van gogh's period in the hague. the artist described how the drawing came about in detail in letters to his brother, theo, and to his friend, anthon van rappard. the museum say the discovery offers an insight into van gogh's working process at the time. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. hello there. for most of you, the afternoon is looking fine and dry with some long spells of sunshine to look forward to. certainly that's the way of things for scotland, england, and wales. further west for northern ireland, cloud will continue to thicken this afternoon with some patchy outbreaks of rain arriving here, particularly towards the evening time. temperatures, high teens and low 20s — in the september sunshine, that'll feel pleasantly warm. the winds stay light today. overnight tonight, rain moves from northern ireland into scotland. might see a few spots getting into westernmost areas of england and wales, but otherwise dry with some mist and fog patches probably forming
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across parts of the south. temperatures 10—14 celsius, quite a mild start to the day on friday. now friday, our whether front to the west very slow—moving, so rain with you for much of the day in northern ireland, wet weather in scotland, and eventually again some patchy areas of rain getting into westernmost areas of wales and england. east wales, central and eastern england, eastern areas of scotland should stay dry, continuing with some sunny spells. temperatures again into the low 20s for many. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the covid boosterjab programme is under way, as some health care workers and patients receive their dose. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine, if they want to keep theirjob. diplomatic fallout, as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact. the prime minster denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. the scottish government drafts in the military to help ambulance delays, after the average wait for an ambulance reached six hours last week. tennis's newest star, emma raducanu, arrives back home in bromley to continue the celebrations
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of her us open win. a new, early work by dutch master vincent van gogh has been discovered. experts say it offers an exceptional insight into his working process. the programme of third booster covid jabs is under way in england and wales, with some vulnerable people and healthworkers receiving their dose this morning. eligible people who had their second vaccine at least six months ago will be invited for the extra dose, the full roll—out begins next week. everyone aged 50 and over across the uk is eligible, as well as front line health care workers and vulnerable groups, about 30 million people in all. but as some people are now receiving their third jab, there are still more than 5 million
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adults across the uk who are yet to have one. here's our health correspondent katherine da costa. come along, let's see you. on the front line and among the first in line to receive a covid booster shot. here we go. role reversal. health staff at croydon university hospital have been rolling up their sleeves to top up their protection this winter. i came for it because i'm very keen to ensure that at all times i maintain as much protection, not only for myself, but also for the patients i work with. we were all vaccinated back. in december, so obviously our immunity is waning somewhat, so it's important we all get- the booster dose as soon as possible, really. - on tuesday, the government's advisory body on vaccines recommended giving booster doses to care home residents, health and care workers, the over—50s, 16 to 49—year—olds with underlying health conditions and household contacts of people with a weakened immune system.
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those groups should receive a jab at least six months after their second shot and the preference is a pfizer vaccine, or a half—dose of moderna. when the nhs contacts you, please come forward and have your vaccine. it might be a text message, it might be a letter, it might be a phone call from your local gp practice, but when you get asked, do come forward, because it's the best protection as you go into winter. the aim is to offer all care home residents in england a vaccine before the start of november, but experts say even among the elderly protection against severe disease is still high, while the under—50s may not need a booster at all. separately, half a million people with a weakened immune system, including those with blood cancer, hiv, or organ donor recipients, have been advised to get a third dose as part of their primary schedule, but more than two weeks on some are still waiting to be contacted.
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it's really important for people with blood cancer and other people with compromised immunity to get the third dose. for some that might be the start of their antibody response. we are starting to see that in some studies. so we really urge people to get it. we are hearing a lot, maybe 90% of the calls and our support line, are from people who haven't heard yet and haven't been called for their third dose and that is creating anxiety. nhs england says people who are immunosuppressed have started to receive a third dose and all those eligible will be contacted by their doctor to discuss the timing of when they should have it. meanwhile, the booster campaign is due to be rolled out more widely across england, scotland and wales next week and later this month in northern ireland. katharine da costa, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia, who told me why the boosters are so important for certain groups. the first priority is people who wouldn't have responded as well
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to just two doses as we would have liked and the announcement a couple of weeks ago of people who have got cancer or certain types of cancer, hiv, or organ transplants, that is absolutely critical and we need to get on with that pretty quickly. beyond that initial group of people, there are others i think that won't have responded as well to the initial rollout of the vaccine. and i think particularly older people, people with severe obesity, don't respond as well to vaccines as we would like and they need a booster. beyond that, i think we are seeing some decline in the effectiveness against infection, although so far not dramatic evidence of reduction in the ability to prevent severe disease, but nevertheless i think there is no doubt that people over 80, people in care homes and really need the booster quite quickly. beyond that, the importance declines to a certain extent, although boosters will always provide additional protection. the issue of course is whether that
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additional protection, the vaccines would be better used elsewhere in the world, where many vulnerable people have yet to receive any vaccines. let's talk about the ethics of that in a minute, if we can. in terms of how important it is that this all, the boosters, are given before the winter to try and protect the health service again, i'm guessing? absolutely. and although i don't think we are going to see a very big surge of infections over the winter, schools are back and actually infections are falling rather than rising at the moment. but i think the thing that does worry me more than actually a surge in covid cases is a surge in influenza at the same time,
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because not only would that apply additional pressure on the health service, at a time where we have still got quite a lot of pressure from covid, but covid and influenza at the same time is far more serious than just covid by itself. so, yes, i think we need to get on with this and also the influenza campaign as well. we can't afford not to progress with the flu campaign this autumn. a diplomatic row has broken out, following the announcement we have the latest government figures regarding covid cases and the number of deaths recorded has reached 158 today, 158 people dying within 28 days of the positive covid test. yesterday, the number was 201, last week the average was 167. down
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a little bit. in terms of the number of cases recorded in the last entry for errors, that is 26,911 down from 30,507 yesterday and quite a lot on average from last week. a diplomatic row has broken out, following the announcement of a new security and defence partnership between the uk, the us and australia. the prime minister says the deal isn't intended to be adversarial towards any other power. but china has called the pact "extremely irresponsible" and france says the decision to scrap its submarine deal with australia is "a stab in the back". our security correspondent frank gardner reports. silent and stealthy. a nuclear—powered submarine on patrol. only six countries in the world have them, but now, under a new pact, britain and the us will help australia build its own fleet of them. they won't be carrying nuclear weapons.
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western nations have been stepping up their naval presence in the indo—pacific region, concerned about what they see as aggressive actions by china. the new pact, called aukus, is being called one of the most significant security partnerships in decades. one of the great prizes of this enterprise is that australia, the uk, and the us will become involved in a project that will last for decades. today, we're taking another historic step to deepen cooperation among all three of our nations. because we all recognise the imperative of ensuring peace and stability in the indo—pacific over the long term. we need to be able to address both the current strategic environment in the region and how it may evolve. freedom of navigation in the south china sea has become a source of tension after china has built bases on artificial reefs and claimed large parts of the ocean as its own.
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but today, its officials were quick to condemn their aukus party. to condemn their aukus party. translation: cooperation - between the united states, uk, and australia over nuclear submarines has seriously undermined regional peace and stability, intensified the arms race, and undermined international nuclear nonproliferation efforts. british industry is likely to benefit from the deal, which could see large contracts for engineering and technology firms. but australia's decision to opt for nuclear—powered subs means cancelling their contract with france to build diesel—electric ones. the french have called it a betrayal. translation: it's a stab in the back. j we had established a relationship of trust with australia, but that trust has been broken. there's a lot of bitterness about the cancellation. this matter is not over. but the backdrop to all of this is a massive military build—up by china. it's invested billions of dollars in expanding its navy,
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its nuclear arsenal, and hypersonic weapons that can sink a warship. frank gardner, bbc news. this afternoon, the bbc has spoken to ambassadorjohn bolton, who was former president trump's national security advisor, as well as a military advisor to president george w bush. he said the new security deal was a positive step. australia, the uk, and the us are reacting to china. they didn't put it that way, but there aren't many other threats in the indo—pacific that we have to worry about. and i think putting australia in the position where it has nuclear submarines is a big step forward. this obviously isn't something that started yesterday, or the day after we withdrew from afghanistan, and i think you have to see it as part of the larger picture that has begun to emerge in the context of the so—called quad, india, japan, australia, and the united states. there'll be another virtual summit meeting of the four quad leaders here in a few days.
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and i think bringing great britain into this makes all the sense in the world, and i think when the french think about it a little bit, they'll want to be part of it, too. this deal is the first significant us defence initiative since pulling out of afghanistan last month. ambassador bolton was also asked if the two things are related and how the taliban's takeover of afghanistan has impacted global security. i think the withdrawal decision from afghanistan was a catastrophic mistake. i mean, the actual execution of the withdrawal was almost humiliating, but the underlying strategic question of whether the us and nato should have kept a military presence in afghanistan i think was clear. i think it's a big win for china, russia, pakistan and iran, a setback for the us and its friends. but i think this initiative helps to show that even in the biden administration, which i don't think has the stomach required for a lot of steps we need to take, but even in the biden administration, this important forward initiative is going forward. and i think it's important
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for others to know that, we're going to have a very significant debate in the united states about how to deal with the belligerent attitude china is demonstrating, notjust in the military field, but in politics and economic matters, as well. i said in my book, published injune of 2020, not knowing what would happen that if in fact there was a deal with the taliban, whatever administration carried it out, it would still be trump's fault. but the idea that biden was hamstrung by what trump had done is laughable, too. trump quite correctly withdrew from the 2015 iran nuclear deal, that hasn't stopped biden trying to get back into it. it hasn't stopped biden from acquiescing to the nord stream ii pipeline, i could go on at some length here. they're both wrong, they were both wrong to think that american military forces should have been withdrawn from afghanistan,
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and sadly, i'm afraid we are all going to pay for it for quite some time to come. today is the last day that care home staff in england can receive their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine, if they want to keep theirjob. mps voted in favour of requiring all care workers to be fully vaccinated by 11th november, unless they're medically exempt. but as zoe conway reports, the new rules have been criticised by some in the sector. st cecilia's need heroes... st cecilia's care homes are so desperate for staff, they've taken to blasting the airwaves in scarborough with job ads. at a local hotel, the company has just offered one lucky applicant a job on the spot. but that's not all, she'll also get £500 in cash and a mealfor two at a local restaurant. for the recruitment team, it's hard going. the five of them have been here for hours. they've only managed to interview three people. one of the reasons why they're finding it so difficult is that the hourly wage for one of their care workers
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is £9.50 per hour. some of scarborough's restaurants are offering £11, even £12 an hour. managing director mike padgham is trying to lift his staff's spirits. everyone in the room has been vaccinated, but other staff haven't. under the compulsory vaccination policy, they'll lose theirjobs. sam, what do you think about compulsory vaccination for care workers? well, i'm happy to have had it done, but those people who choose not to are going to lose theirjobs. because they're scared. why should they have to lose theirjobs because the care homes have to have it done, and other sectors aren't? staff here have been working overtime to cover for ten unfilled posts. now they're about to become even more stretched. this company says it's about to lose four of its best carers. four women who are refusing to be vaccinated. so the company is going to have to let them go. the women say that they're genuinely
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frightened of the vaccine. frightened of possible side effects. i have to respect what they say. they don't want me to arrange any counselling or see experts, they've made their mind up and i think i have to respect that i cannot keep trying to persuade them. i have to give them space. i've even thought, as some providers are, should we just go ahead and keep them and see what happens? are you really saying that you're prepared to defy the government and keep these four unvaccinated staff members on? i'm considering what i might do in the future, because to my mind there's a risk of not having sufficient staff as well. but i'm not saying i'm going to do it. it's in my thought processes at the moment. st cecilia's is hardly alone in facing a staffing crisis. across north yorkshire, there are 1,000 care worker vacancies. the government says it's working with local authorities and providers to ensure there are the right number of staff with the skills to deliver high quality care. zoe conway, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news...
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the covid boosterjab programme is under way, as some health care workers and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout, as britain, the us and australia agree a defence pact. the prime minster denies china's claim that it'll undermine regional stability. the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. the pandemic has a big impact on how millions of people now work in the uk, and new polling suggests a majority of managers and workers believe office staff will never return to the workplace full—time. last year, 37% of workers did some homeworking, according to the office for national statistics. and in a yougov survey, exclusive to the bbc, 70% of those polled said they believe staff won't be back in the office as much as they were before the pandemic.
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and more than three quarters of businesses which allow homeworking say they will continue to offer it in some way. while this shift has been welcomed by many, some people feel they're missing out, as sarah corker explains. at talktalk�*s headquarters, here in the north west, staff can choose when they come into the office and when they work from home and most like to do a bit of both. when i am at home, i do catch up on a lot of admin, but i do hate having teams calls, i would rather have face to face chats, because i get so much more out of them. i think the 9—5 in my opinion is gone now, for the majority of businesses, you know, i was up working last night, just because i enjoy working in the evening, even just to relax and do my admin and things like that. i think sometimes it is difficult at home, because i still dressl the same, but i will be wearing my slippers, i so i don't think there is the same level of, | like, professionalism as i do in the office. i do you know what? i think it levels the playing field. i think it makes it ok to want to leave at three
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to pick up your dog, because you got a new dog in lockdown, or leave at three to pick up the kids or leave at three just because you like doing yoga. in a bbc survey, almost two thirds of workers said they would like to work remotely at least some of the time, but not many of us, 22%, want to be at home every day. this telecoms firm not only had to sort out home—working for their own staff, they also had to do the same for their business and domestic customers. i think certainly the first lockdown sort of triggered people to action stations around, where they were not able to support their own customers, because of the fact that there are technical solutions meant that they had technical solutions meant that they had to work from an office. any sort of office culture that is, i suppose, established by presenteeism can always fail. flexible working was here before and i think that what this has done has accelerated it. the pandemic has forced many businesses to adopt technology and it can help people to get a better work/life balance. not everyone with work from home and not everyone wants to either.
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there are lots of drawbacks for young people who find i themselves working from home. they might be in a shared property, the wi—fi might not be so great, i and to top it all, they might feel quite isolated. - so, being in the office presents them with lots more benefits i to absorb the company culture, learn by observation, _ make social connections and itjust gives them a far better boost i to their career as they start out. before coronavirus, working from home was often seen as a perk on a friday. that has now radically changed. sarah corker, bbc news, in salford. the mother of a 5—year—old boy has won a court case against the environment agency, about noxious gases from a staffordshire landfill site. lawyers for rebecca currie say hydrogen sulphide gas from the site, near her home, has worsened her son's matthew's underlying health issues. thousands of residents near the walleys quarry have complained of breathing difficulties, as kathryn
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stanczyszyn reports. five—year—old matthew richards was born prematurely and has had breathing difficulties since birth, but his family say the noxious gases released from the landfill site he lives next to risks shortening his life. they have taken the environment agency to court, saying the body wasn't doing enough to prevent it, and today a high courtjudge ruled in the family's favour, saying that real and significant change is needed as a matter of urgency. it's come as a shock, it really has come as a shock. i didn't expect to go to the high court in london to fight the environment agency and matthew to come out winning it. it's been horrendous, really, watching your son coughing, choking, vomiting, you go in his bedroom in the morning and it's like you're hit with a brick wall, this toxic gas. people living in the village
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of silverdale in staffordshire have been raising issues for years about the smell of hydrogen sulphide emanating from walley�*s quarry. they say the eggy stench is destroying notjust quality of life but health as well. today a judge ruled the environment agency must act to reduce levels of hydrogen sulphide in the area, saying pressing and ongoing action would improve the air matthew and his community breathes. it's been such a long haul with the environment agency not listening to us and then finally we get a judgment that yes, the smell is unacceptable and it has to stop. we are over the moon. the environment agency has released a statement saying it has every sympathy with residents and will require the operator to make improvements but it's pleased the court didn't find it had breached its legal obligations. solicitors for matthew's family have described this as a david and goliath case and say if things don't change, they won't hesitate to take further legal action. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news.
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independent experts say a "command vacuum" at the scene of the manchester arena terrorist attack hampered a co—ordinated emergency response. senior officers at both greater manchester police and british transport police were criticised for a series of command failures in the immediate aftermath of the bombing in 2017. the public inquiry was told that front—line police officers bravely helped injured people in the arena foyer "in spite" of a lack of command support. john lewis is chartering a fleet of extra ships, along with a number of other businesses, to make sure it has christmas stock on time. sharon white, chair of the staff—owned department store and supermarket chain, said the business was throwing everything at the issues to make sure christmas won't be disrupted. we have raised wages for hgv drivers and we are beginning to see the results of that. we are hiring 7,000 seasonal workers, that is 2,000 up on last year. we are providing free food and drink to partners and seasonal workers and we are chartering additional
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space in ships over your christmas trees and those toys and the fantastic products, arrives in the uk on time. a british woman found guilty of lying about being raped in cyprus has began the appeal against her conviction. the woman was found guilty of "public mischief" and given a four—month sentence, suspended for three years, after recanting a claim she'd been attacked by a group of israeli men. her lawyers say that statement was inadmissable. anna holligan reports. singing. their message was clear — gathered outside the supreme court, they came to show faith, solidarity and support, which they believe the british teenager was denied by the cypriotjustice system. inside, her legal team presented
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these two key arguments. the retraction statement, which was taken after over six hours in custody, with no lawyer, from the young lady who was suffering with ptsd, should never have been admitted. into those proceedings. we also argued that the trialjudge misapplied the burden and standard of proof, in that he started from a position of saying the rape didn't take place, and refused to hear evidence which showed that it did. cypriot police have denied any wrong doing. this young woman's story reverberated around the world. a british tourist taking time out before university, who went to police for help after she had allegedly been raped by up to 12 young men at this hotel, ended up being accused of lying and ultimately convicted for public mischief. or wasting police time, after she retracted the original gang rape allegation. she wasn't here at court, she is at home concentrating
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on securing her degree. her lawyer said this experience has been deeply harrowing, humiliating, and personally intrusive, and yet she had risen above it with grit and determination, and courageousley resolved to continue to fight this case to the end, where she believes justice will be done. these women believe she was a victim of a broken justice system, and that her experience could deter other victims from coming forward. our wish is that her conviction is overturned, that is why we are here today, demanding that this conviction is overturned and she will be able to put the pieces of her life back together and fully recover. the verdict is due within six months. if the appeal here in cyprus fails, her lawyers plan to take her battle to clear her name to the european court of human rights. anna holligan, bbc news.
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news uk, the publisher of the sun and the times, will launch a new channel called talktv early next year. the channel's bosses say it will feature news, entertainment and sports programming and will be available for free across britain. the launch comes after gb news began broadcasting earlier this year. former good morning britain presenter piers morgan will be joining the channel in their primetime slot. with me now is our media and arts correspondent david sillito. another channel, there was a time when we were told tv was not the future? . when we were told tv was not the future? , , ., ., ., ., when we were told tv was not the future? , i. ., ., ., , ., future? yes, you have got to try and kee u- future? yes, you have got to try and keep up with — future? yes, you have got to try and keep up with all _ future? yes, you have got to try and keep up with all the _ future? yes, you have got to try and keep up with all the changes - future? yes, you have got to try and keep up with all the changes that i keep up with all the changes that are happening at the moment because it was only back in april of this year that rupert murdoch's news corp said they did not think there was a business plan to launch a new news channel in the united kingdom. since
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then, gb news has launched, it has had a few ups and downs, technical problems, a slight slide in its audience, losing its lead presenter and chairman, and renewal only this week. so there have been all sorts of ups and downs with gb news and it appears that behind—the—scenes, rupert murdoch has been watching the uk market and decided yes, there probably is a place for a channel which will be on free view and streaming as well but you've also got to remember pearce morgan's new programme will be shown on america, fox nation's streaming service and in australia so there is a chance they may get revenue from notjust inside the united kingdom. but certainly a feeling that there is space in the market for a different type of news. tt space in the market for a different type of news-— type of news. if you have got the mone to type of news. if you have got the money to fund — type of news. if you have got the money to fund it, _ type of news. if you have got the money to fund it, which - type of news. if you have got the money to fund it, which mr- type of news. if you have got the i money to fund it, which mr murdoch clearly has. tie
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money to fund it, which mr murdoch clearl has. . . money to fund it, which mr murdoch clearl has. ., , ., money to fund it, which mr murdoch clearly has-— clearly has. he has a track record of making — clearly has. he has a track record of making big _ clearly has. he has a track record of making big bets. _ clearly has. he has a track record of making big bets. if— clearly has. he has a track record of making big bets. if you - clearly has. he has a track record of making big bets. if you look i clearly has. he has a track record of making big bets. if you look at sky news, when he launched it in the late 1980s it was losing money handover fist and then of course became a huge success. it's history of him to make big bets on things but everything has been changing, the news industry has been struggling over recent years and they have been trying to look at how to get more bang for your buck and if you can mix in radio and tv and streaming with newspapers and websites, that may be a more sustainable business model for the future and that is certainly what they are looking at doing here. using people from talk radio, times radio, bringing them together, putting them on screen, trying to make news in 2021. or 2022 when this is launched. ., ., ., make news in 2021. or 2022 when this is launched-— is launched. from our point of view, the competition _ is launched. from our point of view, the competition is _ is launched. from our point of view, the competition is healthy. - is launched. from our point of view, the competition is healthy. thank i the competition is healthy. thank you very much. famous last words.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. most of us have had a lovely day. plenty of sunshine, certainly england, wales. scotland for the most part but northern ireland something of a difference. thicker cloud and patchy rain and overnight night, it will get wetter in northern ireland, rain turning heavier, spreading to parts of scotland, england and wales having a dry night but listen fog patches. particularly southern areas. temperatures mild, 10—14. mist and fog tomorrow taking a while to clear. this western weather front is very slow moving. it will rain for much of the day of northern ireland. western scotland seem persistent rain and some of that rain edging into westernmost areas of england and wales. a lot of dry weather for these areas through the afternoon. not bad with sunshine
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rising to the low 20s. this weekend, quite a lot of dry weather on saturday. sunday, most of us will see outbreaks of rain, quite heavy. that's latest. hello, this is bbc news with martin croxall. the headlines... the covid boosterjab programme is under way, as some health care workers and patients receive their dose. diplomatic fallout as britain, the us, and australia agree a defence pact. the prime minister denies china's claim that it'll the mother of a five—year—old boy wins a high court case against the environment agency over a staffordshire landfill site, accused of emitting noxious gases that risk shortening her son's life. today is the last day that care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine, if they want to keep theirjob. the scottish government has draughted in the military to help ambulance delays, after the average wait
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for an ambulance reached six hours last week. tennis's newest star, emma raducanu, arrives back home in bromley to continue the celebrations of her us open win. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine. you nicked our top story in your head of martin. five days after making tennis history, britains emma raducanu has arrived home. the new us open champion was reunited with her parents after arriving back in south east london. on saturday she became the first british woman in 44 years to win a grand slam singles title — and she's since had a whirlwind week in new york, with appearances on american tv and at the met gala. the new british number one, and world number 23, now says she's ready to get back to training for more grand slam wins. there she is with her father. to football, and four british clubs
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kick off their europa league campaigns this evening. for west ham, it's the first time they've ever played in the group stage campaign of the competition. they begin with an away match against croatian champions dinamo zagreb. kick—off injust over an hour's time. it's a proud moment for club captain mark noble, who's beginning his 18th and final season at the club. it's been 3—4 months of excitement, of looking forward to who we drew in the group stages. we're here now and as the boss said we have a full squad, no injuries, everyone ready to go and play, we have 4—5 new signings that i could say are used to this part of the world, used to this football, so we're well prepared and we're really excited about everything. leicester city are the other english club in action. they host napoli at 8pm, and their manager is expecting a tough match against a side he feels would be at home in the champions league. i believe they are a
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champions league club. got great experience, as you say, james, over these last number of years in the competition. so they arrived in the europa league as one of the few brits to do well in it, so very good side full of experience and quality, but it's such an exciting game for us to start the competition and we are excited by it. here's a check on the british teams in action today. celtic are away at real betis, while rangers host lyon at 8pm. in the new europa conference league, tottenham are away at rennes. the chelsea and england star reece james has appealed to fans to help find his playing medals after they were stolen on tuesday. james was involved in chelsea's game against zenit st petersburg in the champions league when he says thieves broke into home and stole his champions league and super cup winners medals, and his runners up medalfrom euro 2020. in a post on social media, james appealed for help, saying...
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england's women will welcome three of the world's top sides next february for the first staging of a new annual invitational women's tournament. the lionesses will be joined by germany and spain, both also ranked in fifa's top ten, with the fourth competing nation to be announced soon. there'll be three double—header matches played across seven days in a round—robin format. england's women are batting after being put in by new zealand in the first one day international in bristol. it's the first of five matches, and england havejust finished their innings — they were bowled out for 241. the standout performer for the hosts was heather knight — she scored 89. her half century in bristol was the 22nd of her odi career. four—time world champion sebastian vettel and canadian lance stroll, son of the owner, will race for aston martin again next season in an unchanged driver line—up. vettel won four formula one
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championships in a row with red bull between 2010 and 2013. executive chairman lawrence stroll said that he was "delighted to be continuing with such an excellent blend of youthful talent and experienced expertise. " pretty much sums us up, back to you. it does indeed, thank you. energy prices have soared after a key electricity between britain and france was shut down. national grid said a fire means the cable will be totally offline until the end of next week, as wholesale electricity prices jumped by 19% in response. joining me now is kristina rabecaite, energy market expert and ceo of the renewable energy price comparison site, papaya. why are we being so affected by this cable fire? 50 t why are we being so affected by this cable fire? ,, ., cable fire? so i guess we need to look at what _ cable fire? so i guess we need to look at what happened _ cable fire? so i guess we need to look at what happened in - cable fire? so i guess we need toj look at what happened in the last
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few months. so if we look at what happened with the wind for example — in the last few months, it's been generating very little compared to normal average expected generation. and on top of that, we had to make up and on top of that, we had to make up for it by reporting a lot of foreign gas —— importing. so this disasterjust foreign gas —— importing. so this disaster just stocked foreign gas —— importing. so this disasterjust stocked up what foreign gas —— importing. so this disaster just stocked up what was already going in the wrong direction. already going in the wrong direction-— already going in the wrong direction. ., . ., ., ., direction. how much of our power to be let direction. how much of our power to be get from — direction. how much of our power to be get from france? _ direction. how much of our power to be get from france? we _ direction. how much of our power to be get from france? we import i direction. how much of our power to i be get from france? we import around 7.5% each be get from france? we import around 15% each year — be get from france? we import around 15% each year of _ be get from france? we import around 7.596 each year of france's _ be get from france? we import around 7.596 each year of france's nuclear- 7.5% each year of france's nuclear power, which is a significant amount to help keep the lights on in the country. to help keep the lights on in the count . �* . to help keep the lights on in the count . . ., ., ., , , country. and we are already seeing increased demand, _ country. and we are already seeing increased demand, aren't - country. and we are already seeing increased demand, aren't we? if i increased demand, aren't we? if things are starting to get back to normal, more power is required? absolutely, in fact, we are seeing more demand nowjust because all the companies that have been in lockdown are trying to make up for the lost production. so actually, we are
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ramping up and demand is increasing, whilst the supply has completely reduced to nothing, especially internally. therefore we are starting to rely on a lot of european and foreign gases to support this country, which becomes a very, very expensive to do. we had inflation figures _ a very, very expensive to do. we had inflation figures out _ a very, very expensive to do. we had inflation figures out yesterday, i inflation figures out yesterday, 3.2%, which is higher than it's been for a while — what is the trend looking like when it comes to the cost of power? 50 looking like when it comes to the cost of power?— cost of power? so as you know, the 've cost of power? so as you know, they've increased _ cost of power? so as you know, they've increased in _ cost of power? so as you know, they've increased in the - cost of power? so as you know, they've increased in the cap i they've increased in the cap starting from the 1st of october. but the cap is still not quite high enough to make up for the losses that the utilities are having right now. and we've seen some of the smaller utilities are starting to fold, which is devastating. if we don't solve the situation soon and
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the prices don't start to come down, i don't see how they can keep this cap where it is now and not increase it in april. cap where it is now and not increase it in aril. ., ., ., ,, it in april. how then do we address what seems _ it in april. how then do we address what seems like _ it in april. how then do we address what seems like ever— it in april. how then do we address what seems like ever rising - it in april. how then do we address what seems like ever rising costs i it in april. how then do we address| what seems like ever rising costs of power? t what seems like ever rising costs of ower? ~ . . . power? i think the answer is renewables. _ power? i think the answer is renewables. unfortunately, | power? i think the answer is i renewables. unfortunately, wind power? i think the answer is - renewables. unfortunately, wind has been really low, so we've really seen them hit hard this summer. but hopefully with wind coming back online — starting to generate more, we could start to see those prices reduced again. but we need to continue to build a renewables, introduced technologies to manage it, but more lithium—ion battery is to manage the intermittency, and invest heavily in hydrogen, which will be the answer going forward. thank you very much forjoining us.
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thanks. poor—quality housing is causing thousands of deaths every year in england, according to a new report from the centre for ageing better. the charity says a focus on building new houses has led to millions of homes falling below decent living standards. michael buchanan reports. frustrated at his housing association's refusal to repair his flat, this man showed its condition on social media. i was horrified, embarrassed. the family had been complaining for months about the various problems, even as his father lay dying of cancer. he had nurses coming in and feeding through a tube through his stomach in a place that was infected with cockroaches, mice, rodents, asbestos everywhere. it's just beyond words. it made a bad experience much worse. he shamed the housing association clarion into renovating his home, but that is not enough for the 22—year—old student. inundated by other clarion residents with similar problems, he is on a mission to improve every dilapidated home owned
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by the housing association. these people are living in environments that go completely and break every single health and safety standard going, and still they're being ignored. i don't know — at that point i'm thinking, what are they waiting for? is it someone to die in these properties until something is done? i told them! today's report says poor quality housing is killing people. i told them! trips and falls, respiratory diseases and homes that cannot be heated properly. england, they say, has some of europe's most dilapidated housing stock. we absolutely need new homes to be built. even if we get to 250,000 homes a year it's dwarfed by the 24 million homes we already have. 80% of the homes we will be living in in 30 years' time we already have, and they are already, many of them, poor quality.
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you are also the chairman of clarion housing association, as well. what has gone wrong? we have been publicly shamed. the homes that have been featured are part of a major regeneration project and, because we have been focusing on the regeneration, we've been less concerned about the quality of the homes on a day—to—day basis. and we got that wrong and have taken huge steps to change it. most poor housing is owner—occupied, and the report praises an innovative scheme that provides low—cost loans to those who cannot afford repairs. we work with a lot of people who are asset rich and cash poor so we can make the payments over a longer timescale so we're not giving anything away, people are borrowing the money and paying it back. repairing england's four million poor—quality homes plays a crucial part in solving the country's housing shortage. michael buchanan, bbc news. the scottish government has requested military assistance to help deal with a crisis in the scottish ambulance service.
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the situation was brought to light at first minister's questions, when the leader of the conservatives, douglas ross, highlighted the case of a man reported to have waited 40 hours for an ambulance. our scotland reporterjames shaw, told me more about what had happened to the man involved. this is gerald brown, 65 years old who waited 40 hours for an ambulance in glasgow. by the time it arrived, he had already died, and his son says he was told by his gp that if the ambulance had arrived in time, his father would have survived. that was the headline case brought up by the conservatives and the scottish parliament at first minister's questions today as an indication of how bad things are — and in fact, douglas ross, the leader of the conservatives, brought up what you have to call a crisis in the scottish ambulance service
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last week when he pointed out that the average waiting time for an ambulance was six hours. of course, there is enormous variation in that average of six hours, some even longer and some very much shorter when they are extremely critical cases. but he said it was a crisis, he asked nicola sturgeon, the first minister, to respond to that, and part of her answer included additional measures to help the ambulance service, and that includes calling on the mod to provide support. she said after that session in the parliament, she would be going straight back to her office and finalising the details of that request. it is worth bearing in mind that similar things have happened in different parts of england, where the military has been called in over the course of the summer to support ambulance services. but, as nicola sturgeon herself pointed out, it looks now as if this is going to be very challenging winter season — notjust for the ambulance service but for the whole of the nhs in scotland, possibly the most challenging winter it's experienced since its founding after the second world war.
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the ministry of defence is considering a request to send up to 100 armed services medics to northern ireland to help deal with the covid pandemic. they could be deployed between belfast city hospital and the ulster hospital during october. it is understood a decision will be made next week. four amateur astronauts have blasted off from florida in the first—ever space mission for civilians. the group, led by us billionaire jared isaacman, will spend three days orbiting the earth. here's our science correspondent pallab ghosh. a night—time launch by the private company spacex. just like nasa, but with more audience participation. chanting: three, two, one! ignition, we have lift off. on board, one billionaire and three ordinary american citizens. we're through the period of maximum dynamic pressure. looks like a smooth
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ride for the crew. the powerful engines accelerate them into earth orbit. 3gs acceleration, everything continues to look nominal. and now one of the riskiest parts of the launch. cheering the separation of the first stage of the rocket. the inspiration4 crew had six months of intensive training with spacex but on—board computer systems will be in control as zero gravity kicks in. and it looks like it is a little golden retriever. the flight was funded by billionaire jared isaacman and he gave the three remaining seats to people who had inspirational stories. they include hayley arceneaux, who had cancer as a child. i'm definitely excited i to represent those that aren't physically perfect. | i want to bring this experience back| and share with everyone i encounter and just what this represents i
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for the new age in space travel and who can be an astronaut. the capsule has been fitted with a larger than normal window so the crew can enjoy spectacular views from space before coming back down to earth in three days' time. pallab ghosh, bbc news. and letters to his brother, theo, and his friend. the museum says it offers an insight into van gogh's working process at the time. let's talk now to teio meedendorp, who is a senior researcher at the van gogh museum in amsterdam. thank you very much forjoining us.
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how important discovery is this? it's always a wonderful thing if you can find something new, and it doesn't happen very often. since 1970, the last resume of van gogh's work was published, but there's been many added. whenever there is a new one, it's not very often but we are very glad. one, it's not very often but we are ve lad. ., one, it's not very often but we are very glad-— very glad. how do you know it's genuine? _ very glad. how do you know it's genuine? usually _ very glad. how do you know it's genuine? usually it's _ very glad. how do you know it's genuine? usually it's the i very glad. how do you know it's genuine? usually it's the sum i very glad. how do you know it's| genuine? usually it's the sum of lookin: at genuine? usually it's the sum of looking at files _ genuine? usually it's the sum of looking at files and _ genuine? usually it's the sum of looking at files and materials. i genuine? usually it's the sum of. looking at files and materials. this time it was easy because we had quite a lot of comparative material, the materials van gogh used himself as a drawing medium, it's a very thick, sturdy watercolour paper which is familiar from that period. it even has the same watermark on some of the other drawings. the most typical is the way the drawing was made, the style. and he was not very
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refined draught women, but he was a very aggressive draughtsman who could make beautiful drawings. this is a preliminary _ could make beautiful drawings. this is a preliminary study, so it's an image that's familiar to a lot of people? th image that's familiar to a lot of eo - le? . image that's familiar to a lot of eo . le? ., ., , , image that's familiar to a lot of --eole? ., , �*, people? in a way it is, indeed, it's a study for— people? in a way it is, indeed, it's a study for the _ people? in a way it is, indeed, it's a study for the drawing _ people? in a way it is, indeed, it's a study for the drawing "worn i people? in a way it is, indeed, it's. a study for the drawing "worn out". he had been working on this drawing for1—2 he had been working on this drawing for 1—2 days, but there was only one drawing that we had. so he describes himself that he's trying out some things — with this new drawing we have in our galleries next to each other, it's a wonderful sight, everyone can look for themselves how it slightly changed from one subject to the next. it slightly changed from one sub'ect to the next. ~ ., ., , ., it slightly changed from one sub'ect to the next.— to the next. what have you learnt about his technique, _ to the next. what have you learnt about his technique, his - to the next. what have you learnt about his technique, his process i about his technique, his process that you didn't know before because you have this drawing in front of you? you have this drawing in front of ou? �* . you have this drawing in front of ou? �* , ., , you have this drawing in front of ou? �*, ., you? it's the same as what we already knew, _ you? it's the same as what we already knew, and _ you? it's the same as what we already knew, and in - you? it's the same as what we already knew, and in that i you? it's the same as what we i already knew, and in that respect, in coincides with what we knew about
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van gogh. what gives it a new insight is that it's so very close to the other drawings, and you can follow the process — white was the unhappy with the original and why did he decide to make a new one? in the end, what he wanted to do was make a little graph after the drawing so he could present himself to the outside world as an artist, not through one drawing but a lithograph, as well. you can follow that up very well by seeing them next to each other. t that up very well by seeing them next to each other.— next to each other. i believe it is owned privately, _ next to each other. i believe it is owned privately, but _ next to each other. i believe it is owned privately, but people i next to each other. i believe it is owned privately, but people will| next to each other. i believe it is i owned privately, but people will be able to see it on show? tt is owned privately, but people will be able to see it on show?— able to see it on show? it is indeed owned privately, _ able to see it on show? it is indeed owned privately, it's _ able to see it on show? it is indeed owned privately, it's owned - able to see it on show? it is indeed owned privately, it's owned by i owned privately, it's owned by the same family in the netherlands for well over 100 years, and we now have on loan and we can show an hour art galleries, and it will go back to the family after the 2nd of january. a few months to gaze on it. thank you very much indeed for talking to
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us today. you very much indeed for talking to us toda . . ~ you very much indeed for talking to us toda . ., ,, i. after decades of decline for british butterflies, there may soon be good news on the horizon, thanks to a new — if a little unorthodox — project in bedfordshire. the "banking on butterflies" initiative helps create special environments to act as a buffer against climate change. richard westcott has been to visit. yes, they look a bit random. but these huge, muddy, e—shaped banks are a scientific experiment. the first of its kind in the world. as they get covered in plants, they'll attract butterflies. you see here that that the sun is on the southern—facing side. we've got a shady aspect on the north. butterflies warm up in the sun in the morning and then if it gets too hot for them, they can shelter in the shade. with climate change, things getting warmer, it's really affecting the butterflies, is it, already? yes, exactly. so lots of butterflies are moving northwards to track the temperatures that they need. but many species can't move northwards so we need to be looking at how we can create habitat and create these changes
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in topography on our nature reserve and in the wider landscape. some butterfly species are very sensitive to changes in temperature. by catching... i said by catching. yeah, keep going. some classy net work there, did you get it? i did, i did, it's a meadow brown. by catching and then taking the body temperature of different species with a small probe, researchers can monitor how they're coping with climate change. we've looked at this and found that species that are good at keeping their body temperatures stable have better long—term population trends in the uk, and species that are less good at it have got more negative trends, they are declining more rapidly. and so what we are interested in here is whether these banks can help butterflies cope with those changes. so providing north—facing slopes that might be a little bit cooler and south—facing slopes that might be a little bit warmer, does that help butterflies that struggle with temperature control to adjust their body temperature in response to changes? the real science starts next spring.
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but there were still a few stragglers left this year. small white. you see that lovely yellow underwing. so the really interesting thing about the white butterflies is that they're the ones that really stand out with the best ability to control their own body temperature. and we think that that is probably to do with their colour. they're not difficult to catch in open air. this is a really interesting one. this is a small heath, which is one of our most widespread butterflies, found across the uk but also one of our fastest declining. and we don't really know why, we haven't got to the bottom of it. and itjust got caught in a spider's web. oh, no! two thirds of butterfly species are in decline. they are pollinators and play a key role in our environment. this makes the point perfectly, really, doesn't it, why we are interested in butterflies. it's not just about the butterflies, but they are an important part of the food chain and other things eat them.
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therefore, if we know the butterflies are doing well, we know they are supporting the rest of the ecosystem. as the weather gets warmer and some butterflies struggle... where did it go? i can see it, it's going to go over that fence. scientists hope their new experiment will help more survive. it's gone. richard westcott, bbc news, bedfordshire. with millions of visitors each year, national parks are among the most popular tourist destinations in the uk. but competition to be awarded the special status of national park can be fierce, because of the investment that comes with the title. now, campaigners behind one unsuccessful bid — the south pennines — say a new system of recognition is needed. judy hobson reports. in the hills above burnley, it's obvious to see why this area was once in the running to become a national park. this rich landscape is steeped in cultural and industrial heritage. but what the south pennines doesn't have is a brand.
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above us is burnley, pendle hill. sweeping across you've got the yorkshire dales in the background. helen noble is on a mission to change that. she wants the south pennines to be recognised as a national landscape which she believes will help protect it. it would certainly give everyone a sense of place, somewhere that's well known. but for us, it's very much bringing that investment into the area. this deserves being looked after. it deserves that investment and for us, the community and the landscape has great diversity and we think that should be celebrated. the south pennines park covers 460 square miles, cutting across greater manchester, lancashire and yorkshire, and its home to 450,000 people. why notjust have this area designated a national park? very simply, we don't want to be bound by the legislation that might bring us. what we want is a park that's agile, that can adapt to the challenges
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that it faces, and we think that this new approach, doing things differently, will help us to achieve that. this is a local landmark, the singing ringing tree. walkers here told us why they think the area is so special. it's just stunning, everywhere you look you've got magnificent views. it's like everything, the amount of money that you can spend on it, the better it's going to be. i it's just a really lovely placel to walk, just look at the view. where else would you go? it's on your doorstep. it's that sense of place, the stunning uplands that we are currently at, but also that intermixed with the urban areas and the mill towns and the wonderful people that live here. many local councils and businesses are behind the campaign, which aims to protect this landscape for everyone to enjoy.
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judy hobson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. most of us have had a fine afternoon, that's the way things are looking across england and wales, and to a degree much of scotland, as well. this was one of our recent weather watcher photos showing the sunny skies here, a beautiful reflection here in the lake. but it's not been like that kind of weather everywhere. in northern ireland, we've already started to see some rain, this is newton abby and interim — you can see the cloud thickening across northern ireland, rain has already begun to arrive, that rain bearing cloud is also associated with this area of low pressure to our west, and these are weather fronts bringing pressure to our west, and these are weatherfronts bringing rain, more of that to come as well. overnight tonight, rain will move from northern ireland into scotland. england and wales largely a dry night with clear spells, however there will be some mist and fog patches particularly across the
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southern areas. a mild night, 10-14 c. this southern areas. a mild night, 10—14 c. this weather front out west will be a particularly slow moving one, meaning you'll have rain for much of the day in northern ireland, i'm afraid, during friday. some of the rain not with us for along the date, but some pretty heavy bursts. eventually we will see some of that rain infringing upon local areas, but central and eastern england and eastern scotland to the afternoon should have a lot of dry weather. a bit more cloud than we've seen, but still temperatures in the low 20s in the september son, that'll feel pretty pleasant if you are out and about. that with the front is still on the charts for saturday, it's this type of cloud you can see stretching from scotland down toward south england or so. there will be a few patches of rain left on that, but not a great deal. the best of any sunshine will be across southern and eastern areas with temperatures in the low 20s. but not all weather fronts go through saturday afternoon. what happens later on as we will start to see that front
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spring back to life, and the reason for that is down to the atlanticjet stream. this trough will be getting closer and closer — and what that does is it forces the air to rise upwards through the atmosphere, and that will reinvigorate our front. here it goes, saturday night, the rain burst out of nowhere into scotland, and some of the rain will be pretty heavy at times too. through the second half of the weekend, that rain will very gradually pushed its way eastwards. again, some of the rain could be heavy with a bit of thunder mixed in, getting perhaps brighterfor northern ireland, maybe on the western fringes of england and wales. some changes over the way, all due to that very slow moving weather front. all due to that very slow moving weatherfront. that's all due to that very slow moving weather front. that's your latest.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the covid boosterjab programme is underway — as some healthcare workers and patients receive their dose. today marks the last day care home staff in england can get their first covid vaccine — if they want to keep theirjob. we'll hear from one woman who's decided she'd rather quit diplomatic fallout, as china, france and the eu criticise the defence pact agreed by britain, the us and australia the scottish government drafts in the military to help with ambulance delays — after the average wait for an ambulance reached six hours last week. and tennis superstar — emma raducanu — arrives back home in bromley to continue the celebrations of her us open win.

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