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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 20, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. crisis talks on soaring gas prices — the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. the gas price is having a knock—on effect on food supplies too. could we see the impact on our supermarket shelves in the lead up to christmas? covid vaccines for 12—15—year—olds are available in england and scotland from today. a volcano erupts on the canary islands — the army is called in
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as thousands are evacuated. tributes for one of the game's greats — former england striker jimmy greaves, who's died. there was applause at all of sundays premier league matches in memory of the man who is still the leading goal—scorer in the english top flight. the emmy goes to... the crown. the crown wins best drama at the emmys in los angeles — olivia colman is named best actress for her portrayal of the queen good morning from the chelsea flower show. the first time in 108 years of this show has been held in autumn. of course due to the pandemic. the of course due to the pandemic. the weather today for most will be dry, some sunny spells, showers in the south—east easing, or cloud and patchy rain coming into the north—west later. i will have all the details in about ten minutes. it's monday the 20th of september. our top story. crisis talks between the government
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and energy bosses will be held later, as ministers consider emergency state—backed loans to encourage firms to take on more customers. surging gas prices have left some energy companies battling to stay afloat while supermarkets have warned they could also affect food supplies. the prime minister has said the problems are temporary. katy austin reports. the price of natural gas — a key source of the energy which heats our homes and powers our industries — has soared. it's a global issue with causes including high demand. the price has gone up so much that some smaller energy suppliers have gone bust. there are fears more will follow. the regulator 0fgem says it's working to ensure consumers continue to be protected. the business secretary held crisis meetings with the industry at the weekend, and there will be further talks today. because the industry forecasts ahead, we can see that this is a peak and then we expect prices come down in the spring. so, really, conversations are about how we manage a very tight autumn/winter period and the specific impacts we think that these prices
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will have on industry. another knock—on impact of energy being so expensive is that production has been halted at two large fertiliser plants in england. they make carbon dioxide as a by—product, and that is used widely by food producers — for example, in meat production and packaging. some manufacturers and supermarkets have warned of shortages if the problem isn't urgently resolved. iceland says it's not seeing problems yet, but the situation is a concern. 0ur supply chain are building up an additional 1—2 week stock — particularly on key lines that they're worried about, such as frozen meats — just to ensure that if if the c02 just to ensure that if the c02 crisis does last any longer than a few days — or, indeed weeks — we will be able to keep servicing our stores and ultimately our customers. the government's spoken with the company which runs the fertiliser plants, to discuss options around getting them going again.
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food businesses say the carbon dioxide disruption couldn't have come at a worse time — with the supply chain already under pressure as they struggle to get enough workers and lorry drivers. wholesale gas prices are unlikely to come down just yet, and eventually they could feed through into higher energy bills for households. katy austin, bbc news. let's talk more about this with our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning. what more can you tell us? we good morning. what more can you tell us? ~ ~' ., good morning. what more can you tell us? ~ ~ ., , ., us? we know there will be a meeting today between _ us? we know there will be a meeting today between the _ us? we know there will be a meeting today between the business - today between the business department and the energy companies and we will have a lot more information after that meeting has taken place. at the moment the government is relying on the existing system for when you have a problem with energy suppliers, which is that if a smaller supplier goes bust and its customers are transferred over to a larger energy supplier, and that is known as a supplier, and that is known as a supplier of last resort. the problem here is that for big energy companies it is not a very attractive prospect because the cost
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of supplying those customers is going to be so high, so is that where the government is going to have to step in and provide support? 0r have to step in and provide support? or it do you see them doing something else with maybe off gem, the energy regulator, kind of taking over struggling energy supply and running it for a little while, which would be legal under the law? normally in the circumstances the government has a dilemma of do you spend taxpayers money or do you just let the market do its thing and let companies to take the strain? we can get a clue to which direction the government is heading when you listen to what the prime minister was saying about this issue when he landed in new york overnight. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure that we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under — we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out, as the world economy gets back on its feet _ there are all sorts of ways in which the suppression of the world economy — caused by covid — is now expressing
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itself as problems of recovery. to me, that sounds like a prime minister who is ready to intervene, certainly in the short—term, but also trying to reassure people that this will not affect the supply of gas to your house and it will be resolved eventually.— gas to your house and it will be resolved eventually. thanks very much indeed. _ france has cancelled a meeting between its armed forces minister and the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, which was due to be held this week. it's after a new security deal between britain, the us and australia led to france losing out on a major contract in the process. the prime minister insists relations with paris are "very friendly". 12—to—15—year—olds in england and scotland will start receiving covid vaccines from today. in wales, invitations will be sent out this week, while the programme is expected to start shortly in northern ireland. meanwhile, millions of older and vulnerable people will also be contacted to arrange their booster shots.
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0ur health correspondent katharine da costa reports. having waited for older age groups to be vaccinated, the uk's12—to—15—year—olds are next in line to be offered a jab. some scottish health boards will start administering pfizer vaccines at drop—in clinics from today. those still making up their minds can choose to wait for an appointment later this month. while the risk to you being severely ill may well be low, we want to make sure every single 12—15—year—old is protected — and not only protect themselves, but also, as they go to school, it helps to protect hopefully their teachers and others that they interact with at school. at some schools in england, where permission forms have been sent back, nhs staff are expected to begin immunising teenagers from today, with most likely to start later this week. the decision over whether to vaccinate the over—12s has been finely balanced because young people are at very low risk from covid. while data has shown a very small chance of teenagers suffering
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from heart inflammation after the pfizer vaccine, catching covid also increases the risk of developing myocarditis. last week, the uk's four chief medical officers said 12—to—15—year—olds should be offered a job to help protect a jab to help protect their education and mental health. i think it is really about recognising that, not only is the vaccine helpful for young people to reduce the risk to their health and to educational disruption, but there's also contributing to trying to get through this pandemic, where we still have high rates of infection in the community and younger people taking up a vaccine will contribute to reducing those over time. elderly care—home residents who are most at risk from the virus are being prioritised for booster shots. england and wales have already made a start, while scotland begins its campaign today, and northern ireland's roll—out�*s due later this month. health and social care workers, the over—50s and younger adults with underlying health conditions will also be eligible six months after their second jab.
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the nhs in england and wales will start contacting people by text or letter this week. vaccinations will play a central role in helping the uk to navigate what some fear could be a difficult winter ahead. katharine da costa, bbc news. folic acid is to be added to flour across the uk, to reduce the risk of life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. the government said the move could prevent up to 200 cases of birth defects every year. the new rules will only apply to non—wholemeal wheat flour, with gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour exempt. thousands of people have been evacuated after a volcano erupted on the island of la palma, in the canaries. several homes have been destroyed and a 2km—wide exclusion zone has been set up around the lava flow. this is the volcano's first major eruption for 50 years, as courtney bembridge reports. for the first time in half a century, the cumbre vieja volcano erupted —
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with fountains of molten rock shooting hundreds of metres into the sky, and incandescent orange rivers flowing down the hillside. the island has been on high alert for the past week because of a huge increase in tremors — and thousands of people were told to leave their homes. the eruption started in the afternoon — plumes of smoke could be seen from across the island, and eyewitnesses described hearing a loud explosion. the noise coming from the volcano — it sounds like — i don't know — 20 fighterjets taking off right now, and it's extremely loud. two hours later, with rivers of lava edging down the hillside, soldiers were deployed to help get people out. prime minister pedro sanchez has arrived in la palma after postponing his trip to new york for the united nations' general assembly this week. experts say it's not clear how long the eruption will last,
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and it's going to be an anxious wait for residents. courtney bembridge, bbc news. the wanted will play together for the first time in seven years at a charity concert organised by band member tom parker, who has a brain tumour. the group are set to perform at the royal albert hall tonight as part of stand up to cancer's inside my head show, and tom — speaking to this programme last week — said he hopes the show will raise important funds for medical research into brain tumours. this disease for the last 20 years has been, you know, pretty much untouchable. no—one's been able to find a cure. no—one's been able to find a treatment. this is the brain tumour. the brain tumour, yeah. you know, nothing's really changed so we really want to just focus on trying to get as much money and funding into charities as much as possible, so they can try and find new breakthroughs. and it feels like they're on the cusp of doing it. so...hopefully this
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concert can make a change. and we will have more on how the concert went on tomorrow's programme. that was an amazing interview stuck in a fantastic, and we wish them loads of luck for tonight and we will have more tomorrow. there was plenty of british success at the emmy awards in los angeles overnight. the crown won best drama series, with 0livia colman being named best lead actress in a drama series. 0ther accolades went to michaela coel for for her drama i may destroy you and kate winslet was named best actress in a miniseries for mare 0f easttown. the apple comedy ted lasso was another of the night's big winners. i'm going to be very quick because i am very teary. i wish my dad could be to see this. i lost my during covid and he would have loved all of this. the wonderful 0livia colman there.
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and our la correspondent sophie long will have a full report. when is that happening? around 7:20am white _ carol is out at the chelsea flower show this morning — which, for the first time in more than a century, is taking place in september. good morning. good morning. good mornin: , good morning. good morning. good morning. both- _ good morning. good morning. good morning, both. good— good morning. good morning. good morning, both. good morning to you, as welt _ morning, both. good morning to you, as welt 0f— morning, both. good morning to you, as well. of course it has been postponed to the autumn this year because _ postponed to the autumn this year because of— postponed to the autumn this year because of the pandemic but it is still glorious. it is dark, which is unusual— still glorious. it is dark, which is unusual for— still glorious. it is dark, which is unusual for the chelsea flower show because _ unusual for the chelsea flower show because earlier in the year it is much — because earlier in the year it is much brighter. let's look at the garden — much brighter. let's look at the garden behind me. this was designed by thomas— garden behind me. this was designed by thomas massie and is very much designed _ by thomas massie and is very much designed to— by thomas massie and is very much designed to nurture soil health, enhance — designed to nurture soil health, enhance biodiversity, support pollinators and energise wildlife and do — pollinators and energise wildlife and do you see that egg —shaped seat over the? _ and do you see that egg —shaped seat over the? at — and do you see that egg —shaped seat over the? at the base of that is glass— over the? at the base of that is glass so— over the? at the base of that is glass so if— over the? at the base of that is glass so if you are sitting in it you would _ glass so if you are sitting in it you would have a cracking view of the stream — you would have a cracking view of the stream underneath it. talking of cracking, _ the stream underneath it. talking of cracking, the weather is not too
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bad _ cracking, the weather is not too bad for— cracking, the weather is not too bad. for most it will be dry with a fair bit _ bad. for most it will be dry with a fair bit of— bad. for most it will be dry with a fair bit of sunshine and for the next _ fair bit of sunshine and for the next few— fair bit of sunshine and for the next few days the forecast remains fairly _ next few days the forecast remains fairly settled. it is really until we get — fairly settled. it is really until we get to wednesday when things start to _ we get to wednesday when things start to change and turn more unsettled. settle in the north, and we wiii— unsettled. settle in the north, and we will also see the wind picked up for some. — we will also see the wind picked up for some, maybe even touching gale force in— for some, maybe even touching gale force in the — for some, maybe even touching gale force in the far north. today it is a chilly— force in the far north. today it is a chilly start _ force in the far north. today it is a chilly start as rural parts of scotland. _ a chilly start as rural parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england— scotland, northern ireland, northern england and also wales. temperatures failing _ england and also wales. temperatures failing to— england and also wales. temperatures falling to between two and 4 degrees. in the south—east, under the cloud — degrees. in the south—east, under the cloud still 16 or 17. from lincolnshire into the south—east we are looking — lincolnshire into the south—east we are looking at a fairly cloudy day with some — are looking at a fairly cloudy day with some breaks but still some showers — with some breaks but still some showers. they will start to ease through — showers. they will start to ease through the day. in the north—west, the converse. after writing to the site, _ the converse. after writing to the site. the — the converse. after writing to the site, the cloud will come in, courtesy— site, the cloud will come in, courtesy of a weather front, to parts _ courtesy of a weather front, to parts of — courtesy of a weather front, to parts of scotland and northern ireiand, — parts of scotland and northern ireland, introducing light rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north— temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to _ temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to 21_ temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to 21 or 22 in the sunshine further— north to 21 or 22 in the sunshine further south. overnight different
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in scotland and northern ireland will in scotland and northern ireland wiii sink— in scotland and northern ireland will sink further south, getting into the — will sink further south, getting into the midlands, north wales by the end _ into the midlands, north wales by the end of the night. not much more than a _ the end of the night. not much more than a band — the end of the night. not much more than a band of cloud. there will be some _ than a band of cloud. there will be some clear— than a band of cloud. there will be some clear skies, we lose the show was completely from the south—east and temperatures generally staying in double _ and temperatures generally staying in double figures. into tomorrow, white _ in double figures. into tomorrow, while we — in double figures. into tomorrow, while we have a weather front continuing to slide south, but really — continuing to slide south, but really weak, for most it will be a dry day, — really weak, for most it will be a dry day, a — really weak, for most it will be a dry day, a fair bit of sunshine, some — dry day, a fair bit of sunshine, some fair— dry day, a fair bit of sunshine, some fair weather cloud building, but then— some fair weather cloud building, but then a — some fair weather cloud building, but then a new front into the north—west, which will also introduce some thick cloud and rain and in _ introduce some thick cloud and rain and in the _ introduce some thick cloud and rain and in the north—west it will also be quite — and in the north—west it will also be quite windy. top temperatures tomorrow — be quite windy. top temperatures tomorrow similar to today, just getting — tomorrow similar to today, just getting into the 20s. after that, it tames _ getting into the 20s. after that, it tames a _ getting into the 20s. after that, it tames a bit more unsettled in the northern— tames a bit more unsettled in the northern country.— tames a bit more unsettled in the northern country. carol, i love that art. is northern country. carol, i love that part- is there _ northern country. carol, i love that part- is there a _ northern country. carol, i love that part. is there a sofa _ northern country. carol, i love that part. is there a sofa in _ northern country. carol, i love that part. is there a sofa in there - northern country. carol, i love that part. is there a sofa in there for i northern country. carol, i love that part. is there a sofa in there for a l part. is there a sofa in there for a lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched — lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched no! _ lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched up! that _ lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched up! that is _ lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched up! that is the - lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched up! that is the one - lie down ten minutes later? you can be winched up! that is the one with | be winched up! that is the one with the glass— be winched up! that is the one with the glass bottom, so if you sit in it you _ the glass bottom, so if you sit in it you can— the glass bottom, so if you sit in it you can look down and see the
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stream — it you can look down and see the stream. ,., ., , it you can look down and see the stream-_ i— it you can look down and see the stream._ i would - it you can look down and see the i stream._ i would probably stream. gorgeous. iwould probably crash into the _ stream. gorgeous. iwould probably crash into the stream _ stream. gorgeous. iwould probably crash into the stream so _ stream. gorgeous. iwould probably crash into the stream so we - stream. gorgeous. iwould probably crash into the stream so we will- crash into the stream so we will leave _ crash into the stream so we will leave it — crash into the stream so we will leave it at — crash into the stream so we will leave it at that. is crash into the stream so we will leave it at that.— crash into the stream so we will leave it at that. is no way, carol! see ou leave it at that. is no way, carol! see you later _ leave it at that. is no way, carol! see you later on. _ leave it at that. is no way, carol! see you later on. i _ leave it at that. is no way, carol! see you later on. i reckon - leave it at that. is no way, carol! see you later on. i reckon there l see you later on. i reckon there will be one _ see you later on. i reckon there will be one in _ see you later on. i reckon there will be one in carol's _ see you later on. i reckon there will be one in carol's guided. i see you later on. i reckon there l will be one in carol's guided. she has a beautiful garden, that would fit right in. let's take a look at today's front pages. the times is one of a number of papers highlighting the crisis caused by soaring gas prices, warning that taxpayers could could face a bill of "several billion pounds" to help energy companies weather the storm. "crisis? watt crisis?" is the metro's headline. the paper quotes cabinet minister alok sharma, who has insisted there is no immediate concern over gas supplies. the front page also focuses on tributes tojimmy greaves, calling him one of the "greatest ever" english strikers. the telegraph leads on borisjohnson's trip to the united states. my my dad only calls me for certain stories andjimmy my dad only calls me for certain stories and jimmy greaves was one of them.
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borisjohnson's expected to urge president biden to change the travel rules to allow fully vaccinated people to fly from the uk to the usa. and one of the top trending topics online overnight is the emmys — celebrating wins for the likes of kate winslet and the netflix series the crown. they did really well overnight on. we will be live in la later on at about 7:20am.— we will be live in la later on at about 7:20am._ i | we will be live in la later on at. about 7:20am._ i am we will be live in la later on at - about 7:20am._ i am all about 7:20am. how are you? i am all riuht. are about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right- are you — about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right. are you sure? _ about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right. are you sure? you _ about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right. are you sure? you have - about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right. are you sure? you have had . about 7:20am. how are you? i am all right. are you sure? you have had a i right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few— right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few days. _ right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few days. i _ right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few days. i have - right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few days. i have not - right. are you sure? you have had a traumatic few days. i have not been j traumatic few days. i have not been able to train — traumatic few days. i have not been able to train for— traumatic few days. i have not been able to train for this _ traumatic few days. i have not been able to train for this dancing - able to train for this dancing business for a few days. strictly. that is the _ business for a few days. strictly. that is the one. _ business for a few days. strictly. that is the one. i _ business for a few days. strictly. that is the one. i walloped - business for a few days. strictly. that is the one. i walloped my . business for a few days. strictly. i that is the one. i walloped my head on a revolving door at a hotel. there is cctv footage, which we are not sharing. i there is cctv footage, which we are not sharing-— there is cctv footage, which we are not sharing-_ l- not sharing. i have seen it. i showed to — not sharing. i have seen it. i showed to sally _ not sharing. i have seen it. i showed to sally this - not sharing. i have seen it. i| showed to sally this morning not sharing. i have seen it. i- showed to sally this morning and it was funny but very painful at the time. i thought there was an entrance to a door when i wasn't. i was running outside to get my wallet from the back of a taxi and i walloped straight into his door, sprang back quite spectacularly about two metres or so. immediately back on your —
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about two metres or so. immediately back on your feet. _ about two metres or so. immediately back on your feet. i _ about two metres or so. immediately back on your feet. i needed - about two metres or so. immediately back on your feet. i needed my - back on your feet. i needed my wallet! when _ back on your feet. i needed my wallet! when i— back on your feet. i needed my wallet! when i came _ back on your feet. i needed my wallet! when i came back - back on your feet. i needed my wallet! when i came back in i back on your feet. i needed my i wallet! when i came back in with back on your feet. i needed my - wallet! when i came back in with the wallet! when i came back in with the wallet to pay for the room, i had an enormous full on cartoon and this receptionist was like, you need to sit down. then i noticed all this blood coming down my chin and into my hands. blood coming down my chin and into m hands. . blood coming down my chin and into my hands-- my _ blood coming down my chin and into my hands.- my immediate i my hands. locate. my immediate thou~ht my hands. locate. my immediate thought was. _ my hands. locate. my immediate thought was, oh... _ my hands. locate. my immediate thought was, oh... adrenaline i my hands. locate. my immediate i thought was, oh... adrenaline kicks in and you can't feel the pain and i said to the receptionist, can i ask you a question? do i still have almighty? i thought i might have not teeth out and i am on tv the next day. not emergency dental work! thankfully ijust bit a hole in the bottom of my tonga. disk thankfully ijust bit a hole in the bottom of my tonga.— thankfully ijust bit a hole in the bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, ou ma bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be — bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be doing _ bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be doing too _ bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be doing too much? - bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be doing too much? are - bottom of my tonga. ask your friend, you may be doing too much? are you | you may be doing too much? are you wishing about? i you may be doing too much? are you wishing about?— wishing about? i have cleared the dia a wishing about? i have cleared the diary a bit- _ wishing about? i have cleared the diary a bit. you _ wishing about? i have cleared the diary a bit. you know— wishing about? i have cleared the diary a bit. you know when - wishing about? i have cleared the diary a bit. you know when you i wishing about? i have cleared the l diary a bit. you know when you are so busy, working and then trying to train and look after your family and do everything at the same time and then you start running into glass walls. might be time to tell you... you have learnt that lesson early in
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your strictly journey.— your strictly “ourney. went to hos - ital. your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit _ your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit of _ your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit of a _ your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit of a bump - your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit of a bump dog l your strictly journey. went to hospital. bit of a bump dog i | your strictly journey. went to - hospital. bit of a bump dog i have covered it with _ hospital. bit of a bump dog i have covered it with make-up. - hospital. bit of a bump dog i have covered it with make-up. nadiyal hospital. bit of a bump dog i have . covered it with make-up. nadiya who covered it with make—up. nadiya who came with me to a&e, she will be here later. came with me to me, she will be here later-— came with me to me, she will be here later. ., ., ., ., here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move — here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move on _ here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move on with _ here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move on with the _ here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move on with the day's - here later. cannot wait to meet her. let's move on with the day's news. | thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks — and for many who are returning, they'll be hoping to experience freshers' week in person for the first time. most courses will be offering a mixture of face—to—face and online learning — though one regulator warns that teaching must still be of high quality. our education correspondent elaine dunkley is at the university of bolton for us this morning. good morning. hopefully a slice of normality for the new students. absolutely. welcome to fresh week here at bolton university. that rite of passage, the welcome to university life, discovery, socialising, making new friends and a lot of that was online or
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restricted last year but this time around campuses are fully reopening. good morning, daniel, 12 to university, what are you looking forward to most about university life? i forward to most about university life? ., ., ., ., life? i am looking forward to the hands-on experience. _ life? i am looking forward to the hands-on experience. i- life? i am looking forward to the hands-on experience. i came i life? i am looking forward to the hands-on experience. i came to| hands—on experience. i came to bolton — hands—on experience. i came to bolton for— hands—on experience. i came to bolton for the mechanical side of it rather— bolton for the mechanical side of it rather than — bolton for the mechanical side of it rather than the online delivery of lessons — rather than the online delivery of lessons i — rather than the online delivery of lessons i had in previous years. you are doinu lessons i had in previous years. gm. are doing motorsport technology so it is important you are able to come in here and do that.— in here and do that. yes, we have uuite a in here and do that. yes, we have quite a few— in here and do that. yes, we have quite a few workshops _ in here and do that. yes, we have quite a few workshops with - in here and do that. yes, we have quite a few workshops with cars i in here and do that. yes, we have l quite a few workshops with cars we are working — quite a few workshops with cars we are working on at the moment so i am really— are working on at the moment so i am really looking forward to that rather — really looking forward to that rather than just getting spoken to, i can actually do something and perform — i can actually do something and perform it— i can actually do something and perform it myself.— i can actually do something and perform it myself. freshers' week is about the social _ perform it myself. freshers' week is about the social side, _ perform it myself. freshers' week is about the social side, how _ perform it myself. freshers' week is about the social side, how much i perform it myself. freshers' week is about the social side, how much are you looking forward to that, making new friends, joining clubs, societies? new friends, “oining clubs, societies?_ new friends, “oining clubs, societies? ., , ., ., ., societies? really looking forward to it. i have spoken _ societies? really looking forward to it. i have spoken to _ societies? really looking forward to it. i have spoken to a _ societies? really looking forward to it. i have spoken to a couple - societies? really looking forward to it. i have spoken to a couple of- it. i have spoken to a couple of people — it. i have spoken to a couple of people on— it. i have spoken to a couple of people on the rugby team and they are looking really forward to their training _ are looking really forward to their training sessions and the matches. i am quite _ training sessions and the matches. i am quite looking forward to the clubbing — am quite looking forward to the
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clubbing life and the drinking aspect~ — clubbing life and the drinking aspect. obviously the studies, as well _ aspect. obviously the studies, as well. . , , ~ aspect. obviously the studies, as well. n, , . ., aspect. obviously the studies, as well. , . ., aspect. obviously the studies, as well. absolutely. we have lots of - ressures well. absolutely. we have lots of pressures here _ well. absolutely. we have lots of pressures here and _ well. absolutely. we have lots of pressures here and i _ well. absolutely. we have lots of pressures here and i have - well. absolutely. we have lots of pressures here and i have been l pressures here and i have been speaking to some of them at manchester metropolitan university, and i have been asking how they have been getting on. i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. but just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. over the next few weeks, manchester will welcome more than 70,000 uni students to the city. how about a free t—shirt? we've got a bucket hat. it'sjust fun, you know, just getting a vibe back from the two—year break we've had in lockdown. and, you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that uni feeling. meet the freshers ellie, keira and lola. i left everything last—minute, so i was literally packing to, like, midnight. woke up, carried on packing and then got everything in the car, had a little cry when i said goodbye to my mum. it's the start of a new chapter. because of the pandemic, many students have started uni without visiting the place that
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will become their home. did a few virtual tours, but that was it, really. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, "what if i get up there and i hate it?" it could be completely, like, out of my depth. but, no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year— and i studied a different course, it was quite similar. but, obviously, being. a creative course online, it was just so difficult. like, we weren't getting to use the facilities, i we weren't getting the one—to—one we should have got. _ like, already, i was saying i've had a better week... _ not even a week — the last two days. i've already met so many people. i feel, like, so much more i passionate about my course. i'm enjoying it so much more. so, yeah, ithink i made the best decision i could have. _ at many universities across england, lectures on campus are back and face coverings are no longer mandatory, but students are advised to do covid tests regularly. the idea of future restrictions is still a concern. i hope it doesn't happen again. they did say, yesterday, in the lecture... they said they've got a plan if it does happen. if we get put into lockdown.
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no, none of that! because i am from quite a small town, i knew that even - i being in lockdown here would bel somewhat better than down there, so i was like, as a whole, may as well go for it. i covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. we were stuck in a tiny, tiny little house with so many people when it started. that wasn't fun. got into a lot of arguments. with fees of £9,000 a year and living costs, these third—year students feel out of pocket. i think we should have some compensation for... either teaching orfor the accommodation, because a lot of the rooms didn't get lived in, so people go back to their families, if they're shielding, or whatever. a lot of uni—based accommodation i have tried to give a bit of moneyl back, but a lot of private things, obviously, - what we were in last year, haven't done anything. i and when we weren't living in that house for something like six - months or so of the year, but we are still paying i rent every month. cherie is a second—year sociology student.
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she first went to university at 18, but had to drop out. in the middle of the year, i sadly lost my mum. it was a really difficult time and that made me become a young carerfor my brothers. at the age of 23, she decided to go back. but the pandemic meant she wasn't able to experience university life. she is now part of a support group to help students who are struggling. last year was quite difficult, to be honest, in terms especially for mental health. like, it was quite isolating. ifeel like, as people, we like to have connections and stuff. having that aspect taken away last year, we could definitely see how people actually struggled. there are amazing charities out there who are willing to help lots of different people. if someone was to tell me that five or six years ago, cherie, you are going to be smiling, you are going to go back to uni and be having the time of your life, i would have thought they would be lying, because when you are in that moment of time, you don't think positively at all, because you are just taking in everything. but i always tell people to take it easy, take their time with it,
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and just to be kinder to themselves. freshers' week marks the start of university life — a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many returning back to university. there is a real hope that things will be different this time. the pandemic caused huge disruption to student life. joining me now is the vice chancellor. good morning. exciting to see the students back. so exciting to happen on campus again _ so exciting to happen on campus aaain. ~ . so exciting to happen on campus auain.~ ., ., so exciting to happen on campus aaain. ., ., , . again. what sort of restrictions will ou again. what sort of restrictions will you keep _ again. what sort of restrictions will you keep in _ again. what sort of restrictions will you keep in place - again. what sort of restrictions will you keep in place here, i again. what sort of restrictions l will you keep in place here, what will you keep in place here, what will you keep in place here, what will you do to reassure students it is safe? ,, , , ., , ., is safe? students should understand we are following _ is safe? students should understand we are following government - we are following government guidelines to the letter. the risk assessment is being done all the time _ assessment is being done all the time and — assessment is being done all the time and students come through our heat scanners when they arrive, even semi-post- _ heat scanners when they arrive, even semi—post— pandemic come back on campus. _ semi—post— pandemic come back on campus, students in their classrooms have the _
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campus, students in their classrooms have the track and trace facilities, every— have the track and trace facilities, every desk— have the track and trace facilities, every desk has a qr code and they are encouraged to be double tested every— are encouraged to be double tested every week and to double vaccinate. we are _ every week and to double vaccinate. we are encouraging them, to make it easy to _ we are encouraging them, to make it easy to get _ we are encouraging them, to make it easy to get access to the vaccinations.— easy to get access to the vaccinations. ~ ., ., ,., vaccinations. we have heard some students talking _ vaccinations. we have heard some students talking about _ vaccinations. we have heard some students talking about how - vaccinations. we have heard some| students talking about how difficult it was last year, especially as they were paying fees of £9,000, and living costs. there has to be some sympathy for students.— sympathy for students. there is massive sympathy, _ sympathy for students. there is massive sympathy, there i sympathy for students. there is massive sympathy, there has i sympathy for students. there is| massive sympathy, there has to sympathy for students. there is i massive sympathy, there has to be. they have _ massive sympathy, there has to be. they have had a really high time and it has— they have had a really high time and it has not— they have had a really high time and it has not been easy for anyone, this pandemic, but universities have done _ this pandemic, but universities have done their— this pandemic, but universities have done their very best. here at bolton we have _ done their very best. here at bolton we have had teaching going on throughout on campus, notjust we have had teaching going on throughout on campus, not just for nursing _ throughout on campus, not just for nursing students but for others. in a very— nursing students but for others. in a very safe — nursing students but for others. in a very safe way. it is really important, that students get access to facilities here in bolton during the pandemic. obviously not as you would _ the pandemic. obviously not as you would get _ the pandemic. obviously not as you would get in a normal year but it hasn't _ would get in a normal year but it hasn't been normal for anybody globally — hasn't been normal for anybody globally. in hasn't been normal for anybody aloball . . hasn't been normal for anybody aloball . , ., ., . globally. in terms of balancing lectures in _ globally. in terms of balancing lectures in person _ globally. in terms of balancing lectures in person and - globally. in terms of balancing lectures in person and online, | globally. in terms of balancing i lectures in person and online, how difficult a decision is that? we saw last year huge disruption, students
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having to isolate in their flats, not being on campus for most of the year. not being on campus for most of the ear. , ., ., ., ., year. they have had a hard time across the _ year. they have had a hard time across the country _ year. they have had a hard time across the country but _ year. they have had a hard time i across the country but universities have _ across the country but universities have tried — across the country but universities have tried to offer the very best online _ have tried to offer the very best online provision when it had to be, and now— online provision when it had to be, and now we — online provision when it had to be, and now we have what we call campus plus, and now we have what we call campus plus. which _ and now we have what we call campus plus. which is— and now we have what we call campus plus, which is being on campus... this— plus, which is being on campus... this is— plus, which is being on campus... this is not— plus, which is being on campus... this is not about the notion of blended — this is not about the notion of blended learning, they will be on campus. — blended learning, they will be on campus, starting this week, all behind — campus, starting this week, all behind us — campus, starting this week, all behind us at this very early hour of those _ behind us at this very early hour of those students will be on campus they will— those students will be on campus they will have support online so that if— they will have support online so that if they miss something because they have _ that if they miss something because they have to isolate during the winter. — they have to isolate during the winter, they can pick it up by streaming _ winter, they can pick it up by streaming it, but that is plan b, not plan — streaming it, but that is plan b, not plan a _ streaming it, but that is plan b, not plan a. egon campus is planning a. a not plan a. egon campus is planning a. r ., not plan a. egon campus is planning a. . ., ., not plan a. egon campus is planning a. �* ., ., . not plan a. egon campus is planning a. . ., ., . ., not plan a. egon campus is planning a. a lot of excitement and lots of events planned _ a. a lot of excitement and lots of events planned this _ a. a lot of excitement and lots of events planned this week - a. a lot of excitement and lots of events planned this week and i a. a lot of excitement and lots of i events planned this week and across universities, students will start coming back and there is excitement but also caution on campuses. thank ou ve but also caution on campuses. thank you very much _ but also caution on campuses. thank you very much indeed, _ but also caution on campuses. thank you very much indeed, elaine. i but also caution on campuses. thank you very much indeed, elaine. we i but also caution on campuses. thank. you very much indeed, elaine. we had to see business. _ you very much indeed, elaine. we had to see business. do _ you very much indeed, elaine. we had to see business. do you _ you very much indeed, elaine. we had to see business. do you think- you very much indeed, elaine. we had to see business. do you think those i to see business. do you think those students got _ to see business. do you think those students got up _ to see business. do you think those students got up early _ to see business. do you think those students got up early for _ to see business. do you think those students got up early for us - to see business. do you think those students got up early for us or- to see business. do you think those students got up early for us or have they been up all night?— they been up all night? perhaps all they been up all night? perhaps all the way around _
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they been up all night? perhaps all the way around the _ they been up all night? perhaps all the way around the clock. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. think good morning, i'm thin ,, , good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london has two new tube stations today — on the northern line— the first major expansion since thejubliee line opened in the late nineties. the first trains began to run between nine elms and battersea power station around 5.30 this morning. there'll be six trains an hour at first — that number will double next year. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to meet the iranian foreign minister to call for the immediate release of uk nationals including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. nazanin, from west london, has been detained in iran since 2016 — convicted of propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard ratcliffe says stopping her coming home amounts to hostage—taking, and said he's urged liz truss to make her case a top priority. an investigation is being carried
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out after a double—decker bus hit the front of a house in north london on saturday night. the 191, which wasn't carrying any passengers, collided with a car and then crashed into the front of the property in crouch end. police said there were no reports of any injuries. royal mail is trialling two types of micro electric vechicles for delivering letters and small parcels. the idea's to cut emissions. the vehicles will be trialled over six months in residential areas. it's hoped they will provide a lower carbon alternative to larger vans. yes, it's autumn, but the chelsea flower show gets under way today. the show was postponed from may due to the pandemic. spring and early summer blooms will be replaced by dahlias, pumpkins and autumn colours. well let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the central line was having some problems with train cancellations this morning, but it looks like that's cleared up.
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the piccadilly line has severe delays from acton town to uxbridge due to late finish to engineering work. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was a rather wet day for many of us yesterday across the capital with some lively showers around. today is looking drier, but there are still some more showers to come in the forecast at times. this morning, another mild start to the day. we have temperatures in double figures. it's quite grey and gloomy out there for most of us. the cloud is thickest towards eastern areas of the capital. here, maybe the chance of a bit of drizzle, some light showers around through the morning. further west, we should see things brighten up slowly and a lot of that cloud will tend to break up, too. when we do get any spells of brightness and sunshine across the capital through the afternoon, do watch out because there may be one or two sharp showers developing, as well. top temperatures in the best of any brightness and sunshine will get as high as perhaps 19—20 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the winds stay light.
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there will be some more mist developing. temperatures in some of the rural spots, where we see the clearest of the skies, could possibly drop back into single figures, so a chillier start to the day tomorrow, which is looking dry and fine. with still light winds, then we will see temperatures peak in the low 20s in celsius once more — 21 degrees for most of us. into wednesday and, again, it is dry and fine, but the winds will pick up through the afternoon. feeling more autumnal as we head through the rest of the working week. i'll be back in around half an hour. now it's back to dan and sally. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning. the competition is on for the glitterball trophy, and we'll bejoined by dan's strictly dance partner nadiya bychkova at 8.30. it's had many of us gripped to our screens for the past few sundays, and, later this morning, we'll meet the actor revealed as the russian agent in last night's episode of vigil.
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and we'll look back on the life of former england and tottenham playerjimmy greaves, with his former teammate steve perryman. all that to come. talks have been taking place this weekend between energy companies and the government over what to do about escalating gas prices. there are concerns about the impact on consumers as well as food supplies. nina's been taking a look at this for us. good morning. we can talk about the politics but there are lots of things in play and ultimately you at home will wonder what it means. the wholesale price of gas — that's what suppliers pay before selling energy to us — that's been rocketing. it's more than three times the price compared to a year ago. why? well it's that simple equation of reduced supply, and increased demand.
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as we come out of the pandemic and as we enter winter, our consumption requirements are increasing — so the demand side of the equation is increasing. unfortunately, the supply side is actually quite constrained at the moment. wind generation — on which the uk's become much more dependent — is low. _ the weather's been calm. our gas storage tanks are actually quite low at this time of year versus normal, due to certain supply constraints from russia. and also we've got some technical issues on the grid — for example, the interconnector fire that we saw happening last week, that's constrained the supply side. those two sides of the equation are imbalanced, wholesale prices are increasing. so as the supply is squeezed, the price our providers must pay, goes up. that has already pushed some out of business. the expectation is that more will follow. if you are with one of those suppliers, don't worry — you won't be cut off. regulators will continue your supply and any surplus
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you have will be honoured. but choices for switching and rates being rapidly reduced. go compare is one of the comparison sites which has had to withdraw some offers. those still available are getting pricey. last year, the cheapest annual average fixed rate was around £700, now there are few deals below £1,200. we always tell you to shop around on breakfast. now we're in a strange situation where those on the standard variable tariff — about 15 million consumers — could be in the best position. because their bills are capped by the regulator. although from october, they could go up — by up to 12%. that could see the average gas and electric bill increase by about £140 a year to nearly £1,300 a year. what can you do as a consumer? well, bad news — we might have to get used to the price hike — for now at least.
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and this isn'tjust about energy prices at home. businesses are suffering too. you might not know this, but lots of food suppliers need carbon dioxide to keep frozen products fresh, and to stun animals before slaughter. they get that as a bi—product from fertiliser producers — they've been suspended because of the gas prices. and so that could also affect what's on the shelves. the issue of lack of co2 on top of labour shortages and on top of problems with covid have made it difficult and challenging environment forfood producers. we environment for food producers. we would environment forfood producers. we would expect some difficulties with food production in the coming weeks. i think we, like others, are looking towards christmas and the difficulties we will face over the next months in the build—up to the end of the year.
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that feeds into what we are seeing in squeezed supply chains because of shortages of labour and hgv drivers. we spoke about record—breaking inflation with average prices going up inflation with average prices going up already. think about the pressure families are under at the moment. looking ahead to increased payment in taxes and some families are about to lose the uplifting universal credit. the wider economic recovery is reliant on us having more to spend. any disposable income that is squeezed will have an impact on the wider recovery, so this is a big deal. you said it, this is a big deal. and that is something we will talk to the government minister about at 7:30am. the impact on so many different areas of the economy and something that impacts us at home. and the government, to the extent
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may bail out suppliers, and also whether there needs to be reform on how this is regulated and whether competition is working for everyone. from today, the covid vaccine rollout for 12—15 year olds in scotland and england will begin — and invitation letters will start being sent out in wales this week. meanwhile, those who are eligible will be asked to book in for their boosterjabs. we're joined now by one of our regular gps, dr nighat arif. good morning. lovely to see you back in the kitchen. you were here last week but nice to have you back on the show on a monday. let's start with the vaccination of 12—15 year olds. what are you hearing with parents and children about that. it parents and children about that. it is a mixed bag of what people expect. a lot of disinformation on social media but actually a lot of
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parents are on board with the fact we know we cannot allow children to miss school and we need to prevent postviral complications with children. there are kids who want the vaccine and kids who do not want the vaccine and kids who do not want the vaccine. we get a similar picture with parents. schools are trying to get a lot of information to parents to reassure them. and from doctors. we have had a lot of school mist that has impacted on mental health and family income because parents have had to stay at home when groups have her to stay off school and we cannot have a repeat of that. we know from day to around the world, after millions of doses given to 12—15 year olds, the pfizer vaccine is safe for children, the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks. if it prevents postviral complications, half the rate of
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transmission and the possibility of getting sick and going to hospital and death, then vaccinations we know work and they prevent infection from spreading. if we can get a handle on the pandemic and hopefully get back to a sense of normality. this the pandemic and hopefully get back to a sense of normality.— to a sense of normality. this might be a difficult _ to a sense of normality. this might be a difficult question _ to a sense of normality. this might be a difficult question to _ to a sense of normality. this might be a difficult question to answer i be a difficult question to answer but in terms of take—up, what do you expect it to be? i but in terms of take-up, what do you exoect it to be?— expect it to be? i think it will be very high- _ expect it to be? i think it will be very high- the _ expect it to be? i think it will be very high. the take-up - expect it to be? i think it will be very high. the take-up in i expect it to be? i think it will be | very high. the take-up in adults, very high. the take—up in adults, two macro doses, roughly 85% of the aduu two macro doses, roughly 85% of the adult population vaccinated. booster doses have started for health care professionals. from what i hear, we had an event in the park with a mobile vaccination van to vaccinate 16-18 mobile vaccination van to vaccinate 16—18 year olds and they were going. there was no hesitancy. they were grabbing the opportunity, and there
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was a lot of positivity among 12—15 year olds, because they are used to being vaccinated with hpv and bcg vaccines at school so it is an extension of what they get in school and flu vaccines are given to these age groups. they are a lot on board with the idea. in age groups. they are a lot on board with the idea-— with the idea. in terms of your “ob load. and what i with the idea. in terms of your “ob load. and what we i with the idea. in terms of your “ob load. and what we expect i with the idea. in terms of your “ob load. and what we expect of i load. and what we expect of front—line staff in the nhs, with 12-15s front—line staff in the nhs, with 12—15s being vaccinated, booster vaccines, talking about flu jabs. give us an assessment about what you feel it will look like in the build—up to winterfor feel it will look like in the build—up to winter for you. this feel it will look like in the build-up to winter for you. this is our second _ build-up to winter for you. this is our second autumn _ build-up to winter for you. this is our second autumn and _ build-up to winter for you. this is our second autumn and winter i build-up to winter for you. this is l our second autumn and winter time build-up to winter for you. this is i our second autumn and winter time in our second autumn and wintertime in the pandemic. last year there were mistakes made. we need to make sure we are prepared and we try to be
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prepared. the government and health care professionals, did a lot on the vaccination programme. the winter plan to drive down the number of cases and keep pressure off the nhs and make sure patients are not in hospital. those in intensive care at the moment taking resources we need for other health care to be delivered are those not vaccinated. in the winter, you will be indoors. make sure if you can ventilate as much as possible. mask wearing will probably be part of that, as well. it is about being vigilant, washing hands and being sensible. the workload in general practice, it is immense. we have an ambitious flu vaccination programme that is slightly delayed because of delivery, van drivers not being able to get the vaccine. the vaccines are in primary care. we are rolling it out. we know the workload is going
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to be huge. i think we can manage it. but patients need to be patient. there is a shortage of gps across the country and appointments. we are getting there. the country and appointments. we are getting there-— getting there. there are stories about folic _ getting there. there are stories about folic acid _ getting there. there are stories about folic acid being _ getting there. there are stories about folic acid being added i getting there. there are stories about folic acid being added to | about folic acid being added to flour, which you support. it about folic acid being added to flour, which you support. it has taken a long — flour, which you support. it has taken a long time _ flour, which you support. it has taken a long time to _ flour, which you support. it has taken a long time to come. i flour, which you support. it has taken a long time to come. we| taken a long time to come. we already have vitamin d. cereal boxes i was looking at, fortified with vitamin d and vitamin b12 and folic acid is important in pregnancy and the ideas we have this in flour. 200 neural defect cases can be prevented. we ask pregnant women to take folic acid a month before their
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pregnancy and 12 weeks throughout but unfortunately some women forget and some pregnancies are not planned. so this is a great news story. i know you are desperate to get me off, as well, but this is organ donation awareness week. if you have any thoughts about that, i encourage everyone to turn around to their nearest and dearest and let them know your thoughts on that because we are trying to increase awareness and get people to think about donating. x�*t�*ou awareness and get people to think about donating.— about donating. you know the programme — about donating. you know the programme far— about donating. you know the programme far too _ about donating. you know the programme far too well. i about donating. you know the i programme far too well. everybody about donating. you know the - programme far too well. everybody in the gallery shouting we are out of time. have a lovely day. she knows us well. we are going to be talking about one of the footballers of his generation. jimmy greaves. this picture of him, i love this black and white shot of him.
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he was my dad's favourite player. he rings me on few occasions about a story in the news but he loved jimmy greaves. i loved watching him on the television. he was a star for many people. everybody has their own memory, playing for chelsea, tottenham, england. but his broadcasting career. he just had broadcasting career. hejust had it. he just had it. whatever hejust had it. whatever it is. he had x factor before the x factor. saintand saint and greavesie. a true legend, the greatest english goal—scorer that ever lived, a charismatic, warm man. just some of the tributes being paid tojimmy greaves, the former england and tottenham striker who died at the age of 81. at all of yesterday's premier league matches, a minute's applause took place
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in memory of the man who remains the leading goal—scorer in the english top flight. his former sides tottenham, chelsea and west ham all paid their respects. greaves also scored 44 goals in 57 games for his country. for me, jimmy was one of my heroes, as well. obviously, growing up, watching him play, we didn't have the amount of games on television that we now do, but managed to see him play a few times. i also was fortunate enough to meet him on numerous occasions, and he was always affable and fun and hugely knowledgeable. he was a great personality, a wonderful footballer and a man with huge charisma and fun, and he'll be much missed. well, it was fitting that two ofjimmy greaves' former teams were playing each otherjust hours after his death was announced, with tottenham taking on chelsea. it was his first club, chelsea,
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who took all three points. thiago silva's header sent them on the way to a 3—0 win and to go joint top of the table. antonio rudigerfired in the third in stoppage time. manchester united are level on points with chelsea and liverpool after they beat west ham 2—1 at the london stadium. the home side took the lead, but five minutes later, cristiano ronaldo equalised with that rebound — his fourth goal in three games since re—signing. it looked as though the points might be shared, butjesse lingard, on loan at west ham last season, scored a stunning goal, putting manchester united in front with a minute to go. still time for another twist though. west ham awarded a penalty after a luke shaw handball. controversially, mark noble came off the bench to take it, hoping to be the stoppage time hero, but david de gea made his first penalty save in more than five years, giving united all three points. and brighton have continued their good start to the season. they're into the top four after beating leicester 2—1 in a dramatic game at the amex stadium. leicester had two late goals ruled out after var checks.
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scottish champions rangers have gone back to the top of the premiership after a one—all draw with motherwell. fashion sakala put steven gerrard's side ahead injust the 12th minute at ibrox. but kaiyne woolery silenced the home fans just after the hour. it's the first time rangers have dropped points at home in the league since march last year. meanwhile, old firm rivals celtic lost for the fourth time in five games in all competitions as andrew shinnie's goal lifted livingston off the bottom of the scottish premiership with a 1—0 victory. celtic are now seven months without an away win domestically and are sixth in the table, four points off rangers. in the dundonian derby, it looked like the match was heading for stalemate. but ian harkes had other ideas, snatching the win for united with ten minutes to go. champions harlequins started the defence of their premiership rugby title with a bonus point win over newcastle. louis lynagh's two tries were added to byjoe marchant and danny care
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to give quins a 26—20 win in the north east. it was a winning start for their new senior coach tabai matson. and england women beat new zealand in their one—day international. chelsea flower show? i can tell you like that. i can tell you like that. i have not been. i have not been, either. i have been. septemberfor the first time in many years, isn't it? where are your marrows, carol, good morning. a bit previous. for the first time in more than a century, the chelsea flower show is being held in september, which means pumpkins
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and autumnal colours. members of the royal family and celebrities will get the first glimpse of the show, before it opens to the public tomorrow. our correspondent daniela relph reports. the finishing touches, a finalflourish, the pressure to get itjust right. chelsea is looking autumnal. the change in date this year means late—summer flowers like asters and dahlias are in their prime. and a september show gives designers a chance to display a warmer and grassier look. here, it's all about the trees. david dodd has designed the queen's green canopy garden to celebrate next year's platinum jubilee. we've got a field maple here and the field maple just gives the most spectacular yellow colour. and you can see it is already starting to turn now. it sits on the largest plot at chelsea.
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21 trees have been planted with grassland, hay bales and a wildflower meadow. if everyone can get behind the campaign and plant a tree, we can make a huge impact and a huge difference to the environment. and you've got to think about what trees give us. and when i was asked to do it, i got very excited, because i'm a bit of a tree hugger. and just finally, do you think the queen would like this garden? i certainly hope so. i might be off to the tower if she doesn't. the autumnal look is everywhere, with a focus on harvest fruit and vegetables. an autumn chelsea will have a different feel and a different mood. but the show also hopes to capture that love of gardening and the outdoors that many of us discovered during lockdowns. giant window boxes in the cop26 garden to mark the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year. the message — even if you
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don't have a garden, planting small flowers and shrubs can help combat the effects of climate change. and a tribute to nursing in the florence nightingale garden, marking 200 years since her birth. there are medicinal flowers here with a focus on wellbeing. and late—summer foxgloves — her favourite flower — ready to plant. some special guests got an early viewing, but these nurses will also be able to enjoy the garden after the flower show, when it's moved to st thomas' hospital in london. florence nightingale was very much a forward—thinking nurse. a lot of what we do today is very much embedded in what she taught us — nursing at the forefront, and, you know, that's where we still are. it's a privilege. i think, for a lot of nurses, i think they'll be overwhelmed by, i think they'll be overwhelmed by it if i'm really honest, and they'll be really proud to see someone saying thank you for all the hard work they've done. a chelsea flower show in september has brought its challenges for everyone involved. it's likely to be a one—off chance
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to enjoy the unfamiliar sights an autumn show brings. daniel relph, bbc news, chelsea. you were right. can we now go to carol? yes, we can. i am so excited to get carol on the programme. good morning, carol. you almost gave me a heart attack a few minutes ago. i was in a conversation with the designer, and what? it has been 108 years since... in fact, never have they had an autumnal chelsea flower show before. it is because of the pandemic. you can see this spectacular garden taking inspiration from the city between mountain and water. and these features at the back represent skyscrapers. it illustrates how to
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create green space, cleaner air and provide somewhere for wildlife to live. it connects people and nature in city environments and the show this year is showing the importance of wellbeing and fresh air. the plants are different. we are used to summer plants when it happens in may, now we are looking at plants such as salvias. the weather will be settled and the next few days, the forecast is fairly settled with sunny spells. from mid week, turning more unsettled. on the satellite picture, cloud across the south—east corner. yesterday, parts of east anglia had almost a month of rainfall. that is moving away. showers left behind it. today, after a cold start in rural areas, it will be dry with sunshine. from
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lincolnshire to the south—east, prone to cloud with the odd heavy shower. through the day, you will find a weather front coming in across the north and west introducing thicker cloud and rain. temperatures range from 13 in the north to 21—22 as we come down south back into the sunshine. through evening and overnight, the weather front in scotland and northern ireland will sink south. by the time it gets into england and wales, it will not be much more than a band of cloud. showers in the south—east will die away, we will have clear skies. temperatures 9—13. that is how we start tomorrow morning. the weather front moving south, weakening and for most a dry day with sunny spells. another weather front coming across the north west will introduce cloud and splashes of rain. and here it will turn more
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windy. temperatures similar to today. into the low 20s. later in the evening and overnight, you will find low pressure approaching the north—west. it will turn more windy in the north—west. without coming in overnight we will see rain here. tomorrow, the weather front producing rain in the north—west, move southwards, the rain will be heavier and at the end of the day across north wales. as it removes south, we will have a return to blustery showers. ahead of its sunshine but through the day more cloud developing. top temperature 21. i cannot tell you how lovely it is to be back here. normality has been restored once again. i cannot tell you how lovely it is to see you at chelsea. see you later,.
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it has been a busy weekend for you. when i said good luck with strictly, knock yourself out it was not exactly what i meant. i am all right. i had to take a slight break from training. i have till next saturday to get ready for the live show. i am 0k. to get ready for the live show. i am ok. i no longer have a headache and i am allowed back to the dance floor. and you are super busy. and you are super busy. and you are super busy. and you have the dream partner. she is amazing. shall we look at the moment and remind everybody at the start of the series that kicked off on saturday night. this is weird. hello!
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nadiya is clearly amazing. i'm absolutely over the moon. come up here, we'll have a chat. on my way. i'm honestly so happy to get dan as my partner. are you ready for a challenge? lam. be honest — is this a massive disappointment? are you ok? i'm so pleased. what do i need to work on in the meantime? i mean, should i be... oh, no — you just enjoy your time off because it's going to be full—on! 0k! are you disappointed by this? come on the. she is an amazing dancer. i did not realise how good she was. the only two—time ten world darts champion. she does latin and ballroom and has been world champion twice, back to back. she has a big job on the. you are already learning your first dance. i cannot tell you what it is yet. i would be killed by the strictly ninjas. i can show you. everything
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has to be visual. i will draw a little thing. we have worked out i have to have pictures in my head all the time. i was trying to get in the correct ballroom position, trying to learn basics. we worked out if i draw nadiya's face on my hand, it enables me to get here. i have to put it towards me and then turned towards her otherwise my hand was in the wrong place. every time we train, i draw herface on my hand. does it need that much detail? and we call it handiya. when we dance about, she shouts handiya to me and i know to get into the correct ballroom position. that is how it works. one of those visual tricks. i cannot do that on the
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actual show. why not? i would get in trouble. a good idea. it works in training but i have to work out a way when we actually do it. i havejust actually do it. i have just realised actually do it. i havejust realised i've actually do it. i have just realised i've drawn that with permanent marker. i need to get rid of that before she turns up, otherwise it will be embarrassing. you will need it several weeks, so keep it there. several weeks. keep it there. severalweeks. i keep it there. several weeks. i am keep it there. several weeks. iam not keep it there. several weeks. i am not sure you are backing the right horse. i am determined to enjoy it. time to get the news where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london has two new tube stations today on the northern line — the first major expansion since the late �*90s. the first trains began to run between nine elms and battersea power station around 5.30 this morning. here's our transport correspondent tom edwards. welcome correspondent tom edwards. to nine elms tube st. on welcome to nine elms tube station, on the new northern line extension,
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which hasjust opened. it is on the new northern line extension, which has just opened. it is the first extension to a tube line in the capital we have had for 20 years. it cost £1 billion and eventually it's going to be paid for by developers who have to contribute when they are building in this area in battersea, but this is a big deal for this area. lots of new homes, lots ofjobs. the new northern line extension is now open. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to meet the iranian foreign minister to call for the immediate release of uk nationals — including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. nazanin, from west london, has been detained in iran since 2016, convicted of propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard ratcliffe said he has urged liz truss to make her case a top priority. royal mail is trialling two types of micro electric vehicles for delivering letters and small parcels. they'll try them out over six months in residential areas. it's hoped they will provide a lower
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carbon alternative to larger vans. yes, i know it's autumn — but the chelsea flower show gets under way today. it was postponed from may due to the pandemic. the early summer blooms you'd usually see will be replaced by dahlias, pumpkins, and autumn colours. well, let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the circle line has minor delays clockwise after some train cancellations. and the piccadilly line has minor delays from acton town to uxbridge as engineering work's overrun. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was a rather wet day for many of us yesterday across the capital with some lively showers around. today is looking drier, but there are still some more showers to come in the forecast at times. this morning, another mild start to the day. we have temperatures in double figures. it's quite grey and gloomy out there for most of us. the cloud is thickest towards eastern areas of the capital. here, maybe the chance of a bit of drizzle, some light showers around through the morning. further west, we should see things brighten up slowly and a lot of that cloud will tend to break up, too.
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when we do get any spells of brightness and sunshine across the capital through the afternoon, do watch out because there may be one or two sharp showers developing, as well. top temperatures in the best of any brightness and sunshine will get as high as perhaps 19—20 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the winds stay light. there will be some more mist developing. temperatures in some of the rural spots, where we see the clearest of the skies, could possibly drop back into single figures, so a chillier start to the day tomorrow, which is looking dry and fine. with still light winds, then we will see temperatures peak in the low 20s in celsius once more — 21 degrees for most of us. into wednesday and, again, it is dry and fine, but the winds will pick up through the afternoon. feeling more autumnal as we head through the rest of the working week. i'll be back in around half an hour — plenty more over on our website. now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent.
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our headlines today. crisis talks on soaring gas prices — the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. how will it affect the energy bill on your doorstep? we'll hear the thoughts of an industry boss in the next few minutes. covid vacccines for 12—to—15—year—olds are available in england and scotland from today the emmy goes to... the crown. the crown dominates at the emmy awards. it bags best drama. olivia colman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. tributes and applause — for one of football's greats, jimmy greaves — we'll reflect on his life with a former team—mate. we'll reflect on his life
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good we'll reflect on his life morning from the chelsea f show. good morning from the chelsea flower show. the first time in 108 years it has been held in the autumn. due to the pandemic. the weather today is dry with sunny spells for most, xiao is easing in the south—east but later we will see some rain coming in across the north west. all the details in ten minutes. it's monday the 20th of september. our top story. crisis talks between the government and energy bosses will be held later, as ministers consider emergency state—backed loans to encourage firms to take on more customers. surging gas prices have left some energy companies battling to stay afloat while supermarkets have warned they could also affect food supplies. the prime minister has said the problems are temporary. katy austin reports. the price of natural gas — a key source of the energy which heats our homes and powers our industries — has soared. it's a global issue with causes including high demand. the price has gone up so much that some smaller energy suppliers have gone bust.
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there are fears more will follow. the regulator 0fgem says it's working to ensure consumers continue to be protected. the business secretary held crisis meetings with the industry at the weekend, and there will be further talks today. because the industry forecasts ahead, we can see that this is a peak and then we expect prices come down in the spring. so, really, conversations are about how we manage a very tight autumn/winter period and the specific impacts we think that these prices will have on industry. another knock—on impact of energy being so expensive is that production has been halted at two large fertiliser plants in england. they make carbon dioxide as a by—product, and that is used widely by food producers — for example, in meat production and packaging. some manufacturers and supermarkets have warned of shortages if the problem isn't urgently resolved. iceland says it's not seeing problems yet, but the situation is a concern.
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our supply chain are building up an additional 1—2 week stock — particularly on key lines that they're worried about, such as frozen meats — just to ensure that if the co2 crisis does last any longer than a few days — or, indeed weeks — we will be able to keep servicing our stores and ultimately our customers. the government's spoken with the company which runs the fertiliser plants, to discuss options around getting them going again. food businesses say the carbon dioxide disruption couldn't have come at a worse time — with the supply chain already under pressure as they struggle to get enough workers and lorry drivers. wholesale gas prices are unlikely to come down just yet, and eventually they could feed through into higher energy bills for households. katy austin, bbc news. let's talk more about this with our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning. what more can you tell us? we good morning. what more can you tell us? ~ ~' ., good morning. what more can you tell us? ~ ,, ., ., ., ., ., good morning. what more can you tell
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us? . ~' ., ., ., ., ., ., us? we will know a lot more later on toda after us? we will know a lot more later on today after the _ us? we will know a lot more later on today after the business _ us? we will know a lot more later on today after the business secretary i today after the business secretary kwasi kwarteng has had his meeting with the energy companies. but the issueis with the energy companies. but the issue is that under the existing system in a smaller company goes bust its customers are transferred to a large energy company. that has already happened to hundreds of thousands of consumers in the last couple of months. the problem is it is not an appealing prospect for the big energy firms because it is becoming more expensive to take on those customers. is the government going to have to get involved to make that process a bit more appealing for those firms? or do you do the other back—up option, which is the energy regulator 0fgem stepping in and taking overfailing firms? which ever option the government goes for it leads to the government goes for it leads to the government and, by extension, the taxpayer getting involved. that sounds like something the prime minister borisjohnson is quite comfortable with doing. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure that we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under —
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we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out, as the world economy gets back on its feet _ there are all sorts of ways in which the suppression of the world economy — caused by covid — is now expressing itself as problems of recovery. so the prime minister stressing this is a temporary issue that will go away eventually. also this morning the government is stressing nobody will lose their gas supply to their household as a result of any of this. . ~ household as a result of any of this. ., ,, , ., household as a result of any of this. ., ,, i. , , ., ,, household as a result of any of this. ., ~' i., , , ., ~' ., this. thank you, we will speak to ou this. thank you, we will speak to you later- _ france has cancelled a meeting between its armed forces minister and the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, which was due to be held this week. it's after a new security deal between britain, the us and australia led to france losing out on a major contract in the process. the prime minister insists relations with paris are "very friendly". 12—to—15—year—olds in england and scotland will start receiving covid vaccines from today.
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in wales, invitations will be sent out this week, while the programme is expected to start shortly in northern ireland. some scottish health boards will start administering pfizer jabs at walk—in clinics from today, while appointments can be pre—booked for later this month. while the risk to you of being severely ill may be low, we want to make sure every single 12—15—year—old is protected, and not only protected for themselves, but also as they go into school, it helps to protect, hopefully, their teachers and others they interact with at school, too. thousands of people have been evacuated after a volcano erupted on the island of la palma, in the canaries. several homes have been destroyed and a two—kilometre—wide exclusion zone has been set up around the lava flow. this is the volcano's first major eruption for 50 years. the wanted will play together for the first time in seven years at a charity concert organised by band member tom parker who has a brain tumour. the group are set to perform
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at the royal albert hall tonight as part of stand up to cancer's inside my head show and tom, speaking to this programme last week, said he hopes the show will raise important funds for medical research into brain tumours. this disease for the last 20 years has been, you know, pretty much untouchable. no—one's been able to find a cure. no—one's been able to find a treatment. this is the brain tumour. the brain tumour, yeah. you know, nothing's really changed so we really want to just focus on trying to get as much money and funding into charities as much as possible, so they can try and find new breakthroughs. and it feels like they're on the cusp of doing it. so...hopefully this concert can make a change. that was a brilliant interview we have the other day, so moving. it have the other day, so moving. it was fantastic, he spoke so openly and brutally honest about it, which i think probably helps him and has helped a lot of other people, as well.
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and we will have more on how the concert went on tomorrow's programme. it is 7:10am. carol is at the chelsea flower show which for the first time in a century is taking place in september. but not alone! good morning. who place in september. but not alone! good morning-— place in september. but not alone! good morning. who is this gorgeous creature chris _ good morning. who is this gorgeous creature chris good _ good morning. who is this gorgeous creature chris good morning! - good morning. who is this gorgeous creature chris good morning! this i good morning. who is this gorgeous creature chris good morning! this is| creature chris good morning! this is flash. creature chris good morning! this is flash- guide — creature chris good morning! this is flash. guide dogs _ creature chris good morning! this is flash. guide dogs at _ creature chris good morning! this is flash. guide dogs at the _ creature chris good morning! this is flash. guide dogs at the 90th i flash. guide dogs at the 90th anniversary guide here and flash is one of— anniversary guide here and flash is one of the — anniversary guide here and flash is one of the dogs you will see if you come _ one of the dogs you will see if you come down — one of the dogs you will see if you come down today. she is a friend of the programme she was on our programme on the 28th of april trainer— programme on the 28th of april trainer mel and she nibbled programme on the 28th of april trainer meland she nibbled her programme on the 28th of april trainer mel and she nibbled her head and was _ trainer mel and she nibbled her head and was only 18 weeks old. she has grown _ and was only 18 weeks old. she has grown a _ and was only 18 weeks old. she has grown a bit — and was only 18 weeks old. she has grown a bit and is very well behaved _ grown a bit and is very well behaved. she is gorgeous. the first guide _ behaved. she is gorgeous. the first guide dogs— behaved. she is gorgeous. the first guide dogs for the blind weight german— guide dogs for the blind weight german shepherds, but as you can see she is_ german shepherds, but as you can see she is a _ german shepherds, but as you can see she is a beautiful, beautiful labrador. the forecast for the next few days _ labrador. the forecast for the next few days is — labrador. the forecast for the next few days is going to be barely settied~ — few days is going to be barely settled. there will be some sunny spells _ settled. there will be some sunny spells around and then as we move on
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from wednesday it in settled. this morning. — from wednesday it in settled. this morning. a — from wednesday it in settled. this morning, a chilly start across rural parts _ morning, a chilly start across rural parts of— morning, a chilly start across rural parts of scotland, england also wales — parts of scotland, england also wales. northern ireland also having a bit of— wales. northern ireland also having a bit of a _ wales. northern ireland also having a bit of a chilly start rural parts but for— a bit of a chilly start rural parts but for most it will be dry, some sunshine, — but for most it will be dry, some sunshine, bit more cloud across lincolnshire into the southeast with one or _ lincolnshire into the southeast with one or two — lincolnshire into the southeast with one or two showers and then later on in the _ one or two showers and then later on in the day— one or two showers and then later on in the day what you find is a new weather — in the day what you find is a new weather fronts can begin across northern— weather fronts can begin across northern ireland and western scotland, that will introduce more cloud _ scotland, that will introduce more cloud and — scotland, that will introduce more cloud and also, again, some patchy rain _ cloud and also, again, some patchy rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the _ rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north— rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to 21 or 22 in the south — in the north to 21 or 22 in the south. through this evening and overnight— south. through this evening and overnight the weather front in the north— overnight the weather front in the north west will slip a little bit further — north west will slip a little bit further south, not bringing much more _ further south, not bringing much more than — further south, not bringing much more than a band of cloud with it. the showers in the south—east will tend to _ the showers in the south—east will tend to fade and there will be some clear skies— tend to fade and there will be some clear skies with temperatures failing — clear skies with temperatures falling between about nine and 13 degrees — falling between about nine and 13 degrees. into tomorrow, well, most of us— degrees. into tomorrow, well, most of us again— degrees. into tomorrow, well, most of us again having a dry day. sunny spetts _ of us again having a dry day. sunny spells around but through the day a new weather front coming in across
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the north— new weather front coming in across the north west will introduce bigger cloud and _ the north west will introduce bigger cloud and again some spots of rain. and the _ cloud and again some spots of rain. and the wind will pick up here, as wett~ _ and the wind will pick up here, as well. temperatures up to about 21 degrees — well. temperatures up to about 21 degrees it— well. temperatures up to about 21 degrees. it is after that its tends wetter— degrees. it is after that its tends wetter and windier degrees. it is after that its tends wetterand windier in degrees. it is after that its tends wetter and windier in the north. isn't_ wetter and windier in the north. isn't she — wetter and windier in the north. isn't she absolutely gorgeous? young flash. _ isn't she absolutely gorgeous? young flash. she _ isn't she absolutely gorgeous? young flash, she likes my cables! she is gorgeous — flash, she likes my cables! she is ”oreous. ., ., ., gorgeous. you have a good friend there, already. _ gorgeous. you have a good friend there, already. go _ gorgeous. you have a good friend there, already. go on, _ gorgeous. you have a good friend there, already. go on, flash. - gorgeous. you have a good friend there, already. go on, flash. i. there, already. go on, flash. i think she likes adrian, the cameraman.— think she likes adrian, the cameraman. ., ., , �* ., ~ think she likes adrian, the cameraman. ., ., , �* ., cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you ve much cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you very much for— cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you very much for that, _ cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you very much for that, carol. _ cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you very much for that, carol. we - cameraman. who doesn't?! thank you very much for that, carol. we will - very much for that, carol. we will see you later. very much for that, carol. we will see you later-— very much for that, carol. we will see you later. every has 'ust treat! look, see you later. every has 'ust treat! look. she-s — see you later. every has 'ust treat! look, she's gone! _ see you later. every has 'ust treat! look, she's gone! we _ see you later. every hasjust treat! look, she's gone! we have - see you later. every hasjust treat! look, she's gone! we have a - see you later. every hasjust treat! - look, she's gone! we have a kirkwood down! carol! — look, she's gone! we have a kirkwood down! carol! she _ look, she's gone! we have a kirkwood down! carol! she is _ look, she's gone! we have a kirkwood down! carol! she is strong! _ look, she's gone! we have a kirkwood down! carol! she is strong! oil- down! carol! she is strong! oil riuhts, down! carol! she is strong! oil rights. carol? _ down! carol! she is strong! oil rights, carol? i— down! carol! she is strong! oil rights, carol? ithink- down! carol! she is strong! oil rights, carol? i think she - down! carol! she is strong! oil rights, carol? i think she has. down! carol! she is strong! oil. rights, carol? i think she has lost her earpiece- _ rights, carol? i think she has lost her earpiece. we _ rights, carol? i think she has lost her earpiece. we are _ rights, carol? i think she has lost her earpiece. we are just - rights, carol? i think she has lost| her earpiece. we are just checking you are ok, are you all right? yes! yes! she is — you are ok, are you all right? yes! yes! she is a _ you are ok, are you all right? yes! yes! she is a very _ you are ok, are you all right? yes! yes! she is a very strong _ you are ok, are you all right? yes! yes! she is a very strong girl,
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flash — yes! she is a very strong girl, flash she _ yes! she is a very strong girl, flash. she went back to her trainer, mel, _ flash. she went back to her trainer, mel, on _ flash. she went back to her trainer, mel, on the — flash. she went back to her trainer, mel, on the other side of the camera _ mel, on the other side of the camera. ~ ., ., i. ., camera. we are glad you are ok. don't you — camera. we are glad you are ok. don't you love — camera. we are glad you are ok. don't you love live _ camera. we are glad you are ok. don't you love live television? i camera. we are glad you are ok. i don't you love live television? high drama. don't you love live television? high drama- she — don't you love live television? high drama- she is— don't you love live television? h gr drama. she is laughing her don't you love live television? h ;i drama. she is laughing her head don't you love live television? h qi drama. she is laughing her head off. you might have lost a shoe. let's return to our top story. the government is holding fresh talks with energy bosses today about the impact of surging gas prices in the uk and across the world. let's take a look at what we know so far. the wholesale price of energy has been going up — for reasons ranging from global demand to lower solar and wind output — and it means some smaller suppliers are going out of business. last night the prime minister said he was very confident in the uk's energy supply chains and that the problem was temporary, but the government is now considering offering emergency state—backed loans in an attempt to deal with the crisis. greg jackson is the boss of octopus energy, and hejoins us now. good morning to you, mrjackson. great to see it. the government say they are offering bailouts and
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support. how much of that help is needed at the moment? goad support. how much of that help is needed at the moment? good morning. i think what we — needed at the moment? good morning. i think what we are _ needed at the moment? good morning. i think what we are seeing _ needed at the moment? good morning. i think what we are seeing right - needed at the moment? good morning. i think what we are seeing right now - i think what we are seeing right now is that some of those smaller companies that were perhaps less prudently run less well backed already had financial problems queueing up. the current hike in gas prices and wholesale global gas prices and wholesale global gas prices is kind of causing issues that were already there to kind of come to a head. i think the most important thing is that, first of all, when we have been in times like this, larger companies like ours, and the government, we work together with 0fgem to make sure customers of those companies that are in trouble are well looked after. the most important thing is that festival customers don't need to worry about their energy supply and if anything does happen to the company which supplies them there are a well oiled processes to make sure that, you know, not only will their energy supply continue but things like credit balances will be protected. thanks to the price cap, of course, they can be sure that they are not
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going to get charged excessive amounts, to. 50 going to get charged excessive amounts. to— going to get charged excessive amounts,to. ., ., ., , amounts, to. so usa not to worry about the energy _ amounts, to. so usa not to worry about the energy supply - amounts, to. so usa not to worry about the energy supply and - amounts, to. so usa not to worry about the energy supply and evenj about the energy supply and even with the price cap in place, of course there is concern about prices going up —— so you are saying not to worry. you are at these talks today. what do you want to hear and what might you be able to say? first what do you want to hear and what might you be able to say?- might you be able to say? first of all, we might you be able to say? first of all. we are _ might you be able to say? first of all, we are facing _ might you be able to say? first of all, we are facing is _ might you be able to say? first of all, we are facing is high - might you be able to say? first of all, we are facing is high gas - all, we are facing is high gas prices globally in the run—up to this autumn and winter. those companies like ours that buy energy long in advance can already see prices getting back to normal later. it is about how we help customers through this winter. what we need to do here is say, are their immediate measures that can be taken? for example, there are quite high environmental and social levies on electricity bills. you might say, for example, eon have said they should be because electricity is increasingly clean, it is ordered to pay a levy on it and people need help with their bills. the other
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area we need to focus on right now is, if some of those companies that were already not in a great place to leave the market, how do we make sure that that is a minimum cost to other bill payers and to the public purse? in other bill payers and to the public urse? , ., ., ., , purse? in terms of how long this miaht ao purse? in terms of how long this might go on _ purse? in terms of how long this might go on for. _ purse? in terms of how long this might go on for, some _ purse? in terms of how long this might go on for, some people i purse? in terms of how long this | might go on for, some people are suggesting things might start improving within the next two weeks, but also some people are suggesting it might not get fixed until spring because the price will remain high. what is your forecast? timer;r because the price will remain high. what is your forecast?— because the price will remain high. what is your forecast? they are both ri . ht. what is your forecast? they are both right. short-term _ what is your forecast? they are both right. short-term issues— what is your forecast? they are both right. short-term issues are - right. short—term issues are affecting the uk only, really. for example, so much of our nuclear capacity is off—line at the moment for unplanned maintenance. it is the equivalent of between three million and 5 million homes with electricity not being generated. we are having to use gas for that instead. those kind of unplanned maintenance issues look like they will be largely resolved over the next couple of weeks. that is the short—term improvement. the longer term across the entire winter, what we face is
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high gas prices driven by global supply and demand, sol high gas prices driven by global supply and demand, so i think it is certainly the case that, unfortunately, the uk is at the mercy of these global forces in fossil fuels. mercy of these global forces in fossilfuels. but mercy of these global forces in fossil fuels. but as the supply and demand picture begins to even out towards the middle to the end of this winter, i think, you know, towards the middle to the end of this winter, ithink, you know, at least by then we will get some respite. i least by then we will get some res - ite. ., �* least by then we will get some resite. ., �* ,, ., least by then we will get some resite. ., �* 4' ., y., , respite. i don't know if you will be able to answer— respite. i don't know if you will be able to answer this _ respite. i don't know if you will be able to answer this is _ respite. i don't know if you will be able to answer this is probably - respite. i don't know if you will be i able to answer this is probably what people will be asking at home. how much are pills going to go up by this winter? irate much are pills going to go up by this winter?— much are pills going to go up by this winter? ~ ., ., ., , , this winter? we have already seen the ener: this winter? we have already seen the energy price — this winter? we have already seen the energy price cap _ this winter? we have already seen the energy price cap increase - this winter? we have already seen the energy price cap increase by l the energy price cap increase by £150. if the price cap is not in place i'm pretty sure that the formic big six would have hiked prices by hundreds of pounds. they could have been 300 to £500 higher than we are seeing. the increased prices are going to flow through to the next price cap, so i think you may see another kind of increase in the next price cap from might, as well. , g. . ~' , ., the next price cap from might, as well. , g. . ., the next price cap from might, as well. , ., ., well. greg jackson from octopus enera , well. greg jackson from octopus energy. thank— well. greg jackson from octopus energy, thank you _ well. greg jackson from octopus energy, thank you very - well. greg jackson from octopus energy, thank you very much. i
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the stars of the small screen turned out for the emmy awards, which has taken place in los angeles overnight. there was plenty of british success, with the royal netflix series the crown picking up five of the major awards — including for best drama. the apple comedy ted lasso was another of the night's big winners, as sophie long reports. i know you love that. a bit sweary at times. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la.
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brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare of easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. 0h! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. olivia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh o'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher.
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there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. that looked like a spangly night. wonderful. ~ ., ., that looked like a spangly night. wonderful-— wonderful. what a celebration. amazinu wonderful. what a celebration. amazing story _ wonderful. what a celebration. amazing story for _ wonderful. what a celebration. amazing story for you - wonderful. what a celebration. amazing story for you this - wonderful. what a celebration. - amazing story for you this morning. two paramedics who were attacked while on duty have been honoured for their bravery at an awards ceremony celebrating health and social care workers. deena evans and michael hipgrave were recognised at the sun's annual who cares wins awards for their dedication and courage in difficult situations. here's the moment their names were read out by the duke of cambridge. please welcome to the stage our 999 heroes — deena evans and michael hipgrave. applause.
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firstly, i want to thank mick... ..who — if he hadn't have stepped in front of me that day... ..i wouldn't be stood here now saying thank you. so this is for every paramedic that often gets overlooked. this is for you. cheering. what a moment that must have been! i love the way you kept the speech nice and short, but said everything you needed to say. good morning to you needed to say. good morning to
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you all. deena and michael and richard are here. that was quite a moment to receive that and get the applause from semi people, deena.- from semi people, deena. really overwhelming. — from semi people, deena. really overwhelming, really _ from semi people, deena. really . overwhelming, really overwhelming. it still feels really real i can't quite get my head around that it happened to. i quite get my head around that it happened to-_ happened to. i know you had a terrible experience, _ happened to. i know you had a terrible experience, which - happened to. i know you had a terrible experience, which is l happened to. i know you had a i terrible experience, which is why you were receiving an award for recognition about how you looked after each other. if you don't mind, just tell us what happened. irate after each other. if you don't mind, just tell us what happened. we were called to a welfare _ just tell us what happened. we were called to a welfare call, _ just tell us what happened. we were called to a welfare call, which - just tell us what happened. we were called to a welfare call, which is - just tell us what happened. we were called to a welfare call, which is a i called to a welfare call, which is a common call, happens quite regularly, just check ups on people orany regularly, just check ups on people or any concerns. and we needed to gain access, for centuries. the police were with us and we forced entry. there was no warning of any violence, no mental health, no addiction problems, nothing like that, no concerns, which is why we step through the first comment we
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believed it to be a medical problem. i happen to be at the front end as i step through the door first, the patient was behind the door and just ran at us with a knife in each hand. and you were attacked and then, michael, i know you call michael mick, what happened from your perspective? i mick, what happened from your perspective?— mick, what happened from your --ersective? , ., , ., ,, perspective? i saw deena get stabbed b the perspective? i saw deena get stabbed by the assailant. _ perspective? i saw deena get stabbed by the assailant. my _ perspective? i saw deena get stabbed by the assailant. my instinct - perspective? i saw deena get stabbed by the assailant. my instinct was - perspective? i saw deena get stabbed by the assailant. my instinct was to i by the assailant. my instinct was to try to _ by the assailant. my instinct was to try to protect it so i covered her up try to protect it so i covered her up and — try to protect it so i covered her up and pushed her out of the door and, _ up and pushed her out of the door and. in _ up and pushed her out of the door and, in doing so, he then stabbed me inthe— and, in doing so, he then stabbed me in the back _ and, in doing so, he then stabbed me in the back-— and, in doing so, he then stabbed me in the back._ what _ and, in doing so, he then stabbed me in the back._ what happened in the back. dear me. what happened then? we ran — in the back. dear me. what happened then? we ran together— in the back. dear me. what happened then? we ran together into _ in the back. dear me. what happened then? we ran together into the i then? we ran together into the carden then? we ran together into the garden and _ then? we ran together into the garden and saw _ then? we ran together into the garden and saw that _ then? we ran together into the garden and saw that as - then? we ran together into the garden and saw that as our i then? we ran together into the | garden and saw that as our only escape route, ran together into the garden, collapsed in the garden, but obviously we were still trying to treat each other while we were on the floor. i could feel myself bleeding out, i could deal mick bleeding out, i could deal mick bleeding out, i could deal mick bleeding out, we were trying to treat each other and then when help arrived, it was richard. {30
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treat each other and then when help arrived, it was richard.— arrived, it was richard. go on, richard. you _ arrived, it was richard. go on, richard. you take _ arrived, it was richard. go on, richard. you take up - arrived, it was richard. go on, richard. you take up the i arrived, it was richard. go on, | richard. you take up the story. arrived, it was richard. go on, l richard. you take up the story. i was richard. you take up the story. wasjust in the office talking richard. you take up the story. was just in the office talking to richard. you take up the story.“ was just in the office talking to a fellow— was just in the office talking to a fellow colleague, a fellow officer, jon. deena and mick's emergency button _ jon. deena and mick's emergency button went off to say that they have _ button went off to say that they have been attacked and stabbed so myself _ have been attacked and stabbed so myself and another officerjumped in our cars— myself and another officerjumped in our cars and — myself and another officerjumped in our cars and went to the scene to provide _ our cars and went to the scene to provide some treatment for them. on arrival. _ provide some treatment for them. on arrival. both— provide some treatment for them. on arrival, both were collapsed in the back garden, not in a good state at all. thankfully they are here today and have _ all. thankfully they are here today and have made a full recovery. it is amazinu. and have made a full recovery. it is amazing- i— and have made a full recovery. it is amazing. i know— and have made a full recovery. it 3 amazing. i know you are sat here and have this amazing award and had a great night but this is obviously something that affects you both deeply and the way you spoke about this fellow alongside you you work with, you feel he saved your life. 100%. if you stand me and mick facing each other, his wound actually lives up just below my first stab wound, so if he hadn't have stepped in front of me, i would
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have stepped in front of me, i would have had to stab wounds and wouldn't be here. find have had to stab wounds and wouldn't be here. . , ., have had to stab wounds and wouldn't be here. �* ,, . . be here. and you are all here in uniform- _ be here. and you are all here in uniform. how _ be here. and you are all here in uniform. how hard _ be here. and you are all here in uniform. how hard was - be here. and you are all here in uniform. how hard was it i be here. and you are all here in uniform. how hard was it for. be here. and you are all here in | uniform. how hard was it for you be here. and you are all here in i uniform. how hard was it for you to .et uniform. how hard was it for you to get that— uniform. how hard was it for you to get that uniform _ uniform. how hard was it for you to get that uniform back— uniform. how hard was it for you to get that uniform back to _ uniform. how hard was it for you to get that uniform back to work? i i get that uniform back to work? i think get that uniform back to work? think in the initial stages, quite difficult — think in the initial stages, quite difficult. during the recovery. i think— difficult. during the recovery. i thinkwe— difficult. during the recovery. i think we both decided, after about four months, that we wanted to get back to _ four months, that we wanted to get back to work. it is the job we love, we were _ back to work. it is the job we love, we were not— back to work. it is the job we love, we were not going to let this man spoil— we were not going to let this man spoil the — we were not going to let this man spoil the rest of our lives by ruining _ spoil the rest of our lives by ruining our career, so we both decided — ruining our career, so we both decided that it was time to go back to work _ decided that it was time to go back to work. he— decided that it was time to go back to work. ., ., ., ., ., to work. he had had enough of our time, he wasn't _ to work. he had had enough of our time, he wasn't taking _ to work. he had had enough of our time, he wasn't taking anything i to work. he had had enough of our. time, he wasn't taking anything else away from us. it is time, he wasn't taking anything else away from us— away from us. it is clear that to go back to a job _ away from us. it is clear that to go back to a job like _ away from us. it is clear that to go back to a job like this, _ away from us. it is clear that to go back to a job like this, you - away from us. it is clear that to go back to a job like this, you love i back to a job like this, you love thejob and you back to a job like this, you love the job and you said back to a job like this, you love thejob and you said in your acceptance it is for all those people who quietly get on with it are sort of heroes without being seen as heroes. is that were the driving forces, deena, behind making sure that somehow you are able to get back out there?—
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get back out there? yeah, absolutely. _ get back out there? yeah, absolutely. something i get back out there? yeah, | absolutely. something else get back out there? yeah, i absolutely. something else i said was that the average person sees three traumas in their lifetime, but they say that the paramedic sees 300 but we just deal with it. we go to work, the everything, go home and continue with our lives and so that is what it was for, for everybody who isn't recognised for that. we often get overlooked.— who isn't recognised for that. we often get overlooked. richard, how im ortant often get overlooked. richard, how important was _ often get overlooked. richard, how important was it _ often get overlooked. richard, how important was it for _ often get overlooked. richard, how important was it for you _ often get overlooked. richard, how important was it for you that i often get overlooked. richard, how important was it for you that mick l important was it for you that mick and deena — important was it for you that mick and deena were _ important was it for you that mick and deena were recognised? immensely imortant. and deena were recognised? immensely important- being — and deena were recognised? immensely important. being able _ and deena were recognised? immensely important. being able to _ and deena were recognised? immensely important. being able to come _ and deena were recognised? immensely important. being able to come back i important. being able to come back to work after only four months of being off after it such a horrific incident. you not only have the physical damage and the physical healing that needs to take place but also the psychological and mental trauma that has to be dealt with, as well. so for them to be able to come back after such a short space of time after what they have gone through and to go back into the streets and not on somebody�*s door, not knowing who will be the other side of it or it what will be the
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other side of it after what they have been through, it is amazing, remarkable, and credit to them, they really deserve this award. did remarkable, and credit to them, they really deserve this award.— really deserve this award. did you aet really deserve this award. did you net to really deserve this award. did you get to have _ really deserve this award. did you get to have a _ really deserve this award. did you get to have a chat _ really deserve this award. did you get to have a chat with _ really deserve this award. did you get to have a chat with the i really deserve this award. did you get to have a chat with the duke l really deserve this award. did you | get to have a chat with the duke of cambridge? did he say something to you? i see that smile. irate cambridge? did he say something to you? i see that smile.— you? i see that smile. we met him 'ust you? i see that smile. we met him just before — you? i see that smile. we met him just before the _ you? i see that smile. we met him just before the awards _ you? i see that smile. we met him just before the awards so - you? i see that smile. we met him just before the awards so we i you? i see that smile. we met him just before the awards so we had i you? i see that smile. we met him just before the awards so we had a| just before the awards so we had a champagne reception when he was there and he took the time to come over and talk to us and genuinely ask about ourjobs and obviously because of what he has done, we had that bit in common, we could talk aboutjobs that we go to. in that bit in common, we could talk about jobs that we go to. about 'obs that we go to. in terms of about jobs that we go to. in terms of recovering _ about jobs that we go to. in terms of recovering from _ about jobs that we go to. in terms of recovering from what _ about jobs that we go to. in terms of recovering from what has i about jobs that we go to. in terms i of recovering from what has happened to you. _ of recovering from what has happened to you. does _ of recovering from what has happened to you, does sharing _ of recovering from what has happened to you, does sharing this _ of recovering from what has happened to you, does sharing this story- of recovering from what has happened to you, does sharing this story and i to you, does sharing this story and talking _ to you, does sharing this story and talking about — to you, does sharing this story and talking about it _ to you, does sharing this story and talking about it like _ to you, does sharing this story and talking about it like that, - to you, does sharing this story and talking about it like that, does i talking about it like that, does that help — talking about it like that, does that help you _ talking about it like that, does that help you in _ talking about it like that, does that help you in some - talking about it like that, does that help you in some way, i talking about it like that, does i that help you in some way, knowing you might _ that help you in some way, knowing you might be — that help you in some way, knowing you might be helping _ that help you in some way, knowing you might be helping other- you might be helping other paramedics. _ you might be helping other paramedics, other- you might be helping other paramedics, other people. you might be helping other. paramedics, other people who you might be helping other- paramedics, other people who have been through— paramedics, other people who have been through trauma _ paramedics, other people who have been through trauma which - paramedics, other people who have been through trauma which it - paramedics, other people who have been through trauma which it doesl been through trauma which it does for me _ been through trauma which it does for me. ~ , , ., , been through trauma which it does for me._ absolutely. i l for me. absolutely. absolutely. i think the more _ for me. absolutely. absolutely. i think the more we _ for me. absolutely. absolutely. i think the more we talk— for me. absolutely. absolutely. i think the more we talk about i for me. absolutely. absolutely. i think the more we talk about it, | think the more we talk about it, it'sjust a guess think the more we talk about it, it's just a guess that little bit easier each time to talk about it, and if it does help somebody else going through similar trauma, no matter what platform is, if it helps them talk about it then it has
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helped. them talk about it then it has heled. �* , ., them talk about it then it has heled. �* ,, , them talk about it then it has heled. �* , ., ~' them talk about it then it has heled. . , ., ,, ., helped. are you still working as a air with helped. are you still working as a pair with white _ helped. are you still working as a pair with white i _ helped. are you still working as a pair with white i imagine - helped. are you still working as a pair with white i imagine you i helped. are you still working as a| pair with white i imagine you have never worked with anyone else other than mick. irate never worked with anyone else other than mick. ~ ., �* ., , never worked with anyone else other than mick. ., , ., ,, than mick. we don't actually work toaether than mick. we don't actually work together as _ than mick. we don't actually work together as a _ than mick. we don't actually work together as a crew _ than mick. we don't actually work together as a crew very _ than mick. we don't actually work together as a crew very often, i than mick. we don't actually work together as a crew very often, we i than mick. we don't actually work. together as a crew very often, we do different— together as a crew very often, we do differentjobs, but, yeah, we are still there — differentjobs, but, yeah, we are still there for support, and we? yeah, _ still there for support, and we? yeah, yeah. so still there for support, and we? yeah. yeah-— still there for support, and we? yeah, eah. ., , ., ,, ., yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank ou yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank you for— yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank you for coming _ yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank you for coming in _ yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank you for coming in and i yeah, yeah. so lovely to speak to, thank you for coming in and thank| thank you for coming in and thank you for the amazing job you do and congratulations on the award. it is clearly thoroughly deserved a. thank ou. thank clearly thoroughly deserved a. thank you- thank you- _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london has two new tube stations today on the northern line — the first major expansion since the late '90s. the first trains began to run between nine elms and battersea power station around 5.30 this morning. here's our transport correspondent torn edwards.
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welcome to nine elms tube station, on the new northern line extension, which hasjust opened. it is the first extension to a tube line in the capital we have had for 20 years. it cost £1 billion and eventually it's going to be paid for by developers who have to contribute when they are building in this area in battersea, but this is a big deal for this area. lots of new homes, lots ofjobs. the new northern line extension is now open. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to meet the iranian foreign minister to call for the immediate release of uk nationals, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. nazanin, from west london, has been detained in iran since 2016 — convicted of propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard ratcliffe said he's urged liz truss to make her case a top priority. an investigation is being carried out after a double—decker bus hit
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the front of a house in crouch end on saturday night. the 191, which wasn't carrying any passengers, had collided with a car first. police said there were no reports of any injuries. royal mail is trialling two types of micro electric vechicles for delivering letters and small parcels. they'll try them out over 6 months in residential areas. it's hoped they will provide a lower carbon alternative to larger vans. let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the circle line has minor delays clockwise after some train cancellations. and there's no piccadilly line between wood green and cockfosters due to a faulty train. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was a rather wet day for many of us yesterday across the capital with some lively showers around. today is looking drier, but there are still some more showers to come in the forecast at times. this morning, another mild start to the day. we have temperatures in double figures. it's quite grey and gloomy out there for most of us. the cloud is thickest towards eastern areas of the capital.
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here, maybe the chance of a bit of drizzle, some light showers around through the morning. further west, we should see things brighten up slowly and a lot of that cloud will tend to break up, too. when we do get any spells of brightness and sunshine across the capital through the afternoon, do watch out because there may be one or two sharp showers developing, as well. top temperatures in the best of any brightness and sunshine will get as high as perhaps 19—20 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the winds stay light. there will be some more mist developing. temperatures in some of the rural spots, where we see the clearest of the skies, could possibly drop back into single figures, so a chillier start to the day tomorrow, which is looking dry and fine. with still light winds, then we will see temperatures peak in the low 20s in celsius once more — 21 degrees for most of us. into wednesday and, again, it is dry and fine, but the winds will pick up through the afternoon. feeling more autumnal as we head through the rest of the working week. i'll be back in around an hour. now it's back to dan and sally.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. the prime minister has arrived in new york for the un general assembly, where he'll urge world leaders to take concrete action on climate change. however, a diplomatic row with france over a new security deal, and the ongoing crisis in the energy sector, may dominate his attention. we're joined now by foreign ministerjames cleverly. good morning. can we start with the as crisis, good morning. can we start with the gas crisis. on _ good morning. can we start with the gas crisis, on the _ good morning. can we start with the gas crisis, on the mind _ good morning. can we start with the gas crisis, on the mind of— good morning. can we start with the gas crisis, on the mind of many i gas crisis, on the mind of many viewers this morning? the prime minister said the government will do everything it can in response. what will the government do? the priority ofthe will the government do? the priority of the government _ will the government do? the priority of the government is _ will the government do? the priority of the government is one, _ will the government do? the priority of the government is one, to - will the government do? the priority of the government is one, to protect consumers from unpredictable price hikes. we have done that through the energy price cap. and also support
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for poorerfamilies. the energy price cap. and also support for poorer families. the other is to protect the integrity of our supply. we are in a better position than many other countries in the world. this is a global phenomenon. because we have domestic gas production capability and our imported gas is from predominately very secure sources, close friends like norway, for example. the business sector has spoken with the —— the business secretary spoke to the sector and will continue to do so to make sure we can discharge those joint priorities. we can discharge those 'oint prioritiesfi we can discharge those 'oint riorities. ., , ., priorities. how concerned should viewers be? _ priorities. how concerned should viewers be? we _ priorities. how concerned should viewers be? we spoke _ priorities. how concerned should viewers be? we spoke to - priorities. how concerned should viewers be? we spoke to the i priorities. how concerned should i viewers be? we spoke to the chief executive of octopus this morning and the general feeling is we could go from 60—something energy companies down to something like ten. irate companies down to something like ten. ~ ., . , ., , ten. we would much prefer to see diversity in _ ten. we would much prefer to see diversity in the — ten. we would much prefer to see diversity in the market, _ ten. we would much prefer to see diversity in the market, have i ten. we would much prefer to see| diversity in the market, have more
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suppliers than fewer. the business secretary has spoken and will continue to speak with the sector about how we respond to what should be a short—term issue globally. our priority is protection of the consumer and protecting the integrity of the gas supply. we will explore with the market the best way of doing that. if we can keep a diversity of suppliers, that would be something we would seek to deliver. ., ., deliver. one thing we have heard from viewers _ deliver. one thing we have heard from viewers this _ deliver. one thing we have heard from viewers this morning i deliver. one thing we have heard from viewers this morning is i deliver. one thing we have heard from viewers this morning is that this comes at a time when households are under financial strain, this comes at a time when households are underfinancial strain, national are under financial strain, national insurance are underfinancial strain, national insurance rises, extra money needed for nhs and social care, more than 5 million receive universal credit who are losing £20 a week uplift. in the light of increased costs for energy, will the government reconsider looking at the universal credit
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issue? ~ ., , ., , , issue? what we should remember is that the uk economy _ issue? what we should remember is that the uk economy has _ issue? what we should remember is that the uk economy has shown - issue? what we should remember is| that the uk economy has shown itself to be remarkably resilient. can i interru -t to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? _ to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? i _ to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? i did _ to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? i did not - to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? i did not ask - to be remarkably resilient. can i interrupt you? i did not ask about the uk economy, i asked about universal credit. find the uk economy, i asked about universal credit.— the uk economy, i asked about universal credit. �* ., ., , universal credit. and i am answering about universal _ universal credit. and i am answering about universal credit, _ universal credit. and i am answering about universal credit, which - universal credit. and i am answering about universal credit, which is - about universal credit, which is about universal credit, which is about employment and income and employment and income is linked to the economy. the uk economy has shown itself to be resilient and we have vacancies in the job market, shown itself to be resilient and we have vacancies in thejob market, a significant number, that means employers will have to offer more to fill vacancies or retain members of staff who might move to job offers out there. that will have good old—fashioned demand and supply. there is an increase in demand which will mean wages should rise and that
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is sustainable way of making sure people have decent pay packets and that through employment. it is absolutely right we make sure we match vacancies to people seeking work and watch the natural phenomenon of supply and demand of increasing wages through the economy. increasing wages through the econom . ~ increasing wages through the economy-— increasing wages through the econom .~ , ., ., economy. will you consider again removinu economy. will you consider again removing the _ economy. will you consider again removing the uplift? _ economy. will you consider again removing the uplift? that - economy. will you consider again removing the uplift? that uplift l economy. will you consider again i removing the uplift? that uplift was tem ora removing the uplift? that uplift was temporary and _ removing the uplift? that uplift was temporary and always _ removing the uplift? that uplift was temporary and always meant - removing the uplift? that uplift was temporary and always meant to - removing the uplift? that uplift was temporary and always meant to be l temporary and always meant to be temporary and always meant to be temporary and always meant to be temporary and it is important temporary and it is important temporary measures are temporary, because if every single response like an uplift on universal credit had to be permanent, it would massively limit the flexibility of governments in dealing with one—off events like the coronavirus pandemic. ultimately, because of the number of vacancies, we will naturally see employers have to increase wages to attract new staff
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and to retain existing staff and thatis and to retain existing staff and that is the better way to get more money into people's pay packets. will you bail out some of these energy firms?— will you bail out some of these energy firms? will you bail out some of these ener: firms? ~ ., ., ., ., will you bail out some of these ener: firms? ., ., ., ., , energy firms? what we want to do is to ensure they _ energy firms? what we want to do is to ensure they stay _ energy firms? what we want to do is to ensure they stay afloat _ to ensure they stay afloat organically. to ensure they stay afloat organically-— to ensure they stay afloat organically. to ensure they stay afloat oruanicall .~ ., ., , ., ., organically. what does that mean? what it means _ organically. what does that mean? what it means is _ organically. what does that mean? what it means is that _ organically. what does that mean? what it means is that we _ organically. what does that mean? what it means is that we want - what it means is that we want businesses to stay afloat through their own efforts. so businesses to stay afloat through their own efforts.— their own efforts. so you will not be bailin: their own efforts. so you will not be bailing them _ their own efforts. so you will not be bailing them out? _ their own efforts. so you will not be bailing them out? what - their own efforts. so you will not be bailing them out? what we i their own efforts. so you will not i be bailing them out? what we want their own efforts. so you will not - be bailing them out? what we want to make sure it — be bailing them out? what we want to make sure it is — be bailing them out? what we want to make sure it is we _ be bailing them out? what we want to make sure it is we protect _ be bailing them out? what we want to make sure it is we protect the - make sure it is we protect the integrity of supply, protect consumers, commercialand consumers, commercial and residential, and consumers, commercialand residential, and we will discuss with the industry the best way of doing that. we want diversity in the market. we also want to protect consumers. exactly how we do this is up consumers. exactly how we do this is up for discussion and i will not speculate on how that might happen.
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the prime minister said he would do everything he could. you add those together and it seems like a bailout will be available. i together and it seems like a bailout will be available.— will be available. i will not speculate _ will be available. i will not speculate now _ will be available. i will not speculate now as - will be available. i will not speculate now as to - will be available. i will not speculate now as to how l will be available. i will not i speculate now as to how we will be available. i will not _ speculate now as to how we discharge the commitments we have made to protect consumers from unpredictable price hikes. whilst also protecting the security of supply. the business secretary has spoken to the sector and will ensure we are able to do those things. the and will ensure we are able to do those things-— and will ensure we are able to do those things. and will ensure we are able to do those thins. , , , , ., ., ., ~ those things. the supply of food. we have learnt that _ those things. the supply of food. we have learnt that the _ those things. the supply of food. we have learnt that the gas _ those things. the supply of food. we have learnt that the gas supply - have learnt that the gas supply affects that. what can you do to make sure that when we hear yesterday that there will be shortages on shelves in days, can you turn that around?— shortages on shelves in days, can you turn that around? there are a number of — you turn that around? there are a number of things _ you turn that around? there are a number of things conspiring - you turn that around? there are a number of things conspiring to . number of things conspiring to create the conditions the food and
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drink industry faces, including shortage of hgv drivers as we have seen across the world from the us to the uk to europe. a lot of drivers have either left the sector are all gone back to perhaps wear their families are based and that has put pressure on the market. we are looking to make it easier to get new hgv drivers into the sector. a short to medium term response. we will also talk to the sector at ministerial level to see what can be done to ensure food supplies. we are as a government going to make sure there is food on the shelves. and address some of the long—term issues that have converged at this point as we come out of coronavirus. and
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coronavirus has thrown up some very challenging but short—term issues that we have to deal with at governmental level.- that we have to deal with at governmental level. what is the situation with _ governmental level. what is the situation with the _ governmental level. what is the situation with the french - governmental level. what is the situation with the french at - governmental level. what is the situation with the french at the | situation with the french at the moment? we seem to have annoyed the french with the deal signed with the us and australia. can it be repaired, they have pulled out of talks this week? mi repaired, they have pulled out of talks this week? all international relationships _ talks this week? all international relationships go _ talks this week? all international relationships go through - talks this week? all international relationships go through ups - talks this week? all international relationships go through ups and| relationships go through ups and downs. ultimately, the situation with aukus, the submarine deal, is about strengthening the defence and security relationship with the us and with australia. it is also about ensuring the high—tech manufacturing sector in the uk is supported through the work that will flow out from this agreement. the situation between australia and france and
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negotiations they had entered into is for them. for the uk, negotiations they had entered into is forthem. forthe uk, it negotiations they had entered into is for them. for the uk, it is about protecting ourselves, providing stability and security across the globe, and also about working more closely with long—standing counterparts. i5 closely with long-standing counterparts.— closely with long-standing counterparts. closely with long-standing counterarts. , , ., counterparts. is it ok is that the french found _ counterparts. is it ok is that the french found out _ counterparts. is it ok is that the french found out talks _ counterparts. is it ok is that the french found out talks were - french found out talks were happening elsewhere and said, we are off? ., ., happening elsewhere and said, we are off? . ., . happening elsewhere and said, we are off? ., ., . ., off? the talks that the french have been having _ off? the talks that the french have been having with _ off? the talks that the french have been having with the _ off? the talks that the french have been having with the australians i been having with the australians about submarines is an issue for the australians and the french. it is about submarines is an issue for the australians and the french.- australians and the french. it is an issue for us — australians and the french. it is an issue for us because _ australians and the french. it is an issue for us because the _ australians and the french. it is an issue for us because the french - australians and the french. it is an| issue for us because the french are not talking to us.— issue for us because the french are not talking to us. from the uk point of view, it not talking to us. from the uk point of view. it is — not talking to us. from the uk point of view, it is about _ not talking to us. from the uk point of view, it is about making - not talking to us. from the uk point of view, it is about making sure - not talking to us. from the uk point of view, it is about making sure we | of view, it is about making sure we strengthen and deepen the defence relationship with long—standing partners, australia and the usa. the relationship with france, all bilateral relationships, go through periods of tension. that is the
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inevitability of relationships, just as it is on a personal level. i have no doubt that our relationship with france will endure, but this is about making sure we have a strong defence relationship with two important defence partners. if one is frosty and _ important defence partners. if one is frosty and not _ important defence partners. if one is frosty and not talking _ important defence partners. if one is frosty and not talking to - important defence partners. if one is frosty and not talking to each i is frosty and not talking to each other and ten is perfect, where is the relationship with france at the moment? five?— the relationship with france at the moment? five? ~ ., , ., , moment? five? worse? ultimately, the uk and france — moment? five? worse? ultimately, the uk and france have _ moment? five? worse? ultimately, the uk and france have many— moment? five? worse? ultimately, the uk and france have many shared - uk and france have many shared interests. i'm sure that will come to the fore. this ultimately is about our defence and security relationship with australia and the us. important partners. strategic, a strategic relationship with them and also ensuring that as part of the
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levelling up agenda, we are stimulating a market for high—tech manufacturing technology companies in every part of the uk, england and wales, northern ireland, scotland, including parts of england that we intend to support, the north of england, the west midlands, and that is what this is about.— is what this is about. james cleverly. — is what this is about. james cleverly, thank _ is what this is about. james cleverly, thank you. - the football world has been remembering one of england's most prolific strikers, jimmy greaves, after it was announced he had died at the age of 81. for many, the former totteham player will be fondly remembered for his partnership with ian stjohn on the popular tv show saint and greavsie, but more than anything else, he was a goalscorer. let's take a look back. myjob is to score goals. if i score a goal, then there aren't many critics. there aren't any critics. he was a great personality, a wonderful footballer, and a man
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with huge charisma and fun. and he will be much missed. commentator: greaves coming in from the right wing! _ and greaves will score. the word legend is used loosely at times. injimmy�*s case, he absolutely earned it, he deserved it. greaves hit it first time. he scores! as a goal—scorer, there has been none better. i don't think we are going to see anybody better. he was the best of the best. 0h, beautiful football. what a great goal. fabulous goal. i don't live in the past. i've got to be perfectly honest with you, i've never really looked back and thought, oh, if only i could do it all again, you know. in fact, it's a relief i don't
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have to do it all again! we're joined now by former tottenham player steve perryman, who started with the youth team while jimmy was still a player at the club. good morning. lovely to talk to you, i know under sad circumstances. what was it like going into the club at that point and having jimmy around, what was he like?— that point and having jimmy around, what was he like? good morning, yes, a treat what was he like? good morning, yes, a great man. — what was he like? good morning, yes, a great man, never— what was he like? good morning, yes, a great man, never boasted. _ what was he like? good morning, yes, a great man, never boasted. just - what was he like? good morning, yes, a great man, never boasted. just did l a great man, never boasted. just did what he did. he did hisjob, which was scoring goals. he did it on such a regular basis. if you passed him in the corridor, he would shout out to you. he paid you the respect of giving you a smile, made you feel at home. a great personality. very friendly. a delight to be around, absolute delight. indie friendly. a delight to be around, absolute delight.—
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absolute delight. we talk a lot about his personality - absolute delight. we talk a lot about his personality and - absolute delight. we talk a lot - about his personality and charisma but let's for a moment to remind ourselves of the numbers. his statistics stand the test of time. his numbers still stand up, even now, especially when you consider he retired at 31. in terms of skill and talent, how do you rate him? i would sa he talent, how do you rate him? i would say he was — talent, how do you rate him? i would say he was a — talent, how do you rate him? i would say he was a professional— say he was a professional goal—scorer. he was a master craftsman of his art, which was scoring goals. which everyone would say is the most difficult part of being a football player in a team. hisjob was to being a football player in a team. his job was to score the goals and he lived for scoring goals. he was thinking about scoring goals every minute of the day. he said other people need to run around, other people, specialists in the team, the
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goalkeeper, the centre back who heads it, and he was one ready to get the ball and run at the he encouraged lots of supporters into the game. he was a great advert for the game. he was a great advert for the game. he excited supporters. i always talk to supporters about why you support this or that club. and lots of answers especially from tottenham people, the very first game they saw tottenham people, the very first game they sanimmy greaves and he scored a goal and he played and did this and excited us. that was the hook that made them keep coming. he was notjust a star in the box but on the box. the second half of his career, people will remember him for that. he was brilliant on the telly. he entertained people all his life, on the pitch, in the dressing room, in the tvstudios. i knew him in a
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second type of dressing room. he is to do a theatre tour. i sometimes would join him as a so—called special guest. hejust would join him as a so—called special guest. he just had would join him as a so—called special guest. hejust had people in uproar. he entertained them. he had a special weight. what else he did, he listened to people. i would make sure, if i was due to meet him at six o'clock before a seven o'clock show, he listened to your stories. i was at exeter. he would know our last six results. he knew how essex cricket team were doing and why they were struggling. he was a rugby fanatic. jimmy, unfortunately, the last years of his life, this very special man inside this body with wonderful thoughts and wit and personality that just really
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couldn't get out. that was the biggest shame of all. this very special man finished off in a way... he was very happy, i have to say. what is remarkable about him, he talked about, we have spoken about his battle with alcoholism. he conquered those demons. that is no small achievement, amongst all the other achievements in his life, he managed to come back from that. infer? managed to come back from that. very much so. everyone _ managed to come back from that. 7 much so. everyone was my career has highs and lows and you would have to say that was part of his low. his injury picked up in the world cup 1966 meant he did not take part in that magnificent vinyl. it is about how you recover and how resilient you are —— magnificent final. he was the most magnificent person i have met. he could come back from adversity like no one else. it shows
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it is not all about success, it is how you deal with some failings, as well. ., , ., ., ~ ., ., ~ well. lovely to talk to you. thank ou ve well. lovely to talk to you. thank you very much- — you very much. what a lovely tribute. it shows you the impact a senior player can have on someone coming through and steve talking about him with such reverence and such love. and he listened to people, so important. another footballer told me if important. anotherfootballer told me if you ask someone three questions about them and they do not ask one about you, if they are not worth your time. a good rule in life. we saw flash causing a rumpus last time. he has moved on. we are at the rhs flower show that has not been held
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in the autumn in 108 years, or if ever, it is the first time due to the pandemic. and this is the cop26 garden. this area you can see here represents flooding and building on flooding areas. flood plains. it is also showing how gardening can play an important role in mitigating climate change, looking at issues such as managing soil and water run—off. and also different plants suited to extreme weather conditions. perhaps, behind me, is the most symbolic, which is the gingko tree which has survived multiple extinctions and is still going strong. you can see the autumnal flowers going strong. you can see the autumnalflowers behind me. the dahlia popular at the show this
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year. quite cloudy this morning and for many, the forecast is settled the next days. dry weather, sunshine, but it will become more unsettled from wednesday, particularly initially in the north. you can see cloud in the south—east. yesterday torrential rain in east anglia, almost a month's yesterday torrential rain in east anglia, almost a months worth fell. today we have a lot of cloud, from lincolnshire to the south—east corner. showers coming out of that cloud. some could be heavy but it will break up here and there and for most dry with sunshine. in north—west scotland, some thicker cloud and spots of rain. temperatures range from 13—21 today. this evening and overnight, the weather front in western parts of the uk sinks further south. a band of cloud when it arrives in north
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wales and northern england. some clear skies. any showers in the south—east will die away. temperatures again between 9—13. tomorrow, the weak front continues to the south—east but will break up. for most tomorrow, a dry day and also sunny. however, we will see a new weather front across the north—west that will introduce cloud. also some rain. and it will be more windy. temperatures around 20-21. be more windy. temperatures around 20—21. then low pressure starts to approach from the north—west. the wind will strengthen. as well as that, rain coming in which by the end of wednesday afternoon will be across parts of northern england, some in scotland and northern ireland. behind that, a return to
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blustery showers and sunshine and ahead of it, starting with sunshine. cloud will build and temperatures up to about 21 degrees. what i must say, it is so tranquil and calm here. it is lovely. studio: it is now, anyway. it was not earlier with flash. when he was dragging you around like a rag doll! she is such a rascal. should i say spoiler alert. big—time spoiler alert. if you've been watching the gripping sunday evening thriller, vigil, but haven't caught up on last night's episode — then you may want to turn down the sound. in the penultimate episode we saw the identity of the russian spy finally revealed. let's take a look at
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that dramatic moment. ah! oh! no, not that! it's evidence. agh!
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my my word! it was so dramatic. 0ur director is called jason and he has not seen the programme last night so he is trying to direct this without looking at the screen because he does not want to know who it is. i because he does not want to know who it is. ., because he does not want to know who itis. . ,,, because he does not want to know who itis. . ,.,,._ lorne macfadyen, the traitor. it is always the quiet ones. i have been lurking in the shadows and it is a relief to get that off my chest. ., . . .,. , is a relief to get that off my chest. ., . ., , chest. your character is matthew. when ou chest. your character is matthew. when you get _ chest. your character is matthew. when you get the _ chest. your character is matthew. when you get the script, - chest. your character is matthew. when you get the script, it - chest. your character is matthew. when you get the script, it must. chest. your character is matthew. i when you get the script, it must be a lovely moment to discover. i have known since — a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i _ a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i was _ a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i was cast. _ a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i was cast. i _ a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i was cast. i had - a lovely moment to discover. i have known since i was cast. i had to - known since i was cast. i had to keep it secret from the rest of the cast. so they did not know when we
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were filming for a lot of it. it is exciting to play that shadowy character in the background. and to get a big reveal like that, the icing on the cake. it get a big reveal like that, the icing on the cake.— get a big reveal like that, the icing on the cake. it was 'ust so sca . it icing on the cake. it was 'ust so scary. n was i icing on the cake. it was 'ust so scary. it was proper_ icing on the cake. it wasjust so scary. it was proper keep - icing on the cake. it wasjust so scary. it was proper keep you i icing on the cake. it wasjust so - scary. it was proper keep you awake at night scary moment. when you were filming it, did you realise the impact it would have? i filming it, did you realise the impact it would have?- filming it, did you realise the impact it would have? i think so. at the end of each _ impact it would have? i think so. at the end of each episode, _ impact it would have? i think so. at the end of each episode, tom - impact it would have? i think so. at the end of each episode, tom has l the end of each episode, tom has written brilliant scripts, at the end of each episode we have a cliffhanger and twists and turns. i knew i was going to be very excited when that was shown. i have watched it with my girlfriend and watched my family and friends come up with theories. sometimes their theories are even better.— theories. sometimes their theories are even better. they did not know, either? i did — are even better. they did not know, either? i did my _ are even better. they did not know, either? i did my best. _ are even better. they did not know, either? i did my best. did _ are even better. they did not know, either? i did my best. did your- either? i did my best. did your rirlfriend either? i did my best. did your girlfriend know? _ either? i did my best. did your girlfriend know? no. _ either? i did my best. did your girlfriend know? no. what- either? i did my best. did your girlfriend know? no. what was either? i did my best. did your. girlfriend know? no. what was it like when she _ girlfriend know? no. what was it like when she found _ girlfriend know? no. what was it like when she found out? - girlfriend know? no. what was it
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like when she found out? she . girlfriend know? no. what was it | like when she found out? she had girlfriend know? no. what was it - like when she found out? she had her submissions — like when she found out? she had her submissions but _ like when she found out? she had her submissions but i _ like when she found out? she had her submissions but i did _ like when she found out? she had her submissions but i did not _ like when she found out? she had her submissions but i did not reveal - like when she found out? she had her submissions but i did not reveal it - submissions but i did not reveal it until the last minute.— until the last minute. what i love about the sunday _ until the last minute. what i love about the sunday night _ until the last minute. what i love about the sunday night dramas i until the last minute. what i love j about the sunday night dramas is they have a huge impact on people watching them. the first episode was ten million and loads more watching on catch up. it has that line of duty feel to it when everybody is talking about it. it duty feel to it when everybody is talking about it.— duty feel to it when everybody is talking about it. it must be special to be involved. _ talking about it. it must be special to be involved. it— talking about it. it must be special to be involved. it is— talking about it. it must be special to be involved. it is a _ talking about it. it must be special to be involved. it is a collective . to be involved. it is a collective experience and special to be part of something epic and exciting. such a privilege. especially with that company who produced things such as bodyguard. when i got that part i was over the moon. you bodyguard. when i got that part i was over the moon.— bodyguard. when i got that part i was over the moon. you got the part ares aro. was over the moon. you got the part ages ago- was _ was over the moon. you got the part ages ago. was everything _ was over the moon. you got the part ages ago. was everything delayed i ages ago. was everything delayed because of lockdown? it ages ago. was everything delayed because of lockdown?— ages ago. was everything delayed because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at — because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at the _ because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at the end _ because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at the end of _ because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at the end of 2019 - because of lockdown? it was. i think i was cast at the end of 2019 and - i was cast at the end of 2019 and then to have the five months when we did not know if it would go ahead. a lot of productions did not. we are blessed to for it to be finished. it
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was a challenge going through the lockdown period and trying to keep the same headspace and keep the same weight, as well! the same headspace and keep the same weight. as well!— weight, as well! many others have one weight, as well! many others have gone through _ weight, as well! many others have gone through that! _ weight, as well! many others have gone through that! you _ weight, as well! many others have gone through that! you talk- weight, as well! many others have gone through that! you talk about | gone through that! you talk about people you filmed with. you have surannejones, martin compston. an amazing cast list. it is suranne jones, martin compston. an amazing cast list.— amazing cast list. it is amazing and amazing cast list. it is amazing and a rivileue amazing cast list. it is amazing and a privilege to _ amazing cast list. it is amazing and a privilege to be — amazing cast list. it is amazing and a privilege to be alongside - amazing cast list. it is amazing and a privilege to be alongside them. l amazing cast list. it is amazing and a privilege to be alongside them. i | a privilege to be alongside them. i have admired their work for many years. so yes, i am blessed to be alongside them.— alongside them. what sort of research have _ alongside them. what sort of research have you _ alongside them. what sort of research have you done, - alongside them. what sort of - research have you done, watching spy movies, reading cia notes? i research have you done, watching spy movies, reading cia notes?— movies, reading cia notes? i have robabl movies, reading cia notes? i have probably watched _ movies, reading cia notes? i have probably watched every _ movies, reading cia notes? i havej probably watched every submarine film under the sun. i did a lot of reading and watching espionage. it is quite frightening. national
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security being breached. i loved going into that. it was really fascinating. one particularly fascinating. one particularly fascinating was a cia operative, i am sorry, an american working to infiltrate the cia, from china. it was like a guy who had been approached by the chinese government. and sort of taken in and was working for the chinese government. the fbi released a film, the cia, saying don't spy on us. it is a really good film, good production values. similar to your character? a little bit, yes. sorry if i have spelt it for everyone watching. if i have spelt it for everyone watching-— if i have spelt it for everyone watchinu. i, ., ~ ., ., watching. very similar. a lot to draw on- _ watching. very similar. a lot to draw on. what _ watching. very similar. a lot to draw on. what else _ watching. very similar. a lot to draw on. what else are - watching. very similar. a lot to draw on. what else are you - watching. very similar. a lot to - draw on. what else are you working on? , ., ., ., on? films or tv? i have a film cominu on? films or tv? i have a film
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coming out — on? films or tv? i have a film coming out in _ on? films or tv? i have a film coming out in january, - on? films or tv? i have a film coming out in january, which l on? films or tv? i have a film coming out in january, which i | on? films or tv? i have a film - coming out in january, which i saw coming out injanuary, which i saw last night. operation mincemeat, by john madden, a world war ii story thatis john madden, a world war ii story that is true, a deception mission in which the british used a corpse of a homeless man and dressed him up as a british soldier and then planted him with fake papers off the coast of spain in orderfor the body to be found by the germans. the fake papers were saying they were going to invade a different country to the one they were going to. you to invade a different country to the one they were going to.— one they were going to. you are workin: one they were going to. you are working on _ one they were going to. you are working on some _ one they were going to. you are working on some cool _ one they were going to. you are working on some cool stuff. - one they were going to. you are working on some cool stuff. can one they were going to. you are - working on some cool stuff. can you tell us anything about the final episode. it tell us anything about the final eisode. , , , episode. it is good, it is very aood. i episode. it is good, it is very good- i am — episode. it is good, it is very good. i am careful— episode. it is good, it is very good. i am careful about - episode. it is good, it is very l good. i am careful about what episode. it is good, it is very i good. i am careful about what i episode. it is good, it is very - good. i am careful about what i am sa inc good. i am careful about what i am sa in: but good. i am careful about what i am saying but i — good. i am careful about what i am saying but i do _ good. i am careful about what i am saying but i do not _ good. i am careful about what i am saying but i do not think _ good. i am careful about what i am saying but i do not think we - good. i am careful about what i am saying but i do not think we have i saying but i do not think we have spoken about the cliffhanger last night. we don't want to ruin it. we have not ruin it. all episodes of vigil are available
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to watch on bbc iplayer and the final instalment is on bbc one next sunday at 9pm. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. we area we are a bit late. it is 8:03am. apologies.
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crisis talks on soaring gas prices — the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. how will it affect the energy bill hitting your pocket? i look at what to do if your supplier's gone bump, and how prices could go up in the coming months. covid vaccines for 12—to—15—year—olds are available in england and scotland from today. and the emmy goes to... the crown. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama, olivia colman is named best actress for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. boycie laughs. we hear tributes to actorjohn challis — best known as boycie in only fools and horses. good morning from the rhs chelsea flower show. first time in 108 years
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that it has been held in autumn, due to the pandemic. the weather today for most will be dry, it mike levin the southeast with the heavy shower and later a front, get to the north—west will introduce some rain. i will all the details in about ten minutes. it's monday the 20th of september. our top story. crisis talks between the government and energy bosses will be held later, as ministers consider emergency state—backed loans to encourage firms to take on more customers. surging gas prices have left some energy companies battling to stay afloat while supermarkets have warned food supplies could also be affected. the prime minister has said the problems are temporary. let's talk more about this with our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. we spoke to james cleverly about half an hour ago, what did you learn from listening to him? idat half an hour ago, what did you learn from listening to him?— from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn _ from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn a _ from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn a lot _ from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn a lot more _ from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn a lot more once - from listening to him? not a lot but we will learn a lot more once they i we will learn a lot more once they business secretary kwasi kwarteng has a meeting with all the big
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energy firms and we will get more detail about the thinking of the government. the issue is there is an existing system for helping energy companies, orthe existing system for helping energy companies, or the customers of energy companies, that go bust. you are meant to be transferred to another larger energy supplier, or in extreme circumstances, and this has never been done before, the regulator of gem can step in and appoint a special administrator to take control of one of those companies. however, existing system has never had to deal with this many energy companies finding themselves in trouble. what the government and the industry are doing now is looking at the kind of back—up plan for what you can do. does that involve loans, bailouts, government takeovers of energy companies? that is what we are waiting to hear details of. the big message from the government from the prime minister, who hasjust landed in new york for a whole load of big diplomatic meetings, is that this is under control. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure that we have the supplies that we want, make sure
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that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under — we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out, as the world economy gets back on its feet _ there are all sorts of ways in which the suppression of the world economy — caused by covid — is now expressing itself as problems of recovery. and what we did hear from the minister atjames and what we did hear from the minister at james cleverly that you are talking to earlier on is a bit more about the government's of philosophy around this. they are not that bothered about small energy companies who have may taken a bit of a gamble going bust. they are bothered about consumers having to pay higher bills that they don't expect as a result. a lot of focus in the coming days will be making sure people don't see their bills arejumping from one sure people don't see their bills are jumping from one level to a sure people don't see their bills arejumping from one level to a much higher level overnight. lots
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are jumping from one level to a much higher level overnight.— higher level overnight. lots to think about, _ higher level overnight. lots to think about, adam, _ higher level overnight. lots to think about, adam, as - higher level overnight. lots to think about, adam, as ever. i higher level overnight. lots to - think about, adam, as ever. thank you very much. france has cancelled a meeting between its armed forces minister and the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, which was due to be held this week. it's after a new security deal between britain, the us and australia led to france losing out on a major contract in the process. the prime minister insists relations with paris are "very friendly". 12—to—15—year—olds in england and scotland will start receiving covid vaccines from today. in wales, invitations will be sent out this week, while the programme is expected to start shortly in northern ireland. some scottish health boards will start administering pfizer jabs at walk in clinics from today, while appointments can be pre—booked for later this month. while the risk to you of being severely ill may well be low, we want to make sure every single 12—15—year—old is protected, and not only protected for themselves, but also as they go into school, it helps to protect, hopefully, their teachers and others they interact with at school, too. folic acid is to be added to flour across the uk, to reduce the risk of life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. the government said the move
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could prevent up to 200 birth defects every year. the new rules will only apply to non—wholemeal wheat flour, with gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour exempt. thousands of people have been evacuated after a volcano erupted on the island of la palma, in the canaries. several homes have been destroyed and a 2km—wide exclusion zone has been set up around the lava flow. this is the volcano's first major eruption for 50 years. there was plenty of british success at the emmy awards in los angeles overnight. michaela coel won best limited series writing for her drama i may destroy you, while kate winslet was named best actress in a miniseries for mare of easttown. the royal drama the crown also picked up a number of awards — including for best drama, while olivia colman was named best lead actress in a drama series. mare of ma re of easttown mare of easttown was so good! olivia colman is so good. that
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mare of easttown was so good! olivia colman is so good.— colman is so good. that was a surprised _ colman is so good. that was a surprised me _ colman is so good. that was a surprised me face. _ colman is so good. that was a surprised me face. the? - colman is so good. that was a surprised me face. the? i've l colman is so good. that was a i surprised me face. the? i've won again? there are some fantastic actors... they are all cold actors, he says. we have a full package from sophie long who was watching the emmys. it isa it is a slightly different chelsea flower show this year because it is more autumnal. aha, flower show this year because it is more autumnal.— more autumnal. a bit more like a harvest festival, _ more autumnal. a bit more like a harvest festival, bringing - more autumnal. a bit more like a harvest festival, bringing your i more autumnal. a bit more like a| harvest festival, bringing your tins of beans, your marrows. carol arrived at work this morning with a large pumpkin under each arm. good morning. large pumpkin under each arm. good morninu. ., ~ i. large pumpkin under each arm. good morninu. . ~ i. ., large pumpkin under each arm. good morninu. ., ~' ., ., , morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovel to morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovely to be — morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovely to be back _ morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovely to be back at _ morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovely to be back at the _ morning. thank you for that, dan! is lovely to be back at the chelsea i lovely to be back at the chelsea flower— lovely to be back at the chelsea flower show. the first time in 108 years— flower show. the first time in 108 years it _ flower show. the first time in 108 years it has — flower show. the first time in 108 years it has been held during the autumn— years it has been held during the autumn months. of course that was due to _ autumn months. of course that was due to the _ autumn months. of course that was due to the pandemic recently. you can see _ due to the pandemic recently. you can see how— due to the pandemic recently. you can see how magnificent this garden is, we _ can see how magnificent this garden is, we will— can see how magnificent this garden is, we will be speaking to the designer— is, we will be speaking to the designer in about half an hour. it is called — designer in about half an hour. it is called the queen's green canopy garden, _
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is called the queen's green canopy garden, promoting green's platinum jubilee _ garden, promoting green's platinum jubilee next year. it is the largest garden _ jubilee next year. it is the largest garden here at the show and it highlights the importance of trees and woodlands to encourage individuals, companies, groups to actually— individuals, companies, groups to actually get out there and plant trees — actually get out there and plant trees. there are 3500 plants and 21 trees— trees. there are 3500 plants and 21 trees in— trees. there are 3500 plants and 21 trees in this — trees. there are 3500 plants and 21 trees in this particular plot. you might— trees in this particular plot. you might have _ trees in this particular plot. you might have caught a glimpse of the skyline _ might have caught a glimpse of the skyline there. fairly cloudy at the moment— skyline there. fairly cloudy at the moment in— skyline there. fairly cloudy at the moment in london. for many of us the forecast _ moment in london. for many of us the forecast for _ moment in london. for many of us the forecast for the next few days will remain _ forecast for the next few days will remain settled and there will be some _ remain settled and there will be some sunshine around, as well. quite a bit of— some sunshine around, as well. quite a bit of cloud _ some sunshine around, as well. quite a bit of cloud currently, anywhere from _ a bit of cloud currently, anywhere from lincolnshire or the way to the south _ from lincolnshire or the way to the south coast. one or two showers will be heavy— south coast. one or two showers will be heavy through the course of the day. many — be heavy through the course of the day. many are seeing some sunshine, there _ day. many are seeing some sunshine, there were _ day. many are seeing some sunshine, there were the cloud developing, with a _ there were the cloud developing, with a weather front can begin a west— with a weather front can begin a west of— with a weather front can begin a west of scotland and northern ireland, — west of scotland and northern ireland, that introduce bigger cloud after a _ ireland, that introduce bigger cloud after a sunny start. we will also see spots— after a sunny start. we will also see spots of rain. which is today range _ see spots of rain. which is today range from — see spots of rain. which is today range from about 30 in the north to
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21, range from about 30 in the north to 21. maybe _ range from about 30 in the north to 21, maybe 22 further south. through this evening — 21, maybe 22 further south. through this evening and overnight in a weather— this evening and overnight in a weather front in the north—west will continue _ weather front in the north—west will continue to— weather front in the north—west will continue to move southwards, but it is a weak— continue to move southwards, but it is a weak feature so really it will bring _ is a weak feature so really it will bring with — is a weak feature so really it will bring with it a band of cloud. any showers — bring with it a band of cloud. any showers left in the south—east will fade away— showers left in the south—east will fade away and under clear skies and some _ fade away and under clear skies and some temperatures in rural areas will fall— some temperatures in rural areas will fall away but generally in towns — will fall away but generally in towns and cities we are looking at between — towns and cities we are looking at between nine and 13 degrees. tomorrow we have our weak front continuing — tomorrow we have our weak front continuing to push south, but breaking _ continuing to push south, but breaking up. most tomorrow will have a dry day— breaking up. most tomorrow will have a dry day with sunny spells. a new weather— a dry day with sunny spells. a new weather front coming into the north—west will introduce a bit more cloud _ north—west will introduce a bit more cloud and _ north—west will introduce a bit more cloud and once again some spots of rain with— cloud and once again some spots of rain with temperatures fairly similar— rain with temperatures fairly similar to today. after that, it looks— similar to today. after that, it looks like _ similar to today. after that, it looks like it will turn more unsettled stop first of all in the north— unsettled stop first of all in the north of— unsettled stop first of all in the north of the country with some wet and windy— north of the country with some wet and windy weather coming our way. thank— and windy weather coming our way. thank you _ and windy weather coming our way. thank you very much, great to see you at gorgeous chelsea. lope thank you very much, great to see you at gorgeous chelsea. love that chelsea flower _ you at gorgeous chelsea. love that chelsea flower show. _ let's return now to our top story,
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and crisis talks have been taking place between energy companies and government ministers over escalating gas prices. there's concerns that some smaller firms could go bust — and food supplies could also be affected. nina is looking at this for us this morning. gosh, it is complicated. it is that this is all about _ gosh, it is complicated. it is that this is all about supply _ gosh, it is complicated. it is that this is all about supply and i gosh, it is complicated. it is that i this is all about supply and demand. at the _ this is all about supply and demand. at the moment we are coming out of the pandemic, demand is going up. at the pandemic, demand is going up. at the same time, supply of gas is going down, lots that things at play here. wind turbines are not receiving enough wind, but the point is that the gas is coming through in some areas is causing some problems. that has put a lot of pressure on our energy providers and some have gone bump. you will have energy, people's energy, energy plus. many are expected to follow. good news if you are a consumer and have a contract with one of those businesses, you are protected. the most important thing is, first of all, customers don't need to worry about their energy supply, and if anything does
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happen to the company that supplies them there are well—oiled processes to make sure that, you know, not only will their energy supply continue but things like credit balances will be protected. so that is the good news, that you are protected. the bad news is, that has become a lot less fun. go compare has had to get load deliberately have lows of deals because the supplies cannot afford to tempt you stand. if you are in a fixed rate tariff that will be protected, on it until your deal is out of contract. as for the 15 million households on variable rates, that could go up to 12% come october, taking the average gas and electric price up by from £140 a year to £1300. that could go up again in the spring. no matter what rate you are on in the coming months you can expect an increase. that
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rate you are on in the coming months you can expect an increase.— you can expect an increase. that is household. — you can expect an increase. that is household, what _ you can expect an increase. that is household, what about _ you can expect an increase. that is| household, what about businesses? you can expect an increase. that is i household, what about businesses? it is something i learned over the weekend, you may not necessarily note that carbon dioxide is needed by lots of food suppliers. carbonated drinks, also to stun animals before they are slaughtered. it is provided by some companies that make their sizes. because they have not been able to afford the gas they have not been able to provide that by—product and there has been over the weekend people saying things like bernard matthews, christmas can be cancelled if things don't change. for poultry suppliers they are already under a lot of pressure. they are already under a lot of pressure-— they are already under a lot of ressure. ~ ., , . ,., pressure. we would expect some difficulties with _ pressure. we would expect some difficulties with food _ pressure. we would expect some difficulties with food production i pressure. we would expect some | difficulties with food production in the coming weeks. i think we, like others, are looking towards christmas and the difficulties we will face over the next months in the build—up to the end of the year. think about the timing. it couldn't be worse. we are already talking
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about a shortage of hgv drivers, pressure on the labour market, and at a time when families are looking ahead to paying what national insurance, lots of families facing the reduction in the pocket at £20 a week when the uptick in universal credit ends. fundamentally businesses need our disposable income in orderfor them to recover. we are looking at a bit of a vicious circle when it comes to the economy. the good news is people think we will get over this hump by the spring, that it is temporary. but for many families, suppliers, businesses, a long and tough winter ahead. ., ~' ,, , . as we've just been hearing, the surge in the cost of gas could have a knock—on effect on food supplies. let's speak more about this with kate morgan and vicky scott, who are pig farmers in yorkshire. good morning to both of you, lovely to speak to you. i don't know if you could hear what we were talking about but we have all been learning over the weekend about how the gas shortage is affecting ulcers of different businesses. give us an idea of how it is giving or having
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an effect on you guys. ok. idea of how it is giving or having an effect on you guys.— idea of how it is giving or having an effect on you guys. ok, so our ms an effect on you guys. ok, so our .�*si io an effect on you guys. ok, so our pigs go to — an effect on you guys. ok, so our pigs go to slaughter _ an effect on you guys. ok, so our pigs go to slaughter every - an effect on you guys. ok, so our pigs go to slaughter every week, | an effect on you guys. ok, so our i pigs go to slaughter every week, we send about 1700 every week, and they are stunned with c02 and if that runs out then we can't send them and they will just be runs out then we can't send them and they willjust be a huge, huge backlog on farms.— they willjust be a huge, huge backlog on farms. they willjust be a huge, huge backlo on farms. , . ., , ., backlog on farms. there is already a hu i e backlog on farms. there is already a huge backlog _ backlog on farms. there is already a huge backlog because _ backlog on farms. there is already a huge backlog because of _ backlog on farms. there is already a huge backlog because of disease i backlog on farms. there is already a | huge backlog because of disease and brexit. _ huge backlog because of disease and brexit, there is not enough staff in the abattoirs to butcher the pigs so we already— the abattoirs to butcher the pigs so we already have a big backlog on the farms _ we already have a big backlog on the farms so _ we already have a big backlog on the farms so this is a double whammy. there _ farms so this is a double whammy. there is— farms so this is a double whammy. there is brexit related issues and then this gas problem on top of that. what does it mean for you, how does that boil down to how you are affected at the moment?— affected at the moment? well, we have so many _ affected at the moment? well, we have so many pigs _ affected at the moment? well, we have so many pigs backlogged i have so many pigs backlogged already, i think the abattoirs probably have a weak�*s supply and that'll be it. they cannot kill our pigs. these are pigs in the shed
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should have gone to slaughter, it should have gone to slaughter, it should be washed out and new pigs come in within the next two weeks. if we cannot move them, it is devastating to think what will happen. devastating to think what will ha en. ., , , devastating to think what will ha--en. ., , , happen. the trouble is, as well, with our method _ happen. the trouble is, as well, with our method of— happen. the trouble is, as well, with our method of production, | happen. the trouble is, as well, | with our method of production, it happen. the trouble is, as well, i with our method of production, it is continuous. — with our method of production, it is continuous, so we cannotjust suddenly— continuous, so we cannotjust suddenly decide today that can we will not _ suddenly decide today that can we will not sell any more pigs. we have pi-s will not sell any more pigs. we have pigs coming — will not sell any more pigs. we have pigs coming through the cycle for at least a _ pigs coming through the cycle for at least a year. it is not something we caniust _ least a year. it is not something we caniust turn — least a year. it is not something we canjust turn a least a year. it is not something we can just turn a and say, actually, we will— can just turn a and say, actually, we will stop— can just turn a and say, actually, we will stop now.— can just turn a and say, actually, we will stop now. you are a family farm, we will stop now. you are a family farm. have _ we will stop now. you are a family farm. have you — we will stop now. you are a family farm, have you ever _ we will stop now. you are a family farm, have you ever had - we will stop now. you are a family farm, have you ever had a - we will stop now. you are a family. farm, have you ever had a situation as concerning as this before greece no, this is as bad as it has been for the — no, this is as bad as it has been for the pig — no, this is as bad as it has been for the pig industry for a long time — for the pig industry for a long time it— for the pig industry for a long time it is— for the pig industry for a long time. it is desperate.- for the pig industry for a long time. it is desperate. what is the wa out, time. it is desperate. what is the way out. what — time. it is desperate. what is the way out, what do _ time. it is desperate. what is the way out, what do you _ time. it is desperate. what is the way out, what do you need? i time. it is desperate. what is the way out, what do you need? we. time. it is desperate. what is the i way out, what do you need? we need the government _ way out, what do you need? we need the government to _ way out, what do you need? we need the government to sort _ way out, what do you need? we need the government to sort this _ way out, what do you need? we need the government to sort this out. i the government to sort this out. they could have sorted out the shortage of staff issues, there are people wanting to come back to work,
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and they can sort this out. they need to take action now because this is a real problem and i for one cannot actually begin to imagine what we are going to have to do if they don't step in. it is what we are going to have to do if they don't step in.— they don't step in. it is going to be dire. give _ they don't step in. it is going to be dire. give us _ they don't step in. it is going to be dire. give us an _ they don't step in. it is going to be dire. give us an idea. - they don't step in. it is going to l be dire. give us an idea. viewers are learning _ be dire. give us an idea. viewers are learning about _ be dire. give us an idea. viewers are learning about how _ be dire. give us an idea. viewers are learning about how this i be dire. give us an idea. viewers are learning about how this gas l be dire. give us an idea. viewers| are learning about how this gas is affecting various industries. it is great to be on your farm this way. are you talking or thinking about potentially going out of business or having to lay people up? what sort of measures will you have to take? well, because of our production and because _ well, because of our production and because we — well, because of our production and because we service out and it takes a year— because we service out and it takes a year from — because we service out and it takes a year from the conception all the way through to the piglets going to slaughter, it is not something we can make — slaughter, it is not something we can make a — slaughter, it is not something we can make a quick decision and, we have _ can make a quick decision and, we have pigs— can make a quick decision and, we have pigs backing up in the system. if the _ have pigs backing up in the system. if the worst — have pigs backing up in the system. if the worst comes to the worst and we have _ if the worst comes to the worst and we have to — if the worst comes to the worst and we have to make the decision to stop serving _ we have to make the decision to stop serving sows and deal with the problem — serving sows and deal with the problem going forward.- serving sows and deal with the problem going forward. there is a lot of money _ problem going forward. there is a lot of money to _ problem going forward. there is a lot of money to be _ problem going forward. there is a lot of money to be made, - problem going forward. there is a lot of money to be made, losing l problem going forward. there is a i lot of money to be made, losing £10, £20 pair. there is a lot of money to
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be lost. retailers i say, they have their margins covered. late be lost. retailers i say, they have their margins covered.— their margins covered. we are buildini their margins covered. we are building up — their margins covered. we are building up to _ their margins covered. we are building up to what _ their margins covered. we are building up to what i - their margins covered. we are building up to what i imagine l their margins covered. we are | building up to what i imagine is their margins covered. we are i building up to what i imagine is a really busy period for you in preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean, preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean. we — preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean. we are _ preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean, we are continuous, - preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean, we are continuous, so i preparation for christmas. yeah, i mean, we are continuous, so the| mean, we are continuous, so the workload is the same throughout the year, but it is really important and pig industry is renowned for having a tough time injanuary, february, the demand for pork drops are set for us to be struggling now is a real concern.— for us to be struggling now is a real concern. ., ., ., ., real concern. you are going through this, i real concern. you are going through this. i imagine _ real concern. you are going through this, i imagine you _ real concern. you are going through this, i imagine you are _ real concern. you are going through this, i imagine you are talking i real concern. you are going through this, i imagine you are talking to i this, i imagine you are talking to otherfarmers, as well, who i think are in similar situations. people will be watching this you are asking the obvious question about what happens to sausages at the butchers and on supermarket shelves, is that something we will experience? potentially, if the c02 issue doesn't _ potentially, if the c02 issue doesn't get results and we don't get more _ doesn't get results and we don't get more butchers into the abattoirs it will be _ more butchers into the abattoirs it will be a _ more butchers into the abattoirs it will be a massive issue. people are
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going _ will be a massive issue. people are going out— will be a massive issue. people are going out of— will be a massive issue. people are going out of business now and this is a real— going out of business now and this is a real problem that needs to be addressed — is a real problem that needs to be addressed-— addressed. really nice to talk to ou this addressed. really nice to talk to you this money. _ addressed. really nice to talk to you this money, thank _ addressed. really nice to talk to you this money, thank you i addressed. really nice to talk to you this money, thank you for. you this money, thank you for explaining the impact this is having on you and yourfarm. i hope you have a lovely day and we will speak to you again soon, thank you. thank ou. to you again soon, thank you. thank you- thank — to you again soon, thank you. thank you- thank you- _ thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks — and for many who are returning, they'll be hoping to experience freshers' week in person for the first time. most courses will be offering a mixture of face—to—face and online learning — though one regulator warns that teaching must still be of high quality. our education correspondent elaine dunkley is at the university of bolton for us this morning. iimagine it i imagine it is a really exciting time for the students coming in and settling into a new way of life and making friends.— settling into a new way of life and making friends. absolutely. there is the have making friends. absolutely. there is they have the _ making friends. absolutely. there is they have the semester, _ making friends. absolutely. there is they have the semester, students i making friends. absolutely. there is. they have the semester, students are coming in, lecturers coming in. it is freshers' week, the rite of
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passage, time to celebrate, make new freedoms. get involved with new clubs and new societies and that is fit for all students because last year a lot of it was online, a lot of restrictions in place. it is not just those beginning their universityjelly just those beginning their university jelly you are just those beginning their universityjelly you are exciting. we have daniel, georgia, jake, james. you are in your second year. you didn't have a freshers' week last year, what's it like to be back on campus and meeting friends? izierr; on campus and meeting friends? very different because you have that big change _ different because you have that big change from having no freshers' and being _ change from having no freshers' and being belly — change from having no freshers' and being belly on campus to all of a sudden, — being belly on campus to all of a sudden, people, wow. it is much more refreshing, _ sudden, people, wow. it is much more refreshing, a _ sudden, people, wow. it is much more refreshing, a lot more social and getting _ refreshing, a lot more social and getting to — refreshing, a lot more social and getting to meet people, so it is very good. getting to meet people, so it is very good-— getting to meet people, so it is ve iood. ~ . ., , getting to meet people, so it is ve iood. . ., , very good. what was the hardest part of last year? — very good. what was the hardest part of last year? so _ very good. what was the hardest part of last year? so much _ very good. what was the hardest part of last year? so much disruption i very good. what was the hardest part of last year? so much disruption for. of last year? so much disruption for you guys. of last year? so much disruption for ou iu s. of last year? so much disruption for oqu s. ., ., ., , you guys. the isolation of 'ust beini you guys. the isolation of 'ust being away i you guys. the isolation of 'ust being away from i you guys. the isolation of 'ust being away from people, i you guys. the isolation ofjust being away from people, i i you guys. the isolation ofjust - being away from people, i remember when i _ being away from people, i remember when i was _ being away from people, i remember when i was staying in halls about three _ when i was staying in halls about
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three months, iwas when i was staying in halls about three months, i was in a flat by myself — three months, i was in a flat by myself. getting other people to move in it was— myself. getting other people to move in it was difficult because we had all the _ in it was difficult because we had all the restrictions, in it was difficult because we had allthe restrictions, but in it was difficult because we had all the restrictions, but thankfully i had _ all the restrictions, but thankfully i had someone come in and someone .ave i had someone come in and someone gave me _ i had someone come in and someone gave me a _ i had someone come in and someone gave me a refresher of socialising so it really— gave me a refresher of socialising so it really appreciative. you guys are in— so it really appreciative. you guys are in your— so it really appreciative. you guys are in your second year, it is like freshers' — are in your second year, it is like freshers' for— are in your second year, it is like freshers' for you but equally you have _ freshers' for you but equally you have to — freshers' for you but equally you have to knuckle down and study because — have to knuckle down and study because it — have to knuckle down and study because it means something this year. _ because it means something this year. it— because it means something this year, it goes towards your grades stop you — year, it goes towards your grades stop you feel about that with you have _ stop you feel about that with you have a _ stop you feel about that with you have a lot — stop you feel about that with you have a lot of catching up to do. as much have a lot of catching up to do. much as we have a lot of catching up to do. as much as we have catching up to do a study— much as we have catching up to do a study wise _ much as we have catching up to do a study wise we — much as we have catching up to do a study wise we still _ much as we have catching up to do a study wise we still have _ much as we have catching up to do a study wise we still have to _ much as we have catching up to do a study wise we still have to do - much as we have catching up to do a study wise we still have to do the i study wise we still have to do the catching — study wise we still have to do the catching of — study wise we still have to do the catching of socially _ study wise we still have to do the catching of socially because i study wise we still have to do the catching of socially because the i catching of socially because the connections _ catching of socially because the connections we _ catching of socially because the connections we are _ catching of socially because the connections we are making i catching of socially because the| connections we are making now, catching of socially because the - connections we are making now, they will take _ connections we are making now, they will take us— connections we are making now, they will take us places _ connections we are making now, they will take us places in _ connections we are making now, they will take us places in the _ connections we are making now, they will take us places in the future. i will take us places in the future. even _ will take us places in the future. even though— will take us places in the future. even though they _ will take us places in the future. even though they might - will take us places in the future. even though they might not - will take us places in the future. even though they might not be i will take us places in the future. - even though they might not be anyone at the _ even though they might not be anyone at the moment, if you make connections at this point whilst you are still_ connections at this point whilst you are still at— connections at this point whilst you are still at university, somewhere, you still_ are still at university, somewhere, you still have their phone numbers for later_ you still have their phone numbers for later down the line. lots you still have their phone numbers for later down the line.— for later down the line. lots of thin . s for later down the line. lots of things happening _ for later down the line. lots of things happening here. - for later down the line. lots of things happening here. lots i for later down the line. lots of things happening here. lots of events and lectures are now in person. i have been catching up with students around the country. here
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are some i spent time with at manchester metropolitan university. i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. but just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. over the next few weeks, manchester will welcome more than 70,000 uni students to the city. how about a free t—shirt? we've got a bucket hat from fancy. it'sjust fun, you know, just getting a vibe back from the two—year break we've had in lockdown. and, you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that uni feeling. meet the freshers elly, keira and lola. i left everything last—minute, so i was literally packing to, like, midnight. woke up, carried on packing and then got everything in the car, had a little cry when i said goodbye to my mum. it's the start of a new chapter. because of the pandemic, many students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home. did a few virtual tours, but that was it, really. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, "what if i get up there and i hate it?"
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it could be completely, like, out of my depth. but, no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year— and i studied a different course, it was quite similar. but, obviously, being. a creative course online, it was just so difficult. like, we weren't getting to use the facilities, - we weren't getting the one—to—one we should have got. _ like, already, i was saying i've had a better week... _ not even a week — the last two days. i've already met so many people. i feel, like, so much more . passionate about my course. i'm enjoying it so much more. so, yeah, ithink i made the best decision i could have. _ at many universities across england, lectures on campus are back and face coverings are no longer mandatory, but students are advised to do covid tests regularly. the idea of future restrictions is still a concern. i hope it doesn't happen again. they did say, yesterday, in the lecture... they said they've got a plan if it does happen. if we get put into lockdown. no, none of that! because i am from quite a small town, i knew that even - i being in lockdown here would be| somewhat better than down there, so i was like, as a whole, may as well go for it. -
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covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. we were stuck in a tiny, tiny little house with so many people when it started. that wasn't fun. got into a lot of arguments. with fees of £9,000 a year and living costs, these third—year students feel out of pocket. i think we should have some compensation for... either teaching orfor the accommodation, because a lot of the rooms didn't get lived in, so people going back to their families, if they're shielding, orwhatever. a lot of uni—based accommodation i have tried to give a bit of moneyi back, but a lot of private things — l obviously, what we were in lasti year — haven't done anything. and when we weren't living in that house for something like six - months or so of the year, but we were still paying l rent every month. cherie is a second—year sociology student. she first went to university at 18, but had to drop out. in the middle of the year, i sadly lost my mum. it was a really difficult time and that made me become a young carerfor my brothers. at the age of 23, cherie
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decided to go back. but the pandemic meant she wasn't able to experience university life. she is now part of a support group to help students who are struggling. last year was quite difficult, to be honest, in terms especially for mental health. like, it was quite isolating. ifeel like, as people, we like to have connections and stuff. having that aspect taken away last year, we could definitely see how some people actually struggled. there are amazing charities out there who are willing to help lots of different people. if someone was to tell me that five or six years ago, cherie, you are going to be smiling, you are going to go back to uni and be having the time of your life, i would have thought they would be lying, because when you are in that moment in time, you don't think positively at all, because you are just taking in everything. but i always tell people to take it easy, take their time with it, and just to be kinder to themselves. freshers' week marks the start of university life — a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many
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returning back to university. stu d e nts students are hoping for some normality but we are still in a pandemic. here at bolton they have a vaccination bus on site, how are you feeling going forward? goad vaccination bus on site, how are you feeling going forward?— feeling going forward? good to be back with peers _ feeling going forward? good to be back with peers and _ feeling going forward? good to be back with peers and to _ feeling going forward? good to be back with peers and to be - feeling going forward? good to be j back with peers and to be learning face—to—face, a blended approach but it is good _ face—to—face, a blended approach but it is good. do face-to-face, a blended approach but it is aood. ., , face-to-face, a blended approach but itis aood. ., ,~ it is good. do you worry about the fact we are _ it is good. do you worry about the fact we are still _ it is good. do you worry about the fact we are still in _ it is good. do you worry about the fact we are still in a _ it is good. do you worry about the fact we are still in a pandemic- it is good. do you worry about the j fact we are still in a pandemic and we saw what happened last year? definitely, especially because we are on— definitely, especially because we are on such — definitely, especially because we are on such a _ definitely, especially because we are on such a creative _ definitely, especially because we are on such a creative course, i definitely, especially because we are on such a creative course, it| are on such a creative course, it has been — are on such a creative course, it has been really— are on such a creative course, it has been really difficult - are on such a creative course, it has been really difficult so - are on such a creative course, it has been really difficult so to i are on such a creative course, itj has been really difficult so to go back to — has been really difficult so to go back to third _ has been really difficult so to go back to third year— has been really difficult so to go back to third year and _ has been really difficult so to go back to third year and be - has been really difficult so to go back to third year and be able . has been really difficult so to go| back to third year and be able to has been really difficult so to go . back to third year and be able to be in the _ back to third year and be able to be in the workshop _ back to third year and be able to be in the workshop and _ back to third year and be able to be in the workshop and stuff _ back to third year and be able to be in the workshop and stuff i - back to third year and be able to be in the workshop and stuff i think. in the workshop and stuff i think will be _ in the workshop and stuff i think will be hopefully— in the workshop and stuff i think will be hopefully really- in the workshop and stuff i think will be hopefully really good. inl will be hopefully really good. in terms will be hopefully really good. terms of the restrictions, do will be hopefully really good.“ terms of the restrictions, do you think it is necessary to still have some on—site? i think it is necessary to still have some on-site?_ think it is necessary to still have some on-site? i think it is better safe than to _ some on-site? i think it is better safe than to be _ some on-site? i think it is better safe than to be sorry, _ some on-site? i think it is better safe than to be sorry, so - some on-site? i think it is better safe than to be sorry, so to - some on-site? i think it is better safe than to be sorry, so to have| safe than to be sorry, so to have some _ safe than to be sorry, so to have some good, _ safe than to be sorry, so to have some good, but what is necessary, it is going _ some good, but what is necessary, it is going to _ some good, but what is necessary, it is going to stop you are alljust glad _ is going to stop you are alljust glad to— is going to stop you are alljust
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glad to be _ is going to stop you are alljust glad to be back. they are alljust .lad glad to be back. they are alljust glad to— glad to be back. they are alljust glad to be — glad to be back. they are alljust glad to be back. they are alljust glad to be back. definitely, it is 'ust glad to be back. definitely, it is just good — glad to be back. definitely, it is just good to be face—to—face, you team _ just good to be face—to—face, you learn differently and we have a blended — learn differently and we have a blended approach, so we have a bit of online, _ blended approach, so we have a bit of online, a — blended approach, so we have a bit of online, a bit of a face—to—face. it of online, a bit of a face—to—face. it is _ of online, a bit of a face—to—face. it is realty— of online, a bit of a face—to—face. it is really good to be back with our peers _ it is really good to be back with our peers. a it is really good to be back with our peers— it is really good to be back with our eers. �* ., ., . ., our peers. a lot of excitement on camus. our peers. a lot of excitement on campus there — our peers. a lot of excitement on campus. there are _ our peers. a lot of excitement on campus. there are still _ campus. there are still restrictions, lots of precautions to be taken, but these students are certainly pleased to be back at university. certainly pleased to be back at university-— certainly pleased to be back at universi . . ,, i. , . certainly pleased to be back at universi . . ,, , . . university. thank you very much. we are about to — university. thank you very much. we are about to go _ university. thank you very much. we are about to go strictlyfied. - university. thank you very much. we are about to go strictlyfied. you - are about to go strictlyfied. you already have. _ are about to go strictlyfied. you already have. i— are about to go strictlyfied. mt, already have. i have lost you. are about to go strictlyfied. you i already have. i have lost you. that is not true- — already have. i have lost you. that is not true. you _ already have. i have lost you. that is not true. you know _ already have. i have lost you. that is not true. you know that is not true. we will be talking to one of the professional dancers from the strictly ballroom very shortly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london has two new tube stations today on the northern line — the first major expansion since the late '90s.
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the first trains began to run between nine elms and battersea power station around 5.30 this morning. here's transport correspondent tom edwards. welcome to nine elms tube station, on the new northern line extension, which hasjust opened. it is the first extension to a tube line in the capital we have had for 20 years. it cost £1 billion and eventually it's going to be paid for by developers who have to contribute when they are building in this area in battersea, but this is a big deal for this area. lots of new homes, lots ofjobs. the new northern line extension is now open. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to meet the iranian foreign minister to call for the immediate release of uk nationals, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. nazanin, from west london, has been detained in iran since 2016, convicted of propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard ratcliffe
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said he's urged liz truss to make her case a top priority. an investigation is being carried out after a double decker bus hit the front of a house in crouch end on saturday night. the 191, which wasn't carrying any passengers, had collided with a car first. police said there were no reports of any injuries. i know it's autumn, but the chelsea flower show gets under way today. it was postponed from may due to the pandemic. the early summer blooms you'd usually see will be replaced by dahlias, pumpkins and autumn colours. we talked about the northern line, let's see how the rest of the tube is running. the circle line has minor delays clockwise, and there's no piccadilly line between wood green and cockfosters due to a faulty train. severe delays on the rest of the line, too. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was a rather wet day for many of us yesterday across the capital with some lively showers around. today is looking drier, but there are still some more showers to come in the forecast at times.
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this morning, another mild start to the day. we have temperatures in double figures. it's quite grey and gloomy out there for most of us. the cloud is thickest towards eastern areas of the capital. here, maybe the chance of a bit of drizzle, some light showers around through the morning. further west, we should see things brighten up slowly and a lot of that cloud will tend to break up, too. when we do get any spells of brightness and sunshine across the capital through the afternoon, do watch out because there may be one or two sharp showers developing, as well. top temperatures in the best of any brightness and sunshine will get as high as perhaps 19—20 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the winds stay light. there will be some more mist developing. temperatures in some of the rural spots, where we see the clearest of the skies, could possibly drop back into single figures, so a chillier start to the day tomorrow, which is looking dry and fine. with still light winds, then we will see temperatures peak in the low 20s in celsius once more — 21 degrees for most of us. into wednesday and, again, it is dry and fine, but the winds will pick up through the afternoon. feeling more autumnal as we head through the rest
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of the working week. i'll be back in around half an hour. now back to dan and sally. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. we are here until 9:15am. and then... morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store from jeanette and gethin. dancing dan coming up. as we've been hearing on breakfast, john challis and jimmy greaves sadly passed away yesterday — there's been so many lovely tributes. but, even if you're not a fan of the beautiful game, i guarantee you'll support one club from liverpool. john bishop is a fan.
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it is fantastic you are using sport to get back on your feet and get your life back together. we find out how one league with a difference is changing the lives of homeless people. plus, with growing evidence they're fuelling millions - of people's addiction to food, dr xand tells us why it's time| to give ultra—processed products the red card. i over half the calories most of us eat are from these foods — they're addictive, driving the obesity crisis. i've struggled with it myself. i'll tell you what to look out for later. also today — it protected millions ofjobs during the pandemic but the furlough scheme ends this month. legal expert hatti suvari explains what to do if you or a loved one is facing redundancy — and what your rights are if you don't want to return to the office. plus, with autumn starting this . week, mark lane tells us why it's the perfect time to get to work on your garden so your - plants survive and thrive in the colder months. i
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and you will not want to miss the new bbc— and you will not want to miss the new bbc comedy drama. the cleaner. we hear how fake crime scenes brought out the darker side of comedian greg davies from his co—star, jo hartley. and it's back — i'll be - giving my verdict on this year's strictly come dancing couples - who were revealed at the weekend. what a brilliant lawn show. you are giving _ what a brilliant lawn show. you are giving your— what a brilliant lawn show. you are giving your verdict _ what a brilliant lawn show. you are giving your verdict on— what a brilliant lawn show. you are giving your verdict on the _ giving your verdict on the partnerships. _ giving your verdict on the partnerships. what- giving your verdict on the partnerships. what did i giving your verdict on the i partnerships. what did you giving your verdict on the - partnerships. what did you make giving your verdict on the _ partnerships. what did you make of that guy— partnerships. what did you make of that guy on — partnerships. what did you make of that guy on breakfast? _ partnerships. what did you make of that guy on breakfast? intell- partnerships. what did you make of that guy on breakfast?— that guy on breakfast? well he got nadi a that guy on breakfast? well he got nadiya which _ that guy on breakfast? well he got nadiya which is _ that guy on breakfast? well he got nadiya which is amazing. _ that guy on breakfast? well he got nadiya which is amazing. i - that guy on breakfast? well he got nadiya which is amazing. i expect i nadiya which is amazing. i expect good _ nadiya which is amazing. i expect good stuff from those two. that is good to hear. promising good things already. good morning, guys. good _ good morning, guys. good morning. we just got the seal of approvalfrom good morning. we just got the seal of approval from jeanette, so that is good already.
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do you professional share videos of your partners? just a little bit. i have seen them. , . , ., , i have seen them. this means he has otential. potential. he is doing really well and learning so quick. let's talk about him as if he is not here. this is really uncomfortable. you two go away and get ready for your programme. i think they should stay there and listen. stay, stay. go away! you are not uncomfortable, are you? uncomfortable, are you ? not uncomfortable, are you? not at all. nadiya, lovely to have you here on breakfast for the first time. it is very exciting because we are going to use this kind of sofa in ourfirst dance. our first dance. are you allowed to say that? is it a secret? it is. i am told all
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the time i cannot stand on the table. i am sure on strictly they will build a table. so i hope you will feel like home. i did ask the team if i could stand on the table and they went bananas for health and safety issues. but we will be able to dance around the set. on the table, everywhere. i think i am the most excited. i cannot wait. are you allowed to say what we are doing? it are you allowed to say what we are doinu ? . are you allowed to say what we are doinu ? , ., are you allowed to say what we are doin. ? , ., ., are you allowed to say what we are doinu ? , ., ., , are you allowed to say what we are doinr? , ., ., , . are you allowed to say what we are doinr? , ., .,, . , doing? it is going to be a quickstep to one of your— doing? it is going to be a quickstep to one of your favourite _ doing? it is going to be a quickstep to one of your favourite songs. - doing? it is going to be a quickstep to one of your favourite songs. are| to one of your favourite songs. are you going to sing that? it is to one of your favourite songs. are you going to sing that?— you going to sing that? it is a chanced you going to sing that? it is a changed show _ you going to sing that? it is a changed show this _ you going to sing that? it is a changed show this year - you going to sing that? it is a changed show this year you i you going to sing that? it is a i changed show this year you have you going to sing that? it is a - changed show this year you have to sing and dance. it is blues brothers, everyone needs someone to
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love. are we giving away too many secrets? we have checked with the strictly mafia. did everyone catch the programme, your friends and did everyone catch the programme, yourfriends and family. did everyone catch the programme, your friends and family. the most brilliant moment. when you two saw each other for the first time. this is weird. hello! hi! hello! nadiya is clearly amazing. i'm absolutely over the moon. come up here, we'll have a chat. on my way. are you ready for a challenge? iam. be honest — is this a massive disappointment? are you ok? i'm so pleased. what do i need to work on in the meantime? i mean, should i be... oh, no — you just enjoy your time off because it's going to be full—on! 0k! she has fully put me at ease. i
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think we can do it together. performing for in the very first time — performing for in the very first time please _ performing for in the very first time. please welcome - performing for in the very first time. please welcome your. performing for in the very first - time. please welcome your strictly stars _ # i want to dance, the music's got me going. studio: wow, i can see the potential already. it was good fun. it is going to be a lot of fun. be it was good fun. it is going to be a lot of fun. �* ., , ,. lot of fun. be honest. he said were ou lot of fun. be honest. he said were you disappointed? _ lot of fun. be honest. he said were you disappointed? what _ lot of fun. be honest. he said were you disappointed? what did - lot of fun. be honest. he said were you disappointed? what did you . lot of fun. be honest. he said were i you disappointed? what did you think when you found out it was him? i was so ha - . when you found out it was him? i was so happy- i— when you found out it was him? i was so happy- iwas— when you found out it was him? i was so happy. i was really _ when you found out it was him? i —" so happy. i was really hoping i was going to get dan. i had never met him before but i had the feeling we would be good partnership and he seems like a really nice man. so far. everyone tell me how lovely dan
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is. and i was like, i really want to have a lovely partner, this season. and what do you think of his dancing ability? be nice. he has never danced before. a lot of people who do it have experience but you are taking someone from the very start. baby steps. never danced before. but you learn so quick. he picks up things really quickly. he works really hard. as a teacher, it is the best. 50 really hard. as a teacher, it is the best, ., really hard. as a teacher, it is the best. . , . best. so far, so good. does he have secial best. so far, so good. does he have special tricks _ best. so far, so good. does he have special tricks to _ best. so far, so good. does he have special tricks to remember - best. so far, so good. does he have special tricks to remember things? | best. so far, so good. does he have| special tricks to remember things? i showed this to our lovely viewers. this is handiya, which we came up with in training.— this is handiya, which we came up with in training. when we were doing our with in training. when we were doing your position — with in training. when we were doing your position you _ with in training. when we were doing your position you are _ with in training. when we were doing your position you are like, _ with in training. when we were doing your position you are like, i - with in training. when we were doing your position you are like, i need - your position you are like, i need something, i need something to
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remember where my arm should be. so he came up with handiya. irate remember where my arm should be. so he came up with handiya.— he came up with handiya. we did the basic ste -s he came up with handiya. we did the basic steps and _ he came up with handiya. we did the basic steps and then _ he came up with handiya. we did the basic steps and then nadiya - he came up with handiya. we did the basic steps and then nadiya said - he came up with handiya. we did the basic steps and then nadiya said we | basic steps and then nadiya said we need to do pasture. i could not work out to get in the right position. she said get the hand pointed at you and then turn to me. i focused she said get the hand pointed at you and then turn to me. ifocused on the hand and drew a picture of nadiya called the handiya. and when we are dancing about, she shouts handiya at me. i am shouting! you are not shouting at all.— are not shouting at all. during the dance he makes— are not shouting at all. during the dance he makes me _ are not shouting at all. during the dance he makes me say _ are not shouting at all. during the dance he makes me say things. i dance he makes me say things. usually i would be quiet. but it is our way of working together. because i know your keywords. like a robot. stretch, handiya. candy floss. we have many things. i stretch, handiya. candy floss. we have many things.— have many things. i am not sure i should give _ have many things. i am not sure i should give away _ have many things. i am not sure i should give away all— have many things. i am not sure i should give away all my _ have many things. i am not sure i should give away all my secrets. l have many things. i am not sure i i should give away all my secrets. we are trying to learn how, when you
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are trying to learn how, when you are in position, in hold, we are trying to work out how hard to hold your partner. initially, i was clinging on for dear life. i picture nadiya as a column of candy floss. you go around the column of candy floss but not too hard so you crush the candy floss. and looking over the candy floss. and looking over the top to get your stretch. he works really hard. how are you fitting this in? some people are just doing strictly.— fitting this in? some people are just doing strictly. most of them are 'ust just doing strictly. most of them are just doing — just doing strictly. most of them are just doing strictly _ just doing strictly. most of them are just doing strictly and - just doing strictly. most of them are just doing strictly and taking j are just doing strictly and taking time off their usualjobs. i do not know how he is doing it but he is brilliant. not even once in rehearsal he mentioned he was tired. you are up at 3am. ienjoy you are up at 3am. i enjoy it. we are working under exam conditions.— i enjoy it. we are working under exam conditions. focus while we are
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there. exam conditions. focus while we are there- when — exam conditions. focus while we are there- when he _ exam conditions. focus while we are there. when he is _ exam conditions. focus while we are there. when he is there, _ exam conditions. focus while we are there. when he is there, it - exam conditions. focus while we are there. when he is there, it is - exam conditions. focus while we are there. when he is there, it is not. there. when he is there, it is not hundred percent, it is like 150%. ida hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes. hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes- no — hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes. no lunch, _ hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes. no lunch, nadiya! - hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he- hundred percent, it is like 150%. no brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells. brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i will brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i willjust _ brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i willjust have _ brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i willjust have a _ brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i willjust have a quick - brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells me i willjust have a quick one. i brakes. no lunch, nadiya! he tells| me i willjust have a quick one. 0k. me i will 'ust have a quick one. ok. i was me i willjust have a quick one. ok. i was going — me i willjust have a quick one. ok. i was going to _ me i willjust have a quick one. ok. i was going to say. _ me i willjust have a quick one. ok. i was going to say, the important thing is you need to feed him. you need carbohydrates.— need carbohydrates. more food, i think. 0k. _ need carbohydrates. more food, i think. ok. i— need carbohydrates. more food, i think. ok, i order— need carbohydrates. more food, i think. ok, i order lunch. - need carbohydrates. more food, i think. ok, i order lunch. we - need carbohydrates. more food, i think. ok, i order lunch. we have not spent— think. ok, i order lunch. we have not spent much _ think. ok, i order lunch. we have not spent much time _ think. ok, i order lunch. we have not spent much time with - think. ok, i order lunch. we have not spent much time with other l think. ok, i order lunch. we have i not spent much time with other cast members but we spent time with them on the lawn show. amazing people on the programme this year. i am totally amazed by rose from eastenders. she is deaf. and the ability to be on the programme and talk about what it is like, as someone who is deaf. she hears the music in a different way. it someone who is deaf. she hears the music in a different way.— someone who is deaf. she hears the music in a different way. it made me c . she music in a different way. it made me cry- she said — music in a different way. it made me cry. she said she _ music in a different way. it made me cry. she said she can _ music in a different way. it made me cry. she said she can hear _ music in a different way. it made me cry. she said she can hear the - music in a different way. it made me cry. she said she can hear the music| cry. she said she can hear the music just different from how we hear it.
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this is how she's going to perform and dance, in her own way. it will be such an experience for her and all of us. mr; be such an experience for her and all of us. y . be such an experience for her and all of us. g . , be such an experience for her and allofus. g . ,., , all of us. my dad is profoundly deaf. all of us. my dad is profoundly deaf- for— all of us. my dad is profoundly deaf. for people _ all of us. my dad is profoundly deaf. for people who - all of us. my dad is profoundly deaf. for people who are - all of us. my dad is profoundly i deaf. for people who are hearing impaired or deaf, she has made a difference. part of the fun of strictly is making friends with people on the show. it is different this year but hopefully you will get to know each other well and spend time together because you will go through mad stuff. we have hundreds of messages on the strictly whatsapp group. a lot of it is really encouraging and getting to know each other. it is a big, weird programme you are sucked into. it is like living in a musical. it is great fun. i am really enjoying it so far. i great fun. i am really en'oying it so far. . . , ., .
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so far. i am glad you are en'oying it. i cannot — so far. i am glad you are en'oying it. i cannot wait * so far. i am glad you are en'oying it. i cannot wait for i so far. i am glad you are enjoying it. i cannot wait for saturday. - it. i cannot wait for saturday. on the it. i cannot wait for saturday. 0n the bbc — it. i cannot wait for saturday. on the bbc breakfast - it. i cannot wait for saturday. on the bbc breakfast settle i on the bbc breakfast settle saturday! and we will see you in the final. what time do we start training? like now. i have to finish the programme first. see you in a bit. programme first. see ouinabit. . the stars of the small screen turned out for the emmy awards, which has taken place in los angeles overnight. there was plenty of british success, with the royal netflix series the crown picking up five of the major awards — including for best drama. the apple comedy ted lasso was another of the night's big winners, as sophie long reports. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off
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one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare of easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. 0h! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. olivia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london
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in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh o'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. some big wins. you might be wondering why the chelsea flower show is taking place in september but everything has been affected by what we have been going through an carol is there this morning.
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looking lovely. it is. and i am joined by david dodd. you designed this garden, and tell us about it. the queen's green canopy is an initiative starting on the ist of october in celebration of the jubilee. it is encouraging everyone in the country to plant a tree. the importance, and highlighting the importance, and highlighting the importance of tree planting, creating canopies, better habitat for wildlife, climate change. all the benefits we will have if everyone plants a tree. tastes the benefits we will have if everyone plants a tree. was it quite different this _ everyone plants a tree. was it quite different this year _ everyone plants a tree. was it quite different this year because - everyone plants a tree. was it quite different this year because of - different this year because of course the show is taking place in autumn and not in may, to choose what you would plant? absolutely, the planting _ what you would plant? absolutely, the planting palette _ what you would plant? absolutely, the planting palette became - the planting palette became challenging because if you think in spring, everything comes out into bloom, and in autumn everything is
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starting to go into recession slightly. choosing plants that will look beautiful at this time of year. it is still a flower show. luckily there are varieties that look good in september. what do you have in the garden? we have four main zones and we have meadow, which is very low in biodiversity. we then go to the wild flower low in biodiversity. we then go to the wildflower meadow which is better for butterflies and insectss. and then woodland planting and the queen's green canopy, to encourage more planting is betterfor wildlife. more planting is better for wildlife. ., . ,. . wildlife. you had such a small amount of— wildlife. you had such a small amount of time _ wildlife. you had such a small amount of time which - wildlife. you had such a small amount of time which do - wildlife. you had such a small amount of time which do it i wildlife. you had such a small| amount of time which do it but wildlife. you had such a small. amount of time which do it but it looks like it has been here years. we take on two, three gardens at chelsea. it is incredibly stressful but we always try to reassure other designers and people we work with that it will happen. so far, after
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having done over 30 show gardens, we have never let anyone down. that having done over 30 show gardens, we have never let anyone down.— have never let anyone down. that is an achievement. _ have never let anyone down. that is an achievement. what _ have never let anyone down. that is an achievement. what will- have never let anyone down. that is an achievement. what will happen l have never let anyone down. that is| an achievement. what will happen to the garden at the end of the show? it is fantastic there is a legacy to the garden. the trees will go to rhs bridgwater. they will be planted permanently. this is a temporary show, but they will have a permanent home afterwards.— home afterwards. david, it looks fantastic. it _ home afterwards. david, it looks fantastic. it has _ home afterwards. david, it looks fantastic. it has been _ home afterwards. david, it looks fantastic. it has been a - home afterwards. david, it looks| fantastic. it has been a pleasure. it is notjust the garden that is fantastic, the weather is kind. the forecast for the next days is fairly settled with sunny spells. today there is cloud in london. yesterday we had a lot of rain in east anglia. you can see the cloud associated with that. in parts of east anglia they had almost a month's worth of rainfall during the day. from lincolnshire to the south coast and
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south east, a cloudy day ahead but still heavy showers knocking around. the bulk of the uk, a dry day with sunny spells. through the day, a weather front comes into the north west of scotland and northern ireland, introducing figure cloud and rain. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to 2! further south. this evening and overnight, a weather front over scotland and northern ireland move southwards getting into north wales, northern england. a band of cloud. any showers in the south—east will die away and for most a dry night. overnight lows between 9—13. tomorrow we start with a weather front pushing down towards the south—east, but a band of cloud will break up. most of the uk dry with sunny spells. a new weather front in
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the north—west will introduce figure cloud and some spots of rain with temperatures similar to what we are looking at today. tomorrow evening and overnight, low pressure across the north west. that will introduce stronger winds. wet and windy weather coming in during wednesday. getting as far south as southern scotland, northern england, north wales at the end of the day and behind it a mixture of sunshine and blustery showers. the head of it, cloud building through the day with temperatures up to about 20, 2! degrees. it has been such a pleasure to be back here at rhs chelsea flower show. autumn isjust as pretty as it is in may. thanks. we will see you tomorrow. it is great having carol back.
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matt is ok. so glad to get rid of him, so difficult to work with! fans of only fools and horses have been fondly remembering john challis, who has died at the age of 79. john played the used—car dealer boycie — known for his signature laugh and devious rivalry with the trotters. his co—star sir david jason led tributes to the actor, calling him a gentleman in the true sense of the word. let's look back at some ofjohn's best moments in the sitcom. marlene, have some sensitivity. don't talk about millions of pounds and big houses in front of del. ha—ha ha—ha ha! i've left the mercedes parked downstairs. you know what they're like on this estate, they'd have the wheels off a jumbo if it flew too low. i can't expect my wife to mix with all those ordinary patients. have you ever spent an evening in trigger�*s flat? it's like having a seance with mr bean. medals for road sweepers? good god, they'll be giving del boy an award for good taste, next.
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ha—ha ha—ha ha—ha! ha—ha ha—ha ha—ha ha! he was such a brilliant character. and we can now talk to broadcaster nick owen who was a good friend ofjohn challis. what i loved about that, while we were watching, i was watching you laughing along at the great lines. at marlene and the laughter. you had a long relationship withjohn. taste go a long relationship with john. we go back ruite a long relationship with john. we go back quite a — a long relationship with john. we go back quite a few _ a long relationship with john. we go back quite a few years _ a long relationship with john. we go back quite a few years and - a long relationship with john. we go back quite a few years and it - back quite a few years and it started when i interviewed him on tv ages ago and we hit it off immediately. he was football mad, cricket mad, as i am. and so we struck up a friendship. ultimately, our wives became close friends. and so we had terrific times together. it is really nice to be able to
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laugh and smile and see those sketches and his ridiculous laugh that he used to do for us. a wonderful thing, and at a time of great sadness it is wonderful to be able to smile.— great sadness it is wonderful to be able to smile. ~ . . , ,, . able to smile. what was he like away from television? _ able to smile. what was he like away from television? you _ able to smile. what was he like away from television? you went _ able to smile. what was he like away from television? you went on - from television? you went on holidays with him, what was he like to be with? he holidays with him, what was he like to be with? . . , holidays with him, what was he like to be with?— to be with? he was very pleasant com an . to be with? he was very pleasant company- he _ to be with? he was very pleasant company. he was _ to be with? he was very pleasant company. he was interesting, i to be with? he was very pleasant company. he was interesting, hej to be with? he was very pleasant - company. he was interesting, he had lots of interests in the world as well as show business. we talk to sport a lot. he was a really all—round good guy. an absolute gentleman. self—effacing. no airs and graces, feet on the ground. and very gratefulfor and graces, feet on the ground. and very grateful for what boycie gave him, although it has to be said he gave an enormous amount to boycie because he took the basic character and built him to something special with that laugh and a voice and so on. he wasjust with that laugh and a voice and so on. he was just an all—round good
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quy- on. he was just an all—round good guy. i am on. he was just an all—round good guy. lam privileged on. he was just an all—round good guy. i am privileged and proud to have called him a friend. it was a lovely 20 years or so of friendship. i treasure it. sally mentioned he went on holiday. was there a memorable trip to benidorm? itiat went on holiday. was there a memorable trip to benidorm? not so much a holiday _ memorable trip to benidorm? not so much a holiday as _ memorable trip to benidorm? not so much a holiday as joining _ memorable trip to benidorm? not so much a holiday as joining up - memorable trip to benidorm? not so much a holiday as joining up with - much a holiday as joining up with them when they were working on benidorm. they said you have to come out, it is a fabulous place and the cast are terrific. we joined them for a week in benidorm in their hotel which was the cast hotel. luckily i knew members of the cast anyway from people i have interviewed over the years. we had some great nights. boozy nights, it has to be said. going out to dinner with the cast. a table of 20 people. and we went on set with them. walking down the street withjohn and it was all right, boycie. all over spain. anywhere you went in this country, as well. when he had a
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day off we drove into the mountains of spain. we went to a hotel he said you have to see because there is someone you might know. and someone said how are you doing? it was terry venables. he was a wonderful guide to be with, as his his wife carol —— wonderful guy to be with. he can make us smile and laugh. the wonderful guy to be with. he can make us smile and laugh. the way you talk about him. _ make us smile and laugh. the way you talk about him. we _ make us smile and laugh. the way you talk about him. we are _ make us smile and laugh. the way you talk about him. we are used _ make us smile and laugh. the way you talk about him. we are used to - talk about him. we are used to seeing him in character. he seems to have been a down—to—earth man away from television. have been a down-to-earth man away from television.— from television. absolutely. he lived a normal _ from television. absolutely. he lived a normal life. _ from television. absolutely. he lived a normal life. he - from television. absolutely. he lived a normal life. he was - from television. absolutely. he lived a normal life. he was a i lived a normal life. he was a popular and well—known figure in his community. he lives not farfrom ludlow and people loved him because he was approachable. and so unaware of his outrageous fame. he would be recognised all over the english—speaking world. that sitcom used to get 2a million people
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sometimes. unheard—of these days. an astonishing figure. he was really very good company. and the way he created boycie and turned it into something special and an integral part of probably the most popular sitcom of all time says a lot for his acting ability and ability to turn something into a special part. so well known and so well loved as of coursejimmy so well known and so well loved as of course jimmy greaves so well known and so well loved as of coursejimmy greaves is, someone you knew. somebody my dad loved, i loved, who appealed to so many across the generations and beautiful tributes to jimmy greaves as well. it has been a desperately sad weekend. jimmy was a very good friend. we worked closely together from the late 70s when he started becoming a pundit. i worked with him on itv sport and he became a regular
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on itv sport and he became a regular on tv am and also in the world cup and other things we did on itv sport. my panel for the world cup semifinal in 1990 was gordon banks, geoff hurst and jimmy greaves. imagine sitting alongside that lot when you are a football fan as i am. i used to watchjimmy as a player, coming from not far from london, outside luton. if they were away my father would take me to spurs, west ham, chelsea and arsenal. to see him at spurs, the way the crowd went when he touched the ball. a wonderful player to watch. and i worked with him closely and he was a captain on a game show i did with him. we used to get 14 million for that, a fantastic experience. so many other things. some very happy memories. a regular pundit on various football programmes i did and a regular contributor to our
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good morning programme. he had a terrible few years after a serious stroke. we knew his end was not far away, as withjohn. for them both to go within hours on sunday morning, a very sad weekend for me and many people because they were both such incredibly popular figures. thank ou so incredibly popular figures. thank you so much _ this is bbc news with the latest headlines. crisis talks on soaring gas prices — the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet. are you worried about your energy company going bust, the price of your bills, or your gas supply?
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i'd love to hearfrom you this morning —

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