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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 19, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and roger johnson. our headlines today: soaring gas prices lead to concern over food supplies. the government and industry leaders will hold meetings today and tomorrow to tackle the problem. invitations to book covid booster jabs will be sent to more than 1 million people in england in the coming week a capsule carrying the first all—civilian crew into space returns to earth after three days in orbit. liverpool go top of the premier league after victory over crystal palace. this man sadio mane, got his 100th goal for the club to help them stay
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unbeaten this season. a new documentary about the duke of edinburgh reveals his favourite celebrity chefs. we'll get their reaction. we have got some rain in the forecast today, moving east through the course of the day. they could be localised flooding across parts of eastern england in particular, but things will brighten up from the west later on. i'll bring you all the details throughout this morning's legrand. it's sunday the 19th of september. our top story: the impact of soaring wholesale gas prices will be discussed at a series of meetings between the government and industry leaders over the coming days. the increase in the cost of gas has led to warnings of a knock—on effect on food supplies. the business secretary kawsi kwarteng says he will meet with industry figures to plan a way forward. our business correspondent katy austin reports.
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the reasons wholesale gas prices have soared include high demand and lower wind and solar generation. the business secretary held urgent meetings with energy companies yesterday. the high prices have already pushed some smaller suppliers to the wall and there is concern more could follow soon as next week. we are seeinu follow soon as next week. we are seeing the _ follow soon as next week. we are seeing the record-breaking - follow soon as next week. we are seeing the record-breaking price | follow soon as next week. we are i seeing the record-breaking price of seeing the record—breaking price of international gas, but does go through to the market and we have already seen full supply failures in recent weeks, partly as a consequence of that and partly as other futures markets, it consequence of that and partly as otherfutures markets, it is difficult to tell whether they will be anymore. the difficult to tell whether they will be anymore-— be anymore. the rising cost is a worry for— be anymore. the rising cost is a worry for steelmakers, - be anymore. the rising cost is a worry for steelmakers, which i be anymore. the rising cost is a i worry for steelmakers, which need be anymore. the rising cost is a - worry for steelmakers, which need a lot of energy. another effect is a shortage of carbon dioxide. it is a byproduct in fertiliser is produced, and two large uk plants which make it have closed. the owner of one large paltry group which includes bernard matthews called the carbon dioxide is a massive body below. it's use by meat producers, including the packaging process. we
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use including the packaging process. - use c02, it is used to extend shelf life through packaging, notjust in meat but in all things, and in a time when we are struggling because of the haulage shortages, to actually lose shelf life and have a shorter shelf on products going onto shelves is going to cause even more disruption. so this is a really serious problem for us. the rising rice of serious problem for us. the rising price of gas _ serious problem for us. the rising price of gas is _ serious problem for us. the rising price of gas is being _ serious problem for us. the rising price of gas is being felt - serious problem for us. the rising price of gas is being felt by - price of gas is being felt by businesses at the moment, but is likely to feed through to consumers at a time when the cost of living is rising. the business secretary, quasi— kiting, insists britain can meet demand for gas, and the government doesn't expect supply emergencies this winter. —— kwasi kwarteng. he says they will be further meetings with the regulator and industries to try to plan away forward. katy austin, bbc news. more thani million people in england will be sent invitations this week to book their coronavirus boosterjab. nhs england says texts will be received from monday, while letters will be sent to those who are eligible later in the week. duncan kennedy reports. do you want to roll up your sleeve
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for me? , ., ,, for me? the first of the booster “abs for me? the first of the booster jabs went _ for me? the first of the booster jabs went into _ for me? the first of the booster jabs went into arms _ for me? the first of the booster jabs went into arms this - for me? the first of the booster jabs went into arms this week, | for me? the first of the booster- jabs went into arms this week, with frontline health workers among the priority groups. in the coming weeks, invitations will start going out to people in england asking them to book their supplementary injections. it will be another enormous technical challenge. 1.5 million people will be contacted in the first phase through a combination of text messages and letters. foranyone combination of text messages and letters. for anyone aged 50 or over, people living or working into homes for elderly, and frontline health and social care workers. this time the government wants people to wait for their invitations before getting their top up jabs. for their invitations before getting their top upjabs. it for their invitations before getting their top up jabs. it says getting vaccinated will be easier than before because of the opening of the national booking service. the nhs covid vaccination programme has already saved more than 112,000 lives. the organising committee for vaccines says people should receive their booster dose at least six
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months after they had their second coronavirus jab. duncan kennedy, bbc news. the uk's new security agreement with the us and australia will make it safer and could create hundreds of newjobs, the new foreign secretary has said. the pact, known as aukus, will see australia being given the technology to build nuclear—powered submarines. liz truss said it showed the uk's readiness to be "hard—headed" in defending its interests. universities in england must take student views into account when deciding how much to teach online, according to the regulator for higher education. out of nearly 50 institutions contacted by the bbc, just 13 said all teaching would be face—to—face. here's our education editor, branwen jeffreys. universities have been almost empty. 0nly students on some practical courses made it onto campus last year, but within weeks, everyone should be back. almost 50
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universities across the uk have shared their plans. this snapshot shows a return to mainly face—to—face teaching, but many will still hold larger lectures online. in england, where fees are more than £9,000, a warning from the regulator. student views matter. what we will be looking for is the quality of provision, whether or not it is face—to—face or online, but critically, that universities and colleges are taking into account the views of their students stop what they want? what is their feedback? that is in fact intercourse provision over the of next year. vaccination should help the return of student life. they will be pop—up clinics for second jabs in many places, and for those who missed out on student life last year, a chance to refresh byjoining start of term events. brandonjefferies, bbc news. russians are voting on the third and final day of parliamentary elections, with many
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commentators expecting president vladimir putin's united russia party to win. some opposition parties have alleged ballot—rigging and voter intimidation. in the first two days of voting, allegations of electoral fraud were widespread but the head of russia's election commission dismissed the claims. british boxer amir khan has been removed from a flight in the us after a reported row over face coverings. the boxer posted a video on twitter to say he had been taken off the american airlines plane along with a colleague when someone complained his friends mask was not high enough. i was taken off the plane today when i was taken off the plane today when i was taken off the plane today when i was going to training camp to colorado springs, by the police. 0bviously colorado springs, by the police. obviously a complaint was made by american airlines staff, they said that my colleague's mask was not high enough, and not up, that they had to stop the plane and take me and my friend off, when i did nothing wrong. they kicked us both off. in a statement, american airlines said two customers refused to comply
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with repeated crew member requests to stow luggage, place phones in aeroplane mode and adhere to federal face covering requirements. it's not unusual to see large groups of people gathering under the eiffel tower, but this weekend they weren't looking at the iconic landmark. on saturday, a man stunned the crowds as he walked along a rope 70m. above the ground in paris. 0ur correspondent tim allman has the story. sometimes, the only question that needs to be asked is, why? there in the distance, a man walks through midair, suspended on a 600—metre stretch of elasticated webbing. his starting point, one of the most famous places on earth. translation: it was great, it's really beautiful starting. from the eiffel tower. it's a world—renowned place, one that i'm aware of the view from the ground, and discovering it from above, it's really beautiful.
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nathan paulin is a slackliner — a bit like tightrope walking except the rope is looser, bouncier, a sort of long, narrow trampoline. and he doesn'tjust walk — he sits, he lies down, even hangs around for a bit. for the spectators on the ground, it was quite a sight. imagine what it was like for nathan. translation: when i was young, i had vertigo - and i learned to contain it. during the performance, i really didn't feel it. i really didn't have a fear of heights. i felt some stress over starting it, but no vertigo, no. in case you were wondering, he was wearing a safety line, just to be careful. and, after 30 minutes orso, his midair odyssey came to an end. easy.
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as long as you don't look down. i don't like the look of that. terrifying. i had to go on one of those bridges we hold on to decide on holidays, and that was terrifying. on holidays, and that was terrifying-— on holidays, and that was terrifying. on holidays, and that was terri in_ . , terrifying. was it about six foot off the floor? _ terrifying. was it about six foot off the floor? no, _ terrifying. was it about six foot off the floor? no, it _ terrifying. was it about six foot off the floor? no, it was - terrifying. was it about six foot off the floor? no, it was high l terrifying. was it about six foot l off the floor? no, it was high up! it was off the floor? no, it was high up! it was still _ off the floor? no, it was high up! it was still frightening. _ off the floor? no, it was high up! it was still frightening. and - off the floor? no, it was high up! it was still frightening. and i - off the floor? no, it was high up! it was still frightening. and i was| it was still frightening. and i was tired on. he was tied on, anyway. strictly come dancing is officially back, with the launch show revealing the pairs who will be competing for the glitterball trophy. among the pairings this year is former great british bake 0ff winnerjohn whaite, who has been partnered withjohannes radebe, making them the first all—male partnership on the series. and showing our very own dan the steps will be nadiya bychkova. fantastic. it was one of the best 0 eninas fantastic. it was one of the best openings ever- _ fantastic. it was one of the best openings ever. was _ fantastic. it was one of the best openings ever. was it? - fantastic. it was one of the best openings ever. was it? it - fantastic. it was one of the best openings ever. was it? it was i openings ever. was it? it was su erb. openings ever. was it? it was superb- and _ openings ever. was it? it was superb. and down _ openings ever. was it? it was superb. and down is - openings ever. was it? it was superb. and down is looking l openings ever. was it? it was i superb. and down is looking very comfortable, i think. superb. and down is looking very comfortable, ithink. and superb. and down is looking very comfortable, i think. and goodness,
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we are all backing him. it is coming up we are all backing him. it is coming up on 6:11am. some of the biggest names on television will gather in los angeles tonight for the emmy awards, honouring the best tv of the past year. there are high hopes for british talent with the crown, leading the nominations along with the london based football comedy ted lasso earning 20 nominations. 0ur los angeles correspondent sophie long reports. cleaned them both, love them both. i haven't seen ted lasso yet, i have heard great things. it is on my list. afc richmond announced the hiring of the new manager, american football coach ted lasso. you the new manager, american football coach ted lasso.— coach ted lasso. you are now an american — coach ted lasso. you are now an american who — coach ted lasso. you are now an american who is _ coach ted lasso. you are now an american who is in _ coach ted lasso. you are now an american who is in charge i coach ted lasso. you are now an american who is in charge of i coach ted lasso. you are now an american who is in charge of a i american who is in charge of a football— american who is in charge of a football club despite possessing very little knowledge of the game. in a nutshell, scorned woman damaged by divorce hires an american goofball in secret open running a football club which happens to be the only thing her ex—husband truly loves, into the ground. little the only thing her ex-husband truly loves, into the ground.— loves, into the ground. little does she realise — loves, into the ground. little does she realise that _ loves, into the ground. little does she realise that when _ loves, into the ground. little does she realise that when the - loves, into the ground. little does she realise that when the human l she realise that when the human being comes into her life, no matter how hard she tries, he is actually her salvation, how hard she tries, he is actually hersalvation, rather how hard she tries, he is actually her salvation, rather than her scheming. her salvation, rather than her scheming-—
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her salvation, rather than her scheming-_ ifi her salvation, rather than her i scheming._ if he's scheming. george is here. if he's here, scheming. george is here. if he's here. why _ scheming. george is here. if he's here. why isn't — scheming. george is here. if he's here, why isn't he _ scheming. george is here. if he's here, why isn't he here? - scheming. george is here. if he's here, why isn't he here? oh, i scheming. george is here. if he's| here, why isn't he here? oh, yes. good point- _ here, why isn't he here? oh, yes. good point. ted _ here, why isn't he here? oh, yes. good point. ted lasso _ here, why isn't he here? oh, yes. good point. ted lasso is- here, why isn't he here? oh, yes. good point. ted lasso is a - good point. ted lasso is a heartwarming _ good point. ted lasso is a heartwarming comedy i good point. ted lasso is a l heartwarming comedy which good point. ted lasso is a - heartwarming comedy which jokes good point. ted lasso is a _ heartwarming comedy which jokes more heartwarming comedy whichjokes more than the occasional tear, a mixture of a mostly british class with an american can do sensibility that has earned its cast and creators are record—breaking 20 emmy nominations. well, ijust didn't believe it, really, and ifelt a bit, sort of library. and, in that i was very tired, because itjust seemed an awful shock. tired, because itjust seemed an awfulshock. it tired, because itjust seemed an awful shock. it kind of feels like i am glad it didn't come a moment sooner. ~ . , sooner. which some people might find weird, ou sooner. which some people might find weird. you know. _ sooner. which some people might find weird, you know, being _ sooner. which some people might find weird, you know, being in _ sooner. which some people might find weird, you know, being in my - sooner. which some people might find| weird, you know, being in my mid-40s weird, you know, being in my mid—405 you think. _ weird, you know, being in my mid—405 you think. no, — weird, you know, being in my mid—405 you think, no, wouldn't you have loved _ you think, no, wouldn't you have loved it— you think, no, wouldn't you have loved it in— you think, no, wouldn't you have loved it in your 305? but i don't think_ loved it in your 305? but i don't think that — loved it in your 305? but i don't think that i _ loved it in your 305? but i don't think that i would have been able to cope with _ think that i would have been able to cope with the sharp upturn, and i know_ cope with the sharp upturn, and i know i_ cope with the sharp upturn, and i know i certainly wouldn't have been able to _ know i certainly wouldn't have been able to play this character, rebecca whetton, _ able to play this character, rebecca whelton, who has so many different layers _ whelton, who has so many different layers to _ whelton, who has so many different layers to her, so manyjoyous things. — layers to her, so manyjoyous things, but so many up5et5 to overcome _ things, but so many up5et5 to overcome. so, yeah, strangely
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things, but so many upsets to overcome. so, yeah, strangely enough the universe _ overcome. so, yeah, strangely enough the universe knows what it is doing. ithink— the universe knows what it is doing. i think that's — the universe knows what it is doing. i think that's what it's all about, embracing — i think that's what it's all about, embracing change. _ i think that's what it's all about, embracing change.— i think that's what it's all about, embracing change. over two seasons we have watched _ embracing change. over two seasons we have watched characters - embracing change. over two seasons| we have watched characters overcome pain with positivity. in a celebration of the human spirit that doesn't ignore the struggle. so what of season three? i doesn't ignore the struggle. so what of season three?— of season three? i don't know whether they _ of season three? i don't know whether they just _ of season three? i don't know whether they just do - of season three? i don't know whether they just do it - of season three? i don't know whether they just do it with i of season three? i don't know. whether they just do it with me of season three? i don't know- whether theyjust do it with me and don't tell me anything, because otherwise i would go... when i shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even — shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even the _ shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even the writers _ shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even the writers can - shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even the writers can know. think even the writers can know about— think even the writers can know about season two —— season three. i don't _ about season two —— season three. i don't know— about season two —— season three. i don't know a — about season two —— season three. i don't know a single thing about season— don't know a single thing about season three. we are definitely going _ season three. we are definitely going to — season three. we are definitely going to take the season to finish the story— going to take the season to finish the story that we set out to tell and it _ the story that we set out to tell and it remains to be seen if anything _ and it remains to be seen if anything happens after that stop and the story— anything happens after that stop and the story that you set out to tell, does _ the story that you set out to tell, does not — the story that you set out to tell, does not involve a happy ending, maybe _ does not involve a happy ending, maybe with ted and rebecca? interesting, i'm going to... hey, guys! someone from the bbc has got an interesting idea. i'll pitch it. where did you get these? i’m an interesting idea. i'll pitch it. where did you get these? i'm glad ou like where did you get these? i'm glad you like them- _ where did you get these? i'm glad you like them. you _ where did you get these? i'm glad you like them. you know- where did you get these? i'm glad you like them. you know what, i'llj you like them. you know what, i'll start bringing these to you every morning, called biscuits with the boss. it morning, called biscuits with the
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boss. . , , �* morning, called biscuits with the boss. ., , ,�* . boss. it really isn't necessary. i could have _ boss. it really isn't necessary. i could have backed _ boss. it really isn't necessary. i could have backed you - boss. it really isn't necessary. i could have backed you some i boss. it really isn't necessary. i i could have backed you some biscuits but i just could have backed you some biscuits but ijust brought few days... you but i 'ust brought few days... you see, but i just brought few days... you see, ou but i just brought few days... you see. you can't _ but i just brought few days... you see, you can't beat _ but i just brought few days... you see, you can't beat a _ but ijust brought few days... ym. see, you can't beat a hobnob! but i just brought few days... you i see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie lona , see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie loni, bbc see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie long. bbc news. _ see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie long, bbc news, los— see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. i- see, you can't beat a hobnob! sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. i lovej long, bbc news, los angeles. i love hobnob is. don't— long, bbc news, los angeles. i love hobnob is. don't we _ long, bbc news, los angeles. i love hobnob is. don't we all! _ long, bbc news, los angeles. i love hobnob is. don't we all! that - long, bbc news, los angeles. i love hobnob is. don't we all! that looks i hobnob is. don't we all! that looks riaht u- hobnob is. don't we all! that looks right up my — hobnob is. don't we all! that looks right up my sleeve. _ hobnob is. don't we all! that looks right up my sleeve. honestly, i hobnob is. don't we all! that looks right up my sleeve. honestly, we | right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched _ right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it _ right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it and _ right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it and it _ right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it and it is - right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it and it is one i right up my sleeve. honestly, we have watched it and it is one of i have watched it and it is one of those things, like lots of programmes, but you can watch it as a family, which is great. find programmes, but you can watch it as a family, which is great.— a family, which is great. and at the moment it — a family, which is great. and at the moment it is _ a family, which is great. and at the moment it is what _ a family, which is great. and at the moment it is what we _ a family, which is great. and at the moment it is what we need, - a family, which is great. and at the moment it is what we need, isn't i a family, which is great. and at the | moment it is what we need, isn't it, something to lift the spirits. now the weather with sarah. hoping that the weather will lift our spirits. hoping that the weather will lift ourspirits. no, it is hoping that the weather will lift our spirits. no, it is looking ominous. not making any promises! good morning. a bit of a mix today. yesterday in the sunshine we saw temperatures up to 25, but things are changing a little bit through the course of the day. we have got some outbreaks of rain and forecast, but it isn't going to be a complete washout today. drier weather developing in the west, certainly later on. this is where we have seen the rain over recent hours. we actually have to sons, two stripes
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of rain crossing their way east across the uk, and we will continue to see these areas of rain moving east through the day. as we had on through the day some of that rain could become quite heavy, that's it heavily in parts of eastern england. some thunderstorms possible, 30—40 millimetres of rain in a short space of time, could be a bit of surface water flooding across eastern england in particular. for the rest of the uk, later this afternoon you will see brighter skies moving on. temperature is not as warm as recent days, but still 15— 21 degrees. and the evening hours, we keep the cloud and the wet weather across parts of east anglia and the south—east for a time, so that fun becomes quite slow—moving. elsewhere, clearskies slow—moving. elsewhere, clear skies and slow—moving. elsewhere, clearskies and a noticeably cooler night for many of us than it has been recently, temperatures down into mid—single figures for some of us, staying warm and humid across the south—east where we keep that well—defined. through the week ahead, we start off on a largely dry note, some sunshine around as well. later on through the week you will notice things feel a bit more
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autumnal, gradually turning wetter and windier later on in the week. but as we start the week, we have still got high pressure really not far away, trying to move into from the south. low pressure, mainly to the south. low pressure, mainly to the north of the uk, starting to move closer later in the week. monday shaping up to be a mostly dry day. we still have that well—defined bringing some light drizzly showers, i think to east anglia and the south—east, and clouding overfrom the north—west later in the day with the north—west later in the day with the odd spot of rain as well. but for the bulk of the uk, sunny spells and temperatures in the warmer spots up and temperatures in the warmer spots up to about 22, so not a bad day. mist and fog patches as we going into tuesday morning. they gradually clear away, and actually, tuesday doesn't look like a bad day. sunny spells developing on tuesday, but temperatures will not be as warm as they have been. let's take a look at today's papers. the observer leads on the government's response to soaring gas prices. it writes the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, is confident supply
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can be maintained. talking about about that during the course of the programme this morning. the sunday times carries a story about the trial of a new drug, which it says is raising hopes of a cure for breast cancer. meanwhile, the television presenter julia bradbury has told the mail she's been diagnosed with breast cancer. she say she's speaking out to encourage others to come forward for testing. and the sunday telegraph features an image of new strictly contestant john whaite, with his dancing partnerjohannes radebe. they were announced last night as the show�*s first male same—sex pairing. some inside the papers. inside the mike observer. noisy knockers is a 60% rise in police response. it is talking about the fact we are all
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stuck at home or work during the course of the lockdown and disputes between neighbours rose and the police force is struggling to cope with the increase. i police force is struggling to cope with the increase.— police force is struggling to cope with the increase. i wonder whether it is people — with the increase. i wonder whether it is people being — with the increase. i wonder whether it is people being noisier— with the increase. i wonder whether it is people being noisier or - it is people being noisier or whether people, you know, you are just a little bit more niggly, things get on your nerves a bit more. i was drawn to this story in the sunday times because... how often do you wash your clothes, roger? say if you have a t—shirt you are wearing on sunday afternoon, does it go straight in the wash? sometimes. they have moved us closer together, haven't they? i sometimes. they have moved us closer together, haven't they?— together, haven't they? i have clean socks on. together, haven't they? i have clean socks on- you _ together, haven't they? i have clean socks on. you are _ together, haven't they? i have clean socks on. you are reasonably - together, haven't they? i have clean socks on. you are reasonably fresh. | socks on. you are reasonably fresh. we are being urged to buy better quality and not fast fashion but the best thing you can do for the environment is not wash your clothes as often. it is bad for the environment would appear as a guide
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on how often you should wash them. pants, just the once. workout clothes just the once. dresses, 4— six times. woollyjumpers, 10—15 times and jeans six times. woollyjumpers, 10—15 times andjeans up six times. woollyjumpers, 10—15 times and jeans up to 30 times. there are some top tips here... jeans do start to smell if it is summer... ii jeans do start to smell if it is summer- - -— jeans do start to smell if it is summer... , ., ., , summer... if they are getting a bit fun , summer. .. if they are getting a bit funky. throw— summer... if they are getting a bit funky, throw them _ summer... if they are getting a bit funky, throw them in _ summer... if they are getting a bit funky, throw them in the - summer... if they are getting a bit funky, throw them in the freezer i summer... if they are getting a bit i funky, throw them in the freezer and it will refresh your garments and kill bacteria. and the tvs carry a sponge at all times.— sponge at all times. carrying a some sponge at all times. carrying a sponge with — sponge at all times. carrying a sponge with you _ sponge at all times. carrying a sponge with you at _ sponge at all times. carrying a sponge with you at all - sponge at all times. carrying a sponge with you at all times! i sponge at all times. carrying a i sponge with you at all times! that isn't going to work, is it? bonfire night. guy fawkes night, whatever you want to call it, a few weeks away now. bang goes the budget! fears of a shortage. it is blaming issues in china with supply due to hot weather. i don't know whether thatis hot weather. i don't know whether that is an issue but a public holiday celebrating a centenary of
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the communist party, or a centenary of communism was apparently there is an issue and prices will go up because of a lack of supply. something else to put on the pile. i thought is that a brexit supply problem or whatever? but this is the mail on sunday that says it is down to shortage of stock coming from china. 50 to shortage of stock coming from china. . , to shortage of stock coming from china. ., , ,, , , china. so many issues in the supply chain. it china. so many issues in the supply chain- it is — china. so many issues in the supply chain- it is at _ china. so many issues in the supply chain. it is at 6:20am. _ china. so many issues in the supply chain. it is at 6:20am. one - china. so many issues in the supply chain. it is at 6:20am. one heck. chain. it is at 6:20am. 0ne heck of a ride. — that's how one amateur astronaut has described splashing into the atlantic after spending three days in space. the team of two men and two women made history by becoming the first all—civilian mission to orbit the planet. simonjones reports. the final moment of omission quite unlike any other. after orbiting the earth for three days, splashdown off the coast of florida for the four amateur astronauts dubbed the space tourists. applause. mission control: welcome home to planet earth. the mission has shown the world that
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spaceis mission has shown the world that space is for all of us. it was led and bankrolled by billionaire businessman jared and bankrolled by billionaire businessmanjared isaacman. he said it had been a heckuva ride, adding, we'rejust getting it had been a heckuva ride, adding, we're just getting started. there it had been a heckuva ride, adding, we're just getting started. we're 'ust getting started. there he is. it we're just getting started. there he is. it had we're just getting started. there he is- it had all— we're just getting started. there he is. it had all begun _ we're just getting started. there he is. it had all begun three _ we're just getting started. there he is. it had all begun three days i we're just getting started. there he is. it had all begun three days ago. | is. it had all begun three days ago. lift off for is. it had all begun three days ago. lift off for a _ is. it had all begun three days ago. lift off for a commercial— is. it had all begun three days ago. lift off for a commercial mission, i lift off for a commercial mission, first without any professional astronauts on board.- first without any professional astronauts on board. there is an awful lot that _ astronauts on board. there is an awful lot that needs _ astronauts on board. there is an awful lot that needs to - astronauts on board. there is an awful lot that needs to be i awful lot that needs to be accomplished in space was up we know so little about it. they may be some really interesting questions to ——my answers to questions we have been asking so we have to do that. the sacex asking so we have to do that. the spacex capital was fitted with an extra—large window, allowing the crewmembers to enjoy some spectacular views. alongside the billionaire who paid for all four seats, three ordinary citizens with inspirational stories. an artist, us air force veteran and a woman who overcame bone cancer as a child. hello, everyone and welcome to our
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dragon capsule here in space! $5 an dragon capsule here in space! as an adult, hayley _ dragon capsule here in space! as an adult, hayley arceneaux _ dragon capsule here in space! as an adult, hayley arceneaux has - dragon capsule here in space! as an adult, hayley arceneaux has gone back to work for the hospital that treated her. they had all trained for six months, although the computer system on board was actually in control top they carried out several scientific experiments, but in truth, it was more than a fact—finding mission. this was another milestone in the space tourism market.— another milestone in the space tourism market. , ~ .. tourism market. there he is! medical officer hayley — tourism market. there he is! medical officer hayley arceneaux _ tourism market. there he is! medical officer hayley arceneaux has - tourism market. there he is! medical officer hayley arceneaux has now i officer hayley arceneaux has now transgressed the vehicle... showing it can be opened — transgressed the vehicle... showing it can be opened up _ transgressed the vehicle... showing it can be opened up to _ transgressed the vehicle... showing it can be opened up to more - transgressed the vehicle... showing it can be opened up to more people| it can be opened up to more people providing there is a backer with deep pockets who can help others share the sense of adventure. simon jones, bbc news. watching that last night was co—founder of the london space network, anushka sharma, who joins us now. thanks for taking the time to get up early and talk to us this morning. are you excited about what happened? it is fantastic. i haven't had much sleep because they landed not so many hours ago and i had to stay up to witness it so it was fantastic.
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so what is the big deal here? you mentioned there but it opens it up to other people, if you have a early in our backer who will pay for you to go. does it matter to the rest of us, really? to go. does it matter to the rest of us. really?— us, really? so, it is a big deal. because what _ us, really? so, it is a big deal. because what this _ us, really? so, it is a big deal. because what this is _ us, really? so, it is a big deal. because what this is doing i us, really? so, it is a big deal. because what this is doing is i because what this is doing is opening up the prospect of private citizens, getting access to space. and while at the moment that is afforded by billionaires who can afforded by billionaires who can afford the high ticket price, it is hopefully in our lifetime or in the very short— midterm, it is going to drive down that cost because there is competition in the market and a lot of the players, much like spacex, blue origin and virgin galactic, they all actually offer different experiences. as part of that space tourism access to space. and this was unique in that is provided and all civilian crew to actually orbit earth for three days! like actually orbit the earth. spacex premiered a new window which
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afforded the crewmates beautiful views of our planet earth from up there. and gosh, what a fantastic thing to be able to witness. i don't know whether _ thing to be able to witness. i don't know whether you've _ thing to be able to witness. i don't know whether you've looked i thing to be able to witness. i don't know whether you've looked into i thing to be able to witness. i don't i know whether you've looked into the cost, if you have an idea, but you say it will bring the costs down. presumably that is still going to be way beyond the budget of a normal, you know, anyone watching this. most people. you know, anyone watching this. most --eole. ., , you know, anyone watching this. most --eole. . , you know, anyone watching this. most neale, ., , ., people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wronu. people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wrong- the _ people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wrong. the biggest _ people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wrong. the biggest hurdle - people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wrong. the biggest hurdle at i people. yeah, absolutely. do not get me wrong. the biggest hurdle at the | me wrong. the biggest hurdle at the moment is going to be the cost implication that also the wider implication that also the wider implication to our environment and how we think about access to space and what that might cost us. and so, you know, ijust never thought that in my lifetime i would see a way to access space not through a state space agency. born and raised here in the uk, our space agency doesn't have a rocket launch facility yet. we've never had astronauts that actually, you know, launch from our own soil but this is an opportunity that if in the future the costs are
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going to come down then that provides people like me and people like you, hopefully watching, and your children and the next generation of future explorers, having an opportunity to access space, not only for the science but also for the beautiful innovations that will create, for the inspiration, the creativity and hopefully driving a future of stem career champions, so to speak. your enthusiasm — career champions, so to speak. your enthusiasm is _ career champions, so to speak. your enthusiasm is apparent _ career champions, so to speak. your enthusiasm is apparent to see and the smile on your face is fantastic, it lights up the screen. wouldn't it be a bit daunting, i mean, that capsule they were in is controlled by a computer programme, presumably controlled by people down on earth. goodness gracious, what happens if that goes wrong? i would be worried about that. i that goes wrong? i would be worried about that. ., ,, ,., . that goes wrong? i would be worried about that. ., ,, . , that goes wrong? i would be worried about that. ., ,, , , about that. i mean, spacex is very well versed _ about that. i mean, spacex is very well versed in _ about that. i mean, spacex is very well versed in the _ about that. i mean, spacex is very well versed in the dragon - about that. i mean, spacex is very well versed in the dragon capsule. earlier this year they launched the dragon capsule which received, or
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basically sensed nasa and the japanese space agency astronaut to the space agency. they also did a test with two nasa astronauts earlier in the year ahead of this mission, so they have really learned their lessons, i don't think they would ever put any human in a hot seat that meant they wouldn't be in a safe place to be, and i think what that really represents is that yes, part of this mission is automated, that takes away from human error, that takes away from human error, thatis that takes away from human error, that is one of the pluses of artificial intelligence and other such technology, but equally, doctor sian proctor is a trained pilot who had been trained in the art of the dragon capsule, resilience, so should she have needed to take on controls, and we don't know a lot of the details yet about how much control she may have had, at any point, but there was that opportunity that if she needed to she could have taken controls which is fantastic. she she could have taken controls which is fantastic. ,, she could have taken controls which is fantastic-— is fantastic. she was to get out of “ail card. is fantastic. she was to get out of jail card. brilliant. _ is fantastic. she was to get out of jail card. brilliant. next _ is fantastic. she was to get out of jail card. brilliant. next so - is fantastic. she was to get out of jail card. brilliant. next so much. jail card. brilliant. next so much for talking to us, anushka. get some
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sleep and as i said, your enthusiasm is palpable. thank you. it is exciting. — is palpable. thank you. it is exciting, isn't _ is palpable. thank you. it is exciting, isn't it? _ is palpable. thank you. it 3 exciting, isn't it? something that a generation ago nobody would have thought possible. we'll stay in space... in a way. because when david bowie wanted a unique sound for what was to be his smash hit �*space 0ddity�*, he turned to a small white box that was the forerunner to the modern synthesiser. the stylophone, played by thousands of children in the �*60s and �*70s, is hoing to make a comeback with a little help from a special bowie edition — as ian palmer has been finding out. released in 1969, the futuristic sound of david bowie's first hit rocketed to the top of the charts with the help of a stylophone. major with the help of a stylophone. ma'or tom. the instrument i with the help of a stylophone. ma'or tom. the instrument was i with the help of a stylophone. major tom. the instrument was invented l with the help of a stylophone. major| tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. tom. the instrument was invented in 1967- bowie — tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. bowie took — tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. bowie took it _ tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. bowie took it to _ tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. bowie took it to another - tom. the instrument was invented in 1967. bowie took it to another level. 1967. bowie took it to another level is not in a march to the historic
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elaboration, hastings' dubreck has launched this. —— dubreq for top the one he used was white but with a silver grill. itide one he used was white but with a silver grill-— silver grill. we changed it to an analo . ue silver grill. we changed it to an analogue synthesiser _ silver grill. we changed it to an analogue synthesiser anyway i silver grill. we changed it to an i analogue synthesiser anyway which is the one he used and the other addition we used was at bowie logo on the grill of the stylophone so it was clear that it was an official collaboration between us. # ground control to major tom... leah— # ground control to major tom... leah kardos — # ground control to major tom... leah kardos i5 # ground control to major tom... leah kardos is the leader of the stylophone 0rchestra. # ground control to major tom... b, # ground control to major tom... a senior # ground control to major tom... senior lecturer in music, leah helped them develop the stylophone. you know how the song goes. the sound _ you know how the song goes. the sound of— you know how the song goes. the sound of the stylophone i5 you know how the song goes. the sound of the stylophone is not the most _ sound of the stylophone is not the most beautiful melody in the world but bowie — most beautiful melody in the world but bowie found beauty in it, in its harshness, — but bowie found beauty in it, in its harshness, in its ugliness, he found
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something — harshness, in its ugliness, he found something really quite emotional in it. something really quite emotional in it but _ something really quite emotional in it. but most people could save up and buy— it. but most people could save up and buy this and play it and it sounds — and buy this and play it and it sounds exactly like it did in 1969, sounds exactly like it did in 1969, so you _ sounds exactly like it did in 1969, so you can — sounds exactly like it did in 1969, so you can access that sound, you can play— so you can access that sound, you can play along with those sounds, and you _ can play along with those sounds, and you can — can play along with those sounds, and you can also look at it as an opportunity— and you can also look at it as an opportunity to be creative. like bowie — opportunity to be creative. like bowie did. opportunity to be creative. like bowie did-— opportunity to be creative. like bowie did. ,, , ., , bowie did. the stylophone was used b other bowie did. the stylophone was used by other bands. _ bowie did. the stylophone was used by other bands. here _ bowie did. the stylophone was used by other bands. here comes - bowie did. the stylophone was used by other bands. here comes my i bowie did. the stylophone was used i by other bands. here comes my baby. the 21st century _ by other bands. here comes my baby. the 21st century has _ by other bands. here comes my baby. the 21st century has seen _ by other bands. here comes my baby. the 21st century has seen a _ by other bands. here comes my baby. the 21st century has seen a number i the 21st century has seen a number of modern musicians pick up the stylus and play. itide of modern musicians pick up the stylus and play-— of modern musicians pick up the stylus and play. we know that the choral have _ stylus and play. we know that the choral have just _ stylus and play. we know that the choral have just used _ stylus and play. we know that the choral have just used the - stylus and play. we know that the i choral have just used the stylophone on a recent released. we know that jarvis cocker is a big fan and uses them regularly. blur has used one. we finished a course with the man himself who died in 2016 stop rowing continue to experiment with his little white box of tricks, until
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the end. ian palmer, bbc news. fantastic. it really is and when you think of all of the music that followed it, she was saying it is not the most pleasant sound in and of itself but what came from it was very exciting. i of itself but what came from it was very exciting-— very exciting. i was 'ust excited to see john very exciting. i was 'ust excited to john nukes — very exciting. i was 'ust excited to see john nokes on i very exciting. i was just excited to see john nokes on the _ very exciting. i was just excited to see john nokes on the telly, i seejohn nokes on the telly, fantastic. nice to see you on the sofa, jane. it is weird, isn't it? i wouldn't have chosen distress if i had known. liverpool red? not on purpose, i hasten to say- — liverpool red? not on purpose, i hasten to say. feels _ liverpool red? not on purpose, i hasten to say. feels like - liverpool red? not on purpose, i hasten to say. feels like having. liverpool red? not on purpose, i| hasten to say. feels like having a no at hasten to say. feels like having a go at you- _ hasten to say. feels like having a go at you- i _ hasten to say. feels like having a go at you- i am — hasten to say. feels like having a go at you. i am used _ hasten to say. feels like having a go at you. i am used to _ hasten to say. feels like having a go at you. i am used to it. - top of the table. they are, and the title race will— top of the table. they are, and the title race will be _ top of the table. they are, and the title race will be very _ top of the table. they are, and the title race will be very tight - top of the table. they are, and the title race will be very tight this i title race will be very tight this season. i think manchester will the back and regret not getting a victory against southampton, and liverpool, three points clear of them at the moment, but manchester united and chelsea are playing later
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today, they look strong as well. liverpool are three points clear of title rivals manchester city at the top of the premier league. it's after their 3—0 win over crystal palace, but also, after manchester city failed to win against southampton. in fact, the defending champions only had one shot on target. ben croucher rounds up the best of saturday's action. ioo 100 is not out. study on a celebrated a century of liveable goals against his favourite opponents. he goals against his favourite opponents-— goals against his favourite o- onents. .,, ., ,_, .,. opponents. he has now scored in each of his last nine — opponents. he has now scored in each of his last nine appearances _ opponents. he has now scored in each of his last nine appearances against i of his last nine appearances against crystal palace! i of his last nine appearances against crystal palace!— crystal palace! i would love to score against _ crystal palace! i would love to score against them, _ crystal palace! i would love to score against them, all- crystal palace! i would love to score against them, all the i crystal palace! i would love to i score against them, all the time i think. _ score against them, all the time i think. we — score against them, all the time i think, we won the game. so why not, to play— think, we won the game. so why not, to play against them every single weekend? mo to play against them every single weekend? a, ., to play against them every single weekend? ., , weekend? mo salah en'oyed playing auainst weekend? mo salah en'oyed playing against palace h weekend? mo salah en'oyed playing against palace two, i weekend? mo salah en'oyed playing against palace two, as i weekend? mo salah enjoyed playing against palace two, as did _ weekend? mo salah enjoyed playing against palace two, as did nabiac i against palace two, as did nabiac cater, a 3—0 when not a cricket score, but it takes liveable top, three points clear of manchester city, as manager want the fans to return up in their thousands, which they did. he wanted them to make lots of noise, which they did. he
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wanted his players to give those plans plenty of cheer about, which they didn't. the gunners drawn against southampton, who could easily have monitored this penalty not been overturned with the help of the ar. when city did have the ball on the back of the net, but was ruled out too.— on the back of the net, but was ruled out too. . ., g; :: :: :: ruled out too. terrific, over 53,000 here today- — ruled out too. terrific, over 53,000 here today. yeah, _ ruled out too. terrific, over 53,000 here today. yeah, good, _ ruled out too. terrific, over 53,000 here today. yeah, good, as - ruled out too. terrific, over 53,000 here today. yeah, good, as always. thanks, pat. _ here today. yeah, good, as always. thanks, pat. villa _ here today. yeah, good, as always. thanks, pat. villa park— here today. yeah, good, as always. thanks, pat. villa park was - here today. yeah, good, as always. thanks, pat. villa park was rocking | thanks, pat. villa park was rocking as well. everton _ thanks, pat. villa park was rocking as well. everton were _ thanks, pat. villa park was rocking as well. everton were just - thanks, pat. villa park was rocking as well. everton were just rocks, i as well. everton were just rocks, three holes in nine minutes get a 3-1 three holes in nine minutes get a 3—1wind. bowing to the top of the table, along with ransford, who beat wolves 2—0, a first away wind of the season, as was arsenal's at burnley. as was something poetic from motor guard. as was something poetic from motor uuard. a . as was something poetic from motor uuard. a, ., ., ., , as was something poetic from motor uuard. ., ., ., , ., guard. martineau overgaard finds a wa -ast guard. martineau overgaard finds a way past the _ guard. martineau overgaard finds a way past the burnley _ guard. martineau overgaard finds a way past the burnley wall! - guard. martineau overgaard finds a way past the burnley wall! try i guard. martineau overgaard finds a way past the burnley wall! try as i guard. martineau overgaard finds a| way past the burnley wall! try as an oranue way past the burnley wall! try as an orange huff — way past the burnley wall! try as an orange huff and _ way past the burnley wall! try as an orange huff and puff, _ way past the burnley wall! try as an orange huff and puff, they - way past the burnley wall! try as an orange huff and puff, they can't - orange huff and puff, they can't find so much as a point, five straight defeats, the latest at home for what for deleting them rock
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bottom. in the scottish premiership, a point against motherwell would be enough to see champions rangers go back to the top of the table later today, that's after hibs could only manage a draw against st mirren yestersday. eamonn brophy had given st mirren the lead but paul mcginn equalised against his former club. martin boyle scored a penalty in the second half for hibs to go ahead. but saints captainjoe shaughnessy put the ball in the back of the net with two minutes remaining to make it 2—2, so hibs are top of the league on goal difference for the moment, level on points with rangers and hearts, who drew with ross county. stjohnstone beat aberdeen. kent spitfires won a thrilling t20 blast final at edgbaston. after beating sussex by 21 runs in the semi—final, they defeated the now—li—time—beaten finalists somerset in the final. and they did it with some stunning fielding, as adam wild reports.
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this was cricket's longest day, four teams, three matches, two finalists. now to find one winner. a countdown that had begun in the morning, somerset pulling off the semifinal victory as spectacular as the times it seemed unlikely. that was before kent made their way through the afternoon tojoin them. kent made their way through the afternoon to join them. the evening showpiece than a test of stamina in this dance as well as out in the middle. kent, the first to take aim, the butt of daniel bell drummond getting things moving. the former wickets, though, in quick succession, stalling that progress at least for a moment. a big finish, thatis at least for a moment. a big finish, that is what can needed. that is precisely whatjordan cox provided. passing 50 with another magnificent stroke. another 68 the target set for summerset. how would they respond? while mead was going for it, the cloud really enjoying it, no—one it seems more than him. if
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that catch was impressive, watch this. cox on the boundary somehow keeping the ball in play and back to a teammate. kent brilliant, even a final sex couldn't get somerset close enough. cricket�*s longest day belongs to kent. adam wild, bbc news. rugby union, where ellis genge began his captaincy with a win as leicester tigers beat runners—up exeter chiefs 34—19 on the opening weekend of the premiership season. during a commanding performance from the tigers, nick dolly scored two tries, the first securing the winning bonus point. elsewhere there were wins for northampton, worcester, and sale. and in darts, fallon sherrock became the first woman to reach a televised pdc final but lost in the nordic masters to michael van gerwen. afterwards sherrock posted on social media that she was "buzzing"
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and incredibly proud of herself. she led in the final 6—3 but was eventually beaten 11—7 by the three—time world champion. really great to see that, but it was the semifinal but was actually more exciting. she was 7—1 down and came back to when and, to get through to the final. ,, ., , ., , , ., ., the final. showers really blazing a trail. is that — the final. showers really blazing a trail. is that a _ the final. showers really blazing a trail. is that a big _ the final. showers really blazing a trail. is that a big moment, - the final. showers really blazing a trail. is that a big moment, a - the final. showers really blazing a i trail. is that a big moment, a woman in the first final _ trail. is that a big moment, a woman in the first final like _ trail. is that a big moment, a woman in the first final like that? _ trail. is that a big moment, a woman in the first final like that? first - in the first final like that? first televised final, _ in the first final like that? first televised final, but _ in the first final like that? first televised final, but yes, - in the first final like that? first televised final, but yes, it - in the first final like that? f "sf televised final, but yes, it is. it is great, because you've got to see it to be at, so little girls are watching that and seeing that. thinking, i could do that. time now for this week's travel show. this week, on the travel show, we join the husband—and—wife team who are on an incredible zero carbon adventure around wales. iam in i am in argentina exploring an amazing sunken town that has reemerged from under the water, then i had to the country's spectacular glass falls. and in wales we joined a couple starting out on a pedal
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powered adventure at sea, searching for a more sustainable future. we are kicking off this week in south america, argentina to be precise, where early last year i went to explore one of the strangest places i had ever heard of. a town that had to be abandoned due to flooding back in the 1990s, but has since reemerged from beneath the water. you can find ghost towns all over the world, and as many different reasons why they could be abandoned, but i've heard epecuen is special because it is not abandoned — at least not completely. there's not much left...
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just some bricks. you can only guess what they used to be. this places is wild. there's a couple of tourists here, notjust us. well, more cows than tourists. epecuen was built in the 1920s, and at its peak was home to about 5000 people. tourists came from all over argentina to take a therapeutic dip at its famous thermal bath. today, they come for a very different reason. viviana, a former resident, leads tours around the remains of her hometown, explaining what happened here.
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how did it become abandoned? how did it come to this? in 1985, heavy rain and storms sealed epecuen�*s fate. a nearby dam ruptured and within weeks the town was flooded.
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for years and years, the water continued to rise, and by the early 90s, everything you see here was completely submerged. then just over a decade ago, the waters began to subside. now tourists can walk the streets once again. this looks damaged, but it's not, it's completely encrusted in mineral salts from the water. the inside, not so great... i guess that's what a quarter of a century underwater does. for me, ijust see concrete, but
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you, you have memories here. but even when it was mostly underwater, it wasn't entirely abandoned. for over 25 years, a local legend called pablo novak lived on the outskirts.
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some recent health complications have meant that pablo has had to move out of his home and into a nearby nursing facility. that means epecuen�*s last resident has finally moved away, but pablo's memories of the town still live on. while epecuen may now be fully abandoned, what is left behind is a uniquely desolate, stunning landscape with a legacy that will never be forgotten. next, we are off to new zealand to visit the north island's largest rainforest. back in 2014, the government returned ownership of the land back to the local indigenous people who were now encouraging tourists to learn to interact with the forest on a spiritual level, rather thanjust think of it is a great place to take a hike
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and some photos. this tribe, my tribe here, fought for 150 years to have [and returned to the people, and they were eventually successful in 2014. what was formerly the national park area, became a living entity of its own with all the rights of personhood. and i believe that it was the first of its kind in the world. we don't take over and control, they understand where they fit in, and are guided by nature.
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this tree, it is supporting me, and the energy from it feels male. it's a few hundred years old, this tree, that your eyes alight upon, there is that thing acknowledging you and saying hello. if you ignore them, itjust means that you need more time, so more time spent in nature, the more you tune in, the better you develop your understanding of the language that she is speaking to you.
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people that i met when it was a national park often didn't know much about our tribe, or our indigenous ancestry. children of the mist. the retreat was born out of the desire to have a place where people could stay in nature, enfolded in nature, where they could connect with nature and themselves. you are unplugged from the distractions of life. i want people to realise that you don't need much to enjoy life, and to live.
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staying here strips back and takes you right back to the basics of what you need, what the body needs, what the spirit needs. still to come on the travel show... i get to experience the spectacle and sheer force of nature of the amazing iguazu falls here in argentina. and we meet the couple setting out on a sustainable journey at sea with the help of a little pedal power. so don't go away.
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this isn'tjust one waterfall, it's hundreds. iguazu is three times wider than niagara, and it's a marvel of nature right on the border between argentina and brazil. i've been wanting to see this water for my entire life. during the rainy season, every second, up to 13 million litres of water spill over a series of precipices stretching 1.5 miles wide. the first time that i saw the waterfalls i cried. the falls are steeped in local legends. though some are more sinister than others. they believe that behind the waterfalls, especially behind the devil's
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throat, there is a giant snake living there, and they have a big respect about that. have you seen a giant snake? never, but i have seen the devil's throat and i have a lot of respect about that that. it is one of the most spectacular sections of the falls, where a major portion of the iguazu river tumbles over, causing in effect similar to an ocean plunging into an abyss. wow! i've never seen anything like this before! one waterfall, two, three, four, five, six, 20, 30, 100, all cascading down. the rush coming off this waterfall... laughs. you can feel it on your face and hands, this is an incredible moderate nature. you have to come and see this some time in your life.
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wow. next, we join the husband—and—wife team jason and tammie, on an incredible zero carbon adventure around wales, and so far they have completed almost 400 miles over hills and valleys under their own steam. now, it's time for them to tackle the spectacular and sometimes precarious welsh coastline in a boat powered just by pedal. we are on a circumnavigation of wales using just human power, so we're biking, we're walking, canoeing, pack rafting and using a specially designed pedal—powered boat. moksha is an eight metre by 1.5 metre boat made out of wood, that was designed and built back in the early �*90s to complete the first circumnavigation
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of the planet by human power, which is what i did, started off with a friend, and she's like almost a part of me, she's like part of my soul now, i've spent so much of my life in her. like i'm ever gonna wear this. i think for me, human power means being able to be more part of a community, and i think one of the most special things about our journey so far is the fact that we're going very slowly, we are meeting some amazing people that we would have never met. some of the most engaging encounters in terms of people and leading onto sustainability stories which is what we're interested in exploring here in wales, have come about because of human power. so we biked from greenfield dock up on the dee estuary, to hay—on—wye, then we hiked over the black mountains, used pack rafts down the river monnow to monmouth and then we've just biked the last 300 miles from monmouth to here,
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milford haven. so tomorrow we're going to be pedaling moksha, our pedal boat, out into the channel essentially, around the corner, around the pembrokeshire headlands and then around to fishguard, up cardigan bay, around by anglesey and back to where we started from, from greenfield dock there on the dee estuary. thank you! i can't deny that i am more apprehensive about this than crossing an ocean, which i have done in that pedal boat, several times. but this, going around the coast, you've got tides, you've got wind, you've got other vessels, there are so many other variables and that's what i'm, that's what i'm most nervous about.
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seems pretty rough water coming up there. i'm very nervous, because when he gets nervous, it really does freak me out. oh my god! whirlpools! 0k, can you see me? bring the... no, up, up! no, up! stop! dammit. (bleep). yeah, i'm just shattered.
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absolutely shattered. i'm not in my comfort zone on the water, but honestly for me, it's telling the stories of the local heroes that are championing, you know, their local environments and the seals and the whales and they're out there and they're in the trenches every day working hard and they're fighting bureaucracy and i'm so excited to bring those stories to other people so that they can get help, and i'm really, really excited about that. we have heard about this amazing organisation called the sea watch foundation, and jason and i are super excited, we're going to get out on a boat to see if we can't find some dolphins and other sea life, so we're looking forward to it.
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katrin, what exactly is it that the sea watch foundation does? so, the sea watch foundation is a nation wide research charity, we study whales, dolphins and porpoises in the uk. 0ur flagship project is the cardigan bay monitoring project, which is the project that i lead, and we study the semi—resident population of bottlenose dolphins that we get around here and we look at how do they use their habitat and how many animals there are year after year. so today we're not actually on a surveying boat, we're on a tourism boat? yes. can you explain, is that a problem for the dolphins? well, it's a difficult situation. when we look at northern cardigan bay where there is actually a lot less tourist boats, we have seen an impact of disturbance and that is mainly from recreational boat
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traffic. and we've seen an effect in the social structure of the dolphins there. so down here we have much smaller pods with longer lasting bonds, whereas up north the animals are often in bigger groups but they have less long lasting bonds between each other. you just can't get away from it, can you? can we park on the flat part of the ocean from now on? this sounds ridiculous, but if i threw up and something eats it... i've had an ibuprofen and stuff today, i mean, ijust don't... retching.
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so sick... it's like being inside a washing machine. so, how was your night? it was ok... rolling... well, as soon as we get under way, it will be not this continual rolling. honestly, we make a good team, and it's funny because we fight about little things that you know, i think we can't even
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remember what we fought about. whoa! oh, god, ow! yeah, we do fight but weirdly enough when we are out at sea or if we are on this expedition together... if we think we're gonna die, we're fine! why can't one thing be easy? just one? i suppose when the chips are down and when things are going really badly, that's when we come together and work really well together. thank you. you're welcome. tammie's cafe at sea. food waste is a huge problem. yeah. 40% of our food in this country is wasted so we're gonna go and find out how this local group is preventing food from going to landfill, so they pick up food from restaurants, from people's houses and a lot of it's not gone off, it'sjust gone past
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the best before date so then they make delicious food and we are tired of eating brown food on this boat, so this is going to be great, eating food other than our own cooking. it's reallyjust a great concept because they're feeding their local community and then anything that they can't use actually goes into a compost bin, so it is literally a complete circular economy with food that would be otherwise wasted. that's delicious! well, that's all for this week. but coming up next week: what we're trying to do here is get around this headland before the tide turns against us, but it looks like the tide has already turned. we're back with tammie and jason
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as they continue their voyage but with the weather closing in, will they get to their final port of call or have to abandon their mission? you're not going to want to miss it. but until then, from me, mike corey and the rest of the team here, at iguazu falls in argentina, it's goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and roger johnson. 0ur headlines today: soaring gas prices lead to concern over food supplies, the government and industry leaders will hold meetings today and tomorrow to tackle the problem. invitations to book covid booster jabs will be sent to more than a million people in england in the coming week a capsule carrying the first all—civilian crew into space returns to earth after three days in orbit.
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a new documentary about the duke of edinburgh reveals his favourite celebrity chefs. we'll reveal who they are later. some rain in the forecast today, moving east through the course of the day. they could be localised flooding across parts of eastern england in particular but things will brighten up from the west later on. i'll bring you the details throughout this morning's programme. it's sunday, the 19th of september. our top story: the impact of soaring wholesale gas prices will be discussed at a series of meetings between the government and industry leaders over the coming days. the increase in the cost of gas has led to warnings of a knock—on effect on food supplies. the business secretary kawsi kwarteng says he will meet with industry figures to plan a way forward. our business correspondent katy austin reports. the reasons wholesale gas prices have soared include high demand and lower wind and solar generation. the business secretary held urgent meetings with energy companies yesterday. the high prices have already pushed some small suppliers to the wall, and there's concern more
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will follow soon as next week. we're seeing the record—breaking price of international gas, that does feed through to the market and we've already seen full supply failures in recent weeks, partly as a consequence of that and partly, as with other features of our market, it's difficult to tell whether they will be anymore. the rising cost is a worry for steelmakers, which need a lot of energy. another knock—on effect is a shortage of carbon dioxide. it's a byproduct when fertiliser is produced, and two large uk plants which make it have closed. the owner of one large poultry group, which includes bernard matthews, called the carbon dioxide issue a massive body blow. it's used by meat producers, including in the packaging process. we use co2 for, it's used to extend shelf life through packaging, notjust in meat but in all foods, and in a time when we are struggling because of the haulage shortages, to actually lose shelf life and have a shorter shelf on products going onto shelves is going to cause
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even more disruption. so this is a really serious problem for us. the rising price of gas is being felt by businesses at the moment, but is likely to feed through to consumers at a time when the cost of living is rising. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, insists britain can meet demand for gas, and the government doesn't expect supply emergencies this winter. he says there will be further meetings with the regulator and industries to try to plan away forward. katy austin, bbc news. more than1 million people in england will be sent invitations this week to book their coronavirus boosterjab. nhs england says texts will be received from monday, while letters will be sent to those who are eligible later in the week. duncan kennedy reports. do you want to roll up your sleeve for me? the first of the booster jabs went into arms this week, with frontline health workers among the priority groups. in the coming weeks, invitations will start going out to people in england asking them to book their supplementary injections.
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it will be another enormous technical challenge. 1.5 million people will be contacted in the first phase through a combination of text messages and letters. for anyone aged 50 or over, people living or working into homes for elderly, and frontline health and social care workers. this time the government wants people to wait for their invitations before getting their top—up jabs. it says getting vaccinated will be easier than before because of the opening of the national booking service. the nhs covid vaccination programme has already saved more than 112,000 lives. the organising committee for vaccines says people should receive their booster dose at least six months after they had their second coronavirus jab. duncan kennedy, bbc news. the new foreign secretary has waded into a major diplomatic row with france over the uk's new security deal with
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the us and australia. writing in the sunday telegraph liz truss says the deal shows britain can be "hard—headed" in defending its interests. we can speak now to our political correspondent, peter saull. peter, these comments from the new foreign secretary aren't likely to calm this row down are they? no, i don't think they will help. elizabeth truss has only been in the job for a matter of days but she has walked straight into this escalating row with the french. she has written her first article as foreign secretary in the daily telegraph this morning, talking about this new defence deal with the americans and australians known as aukus, she says it points to britain's �*s commitment to stability in the indo pacific region. the problem with this deal as far as the french are concerned is that it led to a cancellation of a deal they had struck at the australians to supply submarines. in this article, liz truss talks about the importance of partnering with like—minded countries to build
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coalitions based on shared values and shared interests, but there is no mention whatsoever of our neighbours just no mention whatsoever of our neighboursjust on no mention whatsoever of our neighbours just on the other side of the english channel. i dare say she will get a frosty reception when she goes with borisjohnson to the un general assembly in new york this week, if she meets her french counterpart. the french foreign minister has attacked britain for what he cold permanent opportunism and he described the breaking of a contract with the australians is a serious breach of trust. universities in england must take student views into account when deciding how much to teach online, according to the regulator for higher education. out of nearly 50 institutions contacted by the bbc, 13 said all teaching would be face—to—face. the others say they are adopting a more blended approach. "a heck of a ride."
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that is how one amateur astronaut describes splashing back to earth after spending two days in space. the final moment of a mission quite unlike any other. after orbiting the earth for three days, splashdown off the coast of florida for the four amateur astronauts dubbed the space tourists. applause. mission control: inspiration4, on behalf of spacex, _ welcome home to planet earth. your mission has shown the world that space is for all of us. it was led and bankrolled by a billionaire businessman jared isaacman. he said it had been a �*heck of a ride', adding, �*we're just getting started'. there he is. and it had all begun three days ago. lift off for a commercial mission, the first without any professional astronauts on board. much of the adventure beamed back live to earth. there is an awful lot that needs to be accomplished in space. there's an awful lot of it
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and we know so little about it. and there may be some really interesting answers to questions we've been asking for a long time out there so we have to do that. the spacex capsule was fitted with an extra—large window, allowing the crewmembers to enjoy some spectacular views. alongside the billionaire who paid for all four seats, three ordinary citizens with inspirational stories. an artist, us air force veteran and a woman who overcame bone cancer as a child. hello everyone and welcome to our dragon capsule here in space! as an adult, hayley arceneaux has gone back to work for the hospital that treated her. they had all trained for six months, although the computer system on board was actually in control. they carried out several scientific experiments, but in truth, it was more than a fact—finding mission. this was another milestone in the space tourism market. there she is. medical officer hayley arceneaux has now egressed the vehicle...
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a chance to show that it can be opened up to more people provided there's a backer with deep pockets who can identify others with a shared sense of adventure. simon jones, bbc news. can you imagine what it is like not just for them but for the families? you wouldn't sleep a wink. it would be very worrying — you wouldn't sleep a wink. it would be very worrying being _ you wouldn't sleep a wink. it would be very worrying being in _ you wouldn't sleep a wink. it would be very worrying being in a - you wouldn't sleep a wink. it would be very worrying being in a space i be very worrying being in a space capsule all those miles up knowing the computer is in charge. yes. capsule all those miles up knowing the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic _ the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic car _ the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic car but _ the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic car but a _ the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic car but a little - the computer is in charge. yes, like an automatic car but a little bit - an automatic car but a little bit higher stakes. 7:10am, we return to our top story. the food industry is warning that soaring gas prices could spark food shortages in the coming months. it comes as the business secretary prepares to meet the energy regulator today to ensure the impact on consumers is minimal. well, to pick through all this we can speak now to energy analyst ellen fraser and also to ian wright from the food and drink association. so many elements to this story. let's begin with the basics. why is that a shortage of energy, why is it
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so serious at the moment? effectively, the energy prices a balance between the demand side and the supply side, a simple occasion. that equation. 0n the demand—side, as the economy comes out of covid, and as we go into winter are turning our heat up so demand is increasing. from the supply side we have a challenging situation, it is not just one but multiple things going on, so the weather has been calm recently, so wind generation has dropped off. we also have, usually, at this time of year, the gas storage tanks in the uk would be really full but we have had importation challenges from russia over the summer. that of course we have some outages in some of the systems associated with the energy supply system as well. so there was a big connectorfire at supply system as well. so there was a big connector fire at the end supply system as well. so there was a big connectorfire at the end of last week which is creating challenges as well, so supply is constrained, demand is increasing and prices are therefore increasing. there is however an enterprise. does that limit what we as consumers will be charged? 50.
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that limit what we as consumers will be charged?— be charged? so, from now, it limits those people _ be charged? so, from now, it limits those people who _ be charged? so, from now, it limits those people who are _ be charged? so, from now, it limits those people who are sitting - be charged? so, from now, it limits those people who are sitting on - be charged? so, from now, it limits those people who are sitting on the | those people who are sitting on the cap, exactly right. but the challenges the big suppliers effectively hedged their energy, they buy a head to make sure they can buy within the prices set by the cup. some of the smaller suppliers just don't have the cash to be able to buy head, and therefore, effectively, they are buying on wholesale markets at the moment, which are skyrocketing. they are effectively capped by the price. can't charge that through to customers. so they are having to swallow that themselves, which is what is creating instability in the energy suppliers, where four went bust last week and we are expecting a number more to fail in the coming weeks as well. a number more to fail in the coming weeks as well-— weeks as well. let's bring ian ian. you have perfectly _ weeks as well. let's bring ian ian. you have perfectly supply - weeks as well. let's bring ian ian. you have perfectly supply and - weeks as well. let's bring ian ian. you have perfectly supply and the| you have perfectly supply and the supply and demand attention and why supplies are low, but what isn't quite so obvious is why, for example, need suppliers are saying christmas could be cancelled. explain the impact to us, if you would? , ., , ., explain the impact to us, if you would? , .,, ., ., ., would? the problem for the food su -l would? the problem for the food supply industry — would? the problem for the food supply industry is _ would? the problem for the food supply industry is that _ would? the problem for the food supply industry is that a - would? the problem for the food supply industry is that a lot - would? the problem for the food supply industry is that a lot of. would? the problem for the food | supply industry is that a lot of our members in different parts of the
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forest rely on the production of carbon dioxide to be effect within their manufacturing processes. so in meat, it used to stun animals and poultry before slaughter. in frozen food it is part of the preservative process, as it is with chilled meat, in those trays where you see film over the meat comedy preservative gas that surrounds the meat product is partly based on carbon dioxide. then obviously it is used in other parts of the food processing industry like in baker's own soft drinks and beer. so it has different purposes, in every single part, or in many parts of the food manufacturing process, and if the gas price increase fertiliser plans, which produce carbon dioxide, or major producers of carbon dioxide, comes out of four plans, basically, which otherwise also produce fertiliser, when the gas price goes
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to high they can't produce their main product, fertiliser, efficiently, and so they don't produce c02 either. i know it is a long and rather concave explanation but that is the reason that we are so dependent on the price of gas to some of ourfood so dependent on the price of gas to some of our food products. what so dependent on the price of gas to some of our food products.- some of our food products. what is the bottom — some of our food products. what is the bottom line _ some of our food products. what is the bottom line for _ some of our food products. what is the bottom line for consumers. - some of our food products. what is the bottom line for consumers. we j the bottom line for consumers. we have had stark warnings from the food industry about christmas, for example. is there a lag on wendy southern impact for consumers or are we looking at the next few days or weeks, that they will be a shortage of meat on the shelves? i weeks, that they will be a shortage of meat on the shelves?— of meat on the shelves? i think we are already — of meat on the shelves? i think we are already looking _ of meat on the shelves? i think we are already looking at _ of meat on the shelves? i think we are already looking at shortages i are already looking at shortages that you have been reporting for the last few weeks, because of labour difficulties, we can't get the labour into abattoirs or into factories, and certainly not among lorry drivers to deliver food, so there is already a difficult situation in the supply chain. i think we probably won't see too many difficulties this week, but i think as the next days, the next two weeks unfold, and discuss price increase and the shutting down of the plants begins to feed through, i think we
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will see shelves fairly soon. now, we're not going to run out of food. big red letters, underlined 55 times. we will not run out of food. but there are going to be major concerns about the continuity of supply, concerns about the continuity of supply, both to supermarkets and convenience stores and two restaurants and takeaway �*s. tina restaurants and takeaway 's. two questions. _ restaurants and takeaway 's. two questions. if _ restaurants and takeaway 's. two questions. if i — restaurants and takeaway 's. two questions, if! can, _ restaurants and takeaway 's. two questions, if i can, going back to gas again. first of all, what happens as a consumer, the gas comes out of your pipe and goes into your boiler or your fire out of your pipe and goes into your boiler or yourfire or out of your pipe and goes into your boiler or your fire or whatever it is. what happens if your energy supply is one of those that goes bust? �* ., , �* . ., ., bust? but doesn't change. that rocess bust? but doesn't change. that process continues _ bust? but doesn't change. that process continues to _ bust? but doesn't change. that process continues to happen. i bust? but doesn't change. that l process continues to happen. the media _ process continues to happen. the media has no ability to stop that supply_ media has no ability to stop that supply into your house, if you are a credit_ supply into your house, if you are a credit customer, and even if you are a prepayment customer, you keep playing — a prepayment customer, you keep playing that money into your metre and it _ playing that money into your metre and it keeps flowing. the challenge is in terms — and it keeps flowing. the challenge is in terms of, who are you paying that bill_ is in terms of, who are you paying that bill to? — is in terms of, who are you paying that bill to? that guarantees to off 'am, that bill to? that guarantees to off jam. the _ that bill to? that guarantees to off jam, the regulator that they give to
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customers, — jam, the regulator that they give to customers, the security of supply is cornpletely— customers, the security of supply is completely safe. —— 0fgem. tim two will then— completely safe. —— 0fgem. tim two will then appoint a new supplier who will then appoint a new supplier who will take _ will then appoint a new supplier who will take on— will then appoint a new supplier who will take on your supply from the one that — will take on your supply from the one that has failed and that service will continue to go as a consumer. and if you pay by direct debit and you have credit and if your firm goes bust, the one that takes it over has to take back credit on. so your money is safe.— over has to take back credit on. so | your money is safe._ just your money is safe. absolutely. just one more question _ your money is safe. absolutely. just one more question on _ your money is safe. absolutely. just one more question on gas. - your money is safe. absolutely. just one more question on gas. there i your money is safe. absolutely. just i one more question on gas. there were 70 gas company suppliers at the start of this year. some predictions say there might only be ten left at the end of the year. does that not show that if all of those companies have failed there is something fundamentally wrong with the market? there are absolutely some real challenges with the market and that data sounds incredibly stark. the reality is, those ten still own 90% of the customer base so there —— is just really slow ones that are
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struggling. and those that are slightly struggling, those that are stridently ad but you are right, there are some structural supply problems with the market and this could actually be quite helpful reset. in the short term, the government may have to step in to make sure the reset happens in an orderly way but actually the outcome of that could be quite positive for the uk. �* ., , , ., the uk. and that is the question, what the government _ the uk. and that is the question, what the government can - the uk. and that is the question, what the government can do. - the uk. and that is the question, what the government can do. i i the uk. and that is the question, i what the government can do. i have the uk. and that is the question, - what the government can do. i have a question of you, kwasi kwarteng saying they are not complacent at the moment but they don't expect emergencies. what sort of intervention would you like to see? i think the government can do two things _ i think the government can do two things it — i think the government can do two things. it can do some things in the labour— things. it can do some things in the labour shortage and we are already talking _ labour shortage and we are already talking about that. but what it can do about _ talking about that. but what it can do about the gas price is really make — do about the gas price is really make an — do about the gas price is really make an intervention mainly to support— make an intervention mainly to support the four or five companies, a very— support the four or five companies, a very small— support the four or five companies, a very small number of companies, who produce c02 as a byproduct of fertiliser~ _ who produce c02 as a byproduct of fertiliser. we probably need the government to go in and support the
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-as government to go in and support the gas price _ government to go in and support the gas price or— government to go in and support the gas price or in some way subsidised the production of c02 for the next few weeks. now, they might find that easier— few weeks. now, they might find that easier now— few weeks. now, they might find that easier now we are out of the eu because — easier now we are out of the eu because eu rules on subsidies don't apply— because eu rules on subsidies don't apply but— because eu rules on subsidies don't apply but they are going to need to be innovative in the next four or five weeks. _ be innovative in the next four or five weeks, or, as you were saying earlier, _ five weeks, or, as you were saying earlier, the — five weeks, or, as you were saying earlier, the knock—on effect of this may well— earlier, the knock—on effect of this may well be felt right the way through— may well be felt right the way through to the end of the year and particularly over the key christmas trading _ particularly over the key christmas trading period. particularly over the key christmas trading period-— trading period. thank you for 'oinin: trading period. thank you for joining us- — now the weather with sarah. how is it looking this morning? if is looking quite calm out there this morning for some of us. this is the picture, the sun is rising in cambridgeshire, but there is some rain in the forecast today for many parts of the uk. the rain pushing east so some dry weather developing across western parts later in the day. a couple of weather fronts, you
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can see a few lines of rain pushing eastwards so a bit of a soggy start for much of scotland, parts of northern england and the rain pushing into eastern england this afternoon where it will become heavy, potentially thundery, could be 30-40 heavy, potentially thundery, could be 30—40 millimetres of rain from east yorkshire down to kent which could lead to surface waterflooding. but most places looking drier and brighter into the afternoon. not quite as warm as it has been over recent days. we will keep it in south anglia but elsewhere clear skies and a bit of a colder night than we have seen recently, not quite as warm and humid. into monday we still have high pressure down towards the south—west, trying to move its way and so that could keep the weather front at bay at least for the first part of the working week. monday looking drier with perhaps a few showers across parts of eastern england with the weather front lingering around as well thought of it won't be quite as warm as it has been but are largely dry start of the new working week.
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things turning more autumnal as we head through the second half of the week. rogerand nina. head through the second half of the week. roger and nina.— week. roger and nina. thanks very much, week. roger and nina. thanks very much. sarah- _ week. roger and nina. thanks very much, sarah. speak— week. roger and nina. thanks very much, sarah. speak to _ week. roger and nina. thanks very much, sarah. speak to you - week. roger and nina. thanks very much, sarah. speak to you later, i much, sarah. speak to you later, thank you. much, sarah. speak to you later, 718 a.m.. barbecuing and the hairy bikers. just some of the duke of edinburgh's favourite past times that have been revealed by members of the royal family. in a new bbc tribute programme airing this week, his family given their personal thoughts and reflections following prince philip's death in april. let's take a look. every barbecue i have ever been on, the duke _ every barbecue i have ever been on, the duke of— every barbecue i have ever been on, the duke of edinburgh has been their cooking _ the duke of edinburgh has been their cooking. we go on barbecues and there _ cooking. we go on barbecues and there is— cooking. we go on barbecues and there is no— cooking. we go on barbecues and there is no chef, there is never anyone — there is no chef, there is never anyone else. you would be the first person _ anyone else. you would be the first person to _ anyone else. you would be the first person to say —— he would be the first _ person to say —— he would be the first person — person to say —— he would be the first person to say that he hasn't -ot first person to say that he hasn't got a _ first person to say that he hasn't got a clue — first person to say that he hasn't got a clue what he is doing but such is the _ got a clue what he is doing but such is the person he is, he tackles a new— is the person he is, he tackles a new challenge and grapples it and learns _ new challenge and grapples it and learns as — new challenge and grapples it and learns as he does it. and he has mastered — learns as he does it. and he has mastered it. it learns as he does it. and he has mastered it.— mastered it. it is mainly experimental. _ mastered it. it is mainly experimental. i- mastered it. it is mainly experimental. i don't i mastered it. it is mainly i experimental. i don't think mastered it. it is mainly -
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experimental. i don't think there are many recipes involved. laughs. but he is a brilliant barbecue cook. he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an _ he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting _ he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting art _ he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting art form. - he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting art form. and - he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting art form. and if. into an interesting art form. and if i into an interesting art form. and if i ever_ into an interesting art form. and if i ever tried — into an interesting art form. and if i ever tried to— into an interesting art form. and if i ever tried to do— into an interesting art form. and if i ever tried to do it _ into an interesting art form. and if lever tried to do it he, _ into an interesting art form. and if lever tried to do it he, i— into an interesting art form. and if lever tried to do it he, i could - lever tried to do it he, i could never— lever tried to do it he, i could never get _ lever tried to do it he, i could never get the _ lever tried to do it he, i could never get the fire _ lever tried to do it he, i could never get the fire to _ lever tried to do it he, i could never get the fire to light - lever tried to do it he, i could never get the fire to light or i never get the fire to light or something _ never get the fire to light or something ghastly, - never get the fire to light or something ghastly, so, - never get the fire to light or something ghastly, so, "go| never get the fire to light or - something ghastly, so, "go away!". salad _ something ghastly, so, "go away!". salad is _ something ghastly, so, "go away!". salad is ready _ something ghastly, so, "go away!". salad is ready-— something ghastly, so, "go away!". salad is ready. cooking is something that i love talking _ salad is ready. cooking is something that i love talking to _ salad is ready. cooking is something that i love talking to him _ salad is ready. cooking is something that i love talking to him about. - salad is ready. cooking is something that i love talking to him about. he i that i love talking to him about. he loved watching cookery programmes. hairy bikers is one of his favourites. we are nowjoined by the hairy bikers themselves, dave myers and si king. the hairy bikers. what is that like men, this hearing sophie wessex saying that?— men, this hearing sophie wessex sa in: that? ~ ., ., ., ., saying that? who would have thought it? we are now— saying that? who would have thought it? we are now by _ saying that? who would have thought it? we are now by royal— saying that? who would have thoughtj it? we are now by royal appointment! it is great, yeah. it is flattering. we always — it is great, yeah. it is flattering. we always thought we would like to reach _ we always thought we would like to reach a _ we always thought we would like to reach a broad demographic and i
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think— reach a broad demographic and i think this — reach a broad demographic and i think this is... pretty broad. good food _ think this is... pretty broad. good food transcends race, relations, politics — food transcends race, relations, politics to _ food transcends race, relations, olitics. ., , ., ., . politics. to be fair to prince phili - , politics. to be fair to prince philip. it — politics. to be fair to prince philip. it is— politics. to be fair to prince philip, it is part _ politics. to be fair to prince philip, it is part of - politics. to be fair to prince philip, it is part of his - politics. to be fair to prince - philip, it is part of his heritage, you know, barbecuing. the greeks, they love a barbecue. i you know, barbecuing. the greeks, they love a barbecue.— they love a barbecue. i love that prince charles _ they love a barbecue. i love that prince charles gave _ they love a barbecue. i love that prince charles gave away - they love a barbecue. i love that prince charles gave away the - they love a barbecue. i love that| prince charles gave away the fact that in every family there is a fit of a barbecue competition and etiquette and there is nothing like the cold be like to bring out the alpha male and shoving prince charles out of the way when he tried to come close! i charles out of the way when he tried to come close!— to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious. to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious- it's _ to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious. it's true, _ to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious. it's true, isn't _ to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious. it's true, isn't it. - to come close! i loved that, it was hilarious. it's true, isn't it. get- hilarious. it's true, isn't it. get off the barbecue.— off the barbecue. people will alwa s, off the barbecue. people will always, there _ off the barbecue. people will always, there will _ off the barbecue. people will always, there will always - off the barbecue. people will always, there will always be | off the barbecue. people will| always, there will always be a off the barbecue. people will- always, there will always be a fella coming _ always, there will always be a fella coming along starting to throw stuff in the _ coming along starting to throw stuff in the air— coming along starting to throw stuff in the air and honestly have no idea what _ in the air and honestly have no idea what they're — in the air and honestly have no idea what they're doing. many years ago there _ what they're doing. many years ago there was— what they're doing. many years ago there was a — what they're doing. many years ago there was a boy watching a documentary about the royal family and on _ documentary about the royal family and on the — documentary about the royal family and on the bbc, behind the royal family. _ and on the bbc, behind the royal family, and it was a barbecue i think— family, and it was a barbecue i think at— family, and it was a barbecue i think at balmoral and i was very impressed — think at balmoral and i was very impressed by the fact that prince philip _ impressed by the fact that prince philip was —
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impressed by the fact that prince philip was making a salad dressing in a iam _ philip was making a salad dressing in a iam iar~ — philip was making a salad dressing in ajamjar. who philip was making a salad dressing in a jam jar. who would have thought that one _ in a jam jar. who would have thought that one day— in a jam jar. who would have thought that one day he would be watching us on the _ that one day he would be watching us on the telly— that one day he would be watching us on the telly doing the same! we probably— on the telly doing the same! we probably had a cheaperjam jar, to be fair~ _ probably had a cheaper 'am 'ar, to be fair. ~ ., ,, probably had a cheaper 'am 'ar, to be fair. ~ ., , ., ~' probably had a cheaper 'am 'ar, to be fair. ~ ., i. ~ i. probably had a cheaper 'am 'ar, to be fair. ~ ., ~ , be fair. what you think your parents would have — be fair. what you think your parents would have of— be fair. what you think your parents would have of this? _ be fair. what you think your parents would have of this? my _ be fair. what you think your parents would have of this? my parents - would have of this? my parents wouldn't have _ would have of this? my parents wouldn't have believed - would have of this? my parents wouldn't have believed it. - would have of this? my parents wouldn't have believed it. my l would have of this? my parents - wouldn't have believed it. my mother and father were great royalists and she used to say my father looked like a mountbattens. she went so far as to cutting all of his pictures out of the newspaper and drawing glasses on that my dad had and said look, it's our gym. so would have been over the moon! you look, it's our gym. so would have been over the moon!— look, it's our gym. so would have been over the moon! you look like ou are been over the moon! you look like you are in — been over the moon! you look like you are in your— been over the moon! you look like you are in your own _ been over the moon! you look like you are in your own royal - been over the moon! you look like you are in your own royal castle i been over the moon! you look like you are in your own royal castle at| you are in your own royal castle at the moment. it you are in your own royal castle at the moment-— you are in your own royal castle at the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind — the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind where _ the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind where we _ the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind where we are. - the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind where we are. it's i the moment. it does look, anyway, never mind where we are. it's not l never mind where we are. it's not ours, put it that way. for never mind where we are. it's not ours, put it that way.— never mind where we are. it's not ours, put it that way. for a moment i thouuht ours, put it that way. for a moment i thought you _ ours, put it that way. for a moment i thought you lived _ ours, put it that way. for a moment i thought you lived like _ ours, put it that way. for a moment i thought you lived like to _ ours, put it that way. for a moment i thought you lived like to princes i i thought you lived like to princes in your own castle. —— two princes.
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we're all part of the same gig, you know? ., ~ �* ., ~' we're all part of the same gig, you know? ., . �* ., ~ ., know? not! we're working today so actually our — know? not! we're working today so actually our hotel. _ know? not! we're working today so actually our hotel. we _ know? not! we're working today so actually our hotel. we are - know? not! we're working today so actually our hotel. we are often i know? not! we're working today so actually our hotel. we are often a i actually our hotel. we are often a holiday— actually our hotel. we are often a holiday soon so no, it was a lovely surprise _ holiday soon so no, it was a lovely surprise when this came out. tiers; surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, _ surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, it _ surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, it is _ surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, it is great. - surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, it is great. i- surprise when this came out. very much so. yeah, it is great. i think| much so. yeah, it is great. i think prince philip _ much so. yeah, it is great. i think prince philip came _ much so. yeah, it is great. i think prince philip came to _ much so. yeah, it is great. i think prince philip came to our- much so. yeah, it is great. i think prince philip came to our school. | prince philip came to our school. came _ prince philip came to our school. came in— prince philip came to our school. came in a — prince philip came to our school. came in a helicopter, i had never seen _ came in a helicopter, i had never seen a _ came in a helicopter, i had never seen a helicopter before. landed on the rugby— seen a helicopter before. landed on the rugby pitch. but then one day he is watching _ the rugby pitch. but then one day he is watching us on the telly! it�*s is watching us on the telly! it's uuite is watching us on the telly! it's quite nice _ is watching us on the telly! it�*s quite nice that, isn't it? is watching us on the telly! it's quite nice that, isn't it? it's. quite nice that, isn't it? it's remarkable. _ quite nice that, isn't it? it's remarkable. it's _ quite nice that, isn't it? it's remarkable. it'sjust i quite nice that, isn't it? it's remarkable. it's just trying | quite nice that, isn't it? it's. remarkable. it'sjust trying to quite nice that, isn't it? it's- remarkable. it'sjust trying to get remarkable. it's 'ust trying to get our head remarkable. it'sjust trying to get your head around _ remarkable. it'sjust trying to get your head around prince - remarkable. it'sjust trying to get your head around prince philip i remarkable. it'sjust trying to get your head around prince philip is| your head around prince philip is set there in, wherever he is, in a royal, royal nurse, watching us on the telly. —— royalness. put royal, royal nurse, watching us on the telly. -- royalness.— the telly. -- royalness. put your -hone the telly. -- royalness. put your phone down _ the telly. -- royalness. put your phone down and _ the telly. -- royalness. put your phone down and watch - the telly. -- royalness. put your phone down and watch the i the telly. -- royalness. put yourj phone down and watch the telly! the telly. -- royalness. put your i phone down and watch the telly! the bikers _ phone down and watch the telly! the bikers are _ phone down and watch the telly! the bikers are run. i�*m phone down and watch the telly! the bikers are run-— bikers are run. i'm 'ust going to stop doing h bikers are run. i'm just going to stop doing whatever _ bikers are run. i'm just going to stop doing whatever i'm - bikers are run. i'm just going to stop doing whatever i'm doing l bikers are run. i'm just going to l stop doing whatever i'm doing by being royal and then, and then watch
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the bikers. i’m being royal and then, and then watch the bikers. �* , , ~ , the bikers. i'm sure he strikes me as a kind of _ the bikers. i'm sure he strikes me as a kind of chap _ the bikers. i'm sure he strikes me as a kind of chap that _ the bikers. i'm sure he strikes me as a kind of chap that would i the bikers. i'm sure he strikes me as a kind of chap that would have | as a kind of chap that would have watched something live rather than on catch up, don't you think? yes. yes absolutely _ on catch up, don't you think? yes. yes absolutely right, _ on catch up, don't you think? yes. yes absolutely right, i _ on catch up, don't you think? yes. yes absolutely right, i do, - on catch up, don't you think? yes. yes absolutely right, i do, too. i think it is i am sitting here with my 999 think it is i am sitting here with my egg and chips and watching the bikers. ~ ., ., my egg and chips and watching the bikers. . ., ., . , my egg and chips and watching the bikers. ~ . . . , it's bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice, bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice. though. _ bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice, though, isn't _ bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice, though, isn't it? _ bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice, though, isn't it? i— bikers. what the egg and chips? it's nice, though, isn't it? i actually- nice, though, isn't it? i actually had ea . nice, though, isn't it? i actually had egg and — nice, though, isn't it? i actually had egg and chips _ nice, though, isn't it? i actually had egg and chips yesterday, i nice, though, isn't it? i actually- had egg and chips yesterday, chaps. i had it yesterday. you cannot beat it with a bit of and brown sauce. —— catch—up. and brown sauce. i’m it with a bit of and brown sauce. -- catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with ou. in catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with you- in one — catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with you- in one of— catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with you. in one of those _ catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with you. in one of those moods - catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with you. in one of those moods where i catch-up. and brown sauce. i'm with l you. in one of those moods where you weren't sure whether you wanted red or brown. half weren't sure whether you wanted red or brown. . . weren't sure whether you wanted red or brown. ., ., ., ~ or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. or brown. half and half. i think it is weird- it— or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. it is _ or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. it is one _ or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. it is one of _ or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. it is one of the - or brown. half and half. i think it is weird. it is one of the other. i is weird. it is one of the other. no, _ is weird. it is one of the other. no, there _ is weird. it is one of the other. no, there is— is weird. it is one of the other. no, there is nothing wrong with combining the two.— no, there is nothing wrong with combining the two. thank you, thank ou. it is combining the two. thank you, thank you. it is vulgar! _ combining the two. thank you, thank you. it is vulgar! maybe _ combining the two. thank you, thank
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you. it is vulgar! maybe win - combining the two. thank you, thank you. it is vulgar! maybe win can i combining the two. thank you, thank you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get i you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's — you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's -- _ you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's -- maybe _ you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's -- maybe one - you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's -- maybe one day i you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get the queen's -- maybe one day we i you. it is vulgar! maybe win can get i the queen's -- maybe one day we can the queen's —— maybe one day we can get the queen's appointment as to whether you can mix red and brown sauce. and congratulations u2 on the royal appointment! the sauce. and congratulations u2 on the royal appointment!— royal appointment! the harry -- the hai mike royal appointment! the harry -- the hairy mike bikers' _ royal appointment! the harry -- the hairy mike bikers' book— royal appointment! the harry -- the hairy mike bikers' book is _ hairy mike bikers' book is fantastic. it's rare to get such personal insight into the royal family, and we can speak about this now with former royal correspondent, jennie bond. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. it is pretty rare to get them talking in this way, isn't it? yes, they don't like giving a lot away about themselves. they are a very private family, as we all know, so this would be a welcome change of image, actually, in a time that has been quite rough for the monarchy and the royalfamily. lately been quite rough for the monarchy and the royal family. lately with prince andrew's court case pending, some bad publicity surrounding one of prince charles�*s charities, so this will be very welcome and it is
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a very affectionate portrait on the man who was really the linchpin of the family. for almost man who was really the linchpin of the family. foralmost100 man who was really the linchpin of the family. for almost 100 years, prince charles says, they were very lucky to have him for so long. and they all depended on him probably a lot more than any of us realised. interesting you make that point and interesting you make that point and i was going to ask you about that, because this is a programme that i think was conceived to celebrate his 100 birthday in the hope that he would make that landmark and sadly as we know he died at the age of 99. but even today the prince andrew allegations are in the papers, the access row over prince charles is in the papers. he would have been instrumental in trying to guide the family through this crisis. well. instrumental in trying to guide the family through this crisis. well, he would in his _ family through this crisis. well, he would in his slightly _ family through this crisis. well, he would in his slightly younger i family through this crisis. well, he | would in his slightly younger years. i think when he reached his late 90s he stood back and let the queen be the matriarch that she is and she is very much now the head of the family. but prince philip, as this
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documentary illustrates, was a man that they would go to with their problems. he was a sounding board. as prince harry says in the documentary. he was a fantastic listener. but he didn't probe, as prince harry says, he didn't interrogate. he let you find your own space to air your problems and try and work your way through your problems. he was a facilitator in that sense. very important in the family. that sense. very important in the famil . ., ., . ., , family. the quote from prince harry is, oh, family. the quote from prince harry is. oh. you — family. the quote from prince harry is. oh. you are _ family. the quote from prince harry is, oh, you are going _ family. the quote from prince harry is, oh, you are going off— family. the quote from prince harry is, oh, you are going off to - is, oh, you are going off to afghanistan. he was very mac —— matter—of—fact. when he came back he said our oh, you made it, how was it was a very matter—of—fact. $5 i was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't think— was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't think he — was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't think he would _ was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't think he would have - was a very matter-of-fact. as i say, i don't think he would have proved l i don't think he would have proved deeply into the turmoil of war. he was a military man. he had seen action obviously in the second world war and obviously felt that harry would reveal as much as he wanted to
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in his own time, but it is a very affectionate portrayal. robert hartman who was a correspondence alongside me, actually, and still does a great deal on royalty, but fantastic access. i mean, we'll see into prince philip's library, into his private rooms, just as they were... and it is live. there are thousands and thousands of books, including, iam thousands and thousands of books, including, i am sure, they hairy bikers. many, many cookery books. he was also quite keen on beriberi. good to know! just a final thought. many of us will, obviously people will watch this documentary. many people will have watched one thing like the crown, i know i have. and you wonder how much reality is in a programme like that compared with what they really are like. you have that view, you have greater knowledge and insight than many of us. do we get a good reflection from
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things like the crown? you us. do we get a good reflection from things like the crown?— things like the crown? you get a fraud view _ things like the crown? you get a fraud view want _ things like the crown? you get a fraud view want what _ things like the crown? you get a fraud view want what went i things like the crown? you get a fraud view want what went on i things like the crown? you get a i fraud view want what went on and what goes on —— broadview. but as i always say, you have to remember, it is a drama, it is fictionalised, it is a drama, it is fictionalised, it is not what really happened, but broadly you get the drift of history. broadly you get the drift of histo . . ,. . broadly you get the drift of histo . ., ,. ., . ., history. fascinating. so much for talkin: history. fascinating. so much for talking to us, grateful— history. fascinating. so much for talking to us, grateful for - history. fascinating. so much for talking to us, grateful for you i talking to us, grateful for you joining us on a sunday morning. prince philip: the royal family remembers will be aired on wednesday at 9:00pm on bbc one. it is coming up to 7:30am. we can join andrew marr to find out what's on the programme this morning. lots happening, diplomatic rows, lots to talk about. bill lots happening, diplomatic rows, lots to talk about.— lots to talk about. all of that stuff. lots to talk about. all of that stuff- and — lots to talk about. all of that stuff. and the _ lots to talk about. all of that stuff. and the biggest i lots to talk about. all of that stuff. and the biggest single j stuff. and the biggest single challenge facing the world is the climate emergency. irisjohnson is overin climate emergency. irisjohnson is over in washington tomorrow talking to president biden about that. the conference coming in glasgow in
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november. talking to alok sharma, the minister in charge of all of that. joy sadiq khan, the mayor of london, ed davey, liberal democrat member. because it is their conference this weekend. also richard radcliffe who is the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe who has been held in iran in different ways for 2000 days. been held in iran in different ways for 2000 days-— been held in iran in different ways for 2000 days. in november 2019, the small yorkshire village of fishlake made the national news. it's after the river don burst its banks and flooded over 17 homes and businesses — leading to the entire village having to be evacuated. resident's are now hoping a book they've written will raise funds to help those still affected. 0ur reporter phillip norton is in fishlake this morning. we just saw those dramatic pictures, philip, but obviously the
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repercussions are still being widely felt? ., ., , , ., felt? yeah, absolutely. morning, and welcome to — felt? yeah, absolutely. morning, and welcome to fishlake. _ felt? yeah, absolutely. morning, and welcome to fishlake. who _ felt? yeah, absolutely. morning, and welcome to fishlake. who could i welcome to fishlake. who could forget those images from 2019. this is the cricket club here, this is one of those images that people won't forget. this was completely underwater after that month of fell in 24 hours, the nearby don bursting its banks. the water level here came right up to, a couple of feet up to the wall here. there is a community spirit he had really got this area through. i'm going to speak to a few of them, because this book that has come out has really helped to bring people together. tell us your memory of what happened? it was horrible. as you say, we had about a month worth— as you say, we had about a month worth of— as you say, we had about a month worth of rain — as you say, we had about a month worth of rain in 24 hours, we were deluged, — worth of rain in 24 hours, we were deluged, i— worth of rain in 24 hours, we were deluged, i remember going to bed at about— deluged, i remember going to bed at about 9:30pm thinking we were through— about 9:30pm thinking we were through it, because the measuring station _ through it, because the measuring station up — through it, because the measuring station up the river was showing that it _ station up the river was showing that it was — station up the river was showing that it was dropping, then i had a bang _ that it was dropping, then i had a bang on— that it was dropping, then i had a bang on the door at about 11 o'clock that night, —
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bang on the door at about 11 o'clock that night, and somebody said, you've — that night, and somebody said, you've got _ that night, and somebody said, you've got to get out, it's coming. within— you've got to get out, it's coming. within no— you've got to get out, it's coming. within no time at all that is about three _ within no time at all that is about three foot deep in my house. so absolutely devastated the place. how has this book — absolutely devastated the place. hm“ has this book come about, and tell us about it? the has this book come about, and tell us about it?— us about it? the book came about because we _ us about it? the book came about because we had _ us about it? the book came about because we had some _ us about it? the book came about because we had some amazing i us about it? the book came about i because we had some amazing support from so _ because we had some amazing support from so many people at the time of and immediately after the flood, it was a _ and immediately after the flood, it was a gentleman by the name of neal west who _ was a gentleman by the name of neal west who was the designer behind it, whose _ west who was the designer behind it, whose idea _ west who was the designer behind it, whose idea it was originally, to thank— whose idea it was originally, to thank all— whose idea it was originally, to thank all those people. so we kicked off with _ thank all those people. so we kicked off with a _ thank all those people. so we kicked off with a meeting at the beginning off with a meeting at the beginning of last— off with a meeting at the beginning of last year and had a team of about five of _ of last year and had a team of about five of us _ of last year and had a team of about five of us who have worked with the whole _ five of us who have worked with the whole community, i mean, we've got stories— whole community, i mean, we've got stories from — whole community, i mean, we've got stories from all the residents who were _ stories from all the residents who were for— stories from all the residents who were for it — stories from all the residents who were for it in the book, and today is the _ were for it in the book, and today is the launch of it, this afternoon in the _ is the launch of it, this afternoon in the church, it isjust a way of saying — in the church, it isjust a way of saying thank you. it in the church, it is 'ust a way of saying thank you._ saying thank you. it is almost a hoto saying thank you. it is almost a photo essay — saying thank you. it is almost a photo essay with _ saying thank you. it is almost a photo essay with people's i saying thank you. it is almost a i photo essay with people's individual stories? it photo essay with people's individual stories? , stories? it is, indeed. the community— stories? it is, indeed. the community has _ stories? it is, indeed. the community has been i stories? it is, indeed. the i community has been fantastic stories? it is, indeed. the - community has been fantastic and that has— community has been fantastic and that has been one of the great things— that has been one of the great things for— that has been one of the great things for so many of us. it helps to get— things for so many of us. it helps to get us— things for so many of us. it helps to get us through this horrible
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period — to get us through this horrible period by— to get us through this horrible period by galvanising the village. i'm period by galvanising the village. i'm going — period by galvanising the village. i'm going to come onto harold, you are a resident here. tell us about your memories of that awful time? well, me and my wife decided we would have a walk around the village, because we had had warnings that it was going to flood. 50 one that it was going to flood. so we were walking — that it was going to flood. so we were walking around _ that it was going to flood. so we were walking around the - that it was going to flood. so we were walking around the village | were walking around the village about _ were walking around the village about ten— were walking around the village about ten o'clock, _ were walking around the village about ten o'clock, and - were walking around the village about ten o'clock, and my- were walking around the village about ten o'clock, and my son i were walking around the village i about ten o'clock, and my son came over to _ about ten o'clock, and my son came over to help— about ten o'clock, and my son came over to help us— about ten o'clock, and my son came over to help us and _ about ten o'clock, and my son came over to help us and he _ about ten o'clock, and my son came over to help us and he was- over to help us and he was sandbagging _ over to help us and he was sandbagging other- over to help us and he was| sandbagging other houses, over to help us and he was- sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, _ sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, and — sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, and it — sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, and it wasn't _ sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, and it wasn't until— sandbagging other houses, and ours as well, and it wasn't until about i as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, _ as well, and it wasn't until about 2am. my— as well, and it wasn't until about 2am. my wife _ as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, my wife and _ as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, my wife and i— as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, my wife and i and - as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, my wife and i and our- as well, and it wasn't until about 2am, my wife and i and our son, j as well, and it wasn't until about i 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were— 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting— 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting in— 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting in the _ 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting in the dining _ 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting in the dining room i 2am, my wife and i and our son, we were sitting in the dining room andl were sitting in the dining room and were sitting in the dining room and we suddenly— were sitting in the dining room and we suddenly saw_ were sitting in the dining room and we suddenly saw water— were sitting in the dining room and we suddenly saw water coming - were sitting in the dining room and we suddenly saw water coming upl we suddenly saw water coming up through— we suddenly saw water coming up through the — we suddenly saw water coming up through the floors, _ we suddenly saw water coming up through the floors, and _ we suddenly saw water coming up through the floors, and it - we suddenly saw water coming up through the floors, and it would l through the floors, and it would then, _ through the floors, and it would then, my— through the floors, and it would then, myseh. _ through the floors, and it would then, my son, he _ through the floors, and it would then, my son, he said - through the floors, and it would then, my son, he said you've i through the floors, and it would i then, my son, he said you've got through the floors, and it would - then, my son, he said you've got to id then, my son, he said you've got to go out _ then, my son, he said you've got to go out within — then, my son, he said you've got to go out~withir115_ then, my son, he said you've got to go out. within 15 minutes, - then, my son, he said you've got to go out. within 15 minutes, three . go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of— go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of water~ _ go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of water. it _ go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of water. it came _ go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of water. it came in - go out. within 15 minutes, three foot of water. it came in from i go out. within 15 minutes, three i foot of water. it came in from the hack_ foot of water. it came in from the back garden— foot of water. it came in from the back garden and _ foot of water. it came in from the back garden and came _ foot of water. it came in from the back garden and came down - foot of water. it came in from the back garden and came down a - foot of water. it came in from the back garden and came down a lot| back garden and came down a lot of road and _ back garden and came down a lot of road and just — back garden and came down a lot of road and just outside, _ back garden and came down a lot of road and just outside, there - back garden and came down a lot of road and just outside, there was - back garden and came down a lot of road and just outside, there was a i road and just outside, there was a bil road and just outside, there was a big whirlpool _ road and just outside, there was a big whirlpool. carried _ road and just outside, there was a big whirlpool. carried my wife - road and just outside, there was a big whirlpool. carried my wife up. road and just outside, there was a i big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end _ big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end of— big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end of the — big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end of the grove _ big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end of the grove and _ big whirlpool. carried my wife up to the end of the grove and we - big whirlpool. carried my wife up to
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the end of the grove and we put- big whirlpool. carried my wife up to| the end of the grove and we put our cars there — the end of the grove and we put our cars there but— the end of the grove and we put our cars there. but as _ the end of the grove and we put our cars there. but as he _ the end of the grove and we put our cars there. but as he says, - cars there. but as he says, devastating _ cars there. but as he says, devastating. thank- cars there. but as he says, devastating. thank you - cars there. but as he says, devastating. thank you for| cars there. but as he says, - devastating. thank you forjoining us this— devastating. thank you forjoining us this morning. _ devastating. thank you forjoining us this morning. we _ devastating. thank you for 'oining us this morning.�* devastating. thank you for 'oining us this morning. we will have more stories from — us this morning. we will have more stories from fishlake _ us this morning. we will have more stories from fishlake later - us this morning. we will have more stories from fishlake later this - stories from fishlake later this morning as this book is lodged. what morning as this book is lodged. what a aood wa morning as this book is lodged. what a good way to — morning as this book is lodged. what a good way to shadows memories and make sure the experience is never forgotten. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00 this morning. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. chorley has been in the international spotlight this week with delegates from around the world gathered to take part in a g7 summit in the lancashire town. the event has been
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organised by the speaker of the commons and local mp sir lindsay hoyle and as mike stevens reports, there have been some glamorous visitors. bells ring. after a night of cakes, the delegates arrived. speakers from all over the world gathered at astley hall to discuss the important issues the day. and the important issues the day. and the locals came out to greet them. is just fantastic and everybody�*s been wonderful. it's really good for the town. i been wonderful. it's really good for the town. ., ~' . been wonderful. it's really good for the town. ., ,, . . . been wonderful. it's really good for the town. ., ,, . . ,. the town. i work at a local school as well. the town. i work at a local school as well- we _ the town. i work at a local school as well. we have _ the town. i work at a local school as well. we have representatives coming _ as well. we have representatives coming from the primary school. i usually _ coming from the primary school. i usually go — coming from the primary school. i usually go to washington, dc to see people _ usually go to washington, dc to see people. she usually go to washington, dc to see eo le. ,, ., , usually go to washington, dc to see ”eole. ,,
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usually go to washington, dc to see --eole. ,, .,, people. she has come here to see ou. not people. she has come here to see you- not quite _ people. she has come here to see you. not quite me. _ people. she has come here to see you. not quite me. and _ people. she has come here to see you. not quite me. and the - people. she has come here to see you. not quite me. and the us . you. not quite me. and the us delegation _ you. not quite me. and the us delegation were _ you. not quite me. and the us delegation were equally - you. not quite me. and the us delegation were equally as - delegation were equally as impressed. delegation were equally as impressed-— delegation were equally as imressed. ., . �* . impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am ve ha-- impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to — impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to be _ impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to be here _ impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to be here to _ impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to be here to see _ impressed. how are you? i'm ok, i am very happy to be here to see the - very happy to be here to see the pride _ very happy to be here to see the pride that— very happy to be here to see the pride that surely takes in his speaker— pride that surely takes in his speaker —— in their speaker. i think this is_ speaker —— in their speaker. i think this is very— speaker —— in their speaker. i think this is very important. of course we have _ this is very important. of course we have a _ this is very important. of course we have a special relationship between the uk _ have a special relationship between the uk and the us. this makes it more _ the uk and the us. this makes it more personal. it the uk and the us. this makes it more personal.— more personal. it is that great bondin: more personal. it is that great bonding that _ more personal. it is that great bonding that is _ more personal. it is that great bonding that is coming - more personal. it is that great bonding that is coming back. bonding that is coming back together. that is what i want to showcase in chorley. find together. that is what i want to showcase in chorley._ together. that is what i want to showcase in chorley. and what to showcase in chorley. and what to showcase it _ showcase in chorley. and what to showcase it was. _ showcase in chorley. and what to showcase it was. -- _ showcase in chorley. and what to showcase it was. -- what - showcase in chorley. and what to showcase it was. -- what are - showcase it was. —— what are showcase. mike stevens, bbc news, in chorley.
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doing an absolutely brilliantjob of showing of lancashire, giving them chorley cakes and lancashire hotpot. it is 7:37am. during the height of the pandemic, puppies were in high demand, and because of lockdown — it meant people could only seem virtually before buying. the charity the kennel club says this so—called 'click & collect�* trend has continued, making it easier for puppy farms to sell dogs bred in cruel conditions. welljoining us now is daniel callaghan, who bought a dog online that sadly died days after buying it, and certified breeder sussie wiles. tell us about your experience, daniel. that sounds very heartbreaking, in more ways than one. ~ . ., heartbreaking, in more ways than one. ~ ., ., ., heartbreaking, in more ways than one. . ., ., , . . heartbreaking, in more ways than one. . ., ., , . one. we did a lot of research and we oriainall one. we did a lot of research and we originally tried _ one. we did a lot of research and we originally tried to _ one. we did a lot of research and we originally tried to adopt _ one. we did a lot of research and we originally tried to adopt but - one. we did a lot of research and we originally tried to adopt but within i
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originally tried to adopt but within a three hour radius of our home we couldn't find any dogs that would be suitable for our home to adopt so we looked online, did all the research, but we found a dog that would suit us and our needs, i paid a substantial amount of money for them. what it home, got all the vet checks done and within 3— four days, he took a turn for the worst and went to the vets for three or four days and sadly passed away a week after having him so quite traumatic. and also expensive.— and also expensive. yes, the vet bill was £2500. _ and also expensive. yes, the vet bill was £2500. and _ and also expensive. yes, the vet bill was £2500. and what - and also expensive. yes, the vet bill was £2500. and what was . and also expensive. yes, the vet| bill was £2500. and what was the reason? he _ bill was £2500. and what was the reason? he had _ bill was £2500. and what was the reason? he had parvovirus - bill was £2500. and what was the reason? he had parvovirus which| bill was £2500. and what was the l reason? he had parvovirus which is the most deadly _ reason? he had parvovirus which is the most deadly disease _ reason? he had parvovirus which is the most deadly disease for - reason? he had parvovirus which is the most deadly disease for dogs l reason? he had parvovirus which is i the most deadly disease for dogs and it is typically contracted in puppy farms. we had been scammed by the person who sold us the puppy. but ou felt person who sold us the puppy. but you felt you had done all the necessary checks?— you felt you had done all the necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got _ necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got to _ necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got to the _ necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got to the place _ necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got to the place that - necessary checks? yes, it was only until we got to the place that rings| until we got to the place that rings it started to feel a bit hairy. they said they would send us the kennel club papers in the post which we thought was a little bit odd. in hindsight we still would have taken
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the dog because we wouldn't know the treatment the dog would have received if we hadn't taken him. in the end you have rupert who is a corgi. the end you have rupert who is a corn i. ~ the end you have rupert who is a corui. ~ . . the end you have rupert who is a corli, . ., ., , the end you have rupert who is a corui. ~ . . , ., . corgi. we have a bit of a royal theme running _ corgi. we have a bit of a royal theme running through - corgi. we have a bit of a royal theme running through this i corgi. we have a bit of a royal- theme running through this morning. one of his sisters is on the crown? yes, the same kennel sold her to the crown. . .. yes, the same kennel sold her to the crown. . ,, ., ,, , , . yes, the same kennel sold her to the crown. . ,, ., ,, ,, . , crown. talking to sussie, a proper reader. crown. talking to sussie, a proper reader- -- — crown. talking to sussie, a proper reader- -- -- _ crown. talking to sussie, a proper reader. -- -- breeder. _ crown. talking to sussie, a proper reader. -- -- breeder. what - crown. talking to sussie, a properj reader. -- -- breeder. what other reader. —— —— breeder. what other shortfalls and what do people look out for that went —— that happened to daniel? out for that went -- that happened to daniel? ., ., ., . , to daniel? you need to go and see the letter in _ to daniel? you need to go and see the letter in the _
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to daniel? you need to go and see the letter in the breeders - to daniel? you need to go and see the letter in the breeders home i to daniel? you need to go and see. the letter in the breeders home and see the _ the letter in the breeders home and see the puppy with the mother. a big red flag _ see the puppy with the mother. a big red flag is _ see the puppy with the mother. a big red flag is when the person asks for a deposit _ red flag is when the person asks for a deposit before you have even met or seen— a deposit before you have even met or seen the — a deposit before you have even met or seen the puppies. it is a 2—way thing _ or seen the puppies. it is a 2—way thing the — or seen the puppies. it is a 2—way thing. the breeder needs to find out that the _ thing. the breeder needs to find out that the puppy is the right home —— or the _ that the puppy is the right home —— or the home — that the puppy is the right home —— or the home is the right place for the puppies. making sure has been tnought— the puppies. making sure has been brought up properly. we the puppies. making sure has been brought up properly.— brought up properly. we are all listenin: brought up properly. we are all listening to _ brought up properly. we are all listening to you _ brought up properly. we are all listening to you and _ brought up properly. we are all listening to you and your - brought up properly. we are all listening to you and your words j brought up properly. we are all. listening to you and your words are very important but the cameraman is doing a greatjob of... very important but the cameraman is doing a great job of. . ._ doing a great 'ob of... melting our hearts! we — doing a great job of... melting our hearts! we are _ doing a great job of... melting our hearts! we are listening! - doing a great job of... melting our hearts! we are listening! yes, - doing a great job of... melting our| hearts! we are listening! yes, they do tend to take _ hearts! we are listening! yes, they do tend to take over. _ hearts! we are listening! yes, they do tend to take over. what - hearts! we are listening! yes, they do tend to take over. what we - hearts! we are listening! yes, they do tend to take over. what we all. do tend to take over. what we all noticed _ do tend to take over. what we all noticed in— do tend to take over. what we all noticed in lockdown was this complete acceleration of people saying. — complete acceleration of people saying. "i — complete acceleration of people saying, "i want a dog, i want a dog", — saying, "i want a dog, i want a dog", people that saying, "i want a dog, i want a dog". people that hadn't saying, "i want a dog, i want a dog", people that hadn't necessarily thought— dog", people that hadn't necessarily thought it _ dog", people that hadn't necessarily thought it through. you see them there _ thought it through. you see them there and — thought it through. you see them there and they are adorable but it is hard _ there and they are adorable but it is hard work having a dog, isn't it? and they— is hard work having a dog, isn't it? and they are — is hard work having a dog, isn't it? and they are quite vulnerable if they aren't looked after properly. yes _ they aren't looked after properly. yes and — they aren't looked after properly. yes and i— they aren't looked after properly. yes. and i think we're finding that
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now. the honeymoon is over and people are turning to rescues for rehoming their dogs because they have come teenagers and hard work and all that sort of thing so that is what you need to, as a reader, try and eliminate, make sure the home is really serious about it. you want a new family member for the next 12—15 years and put up with what all that entails. it is next 12-15 years and put up with what all that entails.— what all that entails. it is a really big _ what all that entails. it is a really big thing. _ what all that entails. it is a really big thing. we - what all that entails. it is a really big thing. we were l what all that entails. it is a i really big thing. we were one what all that entails. it is a - really big thing. we were one of those people that got a dog during lockdown and it is a huge commitment, walking and everything else, and you really have to do it and take it on. daniel, it is a huge commitment but also, a lot of people during lockdown who had dogs, maybe who were furloughed or something, saw it as an opportunity to read and make some money because the prices went through the roof. theo;r make some money because the prices went through the roof.— went through the roof. they did and it is 'ust went through the roof. they did and it isjust very _ went through the roof. they did and it is just very easy — went through the roof. they did and it isjust very easy to, _ went through the roof. they did and it isjust very easy to, obviously, - it is just very easy to, obviously, you couldn't see the dog because of lockdown restrictions. we were in contact with the breeder every single week and they were sending a
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video clips, sending us pictures. so there wasn't any suspicion. we saw videos of rupert with the mother of the letter as well so we thought everything was good but eddie spaghetti... == everything was good but eddie spaghetti- - -— everything was good but eddie spaghetti... -- lacko two, if i was approaching _ spaghetti... -- lacko two, if i was approaching somebody _ spaghetti... -- lacko two, if i was approaching somebody for - spaghetti... -- lacko two, if i was approaching somebody for a - spaghetti... -- lacko two, if i was| approaching somebody for a puppy today, _ approaching somebody for a puppy today, what is the paperwork i should — today, what is the paperwork i should be _ today, what is the paperwork i should be looking out for and what red flags? — should be looking out for and what red flaas? ., ., red flags? you need to get, the time ou ick red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up — red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up the _ red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up the puppy _ red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up the puppy you _ red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up the puppy you should - red flags? you need to get, the time you pick up the puppy you should be | you pick up the puppy you should be getting your registration certificate, the kennel club registration certificate, microchip papers, the insurance certificate, worming certificates, hopefully a puppy worming certificates, hopefully a puppy pack and certainly a diet sheet. all those things to make the transition from where the puppy was born into its new environment as easy as possible. all those things, you should be given at a time of
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picking up your puppy. find you should be given at a time of picking up your puppy. and quickly, what is the best _ picking up your puppy. and quickly, what is the best thing _ picking up your puppy. and quickly, what is the best thing to _ picking up your puppy. and quickly, what is the best thing to do - picking up your puppy. and quickly, what is the best thing to do with . what is the best thing to do with you suspect things aren't quite right? you suspect things aren't quite riuht? . . .. you suspect things aren't quite rilht? , ., ~'., you suspect things aren't quite riuht? , . ,, . . , you suspect things aren't quite rilht? , ., ~'., �* , right? just walk away. buy with your head, not right? just walk away. buy with your head. rrot with _ right? just walk away. buy with your head, not with your _ right? just walk away. buy with your head, not with your heart. _ right? just walk away. buy with your head, not with your heart. as - right? just walk away. buy with your head, not with your heart. as hard l head, not with your heart. as hard as it is to walk away from a puppy in a bad condition and bad surroundings, you have to because otherwise you are just fuelling these people that breed in cruel conditions. and a very good way to source a puppy well is through the kennel club. they have a fantastic facility called find a puppy. and, you know, they are assured breeders and very well check out and make sure we're doing all the right things, doing all the help tests and breeding them properly and rearing them properly so that is what you need to do, do your homework. looking at your puppies. you just think if only they would stay this small and sweet. the think if only they would stay this small and sweet.— small and sweet. the negative teenagers! _ small and sweet. the negative teenagers! these _ small and sweet. the negative teenagers! these guys - small and sweet. the negative teenagers! these guys are - small and sweet. the negative i teenagers! these guys are going small and sweet. the negative - teenagers! these guys are going to grow up like rupert, aren't they? —— they are teenagers. filth.
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grow up like rupert, aren't they? -- they are teenagers.— thank you very much, sussie, thank you for coming in, daniel.— you for coming in, daniel. thank ou, you for coming in, daniel. thank you. rupert- _ you for coming in, daniel. thank you. rupert- l'm _ you for coming in, daniel. thank you, rupert. i'm so _ you for coming in, daniel. thank you, rupert. i'm so sorry - you for coming in, daniel. thank you, rupert. i'm so sorry you . you for coming in, daniel. thank| you, rupert. i'm so sorry you had such a horrible experience as well. thanks for sharing it with us. now the weather with sarah. probably not as adorable as the little puppy. probably not as adorable as the little puppy-— probably not as adorable as the little -u--. ~ , ,, ., ., little puppy. laughs! how do you follow the cuteness _ little puppy. laughs! how do you follow the cuteness of _ little puppy. laughs! how do you follow the cuteness of the - little puppy. laughs! how do you follow the cuteness of the little i follow the cuteness of the little corgi puppies. they are just as cute when they are grown—up dogs, i can tell you that. the weather out there is a little bit great for some and a little bit drizzly. this is the picture in oxfordshire this morning so we have got some rain in the forecast and it has been a dry september for much of the uk, quite warm, too. a change for many of us. outbreaks of rain moving their way west to east during the day but they will be some drier and brighter weather developing in the west behind the rain. this is where we have already had the rain over recent hours. a couple of
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fronts, a couple of rites of rain moving east across the uk. a wet morning across parts of scotland, northern england. this rain pushes into eastern england as we move through into the afternoon and it will become quite heavy and potentially thundery. i did—a0 millimetres of rain in quite a short space of time. he could lead to some localised surface water flooding. a brighter picture later on after the morning mist and fog clears away. not quite as warm as recent days, 15—21. in the evening we will keep that when a front quite slow—moving across parts of eastern england, from east yorkshire all the way down to kent, a bit more rain to come overnight, could be quite a lot of water on the roads first thing monday morning. clear skies and a cold night and we have seen recently, with temperatures getting down to the mid single figures for some of us. still human across east anglia and the south—east where you are trapped under that when a fund to start monday morning. largely dry
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and settled with sunshine to start the week, things will then change from mid week onwards. later in the week, you will notice things turning more autumnal with wet and windy weather. high pressure moving on from the azores will keep things largely settled, more pressure from the north of the uk trying to move on from the north—west. monday itself, but waterfront in the south—east, so punchy and drizzly rain there. for much of the uk, not a bad day. predominately dry and sunny. starting overfrom the north—west later on. temperatures 15-22 north—west later on. temperatures 15—22 on sunday. into tuesday, early morning mist and some fog around what should slowly lift and clear away, so we are looking at a largely dry day, light winds for most of us but the breeze will pick up on the north—west ahead of the next fund which will be moving later on. temperatures 15— 21 degrees, a pleasant enough day, that is when things start to shift. wednesday
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onwards, low pressure moving its way east across the uk. that will bring windy conditions and also wet weather as well. most of the wet and windy weather will be to the north—west of the uk, still a bit drier, we are all going to notice that it will not be quite as warm over the next week or so as it has been for september so far. thank you, sarah. i was thank you, sarah. iwas in thank you, sarah. i was in portsmouth yesterday at lunchtime, blue skies, sun was out, everybody sitting up, it was almost like someone again.— sitting up, it was almost like someone again. sitting up, it was almost like someone aaain. . , someone again. the autumn is well and truly coming — someone again. the autumn is well and truly coming to _ someone again. the autumn is well and truly coming to it? _ someone again. the autumn is well and truly coming to it? goodbye, i and truly coming to it? goodbye, some are. we will have headlines at 8am, but for now, time for click.
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welcome to click, hope you are doing 0k. welcome to click, hope you are doing ok. this week we're going to be talking about videogames, but perhaps in the way you might think. i don't know about you, lara, but my boy is now playing more games online with his friends, which means i'm having to start thinking about the type of games that he wants to play and who he's talking to online. are you at that stage? we're not there just yet, but we are hoping, when the time comes, she is just now into the nice, light—hearted stuff, and i really don't like shooting games. yeah, yeah, exactly. and we do know that there are constant suspicions about links between violent games and violent people, and that's something that infuriates the gaming community. but that's not actually what we're talking about this week. we're notjust talking about the playing of the games, but also the chat that goes on alongside them. now, that can be within the games or on other chat platforms that gamers have
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open at the same time. and although a lot of the chat is about gameplay orjust talking to your mates, popular platforms have historically also played host to more sinister conversations and even become places to recruit people into extremist groups. we joined forces with a group of investigators who've been watching game streams and listening to the conversations happening in the gaming world. and as carl miller explains, what they learned was a revelation. today, we're going to be exploring our nazi camp that we built. in fact, as i've been watching
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a spattering of games being played recently, i've been horrified to learn just what a fertile ground for extremist culture they can turn out to be. mainstream games, as well as indie and custom made ones, have become places not only to play online, but spaces where like minded people meet, chat and posture. how about we try to win a battle royale across multiple games while chatting nationalism? this is mark collett, the founder of the white nationalist group patriotic alternative, talking to players on call of duty. it's one of the many examples of what the team have come up with, representing just a taste of what's out there. online gaming basically forms a means for people to connect over a shared hobby online. and this includes extremists, which can be really, really important in terms of advancing and furthering the extremist movement globally. within these huge gaming platform, small but dedicated communities of extremists opportunistically use to chat, either built into the games
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or on sites popular with gamers to create a culture where extremist views can seem normal. so, it's not sieg—heiling, it's not wearing swastikas or waving, you know, hitlerflags, it's just like you do with your normal friends. you sit at home after school and you play games. and so i think the gaming element to it can create the sense that far right activism is just like any other activity that you enjoy. and of course, once you're in that world, then the radicalization can happen. that's when you're all of a sudden you're starting to go to other meetings, just trying to go to smaller groups that aren't necessarily playing games. but you're talking about politics more explicitly, like at least with cod, they haven't totally bent over to this like strong female lead characters in every military shooter. unlike the kind of wider gaming world where the better you are gaming, the more prowess you get in this space. it's not necessarily that people are just really happy or excited to play a game
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with a famous far—right figure. and so it kind of almost works the opposite way around. in these, the extreme right wing have potentially found safe harbors to broadcast their ideology or to engage in more traditional propagandizing, the sorts of things that they would have done a few years ago on facebook, youtube and twitter. the topics are all too familiar misogyny, anti—semitism and homophobia. but all of this does go beyond just community building. the game can build whole spaces where theirfar right fantasies can come alive. these are small and not played by a huge amount of people. but what they do allow extremists to do is to sort of create custom made role playing experiences, for you to live out your radicalised fantasies online, to do things like run a concentration camp or participate in a terrorist attack. so do you guys think after hitler read the diary of anne frank, he started checking the attic? i'm sure! games which are set up,
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which allow you to fight against feminists or play as donald trump, you know, they're sort of dog whistles or nudge, nudge, wink, wink, which advertise to other players that you might have a far right ideology. although these numbers are small, the way it can play out is highly disturbing, such as the attack in christchurch, new zealand. the killer filmed the massacre with a camera strapped to his head, mimicking the point of view shot of a video game and then streamed the whole thing online. and actually so much does it look like call of duty that far right figures have taken that footage and around it they've placed the elements of a computer game. while many of these are now hard to find, it shows how games can be used to memorialize terrorist attack and reflect the ideologies of the far right. the wall just got ten feet taller. this isn't a straightforward story of how games produce terrorists. what we do have here is something more complex and subtle than that. it's about how games can be spaces which allow extremist communities to be sustained and to develop, especially in the face of increased
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enforcement from places like facebook and twitter. this isn'tjust about culture, though, it's also about money. new research suggests that streaming propaganda on platforms popular with gamers can be used by extremists to monetize their audiences. how about a shirt, though? some of the ways that you can get money on the video game streaming world is through sponsorships with advertising. and that's kind of more traditional ways of making money — the newer way is to take donations directly. so you kind of cut out the middleman, take their donations directly from the people watching you. this is interesting in the far right space because they're not usually playing the video games themselves. so usually just talking or maybe they have a game going in the background. but that's not really why we're there. really, the reason they're
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there is to to talk politics and to convey hate speech, to incite violence, things like that. the more incendiary, my speech, the more money i'm going to make, you can kind of dial up and down the rhetoric and money. i'm talking easily six figures by many of the creators that i looked at. so thinking about probably ten of them in particular, that were earning more than $50,000 a year, some of them more than $10,000 a month. megan's research on this world of extremist streamers centred on us based dlive, who say they've stopped the monetization of extremist speech, but the practice isn't restricted to one platform or one region. we approached the companies about what they were doing to deal with extremist content. some of the games featured here were removed after we contacted them and others have been taken down after being on the platform for a while. but a bigger issue still remains, and the responses that we did receive were all very similar. they all reiterated that they have zero tolerance policies against hate and violent extremism of any kind, and
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they all proactively try to find and remove any content that violates their community guidelines. so gaming and gaming platforms are being used by certain far right groups to make money, exert influence and build community. but the big question is how significant a threat this really is. it's so easy to turn around and say that this is this is blown up, that this is, you know, exaggerated. and we've heard this before year after year that, you know, the threat of the far right isn't as big as everyone says is. the fact of the matter is, in the last three or four years, we've seen record numbers of terrorism arrests from the far right in the uk we've seen huge increased numbers in terms of young people and young far right groupings existing in the uk, many of which engage in gaming. and i think that that's probably one of the concerning trends which we're seeing of gaming right now, is it's just another avenue to easily reach young people, potentially vulnerable people, to some of the most dangerous and violent ideologies which are which are
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being spread currently. any idea that these things are kind of overblown is a luxury. and i'd love it to be true. but the truth of the matter is far right. politics kills people and it recruits people and it ruins people's lives. and gaming is an element of which the far right using to do that right now. carl, as always, an excellent investigation, thank you so much. that was a really difficult watch, i have to say, and my heart sinks that this stuff makes it so easily online. is there is there any way of controlling this kind of thing? these are huge platforms. there's all kinds of activities that happen on there. the vast majority of their use is completely benign. and it can be really overwhelming for any company really to try and accurately and reliably spot when when when when they're being misused in the ways that our programme highlights common, the platforms, whether it's the gaming ones or the chat ones, actuallyjust look out for trigger words. you can have a huge talk about hitler without anyone being radicalized. and there's plenty of
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radicalization that happens without mentioning hitler or really other kinds of like trigger word, extremist phrases as well. so you know that it's never as simple as simply looking for the presence of some words within chats. some of the companies that we saw in your report, like roadblocks and minecraft, are big. they've got money. why are they not able to help themselves or technology companies, whether it's roadblocks or facebook is kind of walking this kind of balancing act. on the one hand, you've got the kind of embarrassment and the harm from that platforms being misused on the other, the kind of cost and difficulty in enforcing it. and they're all going to kind of arrive at some kind of weird point of least pain in the middle there where they kind of balance the kind of like the costs and on the one side and the kind of public risks on the other. and i think currently right now is just less visible that this kind of stuff is happening on the gaming platforms. they've just had less embarrassment and less public exposure around it. karl, thanks very much for covering this story for us, and that's it for the short cuts,
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a click for this week. the full length version is, of course, waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with a team on social media, find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at bvc. thanks for watching, masisi bhabhi. —— thanks for watching, we'll see you soon.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. our headlines today. soaring gas prices lead to concern over food supplies — the government and industry leaders will hold meetings today and tomorrow to tackle the problem. invitations to book covid booster jabs will be sent to more than a million people in england in the coming week a capsule carrying the first all—civilian crew into space returns to earth after three days in orbit. liverpool go top of the premier league after victory over crystal palace. this man sadio mane, got his 100th goal for the club to help them stay unbeaten this season.
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the glitter ball is back — strictly returned to our screens — we'll get an expert's assessment of this yea r�*s contestants, which include our own dan. we have got some rain in the forecast today, moving east through the day, there could be some localised flooding across parts of eastern angle but brightening from the west later. all the details throughout the programme. it's sunday the 19th of september. our top story. the impact of soaring wholesale gas prices will be discussed at a series of meetings between the government and industry leaders over the coming days. the increase in the cost of gas has led to warnings of a knock—on effect on food supplies. the business secretary kwasi kwarteng says he will meet with industry figures to plan a way forward. our business correspondent katy austin reports.
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the reasons wholesale gas prices have soared include high demand and lower wind and solar generation. the business secretary out object meetings yesterday with energy companies. high places have pushed small suppliers to the wall and there is concern more will follow as soon as next week. the record-breaking - soon as next week. the record-breaking price i soon as next week. the| record-breaking price of record—breaking price of international gas leads through to the market and we have already seen the market and we have already seen the failures in recent weeks, partly as a consequence of that and the future of the market is difficult to tell whether the bill be any more. the rising cost is a worry for steelmakers which need a lot of energy. another knock—on effect is a shortage of carbon dioxide, a by—product when fertiliser is produced and two large uk plants which make it out close to. the owner of one large poultry group which includes bernard matthews called the carbon dioxide issue a massive body blow, it is used by meat producers and the packaging process most as the next couple of
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weeks unfold and the gas price increase and shutting of the plants begins to feed throughout thing people see gaps on the shelves fairly soon. taste people see gaps on the shelves fairly soon-— people see gaps on the shelves fairly soon. people see gaps on the shelves fairl soon. ~ . ., ., ., fairly soon. we are not going to run out of food. — fairly soon. we are not going to run out of food. big _ fairly soon. we are not going to run out of food, big red _ fairly soon. we are not going to run out of food, big red letters, - out of food, big red letters, underlined we will not run out of food but there are going to be major concerns about the continuity of supply to supermarkets and convenience stores and two restaurants and takeaways. the risinu restaurants and takeaways. the rising price _ restaurants and takeaways. the rising price of — restaurants and takeaways. the rising price of gas is being felt by businesses, it is likely to feed through to consumers at a time when the cost of living is rising. the business secretary insists britain can meet demand for gas and the government does not expect supply essences this winter, he says there will be further meetings with the industry to try and plan a way forward. more than a million people in england will be sent invitations this week to book their coronavirus
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booster jab. nhs england says texts will be received from monday, while letters will be sent to those who are eligible later in the week. i want you to roll up your sleeve for me. the first of the booster jabs went into arms this week with front line health workers among the priority groups. in the coming week, invitations will start going out to people in england asking them to book their supplementary injections. there you go. all protected. it'll be another enormous technical challenge. one and one half million people will be contacted in the first phase through a combination of texts and letters to anyone aged 50 or over, people living and working in care homes for the elderly and front line health and social care workers. this time, the government wants people to wait for their invitations before getting their top up jabs. it says getting vaccinated will be easier than before because of the opening of the national booking service. the nhs covid vaccination programme has already saved
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more than 112,000 lives. the organising committee for vaccines says people should receive their booster dose at least six months after they had their second coronavirus jab. duncan kennedy, bbc news. the new foreign secretary has waded into a major diplomatic row with france over the uk's new security deal with the us and australia. writing in the sunday telegraph liz truss says the deal shows britain can be "hard—headed" in defending its interests. we can speak now to our political correspondent, peter saull. peter, these comments from the new foreign secretary aren't likely to calm this row down are they? i think that is right, five days after she was appointed only the second woman to become foreign secretary in the uk liz truss has written this article in the sunday telegraph. on the surface it appears uncontroversial, she talks about the need to build strong security ties around the world to defend our
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freedoms but also waxes lyrical about the deal signed last week with the australians and americans known as aukus saying it shows we need to our commitment to the indo pacific region promoting stability there but also she will be well be of the deal has gone down not at all well with france. the french foreign minister has not been mincing his words about that deal because it breaks a contract the french signed with australia to supply submarines and he says it is a major breach of trust and as for the uk again pretty strong ones from the french, saying the uk is carrying out permanent opportunism and this is at a time when our relationships with countries around the world is brought into sharp focus as countries gather for the general
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assembly of the un.— countries gather for the general assembly of the un. some pictures there of joe — assembly of the un. some pictures there of joe biden _ assembly of the un. some pictures there ofjoe biden and _ assembly of the un. some pictures there ofjoe biden and emmanuel. there ofjoe biden and emmanuel macron, safe to say in happier times. thank you. universities in england must take student views into account when deciding how much to teach online, according to the regulator for higher education. out of nearly fifty institutions contacted by the bbc, just thirteen said all teaching would be face—to—face. here 5 our education editor branwenjeffreys. universities have been almost empty. only students on some practical courses made it onto campus last year, but within weeks everyone should be back. almost 50 universities across the uk have shared their plans. this snapshot shows a return to mainly face to face teaching. but many will still hold larger lectures online in england, in england, where fees are more than £9,000. a warning from the regulator. student views matter.
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what we will be looking for is the quality of provision, whether or not it's face to face and online. but critically, the universities and colleges are taking into account the views of their students. what do they want? what's their feedback? and that then is factored into the course provision. over the course of the next year. vaccinations should help the return of student life. there will be pop up clinics for second jabs in many places. and for those who missed out on student life last year, a chance to refresh byjoining the start of term events. russians are voting on the third and final day of parliamentary elections — with many commentators expecting president vladimir putin's united russia party to win. some opposition parties have alleged ballot—rigging and voter intimidation. in the first two days of voting, allegations of electoral fraud were widespread but the head of russia's election commission dismissed the claims.
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the boxer amir khan has alleged he was escorted from a flight in the us for no reason. in a video, posted online, he said he was removed from the american airlines plane when someone complained about his colleague's face mask. the airline involved said staff had taken action when two customers onboard had refused to comply with requests from staff. 'a heck of a ride' — that's how one amateur astronaut has described splashing into the atlantic after spending three days in space. the team of two men and two women made history by becoming the first all—civilian mission to orbit the planet. simonjones reports. the final moments of a mission quite unlike any other, after orbiting the earth for three days, splashdown off the coast of florida for the four amateur astronauts dubbed the space tourists inspiration four on behalf of spacex welcome to planet earth.
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your mission has shown the world that space is for all of us. it was led and bankrolled by a billionaire businessman, jared eisenman. he said it had been a heck ofa ride, adding, we're just getting started. it all began three days ago. liftoff for a commercial mission, the first without any professional astronauts on board. much of the adventure beamed back live to earth. there is an awful lot that still needs to be accomplished in space. there's an awful lot of it, and we know so little about it. and there may be some really interesting answers to questions we've all been asking for a long time out there. so we have to do that. the spacex capsule was fitted with an extra large window, allowing the crew members to enjoy some spectacular views alongside the billionaire who paid for all four seats, three ordinary citizens with inspirational stories, an artist, a us air force veteran, and a woman who overcame bone cancer as a child. hello, everyone, and welcome to our dragon capsule.
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here in space. as an adult, hailie arseneau has gone back to work for the hospital that treated her. they had all trained for six months, although the computer system on board was actually in control. they carried out several scientific experiments, but in truth, it was more than a fact finding mission. this was another milestone in the space tourism market medical officer hayley has now egressed the vehicle. a chance to show that it can be opened up to more people, provided there's a back—up with deep pockets who could identify others with a shared sense of adventure. simon jones, bbc news. what a story. what a relief to be back safe and sound.
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as we've been hearing this morning, there is mounting concern over food supplies this winter caused by a rise in the wholesale gas price. the business secretary says he's working on a way forward. let's discuss this now with the deputy leader of the liberal democrats, daisy cooper. the government saying we are not complacent but do not expect supply emergencies, do you? it is complacent but do not expect supply emergencies, do you?— emergencies, do you? it is what the indust is emergencies, do you? it is what the industry is saying — emergencies, do you? it is what the industry is saying and _ emergencies, do you? it is what the industry is saying and we _ emergencies, do you? it is what the industry is saying and we have - emergencies, do you? it is what the industry is saying and we have had l industry is saying and we have had many people and the manufacturing and food production sectors are saying that. if you look at what is coming ahead this energy price hike is coming at absolutely the worst time for millions of people, the government is going to cut universal credit by £20 a week, increased taxes and as is on top of household bills so we need the government to treat this without an urgency and make sure the most vulnerable consumers are protected. bernard matthews saying _ consumers are protected. bernard matthews saying they _ consumers are protected. bernard matthews saying they are - consumers are protected. bernard i matthews saying they are concerned christmas will be cancelled and we spoke to the food and drinks federation who said as a result of the gas supply shortage we could end
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“p the gas supply shortage we could end up with a c02 shortage, meet not on the shelves in coming weeks. part of the shelves in coming weeks. part of the problem is the vulnerability of renewable energy which perhaps not many people predicted, what needs to be done about that? that many people predicted, what needs to be done about that?— many people predicted, what needs to be done about that? at the moment we need to protect — be done about that? at the moment we need to protect consumers _ be done about that? at the moment we need to protect consumers and - be done about that? at the moment we need to protect consumers and what. need to protect consumers and what you want to see the government do is to keep the cap in place for now as an urgent measure to protect the most vulnerable consumers, the next is to reform the energy cap because it is still kept far too high and then the long—term we need to see a strategy from the government for making sure we have energy security in this country. making sure we have energy security in this country-— in this country. what does that strate: in this country. what does that strategy look _ in this country. what does that strategy look like _ in this country. what does that strategy look like from - in this country. what does that strategy look like from a - in this country. what does that| strategy look like from a liberal democrat perspective? consumers need to be protected but we know energy suppliers will be saying i didn't want to take on that contract because of the energy cap and people on the long—term could be left vulnerable to bigger price hikes. taste vulnerable to bigger price hikes. , have had energy companies collapse in the past, it happened a couple of years ago when many collapsed and
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the government said at that point they were going to introduce new stress tests so the regulator could check whether these new companies were financially fit and well fit enough to enter the market. those measures have not been put in place, the government said it would to years ago so we need to see improved regulation around new entrants into the market and a long—term strategy to protect energy security. the market and a long-term strategy to protect energy security.— to protect energy security. energy security relies — to protect energy security. energy security relies on _ to protect energy security. energy security relies on renewable - to protect energy security. energy | security relies on renewable energy and environment have friendly but we have learned they are not necessarily as viable as we hoped. should be pivot more in that direction? what is the liberal democrat strategy on power? taste direction? what is the liberal democrat strategy on power? we need to move towards _ democrat strategy on power? we need to move towards more _ democrat strategy on power? we need to move towards more renewables - democrat strategy on power? we need to move towards more renewables andj to move towards more renewables and diversify our energy supply so we can get it from lots of different places, that is a long—standing policy of the liberal democrats. i know when ed davey was climate and
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energy secretary in government he almost quadrupled the energy supply from renewables in this country but we need to make sure there is a strategy for a diversity of energy so the lights do not quote. diversity including nuclear? taste so the lights do not quote. diversity including nuclear? we will not su ort diversity including nuclear? we will rrot support new — diversity including nuclear? we will not support new nuclear— diversity including nuclear? we will not support new nuclear ethical - not support new nuclear ethical government has to put money towards it. we have to accept there is a role for nuclear for now but ultimately we do not want to see more nuclear, we want a diverse city of energy from different renewable sources and that is what we need to do to tackle the climate emergency which is the single biggest emergency facing the world. diversification where and how? taste diversification where and how? we will be diversification where and how? , will be setting out a strategy to do that in our next manifesto closer to the general election but we have a crisis right now and we cannot wait to talk about diversifying energy supply in many months. right now and
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we need to do the government stepping in to protect the most vulnerable consumers. you referenced ed davey being — vulnerable consumers. you referenced ed davey being energy _ vulnerable consumers. you referenced ed davey being energy secretary - vulnerable consumers. you referenced ed davey being energy secretary and l ed davey being energy secretary and the coalition government, people will be asking whether or not this crisis is partly down to his lack of strategy in that role and they will be asking which strategy is now. has be asking which strategy is now. as i be asking which strategy is now. is i say as climate and energy secretary he almost quadrupled renewable energy, what has happened since then as the conservative government on its own has scrapped the climate bank set up to invest in renewables, we have outlined a plan of investment of £150 billion into a climate strategy that will create jobs and infrastructure and high—tech jobs we need to jobs and infrastructure and high—techjobs we need to move jobs and infrastructure and high—tech jobs we need to move the country towards renewable so we have that plan investment and we want to see the government stepping up to create those high—tech jobs for diversification.
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create those high-tech 'obs for diversification.* create those high-tech 'obs for diversification. thank you, i hope the conference _ diversification. thank you, i hope the conference goes _ diversification. thank you, i hope the conference goes well- diversification. thank you, i hope the conference goes well for - diversification. thank you, i hope i the conference goes well for youth. now the weather with sarah where is that? is that this morning? mrs i things are looking in cumbria, fairly heavy rain overnight and it is clear for fairly heavy rain overnight and it is clearfor a time but a lot fairly heavy rain overnight and it is clear for a time but a lot of moisture and so mist and fogged around for many. it will brighten through the day, some sunshine developing later on across western parts but also some rain in the forecast, a couple of bands, two weather fronts crossing west so we have a ready scene some rain across northern ireland and scotland, this area of rain will shift east through the night and as things warm up through the day the sunshine gets going to create heavy showers across eastern england, some thunderstorms
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and around llo millimetres falling any short space of time for east yorkshire towards kent which could bring localised flooding. away from eastern england most other parts of the uk brightening latex or some sunshine around, temperatures 15—21, not as one as recently but still not bad. into the evening we keep the front, quite slow moving from the east, so a few more spots of rain, still quite mild and humid underneath the front but for most places clearer skies and cooler so a fresher night to come if you are camping, you will notice that. through the week ahead a dry start for most places, spells of sunshine and from around mid week onwards things will turn more autumnal so eventually wet up and when the but as we start the new working week through monday and tuesday at high pressure towards the south—west
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keeping things largely settled, low pressure trying to move on from the north—west so monday we have still an initialfront north—west so monday we have still an initial front lingering across eastern angle, drizzly showers but most places having a decent day, largely dry with sunshine, cloud from the north—west later and temperatures between 15—22 in the warmest spots. enter tuesday we are likely to see mist and fog patches first then, slowly clearing to leave spells of sunshine, light winds for most but breezy across the north west and temperatures between 16—21 on tuesday and from mid week onwards we see more of the weather fronts and a low pressure systems moving in and a low pressure systems moving in and pushing across the uk which means things will turn more unsettled from around wednesday especially across north—west parts, still somewhat dry weather in the south—east through much of the week but it is going to be not as warm as it has been lately.
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we're no strangers to challenges here on breakfast — and this one is so epic it's taken 2 years to complete. karen penny has walked 11,000 miles around the coast of the uk and will finish this week in the shetland islands. here's how she's done so far. in the shetland islands.
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we were going to talk to karen live from shetland but she was going to finish. either member speaking to you when this began, i know you had some time off because of the pandemic but how are your feet? mr; pandemic but how are your feet? my feet pandemic but how are your feet? ij�*i feet are pandemic but how are your feet? ii feet are great pandemic but how are your feet? i’i1: feet are great and pandemic but how are your feet? m1 feet are great and i pandemic but how are your feet? ii1 feet are great and i am really excited to be here in shetland, it is blowing a gale, a fishing boat has just gone past and i am is blowing a gale, a fishing boat hasjust gone past and i am heading to the most northerly point in britain finishing on tuesday. foretell britain finishing on tuesday. well done, britain finishing on tuesday. well done. glad _ britain finishing on tuesday. well done. glad it _ britain finishing on tuesday. well done, glad it has _ britain finishing on tuesday. well done, glad it has all— britain finishing on tuesday. well done, glad it has all gone so well. explain four people at home why you
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have done this. i explain four people at home why you have done this.— have done this. i set out to end a half years — have done this. i set out to end a half years ago — have done this. i set out to end a half years ago to _ have done this. i set out to end a half years ago to what _ have done this. i set out to end a half years ago to what the - have done this. i set out to end a half years ago to what the coast l have done this. i set out to end a. half years ago to what the coast of britain and ireland for alzheimer's research, sadly we lost to deal members of ourfamily, my research, sadly we lost to deal members of our family, my husbands parents to vascular dementia and outside mills and the impact it has on families doesn't bear thinking about. it is the most wonderful charity, we need to do so much to raise as much money as we can for breakthrough and research and 11,000 miles, 2.5 years, it isjust amazing. miles, 2.5 years, it is 'ust amazingi miles, 2.5 years, it is 'ust amazin. ., s, s, amazing. you have raised over £100,000. — amazing. you have raised over £100,000. it _ amazing. you have raised over £100,000. it is _ amazing. you have raised over £100,000. it is £100,000 - amazing. you have raised over| £100,000. it is £100,000 and amazing. you have raised over - £100,000. it is £100,000 and rising and i hit £100,000. it is £100,000 and rising and i hit the — £100,000. it is £100,000 and rising and i hit the target _ £100,000. it is £100,000 and rising and i hit the target and _ £100,000. it is £100,000 and rising and i hit the target and said - and i hit the target and said andrews —— in st andrews and it is down to the kindness and generosity
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of the wonderful people you meet on your journey. of the wonderful people you meet on yourjourney. when i set out attain oid output to expect, people have taken you into their homes and hearts and into mine as well and i want to thank every single person and the thousand xi have met around the coast of britain. tells and the thousand xi have met around the coast of britain.— the coast of britain. tells about some of the _ the coast of britain. tells about some of the places _ the coast of britain. tells about some of the places you - the coast of britain. tells about some of the places you have i the coast of britain. tells about - some of the places you have stayed. it has been exciting, i hope my mum is not listening, car parks and ditches on occasions but also people taking you into their homes, staying with a lord and lady on the isle of jura, staying with crofters, oil riggers, artists and musicians, people who want to make a difference and want to help you on a huge challenge, we do not want you to put up challenge, we do not want you to put up your tent challenge, we do not want you to put up yourtent in challenge, we do not want you to put up your tent in the middle of the woods and the middle of the innate. i cannot thank people enough. ice slept on a boat, on a hammock and of the styles, what an experience. your
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enthusiasm — the styles, what an experience. your enthusiasm is _ the styles, what an experience. your enthusiasm is obvious _ the styles, what an experience. your enthusiasm is obvious from what you have done and the gratitude you feel to the people who have helped you on your way, to the people who have helped you on yourway, is to the people who have helped you on your way, is that any point at which your way, is that any point at which you havejust your way, is that any point at which you have just thought this is just all too much? it you have just thought this is 'ust all too much?�* all too much? it has been a roller-coaster _ all too much? it has been a roller-coaster of _ all too much? it has been a roller-coaster of a - all too much? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey, i all too much? it has been a i roller-coaster of a journey, a all too much? it has been a - roller-coaster of a journey, a huge roller—coaster of a journey, a huge highs and lows and i have tried to be positive because you are doing something for such a wonderful charity you have to put a brave face on and there are occasions when you feel incredibly lonely and i have tried to explain there's a difference between solitude when you like spending time on your own company but also loneliness when you miss home and family and parents, i miss home and family and parents, i miss my husband and be speak everyday there is nothing like being at home and home is calling, just two days away. at home and home is calling, 'ust two days away-i at home and home is calling, 'ust two days awayi at home and home is calling, 'ust two days away. back in south wales, it will take you _ two days away. back in south wales, it will take you a _ two days away. back in south wales, it will take you a while. _ two days away. back in south wales, it will take you a while. correct - two days away. back in south wales, it will take you a while. correct me i it will take you a while. correct me if i am wrong, when bespoke you said
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your husband willjoin you at certain parts, has that happened? he: has been very good, he likes as creature comforts, not great in tents and my husband and son have joined me here on shetland for the last five days of the book. —— the walk. i am so grateful for them being here, it will be exciting for us to cross the finish line and two days and i am so glad they are here with me to share the experience because he has been captaining the ship scrum are sending me in the right direction and i have not sunk to many times. you right direction and i have not sunk to many times-— right direction and i have not sunk to many times. you have than this durint a to many times. you have than this during a pandemic, _ to many times. you have than this during a pandemic, you _ to many times. you have than this during a pandemic, you had - to many times. you have than this during a pandemic, you had to - to many times. you have than this i during a pandemic, you had to break at one point to go back and enter your bubble. i at one point to go back and enter your bubble-— at one point to go back and enter your bubble. at one point to go back and enter our bubble. . ,, :, your bubble. i had reach shetland, i could not have _ your bubble. i had reach shetland, i could not have been _ your bubble. i had reach shetland, i could not have been further - your bubble. i had reach shetland, i could not have been further away i could not have been further away from home when the first lockdown
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hit and i managed to get back to wales in time and i stayed there and when i was due to restart came back to shetland to continue, aberdeen went into lockdown folly among period so i turned the journey on its head, left my home, went south and with the other way down the south—west coast to the isles of scilly and isle of wight and i was marooned there and the second lockdown happened and i have been to the channel islands, the south—west, the channel islands, the south—west, the east coast back into scotland and here i am back in shetland. what and here i am back in shetland. what are ou and here i am back in shetland. what are you looking _ and here i am back in shetland. what are you looking forward to most at the finish line? you have slept in ditches and houses, what looking for the two most? t. ditches and houses, what looking for the two most?— the two most? t. we take these thin t s for the two most? t. we take these things for granted, _ the two most? t. we take these things for granted, a _ the two most? t. we take these things for granted, a kettle - the two most? t. we take these things for granted, a kettle and | the two most? t. we take these | things for granted, a kettle and a shower, i will never look at the same again, ijust love tea and
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everybody knows, points of it. a cup of tea, a cosy bed and a shower and being home is fantastic, it has been an amazing journey and from my point of view the challenge is still on, stole two days to go and as you can see here it is cleaning up a bit, it was blowing earlier but still some good progress to be made. you forgot to say you're — good progress to be made. you forgot to say you're looking _ good progress to be made. you forgot to say you're looking forward - good progress to be made. you forgot to say you're looking forward to - to say you're looking forward to seeing your husband. a cup of tea is just as important. thank you so much. i am just as important. thank you so much. lam not just as important. thank you so much. i am not pointing you but i raise a mug of tea to say congratulations and very well done and good luck with the last couple of days, a tremendous effort, thank you for talking to us.— you for talking to us. thank you. such a brilliant _ you for talking to us. thank you. such a brilliant cause. _
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you for talking to us. thank you. such a brilliant cause. karen - you for talking to us. thank you. | such a brilliant cause. karen who has worked her way around the uk. and still so much energy. some of the biggest names on television will gather in los angeles tonight for the emmy awards, honouring the best tv of the past year. there are high hopes for british talent with the london based football comedy ted lasso earning 20 nominations. our los angeles correspondent sophie long has been meeting the cast. afc richmond announced the hiring of their new manager of american football coaches ted lasso. an american who's now in charge of a football club despite possessing very little knowledge of the game. in a nutshell, a scorned woman damaged by divorce hires an american goofball and the secret hope of running the football club, which happens to be the only thing her ex—husband truly loves into the ground. little does she realise that when this human being comes
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into her life, no matter how hard she tries, he is actually her salvation rather than her scheming. george is here. if he's here, why isn't he here? oh, yes, good point. ted lasso is a heart warming comedy thatjerks more than the occasional tear, a mixture of mostly british cast with an american candy cast with an american can do sensibility that's earned its cast and creators a record—breaking 20 emmy nominations. well, ijust didn't believe it, really. and i was i felt a bit sort of blubbery. and and then i was very tired because itjust seemed an awful shock. it kind of feels like i'm glad it didn't come a moment sooner, which some people might find weird. you know, being in my mid 405, you think, oh, no, wouldn't you have loved it in your 305 or whatever? but i don't think i would have been able to cope with the sharp upturn and i certainly know i wouldn't have been able to play this character, rebecca felton, who has so many different layers to her, so manyjoyous things, but so many upsets to overcome.
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so, yeah, strangely enough, the universe knows what it's doing. i think that's what it's all about. embracing change. over two seasons, we've watched characters overcome pain with positivity in a celebration of human spirit that doesn't ignore the struggle. so what of season three? i don't know whether theyjust do it with me and don't tell me anything because otherwise i'd go to bed when i shouldn't. but no, no idea. i don't think even the writers can know about i don't know a single thing about season three. we are definitely going to take the season to finish the story that we set out to tell. and it remains to be seen if anything happens after that. and the story that you set out to tell, does that involve a happy ending maybe with ted and rebecca? wow, interesting. i'm going to get guys on the bbc. interesting idea. wait for me. i'll pitch it. ok, cool. where did you get these? i'm glad you like them. you know what?
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i'll start bringing these to you every morning called biscuits with the boss. that really isn't necessary. i could have baked you some biscuits, but i've just got these. i love hobnobs. that is one thing we have watched and it is great, and it's on apple tv. it's all about rotating the apps at the minute because you don't get the best out of all the apps if you download them all so start your rotation. anyway, it is 8:31am. every week, presenter ros atkins takes an in—depth look at one of the issues in the news. this week it's the ethics of covid boosterjabs.
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the uk has a new plan to stop a winter wave of covid and booster jabs are part of it. for winter wave of covid and booster jabs are part of it.— jabs are part of it. for over 50s and the under _ jabs are part of it. for over 50s and the under 50s _ jabs are part of it. for over 50s and the under 50s you - jabs are part of it. for over 50s and the under 50s you are - jabs are part of it. for over 50s and the under 50s you are at i jabs are part of it. for over 50s i and the under 50s you are at risk, and the under 505 you are at risk, we are now motoring ahead with the booster programme, a third dose is six months after your second dose. pt, six months after your second dose. a number of other western countries have similar plans with israel being one of them. it is rolling out boosters to all over 12. several countries including france and germany have given third dose is the go—ahead. the us is also expected to start soon, and there are scientific justification for doing this, it is clear, he was the uk's health secretary. its clear, he was the uk's health secretary-— secretary. its evidence the protection _ secretary. its evidence the protection offered - secretary. its evidence the protection offered by i secretary. its evidence the i protection offered by covid-19 protection offered by covid—19 vaccine reduces over time, particularly older people who are at greater risk. so booster doses are an important way of keeping the virus under control for the long
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term. might make the objective may be clear about the degree to which immunity decreases is not. this is a precautionary tactic and it means that while some people are getting a third jab, many people elsewhere in the world are waiting for their first. that is why the world health organization is calling for a moratorium on boosters. we do not want to see widespread use of boosters for healthy people who are fully vaccinated. we do not want any more promises. wejust want fully vaccinated. we do not want any more promises. we just want the vaccines. more promises. we 'ust want the vaccines. , s, s, , ~ vaccines. the epidemiologist andrew he ard vaccines. the epidemiologist andrew heyward builds— vaccines. the epidemiologist andrew heyward builds on _ vaccines. the epidemiologist andrew heyward builds on this _ vaccines. the epidemiologist andrew heyward builds on this critique, i heyward builds on this critique, writing... which means rich countries have a choice. dominic wilkinson says they have made the wrong one.
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the richest countries are not unaware of this criticism. to understand why they rejected, we need to look at that idea that they are choosing between populations and the rest of the world. they simply do not accept that is the choice. here are borisjohnson and joe biden at the g7 injune. here are boris johnson and joe biden at the g7 in june._ at the g7 in june. there is no point in us 'ust at the g7 in june. there is no point in us just vaccinating _ at the g7 in june. there is no point in us just vaccinating the _ at the g7 in june. there is no point in usjust vaccinating the uk, i at the g7 in june. there is no point in usjust vaccinating the uk, we i in us just vaccinating the uk, we need to vaccinate the world. in usjust vaccinating the uk, we need to vaccinate the world. from the beginning _ need to vaccinate the world. from the beginning of— need to vaccinate the world. from the beginning of my _ need to vaccinate the world. from the beginning of my presidency, we have been clear on it, we need to attack this virus globally as well. well, now the us is planning its booster programme and he was a spokesperson rejecting the idea americans are being prioritised over everyone else. i americans are being prioritised over everyone else-— everyone else. i feel like it is a false choice — everyone else. i feel like it is a false choice and _ everyone else. i feel like it is a false choice and we _ everyone else. i feel like it is a false choice and we can - everyone else. i feel like it is a false choice and we can do i everyone else. i feel like it is a i false choice and we can do both. everyone else. i feel like it is a - false choice and we can do both. we announced that we had an important
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milestone of over 110 million vaccines donated to the world. that is more than any other country has shared combined. it is more than any other country has shared combined.— shared combined. if that is the biden administration, - shared combined. if that is the biden administration, even - shared combined. if that is the i biden administration, even ahead shared combined. if that is the - biden administration, even ahead the world health organization in europe has said boosters can be justified. of course, doing it all is everyone�*s best case scenario, a cake and eat it strategy but this is notjust cake and eat it strategy but this is not just about the most vulnerable, the uk and others are giving boosters to large set of their population and that is happening as vaccination rates in the developing world remain low, but leaving some people bemused.
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real vaccines, not pledge vaccines is the demand. let's look at what is being pledged and what is being delivered. this map shows the number of doses per 100 people. that great, europe, is where vaccination rates are highest. where it is lighter, africa for example, the rates are lowest. use the data. —— here is the data. bearthat lowest. use the data. —— here is the data. bear that in mind and we look at these figures from the science analytics company airfinity which calculates... on this, former british prime minister gordon brown is damning, arguing we simply are not getting doses out to the people need them. until recently, this was due to an understandable shortage of vaccines
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but now there is a clear and inexplicable failure to distribute them equitably. the g7 argues this is not about what it has, it's about what it is donating to the global effort, and here is the who again on what is actually arrived.— what is actually arrived. countries have promised — what is actually arrived. countries have promised to _ what is actually arrived. countries have promised to donate - what is actually arrived. countries have promised to donate more i what is actually arrived. countries l have promised to donate more than what is actually arrived. countries - have promised to donate more than $1 billion but less than 15% of those doses have been materialised. might make south africa's president has called it vaccine apartheid, the most potent of works for a south african to use. we most potent of works for a south african to use.— most potent of works for a south african to use. we know they have had difficulty _ african to use. we know they have had difficulty administering - african to use. we know they have had difficulty administering doses| had difficulty administering doses that have been delivered but there remains a global supply issue and this is professional sarah gilbert who led the team he developed the astrazeneca vaccine. we who led the team he developed the astrazeneca vaccine.— who led the team he developed the astrazeneca vaccine. we need more doses of all— astrazeneca vaccine. we need more doses of all of _ astrazeneca vaccine. we need more doses of all of the _ astrazeneca vaccine. we need more doses of all of the vaccines - doses of all of the vaccines currently licensed and we need more vaccines to be licensed so we're not talking about choices between vaccinating in one country or another can. fit vaccinating in one country or another can.— vaccinating in one country or another can. _, , ., ., u another can. of course, more vaccine
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su -l another can. of course, more vaccine suwly would — another can. of course, more vaccine supply would help- _ another can. of course, more vaccine supply would help. the _ another can. of course, more vaccine supply would help. the vaccines - another can. of course, more vaccine supply would help. the vaccines that| supply would help. the vaccines that already exist are not being equally distributed around the world which brings us back to the boosters, which the uk, the us and others are pushing on with, even while the benefits of doing so are still being assessed. it’s benefits of doing so are still being assessed. �* , , .,, ., assessed. it's the first dose of the vaccine that _ assessed. it's the first dose of the vaccine that has _ assessed. it's the first dose of the vaccine that has the _ assessed. it's the first dose of the vaccine that has the most - assessed. it's the first dose of the vaccine that has the most impact, | vaccine that has the most impact, any time, however you commit to. we get a strong response, good protection after a single dose and then it's improved by a second dose, and we would expect to see it being maintained or possibly slightly improved then by a third dose. that is riaht, improved then by a third dose. that is right, immunity _ improved then by a third dose. that is right, immunity will be possibly slightly improved by a booster, professor gilbert says. look at this report about booster jabs professor gilbert says. look at this report about boosterjabs in the medicaljournal the lancet.. these are two. he was one more. is these are two. he was one more. is there some way of getting immunity
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that means a third dose, booster dose,is that means a third dose, booster dose, is a sensible thing to do? i think there is now reasonably good evidence that is the case. best scientific advice _ evidence that is the case. best scientific advice for _ evidence that is the case. best scientific advice for and - evidence that is the case. best scientific advice for and against —— there are scientific advice for and against using boosters now but let's remember that throughout the pandemic, the who and the g7 are repeatedly committed to a global response saying whatjoe biden and borisjohnson said earlier and he was one more example. —— here is one more example. but are we seeing global solidarity? have we really moved your international considerations? as i watch the world's richest countries defend their approach, a famous
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phrase keeps coming to mind. home defend their approach, a famous phrase keeps coming to mind. none of us are safe until— phrase keeps coming to mind. none of us are safe until all— phrase keeps coming to mind. none of us are safe until all of— phrase keeps coming to mind. none of us are safe until all of us _ phrase keeps coming to mind. none of us are safe until all of us are _ us are safe until all of us are safe. . , , us are safe until all of us are safe. ., , , , ., safe. in reality, this is an argument _ safe. in reality, this is an argument about - safe. in reality, this is an argument about the - safe. in reality, this is an| argument about the route safe. in reality, this is an - argument about the route you take safe. in reality, this is an _ argument about the route you take to that point. it is about the order in which things happen. there is no doubt they will deposit richest countries do want the whole world vaccinated but the immediate priority is their own populations and this week, the uk's was plans are being rolled out and the chief medical officer, a man famed for his metaphors, gave us one more. it is metaphors, gave us one more. it is better to put _ metaphors, gave us one more. it 3 better to put some extra guide ropes on there and then than it is to wait until it is the middle of the night. it is howling with wind and rain and you've then got to get out of your tent and make your tent secure. by the time you crawl back in, you're soaking wet. might make the issue is while the uk adds extra guide ropes, many in the developing world don't have a tent and that is a choice being made by the richer countries, and it's not to passjudgment but to
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acknowledge that when the boosters begin, that choice has been made. 8:41am. let's get the sport. jane is here recapping on the premiership from yesterday and looking ahead to today. four wins from five from liverpool in the premier league. early days but the points on the board count. but not over yet, a marathon, not a sprint! liverpool are top of the premier league after beating crystal palace at anfield. mane opened the scoring just before half time with his 100th goal for liverpool — it's also the ninth game in a row he has scored against palace. 13 goals for him. mohammed salah then put liverpool two goals in front. naby keita also scored, as the host won 3—0.
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i would love to play against crystal palace because i'm always lucky against them sol palace because i'm always lucky against them so i would love to score against them and all the time i think i score, i think we win the game so why not play against them every single weekend? manchester city were frustrated by southampton at the etihad. the visitors thought they had a penalty when kyle walker was shown a red for a foul inside the box but var got involved and the decision was reversed. raheem sterling then thought that he had scored a late winner but it was ruled out for offside. it finished goaless in manchester. but in front of a crowd, it has to be said. and in the late kick off aston villa scored three goals in nine minutes as a brilliant second—half display saw everton's unbeaten run ended at villa park. leon bailey scored the third. near the bottom, burnley are still winless. martin odegaard's free kick gave arsenal a 1—nil win at turf moor. norwich are propping up the table. no points from five games.
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15 straight defeats in the premier league if you count when they were relegated two seasons ago. they were beaten 3—1 at home by watford. in scotland, rangers could go back to the top of the premiership later today, if they get a point from motherwell, that's after hibs could only manage a draw against st mirren yestersday. eamonn brophy had given st mirren the lead but paul mcginn equalised against his former club. martin boyle scored a penalty in the second half for hibs to go ahead. but saints captainjoe shaughnessy put the ball in the back of the net with two minutes remaining to make it 2—2, so hibs are top of the league on goal difference for the moment, level on points with rangers and hearts — who drew with ross county. stjohnstone beat aberdeen. we are going to show you a fantastic piece of fielding in cricket, just one of the best we have seen in a while. in cricket's t20 blast final kent spitfires beat somerset by 25 runs in a thrilling match under
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the lights at edgbaston yesterday. their victory was thanks largely to man—of—the—matchjordan cox — watch this — he combined with matt milnes to complete an amazing catch. look at that, he parries the ball to milnes, to keep it in. fantastic fielding. having put kent in to bat, somerset fell short of the 168 target, handing kent only their second t20 title — the last time they won was 1a years ago. to rugby union where ellis genge began his captaincy with a win as leicester tigers beat runners—up exeter chiefs 311—19 on the opening weekend of the premiership season. during a commanding performance from the tigers, nick dolly scored two tries, the first securing the winning bonus point. elsewhere, victories for northampton, worcester, and sale. and in darts, fallon sherrock became the first woman to reach a televised pdc final but lost in the nordic masters to michael van gerwen. afterwards sherrock posted on social media that she was 'buzzing' and incredibly proud of herself.
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she led in the final 6—3 but was eventually beaten 11—7 by the three time world champion. she is blazing a trail. with that being televised, does that mean bigger money?— being televised, does that mean binermone ? , , bigger money? televised but in the modern game _ bigger money? televised but in the modern game because _ bigger money? televised but in the modern game because there - bigger money? televised but in the modern game because there have l bigger money? televised but in the - modern game because there have been women reaching the final a long time ago. might make thank you very much. iam i am waltzing off. this is where i leave you to read the news for marr, nina will take you through to the end. i say that because i'm talking about what you'll be talking about soon which is strictly. now though, time for the weather with sarah.
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thank you. we have a bit of sunshine out there for some of us this morning. this is the picture in hertfordshire. missing it around, that will clear away fairly quickly but through the course of today, certainly a bit of a mixed bag because we have outbreaks of rain working their way from west to east across the uk, so drier weather following on from the west. here is the radar picture where we had the rain over the past three hours or so and we have a pair of weather fronts, twins, just pushing their way gradually eastwards, so they've already been producing heavy rain overnight and with the early hours of the morning, spreading into eastern england and as it does so, prepping up so becoming heavier, thunderstorms at around about 30—a0 millimetres of rain for the likes of east yorkshire to america —— east yorkshire and there was flooding possible. some sunshine returning with highs of 15—20 c, not as warm
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as it has been over recent days but into the evening and overnight, we will keep the weather fronts, slow moving across east anglia and the south—east, too. elsewhere, clear skies, a fresher night than we've seen with temperatures down into mid single figures to start off your monday morning. all about the week ahead where it will be a dry start, sunshine around from monday into tuesday, from around about mid week onwards, it changes to something more autumnal. then something in the cards later the week. wins out, sitting to the south of the uk, that tries to bring its way in. then clouding over later on monday. this weather fronts still producing one or two outbreaks of rain across east anglia and the south—east but most places having a largely dire day on sunday. sunshine around the temperature is not bad for the time of year, 15—21 c. heading into
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tuesday, high pressure in charge of things, mist and fog patches likely and they should gradually lift and clear so sunny spells for much of the uk, breezy in the north west and temperature is about 16—21 c are not a bad day, reigning from wednesday to thursday in particular where things turn more unsettled, low pressure across the country which leaves us with a... , largely settled. then some rain, windy conditions, particularly north and west were drier still the further south and east you are. back to you. orton well and truly on its way. —— autumn well and truly on its way. in november 2019, the small yorkshire village of fishlake made the national news. it's after the river don, burst its banks and flooded over 170 homes and businesses — leading to the entire village having to be evacuated. resident's are now hoping a book they've written will raise funds
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to help those still affected. our reporter phillip norton is in fishlake this morning. good morning and welcome back. who could forget some of those images we all saw in 2019 is a month was not worth of rain fell in just 24—hour scent this is the cricket club here. under 2.5 feet of water, that was under the pavilion and they got it all back together. there is a strong community spirit here and they've really pulled together. they are now behind this book which documents what happened. you're buying the book, tells about it. it was the idea of a gentleman in the village where the name of meal where two a designer who did all the work putting it together. he brought to the village the beginning of last year a meeting, the village the beginning of last yeara meeting, brought the village the beginning of last year a meeting, brought together a team of five of us who worked tirelessly within the village, in
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the community, to put the book together which we are launching today and it is primarily about documenting this historical event. and thanking all those who came to our aid because we had fantastic, phenomenal support from all over the country so it's really a big thank you to everybody. you are a resident here, how will this book help? it reflect the people in fishlike now as they can associate unfortunately with so many other communities who have been affected by the flood, it is not until it happens to you that you can really feel the same empathy and it's much of the financial effects, the emotional effects, it really does drain. they flood happens very quickly but it takes an awful long time to recover from it, so it will notjust be the residents. it would be a far wider community that can understand. and community that can understand. and like so many. — community that can understand. and like so many, you lost everything in that awful night. what are your
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memories of that time? mainly the seed of memories of that time? mainly the speed of which _ memories of that time? mainly the speed of which it _ memories of that time? mainly the speed of which it happened. - memories of that time? mainly the speed of which it happened. withinj speed of which it happened. within 20 minutes, iwas speed of which it happened. within 20 minutes, i was up to my knees in water in the house, itjust came up through the floor and there was a total feeling of helplessness. then the following day, to see all your possessions as you had been evacuated in a boat and you're passing your possessions floating around the village, it's really, really upsetting and it does not really upsetting and it does not really hit you until months afterwards how powerful an event this has been. you afterwards how powerful an event this has been.— afterwards how powerful an event this has been. you have all pulled toaether, this has been. you have all pulled together, haven't _ this has been. you have all pulled together, haven't you? _ this has been. you have all pulled together, haven't you? fantasticl together, haven't you? fantastic community _ together, haven't you? fantastic community spirit _ together, haven't you? fantastic community spirit and _ together, haven't you? fantastic community spirit and you - together, haven't you? fantastic community spirit and you cannot| together, haven't you? fantastic - community spirit and you cannot pick anyone name out of the hat, the whole village, the community around it, people from far and wide, it's been a fantastic example of how people should react to something like this, yeah. people should react to something like this. yeah-— like this, yeah. you're both residence _ like this, yeah. you're both residence here. _ like this, yeah. you're both residence here. we - like this, yeah. you're both residence here. we are - like this, yeah. you're bothj residence here. we are two like this, yeah. you're both - residence here. we are two years on,
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how has the community dealt with this and are there any lasting effects? you we have all pulled together. different organisations are opening up, keep fit, the coffee club, so we are pulling together. i was a long time out of my property, 14 was a long time out of my property, 1a months, january this year when i moved back, so it was awful, an awful thing to happen to everybody in the village but, yeah, we are all pulling together. i think fishlike is a wonderful little village and a wonderful community spirit that has been brilliant because all of us have been on our own and it was a horrible night because it was all so quick and you do not realise that you are trying to get on the home straight but we are all fine now, thank you. might make great to hear and you've been a great bunch this morning, had a great laugh and it's great that you have all dealt with
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it so well as well, looking after all this time and all the proceeds from this book will go towards helping other flood from this book will go towards helping otherflood hit communities around the uk as well so it is great that several people have pulled together to make this a bit of a reality which is what they've all wanted to do. lovely to see that sense of community. thank you. now, these partly as contest on tv... —— the sparkliest contest on tv, strictly come dancing, the has returned to our screens with a new batch of celebrities, ready to compete for the glitterball trophy.this year the show will have its first all male partnership and first deaf contestant. let's not forget our very own dan will be showing his dance moves on the strictly stage too! will be showing his dance moves very will be showing his dance moves exciting. last night the dancing partners were revealed. let's take a look.
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cheering
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we are bouncing in the studio. we're nowjoined by former strictly star flavia cacace—mistry, lovely to see you, looking gorgeous. you have your sparkly pudsey in the background, lovely to see him, too. i don't know about you but, from the moment the opening song began last night, i was giddy, it was like the start of an exciting season and it's a beautiful way to head into these dark night. a beautiful way to head into these dark niiht. ~ , , dark night. absolutely. i will be honest, i normally _ dark night. absolutely. i will be honest, i normally don't - dark night. absolutely. i will be honest, i normally don't watch | dark night. absolutely. i will be i honest, i normally don't watch the launch, jump and once the competition is up and running but i had to get my notebook out because i had to get my notebook out because i had forgotten how many couples there are at the beginning, the start of the competition coma so i was watching a long and loving it, i
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love the launch because there is not much pressure. it's all about the starting of the whole newjourney for everyone. starting of the whole new 'ourney for eveeneryfi starting of the whole new 'ourney for everyone— starting of the whole new 'ourney for eveorynefi starting of the whole new 'ourney for everyone. you cannot help but take first impressions, _ for everyone. you cannot help but take first impressions, very, i for everyone. you cannot help but take first impressions, very, very| take first impressions, very, very early days but which couple stood out to you? for early days but which couple stood out to you?— out to you? for me, i think rees definitely. _ out to you? for me, i think rees definitely. he — out to you? for me, i think rees definitely, he has _ out to you? for me, i think rees definitely, he has the _ out to you? for me, i think rees definitely, he has the moves, i out to you? for me, i think rees definitely, he has the moves, he will be great in the latin especially. you might be good at being an all—rounder as well if he contains his energy for the ballroom. tom fletcher will be very quirky and different, i think you will be good at things like the jive and the charleston. judi will bring and the charleston. judi will bring a lot of laughter and herfirst dance as american smooth but i can't wait for her latin dances. diana, i think he will be very suited to
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ballroom dancing. it is think he will be very suited to ballroom dancing.— think he will be very suited to ballroom dancing. it is one of the thins he ballroom dancing. it is one of the things he was _ ballroom dancing. it is one of the things he was looking _ ballroom dancing. it is one of the things he was looking forward i ballroom dancing. it is one of the things he was looking forward to. then you had adam pt who was the first out but he threw himself into it. —— adam peaty. first out but he threw himself into it. -- adam peaty.— first out but he threw himself into it. -- adam peaty. yes, and when you come from _ it. -- adam peaty. yes, and when you come from a — it. -- adam peaty. yes, and when you come from a sports _ it. -- adam peaty. yes, and when you come from a sports background, i it. -- adam peaty. yes, and when you come from a sports background, you l come from a sports background, you can be static and muscular but when i saw him in the group number, i thought, he has got some flexibility, some movement so it will be great to see him and if you are a sports person, you will have that motivation, the drive, the determination, so it will be exciting to see him progress as well. �* ., ., , , well. and great to see the first all-male couple _ well. and great to see the first all-male couple as _ well. and great to see the first all-male couple as well- well. and great to see the first all-male couple as well take . well. and great to see the first| all-male couple as well take to well. and great to see the first i all-male couple as well take to the all—male couple as well take to the stage. a great moment. it
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all-male couple as well take to the stage. a great moment.— stage. a great moment. it will be very exciting. _ stage. a great moment. it will be very exciting. very _ stage. a great moment. it will be very exciting, very different i stage. a great moment. it will be i very exciting, very different season that we have these very unique partnerships as well, so you bring something to the table and it's nice to see something fresh. rose on the show will be a beautiful partnership as well. i will enjoy to see eric into my connecting and performing. and for someone who cannot hear music but can feel music, feel vibrations with other people, that was moving, wasn't it? it vibrations with other people, that was moving, wasn't it?— was moving, wasn't it? it will be beautiful- _ was moving, wasn't it? it will be beautiful. it— was moving, wasn't it? it will be beautiful. it is _ was moving, wasn't it? it will be beautiful. it is absolutely - was moving, wasn't it? it will be beautiful. it is absolutely true i beautiful. it is absolutely true because when we sometimes rehearse the competition, we sometimes look for them closing their eyes because if you take something away, the other senses become much stronger so her connection will be very powerful and i cannot wait to see that on the dance floor. and i cannot wait to see that on the dance floor-— dance floor. finally, what is the strictly secret? _ dance floor. finally, what is the strictly secret? because - dance floor. finally, what is the strictly secret? because you i dance floor. finally, what is the l strictly secret? because you think every year, will i getjust as
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excited as last year, will it be just as amazing? last night, i was almost in tears with the excitement, it's still got it. almost in tears with the excitement, it's still got it— it's still got it. absolutely and it alwa s it's still got it. absolutely and it always will- _ it's still got it. absolutely and it always will. they _ it's still got it. absolutely and it always will. they always - it's still got it. absolutely and it always will. they always bring l it's still got it. absolutely and it| always will. they always bring in new things so there are unique partnerships, last year was a smaller show so that with the big couples in the beginning, it will take you all the way to christmas. the costumes are as beautiful as ever, the sets in the music, what more can you wish for? it will be fantastic and ijust more can you wish for? it will be fantastic and i just cannot wait to get started. fantastic and i 'ust cannot wait to get started.— get started. me, too, and it gets really iuicy _ get started. me, too, and it gets really iuicy next _ get started. me, too, and it gets really juicy next week. _ get started. me, too, and it gets really juicy next week. lovely i get started. me, too, and it gets reallyjuicy next week. lovely to | really juicy next week. lovely to see you. really juicy next week. lovely to see ou. ., . really juicy next week. lovely to see ou. ., ,, really juicy next week. lovely to see ou. ., ~ that's all from us this morning. have a good rest of your weekend. breakfast will be back from 6 tomorrow. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc news our top stories so far today the british foreign secretary liz truss has defended the uk's security pact with the us and australia, despite an increasing diplomatic row with france. the british government will hold further talks with the energy regulator amid soaring gas prices — with warnings more companies could go bust. splashdown — the first all—amateur space crew to orbit the earth has safely returned after their three—day mission. and the glitter ball is back — as the celebrity pairings are revealed for this year's strictly come dancing, with an all—male couple featuring for the first time.

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