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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 18, 2021 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc news — i'm lewis vaughanjones — with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world... the us military admits one of its drone strikes in afghanistan killed ten innocent civilians — including seven children. we now assess that it is unlikely that the vehicle and those who died were associated with isis k or where a direct with isis k or where a to us forces. england eases restrictions for international travel — scrapping the need for expensive covid tests for fully—vaccinated travellers arriving from abroad. after australia, the us and britain agree a new security partnership — france recalls its ambassadors, to washington and canberra. and — tennis�*s teenage sensation returns home from the us open — to re—watch her victory with her mum and dad.
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last night, i actuallyjust re—watched the final and tried to relive a couple of the moments and remember how it felt. so, it is sinking in a little bit more. hello and welcome. the us military says it mistakenly killed ten afghan civilians in a drone strike in kabul last month. seven of the dead were children. this is a major reversal of the pentagon's position — at the time, us officials had said the strike was justified and righteous, because it prevented militants from using a car bomb to attack the airport. here's the commander of the us central and general ken mackenzie. good afternoon. i'm here to brief the results of the investigation i directed following the report
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of civilian casualties from our strike in kabul on 29 august. having thoroughly reviewed the findings of the investigation and the supporting analysis by interagency partners, i am now convinced that as many as ten civilians, including up to seven children, were tragically killed in that strike. moreover, we now assess that it is unlikely that the vehicle and those who died were associated with isis—k, or were a direct threat to us forces. i offer my profound condolences to family and friends of those who were killed. this strike was taken in the earnest belief that it would prevent an imminent threat to our forces and the evacuees at the airport. but it was a mistake, and i offer my sincere apologies. as the combatant commander, i am fully responsible for this strike and its tragic outcome our correspondent secunder kermani saw the aftermath of the drone strike in kabul. we were at the scene the morning after the strike,
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and it was a really terrible thing to see. family members combing through the wreckage, trying to find body parts of their loved ones that they could bury. they were, of course, utterly distraught, and also furious at the accusation they had anything to do with isis. in fact, a number of the family members who were killed had worked with american aid organisations, american troops, even, in afghanistan. the family had in fact been hoping to be relocated as part of the evacuation scheme to the us. now we know, and it's confirmed that the intelligence was wrong, of course. this is an incredibly grim end to a — largely bringing an end to american military involvement in afghanistan. one key thing to remember is that we know more about this strike because it took place in kabul. so many others in the past happened in more rural areas, much more difficult to get accurate information about them. and also, i think it's a reminder of how difficult these over the horizon counterterrorism strikes will be for us officials
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to carry out in the future. they've said that will be their biggest weapon in targeting groups like al-qaeda or isis in the future. afterfour weeks in power, the taliban have recast the ministry of women's affairs as a new department to enforce strict islamic moral law. the building in kabul now bears a sign saying: ministry for the propagation of virtue and prevention of vice. it came as videos posted on social media showed a group of women employees outside the ministry building, urging the taliban to allow them to return to work. our reporter sodaba haidare explained the role of the ministry during the first taliban regime. so, they are in so, they are in char-e so, they are in char-e of so, they are in charge of morality crimes, what they call morality crimes, what they call morality crimes. in the 90s, during the taliban regime, they had imposed harsh restrictions on people, and they had police that would died on the streets
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on patrols and monitor people's behaviours and their dress codes. the restriction on women included managing their clothes, and if they showed even as little as their ankle, they would get a public whipping in front of everybody in the marketplace on the streets. they had also been things like music dancing, playing chess, flying kites, but they were in charge of my serious crimes like public executions and floggings as well. this was abolished. this ministry was abolished in 2001 after the us invasion of afghanistan, but it has made a comeback and has terrified so many people who remember those harsh punishments. they have appointed someone to lead this ministry. he is not very well known, but he seems to be a very religious person. they haven't laid out guidelines in terms of what this new ministry would mean for people in afghanistan, and that is something that we have to wait and see, but they have indicated that it wouldn't be as harsh as it was during the first regime in the 90s.
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breaking news that's reaching us here at the bbc in london. the former president of algeria has died after a long illness. he was 84, he led the north african country for nearly two decades, but the ailing president's decision in 2019 to seek a fifth term in office led to massive street protests, so thatis to massive street protests, so that is the former president of algeria who has died after a long illness. he was 84 years old. here, the uk the government has announced major changes to rules for international travellers. among them is a simplified designation system defining countries as either �*open�* or on the red list, and a relaxation of the requirement for covid tests for people arriving in england. 0ur transport correspondent
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caroline davis reports. travel has meant testing. across the country, centres like these have popped up to swab passengers, but things are about to change. throughout the summer, the travel industry and the government have disagreed about the use of these, pcr tests, for all travellers when they arrive in the uk. the government has always argued this is necessary to be able to identify variants of concern, but the travel industry say it is a barrier and too expensive. before the end of october, if you are double—jabbed, pcr tests are going to be replaced by the cheaper lateral flow tests. if you test positive, you will need to have a pcr test and isolate at home. it's a relief for hotels, who have struggled as families have stayed away because of the added cost. the uk market has dropped between 50—70% depending on the travelling month, especially for families hard hit by the restrictions implemented and the traffic light system, which obviously every three weeks is sort of like, yeah, a surprise, what is going to happen.
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so we definitely believe this change is going to boost sales massively. it's not the only change. from the 4th of october, fully vaccinated travellers will also no longer need to take a pre—departure lateral flow test before they travel. under 18s will also avoid this test. if you are not double—jabbed, it's a very different story. you will need to take a test before you travel and self—isolate at home for ten days after every international trip, as well as pay for pcr tests. for the industry, this change can't come soon enough. very pleased with the announcement, just what we wanted to hear. i think the government has been listening to the industry. we have been interacting with them for some time. it's a great piece of news for us. it will give our customers the end of summer they deserve, abroad in the sun. so, yes, we welcome the announcement. but not everyone in the scientific community agrees that pcr tests should be removed. i would like to see pcr tests remain because they have given us so much information already
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from the sequencing. so we know when delta was introduced into the uk, when the delta variant came in, that this virus was imported over 500 times, and we wouldn't have the information if we weren't doing the screening and sequencing associated with that. after months of insisting pcr tests were needed, why has the government changed its mind now? the judgment of the scientists, of the experts, was that it would have been too soon without having the numbers of people vaccinated, not just at home where of course we had this very fast vaccination programme, but critically, abroad as well, at a level whereby, you know, we can now say with a lot of confidence, not only are nine out of ten adults vaccinated here but abroad also, they have caught up with the very high numbers that we saw earlier. and for those with loved ones in some red list countries, there was good news. this man has not seen his family in pakistan for more than three years.
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we are very relaxed and we are happy to see our family, our friends, people who move around easily. friends, people who move around easil . , , easily. the summer may be d in: easily. the summer may be drying to — easily. the summer may be drying to a _ easily. the summer may be drying to a close, _ easily. the summer may be drying to a close, but - easily. the summer may be. drying to a close, but today's announcement has given the industry some help. for now, they are enjoying this moment in the sun. caroline davis there. france is recalling its ambassadors to the us and australia for consultations, according to the french foreign minister. the decision comes two days after australia cancelled a submarine deal with france in favour of a new indo—pacific alliance with the uk and the us. under the new agreement — dubbed aukus — the united states and britain will provide australia with the technology and capability to deploy nuclear—powered submarines. the bbc�*s north america editorjon sopel says the move is unprecedented: never in the history of the us—french relationship has france recalled its ambassador from washington.
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this is what you do with countries that you don't have close relations with. france has a very close relationship historically with the united states of america — and that shows the level of fury that there is in paris over this decision. and part of it is economic — france is going to lose $60 billion worth of sales to the australians in these diesel powered submarines as a result of this deal — but also the fact that this was all done behind france's back, and it was only moments before the announcement that the french learnt about it. and i think that the french are absolutely seething. two men have appeared in court charged with the murder of the journalist lyra mckee in londonderry. she was shot dead by a gunman from the dissident republican group the new ira in april 2019. here's our ireland correspondent emma vardy. lyra mckee's death had a huge impact in northern ireland.
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she was a gay rights that lgbt activist. in the community we have eight saying that it gets better. ——in the community we have a saying that it gets better. she had been stood near police in derry�*s to hse estate, as rioters threw petrol bombs at officers. a gunman from the new dissident group, the new ira, fired up to ten times at police, and she was killed. today two men from dairy appeared via video link in the magistrate court charged with murder. prosecution said the 33—year—old peter gearoid cavanagh escorted the gunman and jordan devine, 21, it is claimed encouraged him, punching the air as the shots were fired. the two men are also charged with possession of a gun and rioting. both are said to be said to be linked to the dissident group claimed by police to be the new ira, described in court by the judge today as having
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a mindless ideology. the defence said the evidence against the men was weak and they were released on bail. police believe the dissident group the new ira still pose a threat in northern ireland, especially to the communities they live in. the memory of lyra mckee's death continues to evoke strong emotions here. those in court today accused of her murder have not yet entered a plea and they will appear again next month. emma vardy, bbc news, derry. let's bring you some breaking news now this news comes from california. ajudge in america has ruled that lawyers —— they had found him guilty of murdering his best friend susan berman in the year 2000. the first homicide conviction for a man of suspected killing three people in three states over the past 39 years. the suspect is 78 and faces a up to life in
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prison, and he was described by prosecutors as a narcissistic psychopath. we will bring you more details on that a little later. ajudge in america has ruled that lawyers for virginia giuffre, the woman who's accused prince andrew of sexual assault, will be able to serve legal papers, on his representative in the us after a week of confusion and wrangling over whether the prince had been formally notificed of the civil claim against him. 0ur royal correspondent jonny dymond has more details. 0n on monday, the last one had in the air cover whether those papers have been properly served. 0n papers have been properly served. on wednesday, the high court here is that it would assess the layers, the woman who made those allegations that are denied. he will insist —— assist those layers.
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——on wednesday, the high court here said it would assist lawyers for virginia giuffre, the woman who made those allegations against the prince, allegations that prince denies, it would assist lawyers in serving those papers. and now, thejudge in new york has said, as you say, the papers can be served on the prince's us lawyer, the man who spoke on monday. that means that this case will almost certainly now go ahead. that lawyer says that a deal struck by virginia giuffre in 2009 withjeffrey epstein, one—time friend of the prince, convicted paedophile, that that deal would make any court case against prince andrew null and void. but that deal is secret and sealed, and only when the case proceeds might it be opened. stay with us on bbc news, still to come:. fake pharmaceutical drugs. a special report on the international operation to get them off the streets. 30 hours after the earthquakethat devastated mexico city, rescue teams still have no idea just how many people have died. well, there's people alive, and there's people not alive. we're just helping and giving them whatever we've got. a state funeral has been held
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for princess grace of monacol at the church where she married prince rainier 26 years ago. - it looked as though they had come to fight a war, but their mission is to bring peace to east timor — and nowhere on earth needs it more badly. the government's case is being forcefully presented by the justice minister. he's campaigned vigorously for abolition, having once witnessed one of his clients being executed. elizabeth seton spent much of her time at this grotto — and every year, hundreds of pilgrimages are made here. now that she's become a saint, it's expected that this area will be inundated with tourists. the mayor and local businessmen regard the anticipated boom as yet another blessing of saint elizabeth. this is bbc news — the latest headlines... the us military admits a drone strike in afghanistan last month against a suspected car bomber killled ten
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innocent civilians — including seven children. england eases restrictions for international travel — scrapping the need for expensive covid tests for fully—vaccinated travellers arriving from abroad. in west africa, the trade in illegal, fake pharmaceutical drugs — which can pose a real danger to public health — has been a problem for a long time. but now, the independent intergovernmental body, the world customs 0rganisation, is leading a global operation with local authorities to crack down on the trade. the bbc was given exclusive access to one operation in benin. hannah gelba rt reports here in west africa, a bbc team is filming customs officers in pursuit of a group of smugglers. they are cracking down on fake medicines and the penalties here are high. the smugglers abandon their vehicles and their stash, any
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medicines or medical device is made or transported here without the right authorisation are automatically classified as steak, and the sacs are full of them. across town to a more fake medicines have been found. this driver was on his way to the main markets. inside his bag are 50 kilos of tramadol, a strong prescription painkiller. he says he knows nothing about it, but back at his house, officers discover more drugs. all the items seized this morning are stored in a warehouse, where they are checked, reported to authorities and then destroyed. we have seized 39 kilos of facemasks and more than six tonnes of illegal pharmaceuticals. smugglers have lots of checks, they removed their backseats to make my space, sometimes they change their licence plates or at bay hide products among fruit and vegetables. the hide products among fruit and vegetables-— hide products among fruit and venetables. ., ~ ., ., ~ vegetables. the market for fake dru . s is
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vegetables. the market for fake drugs is worth — vegetables. the market for fake drugs is worth around _ drugs is worth around 200 billion us dollars worldwide each year. world customs is an international organisation that works with local customs officers to deal with this kind officers to deal with this kind of crime. right now, they are seizing drugs and 145 countries. it's their biggest ever crackdown on counterfeit medicines. ever crackdown on counterfeit medicines-_ medicines. and the pandemic started, medicines. and the pandemic started. we — medicines. and the pandemic started, we received - medicines. and the pandemic started, we received some i started, we received some information regarding the increase of medicines and also medical equipment linked to covid—19, and then he took action to set up the first group operation linked to covid—19. group operation linked to covid-19-_ group operation linked to covid-19. ,, . ., ., covid-19. since the operation bean, covid-19. since the operation began. world _ covid-19. since the operation began, world customs - covid-19. since the operation began, world customs say . covid-19. since the operation i began, world customs say they have seized more than 307 million illegal medical items around the world. 99.5% of all of those were in west and central africa. this area shares borders with four different countries, and for decades, it's been a thorough fare for illegal medicines made in india and china destine for countries like nigeria, but in
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2016, the government changed its approach. this market was once known as benin�*s open air pharmacy, but now there are no medicines for sale on display. leads to cell fake drugs there, but the government seized our medicines, so we had to change our goods. many sellers went bankrupt and had to go back to their villages, bankrupt and had to go back to theirvillages, like bankrupt and had to go back to their villages, like the person who owns this choppy for me. i have heard that a lot of people suffer from have heard that a lot of people sufferfrom kidney failure have heard that a lot of people suffer from kidney failure and benin and we were blamed for it, so overall, i think it's a good fight. it, so overall, i think it's a good fight-— it, so overall, i think it's a good fight. the fight against fake medicines _ good fight. the fight against fake medicines is _ good fight. the fight against fake medicines is ongoing, i good fight. the fight against i fake medicines is ongoing, and with the pandemic, it's been brought to the world's attention. the un says despite all the promises to take action on climate change, the world is still on course to heat up to extremely dangerous levels. its experts have studied the carbon plans of more than 100 countries and concluded that we re still heading in the wrong direction. scientists recently confirmed that to avoid the worst impacts of hotter conditions,
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global emissions need to be cut by 45% by 2030. but this new analysis shows countries are massively off target. 0ur science editor david shukman has more. what happens is every five years, the countries that take part in the so—called paris agreement are meant to update their climate plans, their plans for reducing carbon emissions and send them into the un, so the un's experts have been going throughout these documents, slightly over half of the countries of the world have sent in these plans of bears, but if you add everything up, and he also included the emissions of the countries that have in send dan a carbon reduction plan, what the un calculates is that you will, in effect, a lot of falling emissions which they say is needed, but actually a rise of 16% between now and
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2030. that is literally the opposite of what climate scientists say is needed. i mean, not long ago, last month we were reporting on your programme about the un climate science panel saying that what is really needed to avoid the worst impacts of climate change is to have a 45% reduction, a cut in global emissions by 2030. the science laid out in that report was extremely start and care for all to see. here we have a situation where you have solid everyone is doing for rail in the coming years and you get a rise of the nations. and as you say, the calculation by the un is that that puts the world on course for an increase in temperature of 2.7 celsius by the end of the century. which frankly is territory that climate scientists are scared of. british tennis star emma raducanu has revealed that on herfirst night back
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at home, she watched a replay of the us open final — and says her victory is "gradually sinking in". she's also spoken about how her parents' strict approach helped her become a grand slam champion. natalie pirks reports, and a warning there are flashing images in her report. since she burst onto our screens at wimbledon last summer, life has been a whirlwind for emma raducanu. but now home, she's done the one thing she'd no parties, instead, she did the one thing she hadn't yet managed to do since her astonishing us open win. last night i actually just rewatched the final and tried to relive a couple of the moments and remember how it felt. so it is sinking in a little bit more. it is something difficult to fully comprehend. it was nail—biting stuff, but now with the teenager with nerves of
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steel. i the teenager with nerves of steel. , ., , �* steel. i personally didn't feel any stress. _ steel. i personally didn't feel any stress, it _ steel. i personally didn't feel any stress, it was _ steel. i personally didn't feel any stress, it was just - steel. i personally didn't feel any stress, it wasjust having any stress, it was just having any stress, it was just having a lot of fun out there, and i think that's what helped because i wasn't thinking at all about anything that was out of my control. after the final, it was a really nice moments after winning and leaving the club, that would serve the party buzz going on and there was a lot of music, we were all just singing along.— just singing along. since then, she has not — just singing along. since then, she has not been _ just singing along. since then, she has not been out - just singing along. since then, she has not been out of- just singing along. since then, she has not been out of the i she has not been out of the headlines and let dressed in chenal at the prestigious next gala, hurting the tension has rocketed into her bank account is now £1.8 million better off. but she says she's leaving it to her parents to decide what to her parents to decide what to do with the money and credits than with being where she is now. it's probably tough love, and at the time i'm probably not as grateful as i am in hindsight, but theyjust gave me a hug when i came back, really — nothing crazy, no big celebration. my mum made some really good home—made dumplings, but there was nothing crazy or over—the—top. just some reassurance and saying they're proud of me is enough.
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they are just staying discrete, yeah, i mean, just some reassurance. i yeah, i mean, 'ust some reassurance. i new world ranking _ reassurance. i new world ranking of _ reassurance. i new world ranking of 23 _ reassurance. i new world ranking of 23 has - reassurance. i new worldj ranking of 23 has opened reassurance. i new world i ranking of 23 has opened up a lot of new tournaments for her. she and her team have some planning to do. i she and her team have some planning to do.— planning to do. i think i 'ust really need i planning to do. i think i 'ust really need some i planning to do. i think i 'ust really need some time i planning to do. i think i just really need some time to i planning to do. i think i just l really need some time to rest and recover because it's been very demanding physically, and alsojust emotionally to also just emotionally to withstand seven weeks on the road. �* ~ , ., ., , road. but when wimbledon rolls around, road. but when wimbledon rolls around. by _ road. but when wimbledon rolls around. by we — road. but when wimbledon rolls around, by we need _ road. but when wimbledon rolls around, by we need a _ road. but when wimbledon rolls around, by we need a new- around, by we need a new medicare? i around, by we need a new medicare?— around, by we need a new medicare? i think that one should stay _ medicare? i think that one should stay with _ medicare? i think that one should stay with them. i l medicare? i think that one i should stay with them. i think he is a great inspiration and he's helped me so much, but yeah, i'm obviously looking forward to wimbledon, but it still some time away and i've still some time away and i've still got so much learning to do. . , still got so much learning to do. ., , ., ., , do. learning she will no doubt take in her— do. learning she will no doubt take in her stride. _ huge congratulations to her. right, that is that for me. get in touch with me in social media anytime.
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i'm on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones this has been bbc news. goodbye. hello there. many of us yesterday had a decent day of weather. temperatures reached 22.3 degrees celsius in the warmest spots, but it wasn't like that everywhere. in argyll and bute, cloudy for much of the day with rain and mist and fog patches over the high ground until this happened. late on, as the weather fronts started to clear through, some of the cloud from the front was lit up by the setting sun, and it was a glorious end to the day. there is that weather front on the satellite picture, this stripe of cloud you can see here. the weather fronts associated with this cloud are particularly slow—moving, and they're going to take the whole of the weekend before they reach right the way across to the eastern side of the country. so, this weekend, mixed picture — could be a bit of rain around on saturday, but for many areas, it's a dry day. by sunday, outbreaks of rain become a bit more extensive, heavy and thundery as well for some. so, as i say, a mixed fortune, really.
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for southern and eastern scotland, western areas of england and wales, it's a cloudy start to the day with outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, probably some mist and fog patches mixed in as well. to the east of our weather front, perhaps east wales, but definitely central and eastern england, there'll be a lot of dry weather, sunny spells and warm in that september sunshine — highs up to 23. brighter slice of weather as well for west scotland and northern ireland, but here, a fresher feel to the weather, temperatures 17—19. now, saturday night sees heavy, thundery rain start to break out across wales, moving in across northern england, into scotland as well, so there will be some heavy downpours around. and then, through sunday, this area of heavy and potentially thundery rain will continue to push eastwards and become really slow—moving across parts of central and eastern england. there's a risk of some localised flooding, 30—40 mm possible in one or two areas. in the wettest areas, that's enough to cause some localised surface water flooding. at the same time, the western side of the country will turn brighter and drier and a bit sunnier through
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sunday afternoon. by monday, could still be a little bit of rain left over across east anglia and the far southeast of england, but otherwise, pressure will be building across the country for a time for monday and for tuesday as well, and that means for most of us, we're looking at a fine spell of weather with sunny spells. temperatures into the high teens or even the low 20s. however, it's not going to stay that way because, into the middle part of next week, we're going to see low pressure move in, bringing some heavy rain across the country and some much windier weather on the way as well.
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this is bbc news. the headlines...
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a top american general�*s confirmed one of the last military operations in afghanistan inadvertently killed ten members of an innocent family. the head of us central command said an investigation had found a drone strike killed an aid worker and nine members of his family, seven of them children. the former president of algeria, abdelaziz bouteflika, has died after a long illness. he was 84. abdelaziz bouteflika led the north african country for nearly two decades, but the ailing president's decision in 2019 to seek a fifth term in office led to massive street protests. france is recalling its ambassadors from australia and the united states in what it describes as an exceptional decision. an announcement was made on wednesday that australia would scrap a multi—billion dollar deal to buy french—designed submarines. now on bbc news, the media show.

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