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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 20, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. crisis talks on soaring gas prices in the uk as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet. are you worried about your energy company going bust, the price of your bills, or your gas supply? i'd love to hearfrom you this morning — you can tweet me @annita—mcveigh, using #bbcyourquestions. a gunman has opened fire
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inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire in england. a volcano has erupted on the spanish canary island of la palma forcing the evacuation of some villages. a two—kilometre—wide exclusion zone has been set up around the volcano. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama. olivia coleman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. for the first time in its 108 year history, chelsea flower show is being held in september and it is already filling up with celebrities, the world media and royalty as well, and they are all here to see these spectacular gardens and we will show you them later.
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the uk government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to energy companies, many of which are on the brink of collapse because of soaring gas prices. today we've heard that the country s sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds as it battles to stay afloat amid surging energy prices. the company has 1.7 million customers. wholesale gas prices have risen by 250% since january, after a cold winter put pressure on europe's supplies and reduced levels of stored gas. there has also been increased competition for liquefied natural gas, particularly from countries in asia which also experienced cold weather.
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some firms, particularly the smaller ones, are now in trouble, because the high cost of gas means they can't afford to sell it to customers at the prices they promised them. ministers are due to hold more talks today with industry leaders to try to solve the crisis. speaking as he arrived in new york ahead of the the un general assembly, the prime minister said it was a temporary global problem that would be resolved as economies got back up and running after the pandemic. this is really a function of the world economy waking up after covid. so gas in particular is very much in demand in asia, in china, malaysia, other parts of asia, lng in particular. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself
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out as the world economy gets back on its feet. right now though, it's having major knock—on effects in other parts of the economy including food production. 0ur correspondent katy austin reports. the price of natural gas — a key source of the energy which heats our homes and powers our industries — has soared. it's a global issue with causes including high demand. the price has gone up so much that some smaller energy suppliers have gone bust. there are fears more will follow. the regulator 0fgem says it's working to ensure consumers continue to be protected. the business secretary held crisis meetings with the industry at the weekend, and there will be further talks today. because the industry forecasts ahead, we can see that this is a peak and then we expect prices come down in the spring. so, really, conversations are about how we manage a very tight autumn/winter period and the specific impacts we think that these prices will have on industry.
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another knock—on impact of energy being so expensive is that production has been halted at two large fertiliser plants in england. they make carbon dioxide as a by—product, and that is used widely by food producers — for example, in meat production and packaging. some manufacturers and supermarkets have warned of shortages if the problem isn't urgently resolved. iceland says it's not seeing problems yet, but the situation is a concern. 0ur supply chain are building up an additional 1—2 week stock — particularly on key lines that they're worried about, such as frozen meats — just to ensure that if the c02 crisis does last any longer than a few days — or, indeed weeks — we will be able to keep servicing our stores and ultimately our customers. the government's spoken with the company which runs the fertiliser plants, to discuss options around getting them going again. food businesses say the carbon dioxide disruption couldn't have come at a worse time,
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with the supply chain already under pressure as they struggle to get enough workers and lorry drivers. wholesale gas prices are unlikely to come down just yet, and eventually they could feed through into higher energy bills for households. katy austin, bbc news. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming explained the challenges facing the uk government when it tries to work out how to respond to the issue later. the government's preferred outcome is that the market takes care of it and if an energy supplier is in distress then it either gets bought up by someone else and they solve the problem, or the next stage is if that company goes bust, the customers are given to another supplier that is more stable and they take them over but the problem with that is it is not an appealing prospect for bigger energy companies because taking on those new customers is quite expensive because of the cost of gas at the moment, and then you have the energy price cap, a limit to how much
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they can charge customers, so there is some pressure there. and then 0fgem could come in and appoint special administrators to take over struggling firms, but that is only designed to happen once in a blue moon so that bit of the system is under pressure as well, so they have to come up with a plan c with the industry to deal with the sheer number of companies finding themselves in trouble. so that's the first thing they are trying to do — ensure the integrity of the system as a whole. secondly they have to address the chance of people who do transfer suppliers being hit by much higher bills as a result of the transfer, and that is something that the energy secretary kwasi kwarteng is said to be very concerned about. so those are the two challenges the government is going to try to address with lots of the energy companies who they are meeting at 11 o'clock today. here with me now is
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henry edwardes—evans, who is an energy analyst at the energy and commodities information provider s&p global platts. so many questions from our reviewers about this —— from viewers about this story. why are we in this situation first of all? if this story. why are we in this situation first of all?- this story. why are we in this situation first of all? if we look from a supplier _ situation first of all? if we look from a supplier perspective - situation first of all? if we look from a supplier perspective it | situation first of all? if we look| from a supplier perspective it is because they are wholesale gas and power costs have gone up so much recently. they are tied... variable tariff customers are tied to this. they are unable to push up their own tariffs to reflect the increasing costs in the wholesale market, which have gone through the roof in recent weeks and months.— have gone through the roof in recent weeks and months. some companies have hedged —
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weeks and months. some companies have hedged against _ weeks and months. some companies have hedged against this _ weeks and months. some companies have hedged against this so - weeks and months. some companies have hedged against this so why - have hedged against this so why haven't we all done that? the? have hedged against this so why haven't we all done that? they all haven't we all done that? they all have done — haven't we all done that? they all have done that _ haven't we all done that? they all have done that and _ haven't we all done that? they all have done that and they - haven't we all done that? they all have done that and they can - haven't we all done that? they all have done that and they can do i haven't we all done that? they all. have done that and they can do that for their fixed cost tariffs but as we are hearing the average supplier may have 50—60% of customers on fixed tariffs which they can hedge against, clearly. if they have a lump of customers on variable tariffs then they are restrained from pushing up those tariffs to reflect costs. by the price cap. then they find themselves in trouble because not only do they have to carry those costs through the winter when demand goes up, but they also have costs related to that where they have to put up collateral to meet imbalances on a day—to—day basis and that can be very expensive for a supplier. this basis and that can be very expensive for a summer-— for a supplier. this level of competition _ for a supplier. this level of competition has _ for a supplier. this level of competition has been - for a supplier. this level of i competition has been actively encouraged by politicians and the government. is this a sign that this
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level of competition simply does not work in this market? it is level of competition simply does not work in this market?— work in this market? it is a very competitive _ work in this market? it is a very competitive market _ work in this market? it is a very competitive market and - work in this market? it is a very competitive market and we - work in this market? it is a very competitive market and we do i work in this market? it is a very i competitive market and we do see failure is when wholesale prices go up. we have seen this several times before. we have not seen the wholesale price go up so steep and to such high levels before. so the fear is we will see many more failures than in the past. as your correspondent rightly said, other energy suppliers will not be keen to take on customers of failed suppliers because of the price cap and the inability of their tariffs to respond to the rise in prices. we could see in the talks today, a lot of pressure on the government to come up with some kind of bailout for suppliers to get through the winter and into next year when everyone assumes wholesale prices will start to come down again. for
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our viewers _ will start to come down again. for our viewers watching this, should they be worried about their energy supply and should they be worried if they have been on a good tariff, which ever one they are moved onto with a different company perhaps, will not be as good and they will have to pay more?— will not be as good and they will have to pay more? nobody should be worried about — have to pay more? nobody should be worried about the _ have to pay more? nobody should be worried about the physical— worried about the physical infrastructure and the ability of the infrastructure to supply your household with gas and electricity. the regulator does protect us all with a kind of supplier of last resort mechanism so if our supplier goes bust they guarantee that our supply will continue. in terms of prices in future, i think we should all be worried by this. the transition to renewables is slow and lumpy and the uk still uses a lot of gas for electricity generation as
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well, over 40% of electricity here comes from gas. so if this kind of price inflation is seen again in future then our tariffs will have to reflect the increasing cost of getting gas into our households because there is less investment going into gas infrastructure and more going into renewables. you can see the cycle of this kind of thing happening in winter if we don't have major gas storage ability and we don't have new upstream assets coming online. a higher gas price in future could be something we have to get used to. future could be something we have to net used to. ., future could be something we have to get used te— get used to. compare for us the situation the _ get used to. compare for us the situation the uk _ get used to. compare for us the situation the uk finds _ get used to. compare for us the situation the uk finds itself - get used to. compare for us the situation the uk finds itself in l situation the uk finds itself in with other parts of the world. as the uk doing about the same or worse in terms of gas storage, for example, in terms of the supplies that it has? it
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example, in terms of the supplies that it has?— that it has? it is interesting that we have seen — that it has? it is interesting that we have seen both _ that it has? it is interesting that we have seen both spain - that it has? it is interesting that we have seen both spain and i that it has? it is interesting that i we have seen both spain and italy looking at intervention as well because of the rising retail rates. if your market is reliant on gas to a large extent for heating, cooking, also electricity, this rising gas prices now a political issue and we have seen it come to the fore, particularly in spain where the government has intervened and clawed some of the previous carbon money which companies had made from the carbon market in order to cut retail rates for domestic users. in italy where they use a lot of gas for power generation they are looking to do something similar. it is notjust the uk, it is happening across europe. at the moment, the uk is uniquely exposed because we are an island system and our electricity is often quite reliant on imports from france. last week there was a fire
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in france and it reduced our options during a period of very low wind generation. we are facing increased burning of gas power stations when the cost of gas is very high. electricity prices have gone up several fold electricity prices have gone up severalfold in electricity prices have gone up several fold in the last few months. thank you for talking us through that. lets read some of the tweets you have sent. i am with bulb, the uk's sixth largest energy company, and have not had any update from them regarding the bailout. worried about the price going up. this from jenny, energy prices will have an impact on me, i am disabled, energy prices will have an impact on me, iam disabled, 90% energy prices will have an impact on me, i am disabled, 90% bedbound, energy prices will have an impact on me, iam disabled, 90% bedbound, and my pension was all taken from social
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services as contribution for my care costs. another viewer, my gas will costs. another viewer, my gas will cost 77% more per unit, i am horrified. keep your tweets coming in and i will try to read out as many as possible. there's been a shooting at a university in western russia and eight people are reported to have been killed. the incident happened at perm state university, in the urals, where a young man reportedly opened fire inside the university building. police wounded and detained the attacker, who's believed to be a student. 0ur correspondent steve rosenberg is in moscow. what more can you tell us? this is what we know _ what more can you tell us? this is what we know so _ what more can you tell us? this is what we know so far, _ what more can you tell us? this is what we know so far, about - what more can you tell us? this is what we know so far, about 11 - what we know so far, about 11 o'clock in the morning local time a young man walked onto the campus of
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perm state university armed with a gun and began shooting and it is then believed he went inside the buildings. reports of students and teachers barricading themselves inside that building, mobile phone footage shows other students jumping to safety from windows. police said they wounded and detained the attacker, other reports suggested he was killed. there is no confirmation of that. police have opened an investigation into the shootings. it also emerged that the attacker allegedly left a long post on social media before the shooting. when you read through it, it is quite chilling. he explains in large detail how he went about obtaining a weapon, all the medical tests,
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medical checks he went through to get this weapon, and how he was consumed by hatred and wanted to cause pain to people since primary school. quite a chilling read. it has now been deleted, i believe, from the internet.— from the internet. thank you for that update- _ the headlines on bbc news... crisis talks on soaring gas prices in the uk — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire in england. france has cancelled a meeting between its armed forces minister and the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, amid the diplomatic row prompted by the new security
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alliance agreed by britain, the us and australia. paris has been angered by australia's withdrawal from a contract to buy submarines. the foreign office minister, james cleverly, says he's confident that relations with france will improve. all bilateral relationships go through periods of tension. that is the inevitability of relationships, just as it is on a personal level. i have absolutely no doubt that ultimately our relationship with france will endure, but this is about making sure that we have a really strong defence relationship with two very, very important defence partners. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to urge her iranian counterpart to release british nationals being held in the country, when they meet in new york later. about a dozen western dual nationals are detained in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. caroline hawley�*s report contains some distressing images.
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elika ashoori makes macaroons and cakes for a living, treats for other people's celebrations, but her own wedding is on hold, her whole life consumed by her father's arrest. i have to always throw myself into my work to not think about it too much because it drives me crazy. he was never political. he was a mechanical engineer with a love of astronomy. throughout his entire life he has put me and my brother first. but in august in 2017, while visiting his elderly mother in tehran, anoosheh ashoori was thrown into iran's notorious evin jail, one of around a dozen westerners being held in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. their families describe them as hostages being used by iranian authorities for political and financial leverage with the west. evin is notorious for being horrific. each room is shared by 15—20 people.
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they have rats and cockroaches all the time. he was interrogated very, very heavily. they threatened to hurt us throughout the interrogations. they told my dad that they knew where we lived, where we worked, what pets we had. my dad was saying, "i have nothing to confess to you." twice he tried to take his own life because he thought that if he was out of the equation, then they would not be able to hurt us. last month, cctv footage from inside evin was hacked into and leaked. former inmates say it shows the outside world just a small glimpse of what the jail is like. elika fears her father will not get out until iran and the uk strike a bargain for his release. i mean, he is 67 now and he has been there forfour years, for having done nothing. who will be answerable to that? elika's father always supported everything she did.
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the nature of my business is constantly to talk to people about weddings, birthdays and to be excited for them. and that is why it was very difficult at first for me to do myjob. i didn't want to make things for happy people, as horrible as it sounds. now i use my business and i use my cakes to focus on people's happiness because it is kind of like a beam of hope. in her head she keeps planning the ultimate cake, the one she will make to eventually welcome him home. caroline hawley, bbc news. some 12—15—year—olds in parts of england and scotland are expected to begin receiving covid vaccines today. teenage vaccinations are also due to start shortly in northern ireland and early next month in wales. millions of older and vulnerable people will also be contacted to arrange their booster shots. more from our health correspondent,
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katharine da costa. having waited for older age groups to be vaccinated, the uk's12—to—15—year—olds are next in line to be offered a jab. some scottish health boards will start administering pfizer vaccines at drop—in clinics from today. those still making up their minds can choose to wait for an appointment later this month. while the risk to you being severely ill may well be low, we want to make sure every single 12—15—year—old is protected — and not only protected themselves, but also, as they go to school, it helps to protect hopefully their teachers and others that they interact with at school too. at some schools in england, where permission forms have been sent back, nhs staff are expected to begin immunising teenagers from today, with most likely to start later this week. the decision over whether to vaccinate the over—12s has been finely balanced because young people are at very low risk from covid. while data has shown a very small chance of teenagers suffering from heart inflammation after the pfizer vaccine,
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catching covid also increases the risk of developing myocarditis. last week, the uk's four chief medical officers said 12—to—15—year—olds should be offered a jab to help protect their education and mental health. i think it is really about recognising that, not only is the vaccine helpful for young people to reduce the risk to their health and to educational disruption, but there's also contributing to trying to get through this pandemic, where we still have high rates of infection in the community and younger people taking up a vaccine will contribute to reducing those over time. elderly care—home residents who are most at risk from the virus are being prioritised for booster shots. england and wales have already made a start, while scotland begins its campaign today, and northern ireland's roll—out�*s due later this month. health and social care workers, the over—50s and younger adults with underlying health conditions will also be eligible six months after their second jab.
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the nhs in england and wales will start contacting people by text or letter this week. vaccinations will play a central role in helping the uk to navigate what some fear could be a difficult winter ahead. katharine da costa, bbc news. let's speak to joanna rea, director of advocacy for the uk committee of unicef. this debate, we have gone backwards and forwards on the question of whether some countries should be getting booster vaccinations while some parts of the world, people haven't received their first vaccination. what is your view? many eo - le vaccination. what is your view? many people across — vaccination. what is your view? many people across the _ vaccination. what is your view? many people across the uk _ vaccination. what is your view? many people across the uk will _ vaccination. what is your view? ij�*isfiy people across the uk will benefit from the booster programme, particularly people vulnerable in their health. we are concerned about their health. we are concerned about the widening gap in vaccine roll—out
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between rich companies like the uk and low and middle income countries. about 80% of the population here have received two vaccinations. in some companies like tenure and tanzania, it is lower than —— countries like kenya and tanzania it is 5%. we want a commitment to share surplus vaccines whether the world because that is how we get everybody out of this pandemic. if we do not do that, we risk more variants and future lock downs and risking loss of life and livelihood and devastation to economies. unicef are worried about the wider impact of this pandemic around the world. millions of children are still out of schools and have not been in school for over a year. health clinics are overwhelmed because they don't have staff to provide basic routine services like routine immunisations so we are concerned
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there could be measles outbreaks in countries which could cause more child deaths than coronavirus. health systems are overwhelmed. if we want to end this pandemic everywhere we need to get the vaccine around the world to countries that need it and into the arms of vulnerable people who need those vaccines now.— those vaccines now. their inequalities _ those vaccines now. their inequalities are _ those vaccines now. their inequalities are clearly i those vaccines now. their i inequalities are clearly huge. those vaccines now. their _ inequalities are clearly huge. where are we on pledges made by various governments, wealthier governments, to deliver doses of vaccines to developing countries? the to deliver doses of vaccines to developing countries?- to deliver doses of vaccines to developing countries? the g7 made an ambitious commitment _ developing countries? the g7 made an ambitious commitment earlier- developing countries? the g7 made an ambitious commitment earlier in - developing countries? the g7 made an ambitious commitment earlier in the i ambitious commitment earlier in the year and is part of that the uk government committed to give 100 million vaccines around the world and into next year. we would like to see governments accelerating the volume and pace of sharing of those vaccines and the uk government to deliver that commitment this year in 2021. world leaders are meeting in new york this week, it is a big week at the un, the prime minister has
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arrived and the new foreign secretary has arrived and they will speak about this very issue. we understand president biden is meeting world leaders on wednesday to talk about this. we need bold and ambitious action from countries with surplus vaccines to start sharing them now and there has to be a consistent and constant supply through the art getting too low and middle income countries. if we don't do that then the risks are high for everyone and we simply won't put an end to this pandemic anywhere. your messaue is end to this pandemic anywhere. your message is clearly _ end to this pandemic anywhere. your message is clearly then as if it is not for altruistic reasons then it is for self interest. we not for altruistic reasons then it is for self interest.— not for altruistic reasons then it is for self interest. we have to put an end to this _ is for self interest. we have to put an end to this virus _ is for self interest. we have to put an end to this virus as _ is for self interest. we have to put an end to this virus as soon - is for self interest. we have to put an end to this virus as soon as - is for self interest. we have to put an end to this virus as soon as we | an end to this virus as soon as we can because we are still in the middle of a global pandemic and while it might be like in the uk we are starting to emerge from this it is still a huge problem in many countries around the world and
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simply will not end until it ends everywhere for everyone and so it is in the uk's interests to do this, in the interest of all rich countries, but it is the right thing to do as well because we know how to put an end to this, the fastest way out is sharing vaccines and rich countries are in a position to do that. is there anyway of the production of vaccines being stepped up to try to speed up this process and the logistics of getting those working better to deliver vaccines to countries where they are needed? we countries where they are needed? - need all of this to work together, logistics, making sure countries have trained staff to administer the vaccine, a consistent supply so countries are able to absorb the vaccines they are receiving and getting them around the country, it all needs to work together. we know we have vaccines available that could be shared right now and that needs to start happening as quickly
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as possible. needs to start happening as quickly as ossible. ., ~' , ., the world health organisation has appointed the former uk prime minister, gordon brown, an ambassador for global health financing. mr brown has said he wants to avoid a situation where rich countries are throwing away millions of doses of covid vaccines, which are past their use—by dates, while the poorest countries are desperate for supplies. a murder investigation has been launched after four people were found dead at a house in derbyshire in england. police were called to a property in killamarsh near sheffield yesterday after concerns were raised about the people living there. a man has been arrested and police say they're not looking for anyone else in connection with the deaths. specially—trained officers from derbyshire police are liaising with the families of the deceased. police in scotland are searching for a seven—year—old boy who has been missing
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since sunday evening. carson shepherd was last seen in the afton bridgend area of new cumnock in east ayrshire. the police helicopter, marine and dog units, and scottish fire and rescue service water support unit are all involved in looking for the child. in the us, teams searching for missing 22—year—old gabby petito have found a body they say matches her description in a national park in the state of wyoming. ms petito's not been seen since her boyfriend brian laundri, returned home from a cross—country trip without her. he's wanted by police who've named him a person of interest. 0fficers involved in the discovery said they're awaiting the results of forensic testing. earlier today, human remains were discovered consistent with the description of gabrielle �*gabby�* petito. full forensic identification has not been completed to confirm 100% that we found gabby but her family has been notified of this discovery. the cause of death has not been
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determined at this time. the headlines on bbc news: crisis talks on soaring gas prices in the uk — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire in england. a volcano has erupted on the spanish canary island of la palma — forcing the evacuation of some villages. a two—kilometre—wide exclusion zone has been set up around the volcano.
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domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama and olivia coleman is named best actress for her portrayal of the queen, on a big night of british success. and coming up: the chelsea flower show begins this week — the first time the event's ever been held in autumn, after being rescheduled from earlier this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. spain's prime minister has told residents of la palma in the canary islands that their safety is guaranteed after a volcano erupted there for the first time in 50 years. pedro sanchez postponed a trip to the un in new york to go to the island where villages have been evacuated and homes destroyed. courtney bembridge has more. for the first time in half a century, the cumbre vieja volcano
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erupted — with molten rock shooting hundreds of metres into the sky, and incandescent orange rivers flowing down the hillside. the island has been on high alert for the past week because of a huge increase in tremors — and thousands of people were told to leave their homes. the eruption started in the afternoon — plumes of smoke could be seen from across the island, and eyewitnesses described hearing a loud explosion. the noise coming from the volcano — it sounds like — i don't know — 20 fighterjets taking off right now, and it's extremely loud. translation: i don't know how to exlain it. translation: i don't know how to expiain it- it _ translation: i don't know how to explain it. it was _ translation: i don't know how to explain it. it was powerful. - translation: i don't know how to explain it. it was powerful. i- translation: i don't know how to explain it. it was powerful. i could | explain it. it was powerful. i could not imagine it would be so sudden. roads were quickly cut off and soldiers were deployed to get people
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out. prime minister pedro sanchez arrived in la palma after postponing his trip to new york for the united nations' general assembly this week. translation: we are very mindful of the fires that — translation: we are very mindful of the fires that can _ translation: we are very mindful of the fires that can break _ translation: we are very mindful of the fires that can break out _ translation: we are very mindful of the fires that can break out after - the fires that can break out after these eruptions so we have deployed these eruptions so we have deployed the civil guard, national police and firefighters and also the military emergency unit and i recognise the work the red cross are doing feeding and looking after those who have been forced from their homes. experts say it's not clear how long the eruption will last, and it's going to be an anxious wait for residents. courtney bembridge, bbc news. thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks. most courses will be offering a mixture of face—to—face and online learning. here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley.
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i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. we're just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. over the next few weeks, manchester will welcome more than 70,000 uni students to the city. i got a free t—shirt? i got a bucket hat from fancy. it'sjust fun, you know, just getting a vibe back from the two—year break we've had in lockdown. and, you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that uni feeling. meet the freshers elly, keira and lola. i left everything last—minute, so i was literally packing till, like, midnight. woke up, carried on packing and then got everything in the car, had a little cry when i said goodbye to my mum. it's the start of a new chapter. because of the pandemic, many students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home. did a few virtual tours, but that was it, really. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, "what if i get up there and i hate it?" it could be completely, like, out of my depth. but, no, i'm loving it so far.
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i went to uni last year— and i studied a different course, it was quite similar. but, obviously, being. a creative course online, it was just so difficult. like, we weren't getting to use the facilities, - we weren't getting the one—to—one learning we should have got. - like, already, i was saying i've had a better week... _ not even a week — the last two days. i've already met - so many more people. i feel, like, so much more i passionate about my course. i'm enjoying it so much more. so, yeah, ithink i made the best decision i could have. _ at many universities across england, lectures on campus are back, and face coverings are no longer mandatory, but students are advised to do covid tests regularly. the idea of future restrictions is still a concern. i hope it doesn't happen again. they did say, yesterday, in the lecture... they said they've got a plan if it does happen. if we get put into lockdown. no, none of that! because i am from quite a small town, i knew that even - i being in lockdown here would bel somewhat better than down there, so i was like, as a whole, may as well go for it. - covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life.
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we were stuck in a tiny, tiny little house with so many people when it started. that wasn't fun. got into a lot of arguments. with fees of £9,000 a year, and living costs, these third—year students feel out of pocket. i think we should have some compensation for... either teaching orfor the accommodation, because a lot of the rooms didn't get lived in, so people going back to their families, if they're shielding, orwhatever. a lot of uni—based accommodation i have tried to give a bit of moneyl back, but a lot of private things — l obviously, what we were in lastl year — haven't done anything. and when we weren't living in that house for something like six - months or so of the year, we were still paying - rent every month. cherie is a second—year sociology student. thank you. she first went to university at 18, but had to drop out. in the middle of the year, i sadly lost my mum. it was a really difficult time and that made me become a young carerfor my brothers. that's on the third floor... at the age of 23, cherie decided to go back. but the pandemic meant she wasn't
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able to experience university life. she is now part of a support group to help students who are struggling. last year was quite difficult, to be honest, in terms especially for mental health. like, it was quite isolating. ifeel like, as people, we like to have connections and stuff. having that aspect taken away last year, we could definitely see how some people actually struggled. there are amazing charities out there who are willing to help lots of different people. if someone was to tell me that five or six years ago, cherie, you are going to be smiling, you are going to go back to uni and be having the time of your life, i would have thought they would be lying, because when you are in that moment in time, you don't think positively at all, because you are just taking in everything. but i always tell people to take it easy, take their time with it, and just to be kinder to themselves. freshers' week marks the start of university life — a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many
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returning back to university. news coming in from police in scotland, good news that that seven—year—old missing boy, missing since sunday evening, has been found safe and well. carson shepherd was reported missing from new cumnock in east ayrshire on sunday evening and the local police division posting on twitter we are pleased to report that seven—year—old carson shepherd has been found safe and well. king willem—alexander of the netherlands has inaugurated a monument dedicated to all the dutch victims of the holocaust — at a ceremony in amsterdam. it lists 122,000 jewish people who were killed by the nazis — as well as more than 200 sinti and roma. the bbc�*s tim allman reports. the holocaust was a crime committed in so many places, with so many victims.
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more than 100,000 of them are named here. the first such memorial in the netherlands dedicated to a dark chapter in the country's history. translation: this monument confronts us with the criminal _ murder of thousands, murdered for no other reason than their identity. in doing so, the monument also demands accountability. accountability as to whether more should have been done during the war years to save those who were murdered. the netherlands was occupied for much of the second world war with three quarters of the country's jewish population killed, most by the nazis but some by local collaborators, a difficult legacy to deal with. the king met with some of the survivors, fitted next to the wall where the victims'
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names were inscribed. translation: i thought it was emotional. - i just saw the name of a friend of mine, not anne frank or anyone famous, but a friend of mine and i found it hard to read. i knew she was dead of course. i still have a picture of her at home. as one survivor put it, this monument is a tribute that can never be erased and a warning that can never be forgotten. tim allman, bbc news. canadians go to the polls on monday in an election taking place two years early. prime ministerjustin trudeau called the snap poll last month, seeking to capitalise on public approval for his handling of the covid—19 pandemic to form a majority government, but the latest opinion poll points to an extremely tight race, with mr trudeau virtually neck—and—neck with his conservative rival erin o'toole. from montreal, samira hussain reports.
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in the remaining hours of the campaign, prime minister justin trudeau is in his element, greeting voters, his charm on full display — but it wasn't always this much fun. it's many canadians are just plain frustrated, worried about the economy, the vaccine mandates, that this election was even called in the first place. some of that anger has come out in very un—canadian ways. for many struggling to keep their livelihoods intact and open, mr trudeau's decision to hold canada's second election in less than two years feels like an unwanted distraction. i have so many worries right now. everyday is a worry. we are not through the pandemic, so do i have enough mental space and heart space to even worry about the elections? we are still in small business
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worrying about keeping the doors open, staying in business. the son of a former prime minister, mr trudeau carries the most famous name in canadian politics, but he also carries the burden of canada's liberal history and is coming up against some very modern conservative energy. the leader of the conservative party — and mr trudeau's main challenger — is painting him as a politician born with a silver spoon in his mouth. every canadian has met a justin trudeau in their lives — privileged, entitled, and always looking out for number one. he was looking out for number one when he called this expensive and unnecessary election in the middle of the pandemic. here in western canada support for the conservatives is strongest but the election is not top of mind for farmers who are dealing with some of the driest conditions on record. this is a long way from the country's political heartland. how can they help? they cannot make it rain,
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they cannot make the feed grow, so if somebody gives us some money all it does is now your bale of hay that was $100 is $120. justin trudeau decided to have this election betting that he could turn his apparent success leading canada through the pandemic into a bigger majority and a firmer hold on power, but it is not entirely clear that that bet will actually pay off, such is canada's disillusionment with this election. it is even possible he may lose power altogether. samira hussein, bbc news, montreal. folic acid is to be added to flour across the uk, to reduce the risk of life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. the government said the move could prevent up to 200 birth defects every year. the new rules will only apply to non—wholemeal wheat flour, with gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour exempt. kate steele is the chief executive of the charity shine, which campaigns for families
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affected by spina bifida. earlier she told me about the difficulties around making sure women get enough folic acid. there are lots of unplanned pregnancies across the uk but also the message that we really need to be getting across is that folic acid supplements need to be taken at least eight weeks prior to pregnancy, not once a woman is pregnant, so it is a really important decision that the government has taken today to get folic acid into flour to build up those levels that women need. what if someone doesn't eat products containing flour? what do you say then? because obviously a lot of people will be eating bread, most people have that in their diet, so this is a way of getting folic acid boosted, but what if someone doesn't eat products containing flour? well, i am sure that somewhere along the line somebody will be eating
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products containing flour because it is notjust in bread, but equally there is naturally—occurring folate in some other vegetables, like brussel sprouts and broccoli, so there are opportunities for them to get folic acid that they need but not in the quantities that they need. there are of course other sources as you say. based on your research, about this condition, spina bifida, and other issues relating to the spine, how important is folic acid in preventing these conditions? it is absolutely huge. we have not actually done the research ourselves in terms of folic acid. that research was done 30 years ago, so 30 years ago this year since the medical research council
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published its research into folic acid, so people do not know why spina bifida occurs but what has been proven is that folic acid can help reduce the incidence of spina bifida. kate steele, chief executive of the charity shine. the headlines on bbc news: crisis talks on soaring gas prices in the uk — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. a murder investigation is launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire in england. the netflix drama the crown and the apple tv plus comedy ted lasso have been the big winners
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at the emmy awards in los angeles. america's tv academy was holding its first in—person event since the pandemic. sophie long reports. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare of easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow
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nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. oh! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. olivia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh o'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed
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them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. the entertainmentjournalist clare o'reilly said it was an extraordinarily successful evening for british talent. more than half of the awards went to british talent. the british scene has been reigning supreme for the last few years so i think it was a fairly safe bet. which of those were the most predictable? i think kate winslet, olivia colman as well. the surprise of the night that gave the most raucous applause of all was michaela coel who was the first black winner in the limited anthology writing award. she looked absolutely fantastic.
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her speech to advise fellow writers to write what scares you and she dedicated her award to survivors of sexual abuse. she was the outstanding winnerfor me. how diverse was this whole process? notjust the nominees but the eventual winners. that is where we come slightly unstuck unfortunately. not a single acting gong for anyone of colour despite plentiful nominations. the first time a trans woman had been nominated. the nominations were there but the winners didn't come. is that something that has to be looked at? of course it needs to be looked at but what is actively being done to examine why this happens?
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a more diverse set of nominees but not being reflected in the actual winners. that is a problem the industry itself needs to look at. it is not a box ticking exercise. why are they not coming through? who is to say? the talent is there and the nominations are plentiful, but the awards themselves it was predominantly white awards, caucasian awards, as it has been. it is changing but not fast enough. apart from michaela coel what was the best moment of all of this for you? any time kate winslet wins an award she free wheels her speech. the same with olivia colman. we learned last night that her father passed away during the pandemic, and she is retiring from the crown this year,
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her role is being taken over. for the first time in more than a century, the chelsea flower show is being held in september. the finishing touches, a finalflourish, the pressure to get itjust right. chelsea is looking autumnal. the change in date this year means late—summer flowers like asters and dahlias are in their prime. and a september show gives designers a chance to display a warmer and grassier look. here, it's all about the trees. david dodd has designed the queen's green canopy garden to celebrate next year's platinum jubilee. we've got a field maple here and the field maple just gives the most spectacular yellow colour. and you can see it is already starting to turn now. it sits on the largest plot at chelsea.
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21 trees have been planted with grassland, hay bales and a wildflower meadow. if everyone can get behind the campaign and plant a tree, we can make a huge impact and a huge difference to the environment. and you've got to think about what trees give us. and when i was asked to do it, i got very excited, because i'm a bit of a tree hugger. and just finally, do you think the queen would like this garden? i certainly hope so. i might be off to the tower if she doesn't. the autumnal look is everywhere, with a focus on harvest fruit and vegetables. an autumn chelsea will have a different feel and a different mood. but the show also hopes to capture that love of gardening and the outdoors that many of us discovered during lockdowns. giant window boxes in the cop26 garden to mark the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year. the message — even if you don't have a garden, planting small flowers and shrubs
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can help combat the effects of climate change. and a tribute to nursing in the florence nightingale garden, marking 200 years since her birth. there are medicinal flowers here with a focus on wellbeing. and late—summer foxgloves — her favourite flower — ready to plant. some special guests got an early viewing, but these nurses will also be able to enjoy the garden after the flower show, when it's moved to st thomas' hospital in london. florence nightingale was very much a forward—thinking nurse. a lot of what we do today is very much embedded in what she taught us — nursing at the forefront, and, you know, that's where we still are. it's a privilege. i think, for a lot of nurses, i think they'll be overwhelmed by it, if i'm really honest, and they'll be really proud to see someone saying thank you for all the hard work they've done. a chelsea flower show in september has brought its challenges for everyone involved. it's likely to be a one—off chance
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to enjoy the unfamiliar sights an autumn show brings. daniella relph, bbc news, chelsea. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. we saw some lovely sunrises this morning, but the fog has been there during the rush hour. we start the week with a ridge of high pressure. it is all change for the north of the uk. this is the ridge of high pressure and this weather front brought a couple of inches of rain in places on sunday and led to some local flooding. the chance we could see some sharp showers through the day ahead. further north and west a weak weather front will bring patchy rain so the sunshine diminishes here although it stays bright in the east of scotland
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with plenty of good spells of sunshine elsewhere. still feeling warm. overnight quite chilly and once again through the night as the showers fade and the cloud tends to break up elsewhere it will turn a little chilly in towns and cities but in rural areas it will drop down to three or four celsius and there will be more mist and fog as we get towards tuesday morning because we have settled conditions under high pressure. quite dense fog around potentially on tuesday morning we think across southern and eastern areas but the odd spot elsewhere. the wind is starting to pick up towards the north and west but the cloud doesn't thicken until the afternoon and the rain doesn't arrive until later on so for many tuesday looks like another warm day with plenty of that summer sunshine. it should stay that way in the south as we go into wednesday but this next weather system,
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quite an active weather front starts to push in across scotland and northern ireland through wednesday, the autumn equinox, as almost on cue gale force winds are forecast. once it clears away, some showers, but a notable dip in temperatures. there is this area of low pressure pushing past the north wednesday into thursday. some uncertainty as to how deep that low pressure could be but we could get some fairly windy weather. certainly one to watch this week. you will get more detail on the website.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. millions of older and vulnerable people will be contacted
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to arrange their coronavirus booster shots from today — it comes as 12—15 year olds begin receiving their first dose in some parts of england and scotland. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama — olivia coleman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. and coming up...the chelsea flower show begins this week — the first time the event's ever been held in autumn, after being rescheduled from earlier this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. the government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to energy companies, many of which are on the brink of collapse because of soaring gas prices. this morning we've heard
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that the country's sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds as it battles to stay afloat amid surging energy prices. the company has 1.7m customers. wholesale gas prices have risen by 250 percent since january, after a cold winter put pressure on europe's supplies and reduced levels of stored gas. there has also been increased competition for liquefied natural gas, particularly from countries in asia which also experienced cold weather. some firms, particularly the smaller ones, are now in trouble, because the high cost of gas means they can't afford to sell it to customers at the prices they promised them. ministers are due to hold more talks today with industry leaders to try to solve the crisis. speaking as he arrived in new york ahead of the the un general assembly, the prime minister said it was a temporary global problem that would be resolved as economies got back up and running after the pandemic.
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this is really a function of the world economy waking up after covid. gas in particular is in demand in asia, in china, other parts of asia. we have got to try and fix it as fast as we can make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we will have to do everything we can. this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out, as the world economy gets back on its feet. right now though, it's having major knock—on effects in other parts of the economy including food production. our correspondent katy austin reports. the price of natural gas — a key source of the energy which heats our homes and powers our industries — has soared. it's a global issue with causes including high demand. the price has gone up so much that some smaller energy suppliers have gone bust.
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there are fears more will follow. the regulator 0fgem says it's working to ensure consumers continue to be protected. the business secretary held crisis meetings with the industry at the weekend, and there will be further talks today. because the industry forecasts ahead, we can see that this is a peak and then we expect prices come down in the spring. so, really, conversations are about how we manage a very tight autumn/winter period and the specific impacts we think that these prices will have on industry. another knock—on impact of energy being so expensive is that production has been halted at two large fertiliser plants in england. they make carbon dioxide as a by—product, and that is used widely by food producers — for example, in meat production and packaging. some manufacturers and supermarkets have warned of shortages if the problem isn't urgently resolved. iceland says it's not seeing problems yet, but the situation is a concern. our supply chain are building up an additional 1—2 week stock —
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particularly on key lines that they're worried about, such as frozen meats — just to ensure that if the co2 crisis does last any longer than a few days — or, indeed weeks — we will be able to keep servicing our stores and ultimately our customers. the government's spoken with the company which runs the fertiliser plants, to discuss options around getting them going again. food businesses say the carbon dioxide disruption couldn't have come at a worse time — with the supply chain already under pressure as they struggle to get enough workers and lorry drivers. wholesale gas prices are unlikely to come down just yet, and eventually they could feed through into higher energy bills for households. katy austin, bbc news. let's speak to our business correspondent theo leggett. if you are with an energy company that goes under, what happens, what can you do? i! it
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that goes under, what happens, what can you do?— can you do? if it is 'ust one energy com an can you do? if it is 'ust one energy company that — can you do? if it isjust one energy company that goes _ can you do? if it isjust one energy company that goes under, - can you do? if it isjust one energy company that goes under, there i can you do? if it isjust one energy company that goes under, there is can you do? if it isjust one energy i company that goes under, there is a system for dealing with this which is that the energy regulator will find another supplier to take over those customers. this happened earlier in the year when green network energy went under. its customers were taken on by edf. the system is there to ensure that happens and to ensure customers don't pay too much more. they are supposed to get the cheapest available tariff. the problem comes with lots of energy companies go under at the same time and the other providers that want to take on those customers. they may not want to take on those customers because they could be loss—making, it would be expensive to take them on and there is no profit available. at a time when energy companies, the sensible ones would be better prepared ones, have bought their energy ahead, they already have prices extent. they are secure. but if they take on other consumers, they may be less secure so they are reluctant to do that. we
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are seeing the system being tested right now. are seeing the system being tested riaht now. ., are seeing the system being tested riaht now. . ., ., right now. there are talks today with so much — right now. there are talks today with so much concern _ right now. there are talks today with so much concern amongstl right now. there are talks today i with so much concern amongst the industry. is it likely that it's going to be anything concrete coming out of those talks quickly? ispiel]! out of those talks quickly? we'll have to wait _ out of those talks quickly? we'll have to wait and _ out of those talks quickly? we'll have to wait and see. _ out of those talks quickly? we'll have to wait and see. what - out of those talks quickly? -ii have to wait and see. what these talks are looking at is how this crunch can be eased because the fact that wholesale prices are high, nobody can do anything about that. it is about getting the sector passed this peak and point of crisis. this could be helping energy companies like bulb by preventing them from getting into deep trouble, ijy them from getting into deep trouble, by giving them short—term loans, or about incentivising the more resilient energy companies so they are in a position to take on extra customers if they need to, if we could companies go out of business. that is the kind of issue under discussion at the moment. a murder investigation has been launched after four people were found dead at a house in derbyshire.
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police were called to a property in killamarsh near sheffield yesterday after concerns were raised about the people living there. a man has been arrested and police say they're not looking for anyone else in connection with the deaths. the outwood academy city school in sheffield confirmed it was closed following the "tragic incident" involving three of its students. france has cancelled a meeting between its armed forces minister and the uk's defence secretary, ben wallace, amid the diplomatic row prompted by the new security alliance agreed by britain, the us and australia. paris has been angered by australia's withdrawal from a contract to buy submarines. the foreign office minister, james cleverly, says he's confident that relations with france will improve. all bilateral relationships go through periods of tension. that is the inevitability of relationships, just as it is on a personal level. i have absolutely no doubt that ultimately our relationship with france will endure,
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but this is about making sure that we have a really strong defence relationship with two very, very important defence partners. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to urge her iranian counterpart to release british nationals being held in the country, when they meet in new york later. about a dozen western dual nationals are detained in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. caroline hawley�*s report contains some distressing images. elika ashoori makes macaroons and cakes for a living, treats for other people's celebrations, but her own wedding is on hold, her whole life consumed by her father's arrest. i have to always throw myself into my work to not think about it too much because it drives me crazy. he was never political. he was a mechanical engineer with a love of astronomy. throughout his entire life he has put me and my brother first. but in august in 2017, while visiting his elderly mother in tehran, anoosheh ashoori
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was thrown into iran's notorious evin jail, one of around a dozen westerners being held in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. their families describe them as hostages being used by iranian authorities for political and financial leverage with the west. evin is notorious for being horrific. each room is shared by 15—20 people. they have rats and cockroaches all the time. he was interrogated very, very heavily. they threatened to hurt us throughout the interrogations. they told my dad that they knew where we lived, where we worked, what pets we had. my dad was saying, "i have nothing to confess to you." twice he tried to take his own life because he thought that if he was out of the equation, then they would not be able to hurt us. last month, cctv footage from inside evin was hacked into and leaked.
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former inmates say it shows the outside world just a small glimpse of what the jail is like. elika fears her father will not get out until iran and the uk strike a bargain for his release. i mean, he is 67 now and he has been there forfour years, for having done nothing. who will be answerable to that? elika's father always supported everything she did. the nature of my business is constantly to talk to people about weddings, birthdays and to be excited for them. and that is why it was very difficult at first for me to do myjob. i didn't want to make things for happy people, as horrible as it sounds. now i use my business and i use my cakes to focus on people's happiness because it is kind of like a beam of hope. in her head she keeps planning the ultimate cake,
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the one she will make to eventually welcome him home. caroline hawley, bbc news. there's been a shooting at a university in western russia — and eight people are reported to have been killed. the incident happened at perm state university in the urals — where a young man reportedly opened fire inside the university building. police wounded and detained the attacker, who's believed to be a student. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has the latest. at about 11 o'clock in the morning, local time, young man walked onto the campus of perm state university, armed with a gun and began shooting. we then believe he went inside one of the buildings. there are reports of the buildings. there are reports of students and teachers barricading themselves inside that building, mobile phone footage shows other studentsjumping to mobile phone footage shows other students jumping to safety from first floor windows. police said
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they wounded and detained the attacker. police have opened an investigation into the shootings. it has also emerged that the attacker allegedly left a long post on social media before the shooting. when you read through it, it is quite chilling. he explains in large detail how he went about obtaining a weapon, all the medical tests, the medical checks he went through to get this weapon and how he was consumed by hatred and have wanted to cause pain to people since primary school. quite a chilling read. that has now been deleted, i believe, from the internet. the headlines on bbc news... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university
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in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. the world health organization has appointed the former prime minister, gordon brown, an ambassador for global health financing. mr brown has said he wants to avoid a situation where rich countries are throwing away millions of doses of covid vaccines, which are past their use—by dates, while the poorest countries are desperate for supplies. in the us, teams searching for missing 22—year—old gabby petito have found a body they say matches her description in a national park in the state of wyoming. ms petito's not been seen since her boyfriend brian laundri, returned home from a cross—country trip without her. he's wanted by police who've named him a person of interest. officers involved in the discovery said they're awaiting the results of forensic testing. earlier today, human remains were discovered consistent
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with the description of gabrielle �*gabby�* petito. full forensic identification has not been completed to confirm 100% that we found gabby but her family has been notified of this discovery. the cause of death has not been determined at this time. a 54—year—old man has died and a woman has been seriously injured in a paragliding collision. the conservationist and adventurer sacha dench, and her support dan burton, were in the final stages of a challenge to circumnavigate britain. the pair were flying the battery—powered paramotors to mark the forthcoming un climate change conference in glasgow. a seven—year—old boy reported missing from his home in scotland since sunday evening has been found. east ayrshire police posted an update saying carson shepherd had been found safe and well and thanking people for their help in the search. a police helicopter, marine and dog units, and scottish fire and rescue service
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water support unit had all been involved in looking for the child. some 12 to 15 year olds in parts of england and scotland are expected to begin receiving covid vaccines today. teenage vaccinations are also due to start shortly in northern ireland and early next month in wales. millions of older and vulnerable people will also be contacted to arrange their booster shots. more from our health correspondent, katharine da costa. having waited for older age groups to be vaccinated, the uk's12—to—15—year—olds are next in line to be offered a jab. some scottish health boards will start administering pfizer vaccines at drop—in clinics from today. those still making up their minds can choose to wait for an appointment later this month. while the risk to you being severely ill may well be low, we want to make sure every single 12—15—year—old is protected — and not only protected themselves, but also, as they go to school, it helps to protect hopefully their teachers and others that they interact with at school too.
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at some schools in england, where permission forms have been sent back, nhs staff are expected to begin immunising teenagers from today, with most likely to start later this week. the decision over whether to vaccinate the over—12s has been finely balanced because young people are at very low risk from covid. while data has shown a very small chance of teenagers suffering from heart inflammation after the pfizer vaccine, catching covid also increases the risk of developing myocarditis. last week, the uk's four chief medical officers said 12—to—15—year—olds should be offered a jab to help protect their education and mental health. i think it is really about recognising that, not only is the vaccine helpful for young people to reduce the risk to their health and to educational disruption, but there's also contributing to trying to get through this pandemic, where we still have high rates of infection in the community and younger people taking up a vaccine will contribute to reducing those over time.
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elderly care—home residents who are most at risk from the virus are being prioritised for booster shots. england and wales have already made a start, while scotland begins its campaign today, and northern ireland's roll—out�*s due later this month. health and social care workers, the over—50s and younger adults with underlying health conditions will also be eligible six months after their second jab. the nhs in england and wales will start contacting people by text or letter this week. vaccinations will play a central role in helping the uk to navigate what some fear could be a difficult winter ahead. katharine da costa, bbc news. 15—year old elizabeth walker from dumfries and galloway, scotland would like to be vaccinated and would like the decision to do so to lie with her. shejoins me now alongside her mum shani. welcome. hello. elizabeth, tell us more about why you would like the
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vaccine. i more about why you would like the vaccine. ., ~' more about why you would like the vaccine. ., ~ ., , ., vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop _ vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop and — vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop and i _ vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop and i want, _ vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop and i want, just - vaccine. i work in a second-hand book shop and i want, just if - book shop and i want, just if someone asks if i have been vaccinated, to say that i can to ease their mind. i wouldn't have a bad reaction. i5 ease their mind. i wouldn't have a bad reaction-— bad reaction. is it more about protecting _ bad reaction. is it more about protecting others _ bad reaction. is it more about protecting others than - bad reaction. is it more about protecting others than you? l protecting others than you? definitely. i go on the bus back and forth from school and i want to make sure everyone else is safe. ii'idtu�*e forth from school and i want to make sure everyone else is safe.— sure everyone else is safe. have you had any concerns _ sure everyone else is safe. have you had any concerns for _ sure everyone else is safe. have you had any concerns for yourself - had any concerns for yourself through the pandemic? what impact hasn't had you? i through the pandemic? what impact hasn't had you?— hasn't had you? i think i am concerned _ hasn't had you? i think i am concerned about _ hasn't had you? i think i am concerned about my - hasn't had you? i think i am concerned about my familyl hasn't had you? i think i am - concerned about my family members and the people who teach me at school. i have not had any concerns about myself. find school. i have not had any concerns about myself-— about myself. and you want to be able to make _ about myself. and you want to be able to make the _ about myself. and you want to be able to make the decision - about myself. and you want to be able to make the decision for- able to make the decision for yourself?— able to make the decision for yourself?_ would | able to make the decision for. yourself?_ would you yourself? absolutely. would you stand in her— yourself? absolutely. would you stand in her way _ yourself? absolutely. would you stand in her way in _ yourself? absolutely. would you stand in her way in terms - yourself? absolutely. would you stand in her way in terms of-
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yourself? absolutely. would you i stand in her way in terms of getting the vaccination? ida. stand in her way in terms of getting the vaccination?— the vaccination? no, all her life she has had _ the vaccination? no, all her life she has had the _ the vaccination? no, all her life she has had the vaccines - the vaccination? no, all her life she has had the vaccines that l the vaccination? no, all her life i she has had the vaccines that have been _ she has had the vaccines that have been recommended and i know she has thought— been recommended and i know she has thought about it deeply, she has researched it, she has talked with her peers. — researched it, she has talked with her peers, the same with her younger brother— her peers, the same with her younger brother and _ her peers, the same with her younger brother and both are very definite they want— brother and both are very definite they want to get vaccinated very happily— they want to get vaccinated very happily now they can, especially my younger— happily now they can, especially my younger son, he usually would have music— younger son, he usually would have music lessons with an older member of the _ music lessons with an older member of the community and he is very concerned — of the community and he is very concerned that he cannot have those lessons _ concerned that he cannot have those lessons until he is certain that he is not _ lessons until he is certain that he is not going to be at risk of passing _ is not going to be at risk of passing it— is not going to be at risk of passing it on.— is not going to be at risk of passing it on. is not going to be at risk of -aassin it on. . , ,, . ., passing it on. that is stuart and he is 13. that passing it on. that is stuart and he is 13- that is _ passing it on. that is stuart and he is 13. that is right. _ passing it on. that is stuart and he is 13. that is right. the _ passing it on. that is stuart and he is 13. that is right. the reasons - is 13. that is right. the reasons being discussed here that we are hearing from you and elizabeth are very much about protecting others. have you had any qualms yourself
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about your children being vaccinated in this context, that it is not so much about their own protection, it is about good for society? i much about their own protection, it is about good for society?— is about good for society? i think it is very important _ is about good for society? i think it is very important that - is about good for society? i think it is very important that we - is about good for society? i think it is very important that we are l is about good for society? i thinkl it is very important that we are all part of— it is very important that we are all part of the — it is very important that we are all part of the same community and we should _ part of the same community and we should all— part of the same community and we should all be protecting ourselves and others. both my husband and i are vaccinated and to be got that as soon _ are vaccinated and to be got that as soon as— are vaccinated and to be got that as soon as we — are vaccinated and to be got that as soon as we were able to do so. and with them _ soon as we were able to do so. and with them feeling so strongly about it, i totally support that. elizabeth, a couple of reasons have been put forward that are strongly about the interests of you and your peers, which is about protecting mental health and protecting education. i those things that resonate with you?— education. i those things that resonate with you? yes, deeply because i _ resonate with you? yes, deeply because i am — resonate with you? yes, deeply because i am at _ resonate with you? yes, deeply because i am at school- resonate with you? yes, deeply because i am at school now - resonate with you? yes, deeply| because i am at school now with various health reasons so it would make me feel safe going into a big school in the city knowing i was
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vaccinated and invited to get it, i wouldn't be as badly affected. the time out of _ wouldn't be as badly affected. the time out of school, what impact has not had on you and those around you? i am worried about having to catch up i am worried about having to catch up with my work and i am worried that i am going to miss out on opportunities. d0 that i am going to miss out on opportunities-— that i am going to miss out on opportunities. do you have a date for the vaccine _ opportunities. do you have a date for the vaccine lined _ opportunities. do you have a date for the vaccine lined up? - opportunities. do you have a date for the vaccine lined up? have i opportunities. do you have a date| for the vaccine lined up? have you been invited to get to have it? ida. been invited to get to have it? no, i haven't been invited to get to have it? no, i haven't but _ been invited to get to have it? no, i haven't but i _ been invited to get to have it? no, i haven't but i will— been invited to get to have it? tip, i haven't but i will be going into one of the drop in centres hopefully today. one of the drop in centres hopefully toda . ., ~ i. ., one of the drop in centres hopefully toda . ., ~ ., ., , today. thank you for “oining us. thank you. t thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks. most courses will be offering a mixture of face—to—face and online learning. here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley.
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i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. we're just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. over the next few weeks, manchester will welcome more than 70,000 uni students to the city. i got a free t—shirt? i got a bucket hat from fancy. it'sjust fun, you know, just getting a vibe back from the two—year break we've had in lockdown. and, you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that uni feeling. meet the freshers elly, keira and lola. i left everything last—minute, so i was literally packing till, like, midnight. woke up, carried on packing and then got everything in the car, had a little cry when i said goodbye to my mum. it's the start of a new chapter. because of the pandemic, many students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home. did a few virtual tours, but that was it, really. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, "what if i get up there and i hate it?" it could be completely, like, out of my depth. but, no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year— and i studied a different course,
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it was quite similar. but, obviously, being. a creative course online, it was just so difficult. like, we weren't getting to use the facilities, - we weren't getting the one—to—one learning we should have got. - like, already, i was saying i've had a better week... _ not even a week — the last two days. i've already met - so many more people. i feel, like, so much more i passionate about my course. i'm enjoying it so much more. so, yeah, ithink i made the best decision i could have. _ at many universities across england, lectures on campus are back, and face coverings are no longer mandatory, but students are advised to do covid tests regularly. the idea of future restrictions is still a concern. i hope it doesn't happen again. they did say, yesterday, in the lecture... they said they've got a plan if it does happen. if we get put into lockdown. no, none of that! because i am from quite a small town, i knew that even - i being in lockdown here would bei somewhat better than down there, so i was like, as a whole, may as well go for it. - covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. we were stuck in a tiny, tiny little house with so many
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people when it started. that wasn't fun. got into a lot of arguments. with fees of £9,000 a year, and living costs, these third—year students feel out of pocket. i think we should have some compensation for... either teaching orfor the accommodation, because a lot of the rooms didn't get lived in, so people going back to their families, if they're shielding, orwhatever. a lot of uni—based accommodation i have tried to give a bit of moneyl back, but a lot of private things — i obviously, what we were in lastl year — haven't done anything. and when we weren't living in that house for something like six - months or so of the year, we were still paying - rent every month. cherie is a second—year sociology student. thank you. she first went to university at 18, but had to drop out. in the middle of the year, i sadly lost my mum. it was a really difficult time and that made me become a young carerfor my brothers. that's on the third floor... at the age of 23, cherie decided to go back. but the pandemic meant she wasn't able to experience university life.
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she is now part of a support group to help students who are struggling. last year was quite difficult, to be honest, in terms especially for mental health. like, it was quite isolating. ifeel like, as people, we like to have connections and stuff. having that aspect taken away last year, we could definitely see how some people actually struggled. there are amazing charities out there who are willing to help lots of different people. if someone was to tell me that five or six years ago, cherie, you are going to be smiling, you are going to go back to uni and be having the time of your life, i would have thought they would be lying, because when you are in that moment in time, you don't think positively at all, because you are just taking in everything. but i always tell people to take it easy, take their time with it, and just to be kinder to themselves. freshers' week marks the start of university life — a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many returning back to university.
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four men from blackburn have been charged, after allegedly shouting antisemitic abuse from a car in north london earlier this year. the men are due before westminster magistrates' court next month. mohammed iftikhar hanif, jawaad hussain, asif ali and adil mota are accused of using theatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour — whilst part of a convoy of vehicles taking part in a pro—palestinian protest in stjohn's wood in may. folic acid is to be added to flour across the uk, to reduce the risk of life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. the government said the move could prevent up to 200 birth defects every year. the new rules will only apply to non—wholemeal wheat flour, with gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour exempt. kate steele is the chief executive of the charity shine, which campaigns for families affected by spina bifida, earlier she told me about the difficulties around making sure women get enough folic acid. there are lots of unplanned pregnancies across the uk, but also
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the message that we really need to be getting across is that folic acid supplements really need to be taken at least eight weeks prior to pregnancy, not once a woman is pregnant. so, it's a really important decision that the government has taken today to get folic acid into flour to help build up those levels that the women need. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello, there. the quiet conditions this morning have meant the fog has taken a while to clear but, despite some pleasantly warm sunshine for the start of the week, the wind will strengthen in the north later in the week. feeling fresher here with some more significant rain. the rain today in the form of showers on this weather front, and also some patchy rain coming in and across the north and west of scotland and northern ireland on this weather front. now, some of these showers could be on the heavy side once again for the eastern side of england but there will be some bright spells in between,
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and elsewhere there will be some warm sunshine —18—21, as we saw at the weekend. through the night—time period, that weather front slowly eases away as the ridge of high pressure builds more strongly across the uk. so, for the day on tuesday, after the morning fog clears away, and there could be some dense patches around in southern and eastern areas, there will be plenty of sunshine to follow. but again, just late in the day this time, some patchy rain towards the north and west.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts
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to sort itself out. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. millions of older and vulnerable people will be contacted to arrange their coronavirus booster shots from today — it comes as 12—15 year olds begin receiving their first dose in some parts of england and scotland. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama — olivia coleman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. and coming up... the chelsea flower show begins this week — the first time the event's ever been held in autumn, after being rescheduled from earlier this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. sport and for a full
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round up, from the bbc sport centre. live sport to enjoy. we will show live sport to en'oy. we will show ou live sport to en'oy. we will show you some — live sport to en'oy. we will show you some of — live sport to enjoy. we will show you some of the _ live sport to enjoy. we will show you some of the pictures. - live sport to enjoy. we will show you some of the pictures. a - live sport to enjoy. we will show| you some of the pictures. a really tight up until the final quarter. the world champions were far too goodin the world champions were far too good in the end winning 48 —— a2. the good in the end winning a8 —— a2. the roses head to australia for another series there. i'll ahead of the commonwealth games title next summer. the chief executive of the pakistan cricket board says the situation they are in is �*gut—wrenching'. new zealand pulled out of their tour of the country because of a security threat last week despite pakistan's assurances of safety. england's men's and women's teams are due to travel to rawalpindi in the next few weeks and the ecb are expected to make a decision on that tour this week.
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it would be england's first visit to pakistan since 2005 — and was arranged to show gratitude to pakistan after their test side toured the uk last summer, despite the covid—19 pandemic. this is going to cost us millions of dollars. this has severely affected us from the cricket credibility perspective and has set us back. we certainly hope that england will be touring and that will be announced later on today. we certainly believe they should be coming and we hope he will be coming. they should be coming and we hope he will be coming-— will be coming. staying with cricket- -- — the england women's team were in action yesterday in worcester — and beat new zealand by 13 runs in the second one—day international. rookie off—spinner charlie dean had a superb spell to help the hosts to victory, taking a wickets for 36 runs in only her second odi. england are two up in the four match series. the chelsea manager thomas tuchel said his team was sloppy, lacking energy and the right attitude, but that was only describing their first half at spurs,
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before turning the game around with three second half goals to go joint top of the premier league. n'golo kante came off the bench at halftime to spark the revival, thiago silva put them ahead, kante doubled the lead with a deflected effort before antonio rudiger fired in the third in stoppage time. chelsea have an identical record to liverpool and manchester united also have 13 points. five games into the season, will those be the three main title rivals? everybody will get better. i don't think we see the top teams at the highest level. the preseason was unique. there are and there will be national breaks. i don't think that we see the big teams on the highest level. but don't get me wrong, we are competitive and it is absolutely necessary that we get better. the first half as proof of that. everybody will get better. i am pretty sure. manchester united got away with one at west ham, they won 2—1 at the london stadium.
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the hammers had taken a first half lead through said benrahma but five minutes later cristiano ronaldo equalised with that rebound — his fourth goal in three games since re—signing. it looked as though the points might be shared, butjesse lingard, on loan at west ham last season, scored a stunning goal, putting manchester united in front with a minute to go. still time for another twist though. west ham awarded a penalty after a luke shaw handball. mark noble came off the bench to take it with his first kick of the ball, but that didn't work out, it was saved. david de gea made his first penalty save in more than 5 years, giving united all three points. west ham was one of the clubs that paid tribure to jimmy greaves yesterday. the former england striker who died at the age of 81. as well as playing for the hammers, it was fitting that tottenham and cheslea were playing each other yesterday, he is spurs record goalscorer and was also prolific for the blues. a minute's applause took place there as well for the the leading goalscorer in the english top flight, 357 goals. he also scored aa goals in 57
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games for his country. he was a master craftsman of his art, which was goal—scoring. scoring goals. everyone would say is the most difficult part of being a football player in a football team. so his job was to score the goals. he lived for scoring goals. i pail]! he lived for scoring goals. i will have another _ he lived for scoring goals. i will have another update _ he lived for scoring goals. i will have another update for- he lived for scoring goals. i will have another update for you in the next hour. see you then. thanks, ali. spain's prime minister has told residents of la palma in the canary islands that their safety is guaranteed after a volcano erupted there for the first time in 50 years. pedro sanchez postponed a trip to the un in new york to go to the island where villages have been evacuated and homes destroyed. courtney bembridge has more. for the first time in half a century, the cumbre vieja volcano erupted — with fountains of molten
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rock shooting hundreds of metres into the sky, and incandescent orange rivers flowing down the hillside. the island has been on high alert for the past week because of a huge increase in tremors — and thousands of people were told to leave their homes. the eruption started in the afternoon — plumes of smoke could be seen from across the island, and eyewitnesses described hearing a loud explosion. the noise coming from the volcano — it sounds like — i don't know — 20 fighterjets taking off right now, and it's extremely loud. i don't know how to explain it. it was powerful. powerful. to feel a sudden _ was powerful. powerful. to feel a sudden explosion like that. i could not imagine it would be so sudden.
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rivers of lava edged down the hillside, reaching homes. the prime minister prime minister pedro sanchez has arrived in la palma sanchez has arrived in la palma after postponing his trip to new york for the united nations' general assembly this week. we are very mindful of the fires that can break out of these eruptions, so have we deployed not just the civil guard and fire fighters, but also the military and emergency unit. i fighters, but also the military and emergency unit-— fighters, but also the military and emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that _ emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that the _ emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that the red _ emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that the red cross - emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that the red cross are - the work that the red cross are doing, feeding and looking after those who have been forced from their homes. experts say it's not clear how long the eruption will last, and it's going to be an anxious wait for residents. courtney bembridge, bbc news. a monument dedicated to all the dutch victims of the holocaust has opened in amsterdam. it lists 102,000 jewish people killed by the nazis — as well as more than 200 sinti and roma. tim allman reports.
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the holocaust was a crime committed in so many places, with so many victims. more than 100,000 of them, are named here. the first such memorial in the netherlands dedicated to a dark chapter in the country's history. translation: this monument confronts us with the criminal _ murder of thousands, murdered for no other reason than their identity. in doing so, the monument also demands accountability. accountability early as to whether more should be done during the war years to save those who were murdered. the netherlands was occupied much of the second world war with three quarters of the country's jewish population were killed, most by the nazis but some by local collaborators, a difficult legacy to deal with and the king met with some of the survivors, fitted next
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to the walls where the victims peoples names were inscribed. translation: i thought it was emotional. - i just saw the name of a friend of mine, not anne frank or anyone famous, but a friend of mine and i found it hard to read. i knew she was dead of course. i still have a picture of her at home. as one survivor put it, this monument is a tribute that can never be erased and a warning that can never be forgotten. tim allman, bbc news. a leading football agent, who used to represent raheem sterling, has broken football association rules by signing under—age players, according to evidence seen by bbc panorama. aidy ward, who owns colossal sports management, also asked sterling to speak to a 15—year—old via video call, as part of an attempt by ward to sign him. the fa prohibits agents approaching players before they are in their 16th year.
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rory carson has this report. wired is one of the most high—profile agents in football. we spoke to a player who says he was approached by him when he was just 12 years old, in breach of fa rules. he was born in sierra leone and moved to england with his mum when he was six. he joined moved to england with his mum when he was six. hejoined birmingham city academy and was picked for the england youth team. soon after, mr ward got in touch. what did they say? ward got in touch. what did they sa ?, , ~ ward got in touch. what did they sa 7, , ~' ., ward got in touch. what did they sa?, ~ ., ward got in touch. what did they sa? ~ ., .,, ward got in touch. what did they sa? ~ ., ., , ., say? just like how many teams wanted me to no to say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them. _ say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them. and _ say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them. and why _ say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them. and why i _ say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them. and why i should, i me to go to them. and why i should, like, why i should go. that is when my had started getting into my head a bit. mr my had started getting into my head a bit. ~ ~ ., my had started getting into my head abit. ~ _, my had started getting into my head abit. ~ a bit. mr ward says he has never been the agent _ a bit. mr ward says he has never been the agent but _ a bit. mr ward says he has never been the agent but panorama i a bit. mr ward says he has never| been the agent but panorama has evidence that seems to contradict
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the claim. he was involved in negotiations to move the player to fill them, with agency fees if the transfer went through. the agency fees ended up _ transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being _ transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being way - transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being way more - transfer went through. the agency i fees ended up being way more than transfer went through. the agency - fees ended up being way more than my contract. i was happy with what i got. i did not move there for the money and that, but when i got to look at it i thaw, that is not right. when he found out about the agency fees, he told he had only signed if they were not paid. ii the signed if they were not paid. if the rules ban agents _ signed if they were not paid. if the rules ban agents from _ signed if they were not paid. if the rules ban agents from profiting from the transfer of underage players. fulham fc said it had not paid or agreed to pay mr ward in the transfer. he was released five years later from the transfer. he blames mr ward for a move he was never happy with. i mr ward for a move he was never happy with-— mr ward for a move he was never ha. . with, .,, i, ., ., happy with. i was young and did not know much — happy with. i was young and did not know much about _ happy with. i was young and did not know much about football, - happy with. i was young and did not know much about football, my - happy with. i was young and did not| know much about football, my mum does not know anything about
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football. i thought it was normal. we have also obtained evidence that mr ward approached other underage players. one meeting are said to have happened at this restaurant. mr ward asked raheem sterling to speak via video call to the boy. in a bid by mr ward to attract the young player to his agency. sterling's lawyers says as an international he thinks it is good to speak to aspiring players but not on financial issues. raheem sterling dropped mr wild as is agent late last year. ward is under investigation by the fa and says he cannot comment under respect for the process. you can see more on that story in panorama:
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football s broken dreams, tonight on bbc one at 8.30 canadians go to the polls today in an election taking earlier than expected. prime ministerjustin trudeau called the snap poll last month, seeking to capitalise on public approval for his handling of the covid—19 pandemic. but the latest opinion poll points to an extremely tight race, with mr trudeau virtually neck—and—neck with his conservative rival, erin o'toole. from montreal, samira hussain reports: in the remaining hours of the campaign, prime minister justin trudeau is in his element, greeting voters, his charm on full display — but it wasn't always this much fun. many canadians are just plain frustrated, worried about the economy, the vaccine mandates, that this election was even called in the first place. some of that anger has come out in very un—canadian ways.
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for many struggling to keep their livelihoods intact and open, mr trudeau's decision to hold canada's second election in less than two years feels like an unwanted distraction. i have so many worries right now. every day is a worry. we are not through the pandemic, so do i have enough mental space and heart space to even worry about the elections? we are still in small business worrying about keeping the doors open, staying in business. the son of a former prime minister, mr trudeau carries the most famous name in canadian politics, but he also carries the burden of canada's liberal history and is coming up against some very modern conservative energy. the leader of the conservative party — and mr trudeau's main challenger — is painting him as a politician born with a silver spoon in his mouth. every canadian has met
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a justin trudeau in their lives — privileged, entitled, and always looking out for number one. he was looking out for number one when he called this expensive and unnecessary election in the middle of the pandemic. here in western canada support for the conservatives is strongest but the election is not top of mind for farmers who are dealing with some of the driest conditions on record. this is a long way from the country's political heartland. how can they help? they cannot make it rain, they cannot make the feed grow, so if somebody gives us some money all it does is now your bale of hay that was $100 is $120. justin trudeau decided to have this election betting that he could turn his apparent success leading canada through the pandemic into a bigger majority and a firmer hold on power, but it is not entirely clear that that bet will actually pay off, such is canada's disillusionment with this election. it is even possible he may lose power altogether. samira hussein, bbc news, montreal.
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the headlines on bbc news... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. it's been a big night for british talent at the emmys. the crown won seven awards, including best drama. josh o'connor and olivia colman took home trophies for their portrayals of prince charles and the queen, respectively. there were also prizes for kate winslet for mare
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# you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare of easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you.
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i'm proud of all of you. oh! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. olivia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh o'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles.
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some breaking news to bring you about customers for an energy firm that went down last week, people's energy. 350,000 domestic customers. british gas has agreed it will be taking on the customers. the regulator of gem has confirmed that news. this is the process that is going on for anyone who is with an energy company that have gone under. five a small energy companies have gone under. a new supplier will be found for them and there will be uninterrupted supply. that is what has happened to those customers. some breaking news about the vaccine for under 12. we are hearing that pfizer that there vaccine produced a robust response in 11—year—olds and the ask for authorisation to use the
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vaccine for that age range in the united states and europe as soon as possible is. they said the immune response in their clinical trials in phase two and three clinical trials matched what they had previously observed in 16 to 25—year—olds. the safety profile was generally comparable to the older age group, they say. they also say that since july, paediatric cases of covid have risen around 20%, which underscores the public health need for a public vaccination. this news coming through on a day that 12 to 15—year—olds are being vaccinated in england and scotland. the roll—out is beginning there. for the first time in more than a century, the chelsea flower show is being held in september, which means dahlias, pumpkins and autumnal colours will replace the usual spring and summer blooms. members of the british royalfamily and celebrities will get the first glimpse of the show, before it opens to the public tomorrow.
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our correspondent daniela relph reports. the finishing touches, a finalflourish, the pressure to get itjust right. chelsea is looking autumnal. the change in date this year means late—summer flowers like asters and dahlias are in their prime. and a september show gives designers a chance to display a warmer and grassier look. here, it's all about the trees. david dodd has designed the queen's green canopy garden to celebrate next year's platinum jubilee. we've got a field maple here and the field maple just gives the most spectacular yellow colour. and you can see it is already starting to turn now. it sits on the largest plot at chelsea. 21 trees have been planted with grassland, hay bales and a wildflower meadow. if everyone can get behind the campaign and plant a tree,
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we can make a huge impact and a huge difference to the environment. and you've got to think about what trees give us. and when i was asked to do it, i got very excited, because i'm a bit of a tree hugger. and just finally, do you think the queen would like this garden? i certainly hope so. i might be off to the tower if she doesn't. the autumnal look is everywhere, with a focus on harvest fruit and vegetables. an autumn chelsea will have a different feel and a different mood. but the show also hopes to capture that love of gardening and the outdoors that many of us discovered during lockdowns. giant window boxes in the cop26 garden to mark the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year. the message — even if you don't have a garden, planting small flowers and shrubs can help combat the effects of climate change. and a tribute to nursing in the florence nightingale garden, marking 200 years since her birth.
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there are medicinal flowers here with a focus on wellbeing. and late—summer foxgloves — her favourite flower — ready to plant. some special guests got an early viewing, but these nurses will also be able to enjoy the garden after the flower show, when it's moved to st thomas' hospital in london. florence nightingale was very much a forward—thinking nurse. a lot of what we do today is very much embedded in what she taught us — nursing at the forefront, and, you know, that's where we still are. it's a privilege. i think, for a lot of nurses, i think they'll be overwhelmed by it, if i'm really honest, and they'll be really proud to see someone saying thank you for all the hard work they've done. a chelsea flower show in september has brought its challenges for everyone involved. it's likely to be a one—off chance to enjoy the unfamiliar sights an autumn show brings. daniella relph, bbc news, chelsea.
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our reporter charlotte gallagher is at the chelsea flower show. after a cancellation and postponement, chelsea flower show is back. thousands of people come here this week to enjoy the spectacular gardens and the beautiful plants and flowers. the gardens have a theme and this is the florence nightingale garden and we are delighted to be joined by robert myers, who designed it. congratulations. it looks amazing. what is it about florence that inspired you? taste amazing. what is it about florence that inspired you?— that inspired you? we are celebrating _ that inspired you? we are celebrating the _ that inspired you? we are celebrating the 200th - that inspired you? we are - celebrating the 200th anniversary that inspired you? we are _ celebrating the 200th anniversary of her birth and we wanted this garden to bring out her character, talk about the amazing work she did, both in crimea and after she came back. and relate the guide into her idea around hospital design, this thought he should have pavilion wards laid out connected by corridors, but with green spaces in between, garden separating the words, so the patients inside could look out at a
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green space. this is celebrating the idea around green space for recovery. the fastest route to recovery. the fastest route to recovery leads through a garden. this is a hospital courtyard, with walls around the space represent the hospital, we have the tile, floor to ceiling windows, patients can look out of the space to get the benefit of the greenery here. we had the idea of incorporating drawings of florence in crimea and here on her garden. to reference her and her garden. to reference her and her garden. and the planting has some nice touches, medicinal plants within the mix. we also had access to her childhood pressed flower collection, a lovely thing. some of the flowers in the guide and reference those plaits. the plans we could use in september are depicted only graphic in the world, as part
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of that layout. so those plants out there, even though they are not in there, even though they are not in the garden itself. you there, even though they are not in the garden itself.— there, even though they are not in the garden itself. you have also got one of florence's _ the garden itself. you have also got one of florence's favourite - the garden itself. you have also got one of florence's favourite flowers i one of florence's favourite flowers in the garden. she one of florence's favourite flowers in the garden-— in the garden. she once said any arlour in the garden. she once said any parlour game — in the garden. she once said any parlour game that _ in the garden. she once said any parlour game that her _ in the garden. she once said any parlour game that her favourite l parlour game that her favourite flower was a foxglove. it is tricky in september because they generally flower in may and june. we managed to find some after a lot of searching. we found these white foxglove, just going to see but we like that but look. the art medicinal plants as well. how difficult has _ medicinal plants as well. how difficult has this _ medicinal plants as well. how difficult has this been - medicinal plants as well. how difficult has this been doing it in september, compared with may, everything coming into bloom. brute everything coming into bloom. we tore u- everything coming into bloom. - tore up our plant list when we found out we would be doing it in september. it has been a positive thing using a different palette of plants to what we would have in me allows us to bring in things like the echinacea, another medicinal plant. also grasses. we use them in may but the grasses are in flower in september and you get that lovely airy feel of the grass heads
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floating above everything. it has been a great opportunity and great fun. it was tense trying to find the plants for the show in the short space of time but we found it in the end. ., , ., space of time but we found it in the end. . , ., ., space of time but we found it in the end. . i. ., ., space of time but we found it in the end. . y., . . end. can you relax and en'oy the show? no i end. can you relax and en'oy the show? the judging * end. can you relax and en'oy the show? the judging is _ end. can you relax and enjoy the show? the judging is over. - end. can you relax and enjoy the show? the judging is over. you i end. can you relax and enjoy the i show? the judging is over. you do show? thejudging is over. you do not know what you have got yet but can you relax? brute not know what you have got yet but can you relax?— can you relax? we find out what medal we _ can you relax? we find out what medal we have _ can you relax? we find out what medal we have tomorrow- can you relax? we find out what l medal we have tomorrow morning can you relax? we find out what - medal we have tomorrow morning and thatis medal we have tomorrow morning and that is a bit fraught. then we can enjoy being in the garden. it would be nicejust to enjoy being in the garden. it would be nice just to spend time with friends and visitors in the garden and enjoy this special place while it lasts. it is then going on to st thomas's hospital next year to be rebuilt and it will have a legacy. the legacy of florence nightingale will live on. if you do not get a chance to come down to chelsea this week, will be able to see the guide and in the hospital in the next few months. now for a look at the weather. hello there.
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the wind will strengthen in the north later in the week, feeling fresher here. some significant rain. we rain today, the full showers on the weather front and also some patchy rain coming in across the north—west of scotland and northern ireland. some showers could be on the heavy side. some bright spells in between. elsewhere, warm sunshine. 18 to 21 celsius, as we saw at the weekend. that where the front slowly eases away. the ridge of high pressure builds more strongly across the united kingdom. tuesday, after the morning fog clears away, dense patches around in southern and eastern areas. plenty of sunshine to follow. late in the day this time, patchy rain to the west.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we've got to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies that we want, make sure that we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we'll have to do everything we can. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least eight people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. millions of older and vulnerable people will be contacted to arrange their coronavirus booster shots from today — it comes as 12—15 year olds begin receiving their first dose in some parts of england and scotland.
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a major volcanic eruption is forcing villagers from their homes in the canary islands. this is the moment a house was engulfed by lava. cheering. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama — olivia coleman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. the government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to energy companies, many of which are on the brink of collapse because of soaring gas prices. this morning we've heard that the country's sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds as it battles to stay afloat amid surging energy prices.
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the company has 1.7m customers. meanwhile 0fgem has confirmed british gas has agreed to take on an extra 350,000 customers from the collapsed energy firm, firm, people's energy. wholesale gas prices have risen by 250 percent since january, after a cold winter put pressure on europe's supplies and reduced levels of stored gas. there has also been increased competition for liquefied natural gas, particularly from countries in asia which also experienced cold weather. some firms, particularly the smaller ones, are now in trouble, because the high cost of gas means they can't afford to sell it to customers at the prices they promised them. ministers are due to hold more talks today with industry leaders to try to solve the crisis. speaking as he arrived in new york ahead of the the un general assembly, the prime minister said it was a temporary global problem that would be resolved as economies got back up and running after the pandemic. this is really a function of the world economy waking up after covid.
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gas in particular is in demand in asia, in china, other parts of asia. we have got to try and fix it as fast as we can make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we will have to do everything we can. this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out, as the world economy gets back on its feet. right now though, it's having major knock—on effects in other parts of the economy including food production. our correspondent katy austin reports. the price of natural gas — a key source of the energy which heats our homes and powers our industries — has soared. it's a global issue with causes including high demand. the price has gone up so much that some smaller energy suppliers have gone bust.
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there are fears more will follow. the regulator 0fgem says it's working to ensure consumers continue to be protected. the business secretary held crisis meetings with the industry at the weekend, and there will be further talks today. because the industry forecasts ahead, we can see that this is a peak and then we expect prices come down in the spring. so, really, conversations are about how we manage a very tight autumn/winter period and the specific impacts we think that these prices will have on industry. another knock—on impact of energy being so expensive is that production has been halted at two large fertiliser plants in england. they make carbon dioxide as a by—product, and that is used widely by food producers — for example, in meat production and packaging. some manufacturers and supermarkets have warned of shortages if the problem isn't urgently resolved. iceland says it's not seeing problems yet, but the situation is a concern. our supply chain are building up an additional 1—2 week stock — particularly on key lines that
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they're worried about, such as frozen meats — just to ensure that if the co2 crisis does last any longer than a few days — or, indeed weeks — we will be able to keep servicing our stores and ultimately our customers. the government's spoken with the company which runs the fertiliser plants, to discuss options around getting them going again. food businesses say the carbon dioxide disruption couldn't have come at a worse time — with the supply chain already under pressure as they struggle to get enough workers and lorry drivers. wholesale gas prices are unlikely to come down just yet, and eventually they could feed through into higher energy bills for households. katy austin, bbc news. the energy regulator 0fgem has been reacting, a spokesperson said: we know that the current situation with high wholesale energy prices is putting
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pressure on customers and energy companies. this is a global issue. we have the systems and processes in place to ensure that customer needs are always met. for those customers who are with energy companies that can no longer trade, a new supplier will be appointed. 0fgem is working closely with government to manage the wider implications of the global gas price increase. ona on a separate but related issue the prime minister police spokesman has been asked whether there will be supply difficulties at christmas because of co2 shortages and the spokesman said the uk has highly resilient food supplies chains. the issueis resilient food supplies chains. the issue is that companies which are sensitive to changes in gas prices have been struggling and it has led to some plants not producing at the
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moment and that has had an impact on the supply of co2 which is fundamental in food preservation. let's speak to our business correspondent theo leggett. just had that statement from off gem and we had the news that 350,000 customers of another small energy company, people's energy have been transferred to british gas in result of that company going down. tell us more about what people should do if their company has gone down or they are worried about it. this their company has gone down or they are worried about it.— are worried about it. this is how the system _ are worried about it. this is how the system is — are worried about it. this is how the system is supposed - are worried about it. this is how the system is supposed to - are worried about it. this is how| the system is supposed to work, are worried about it. this is how- the system is supposed to work, how it has been designed. if an energy supplier goes out of business there is a system called supplier of last resort where 0fgem will appoint another company to take over those customers. credit balances will be retained and you are supposed we put on the cheapest available tariff.
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the problem will occur, and this is what everybody is worried about, if lots of energy companies go out of business at the same time, then 0fgem will be left looking around and scraping around for somebody to take over those customers. meanwhile, the more resilient companies will be allotted to take them on because potentially they could lose money by doing so. —— reluctant. that is one of the areas that ministers and people from industry will be discussing today. how to resolve that situation. it looks as though one possibility is that government backing loans for those companies to help them overcome the extra costs of taking on potentially hundreds of thousands, or even any worst—case scenario, millions of extra customers and taking the losses that would be associated with that. tell us about those talks, are unlikely to get concrete developments today in terms of what might be done? mr;
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in terms of what might be done? ii sense in terms of what might be done? ii1: sense is these talks will in terms of what might be done? i"i1: sense is these talks will drag on because it is a complicated situation. at the root of it all is high wholesale energy prices. nobody can change those and they will eventually go down of their own accord but that may take some time. in the meantime, gas and electricity suppliers are any bit of a bind because most customers are on fixed rate tariffs. that means they are locked in with the prices they pay evenif locked in with the prices they pay even if the company they are buying their energy from has to pay higher costs for getting the supplies it needs. everybody else is on standard variable tariffs but there are capped by 0fgem so this cannot be increased beyond a certain level either. this is why the suppliers poor situation because their costs are going up but they cannot recover the money from consumers. what the government will be looking at is either trying to tidy —— tied the energy companies over. there is the possibility of a bailout that is not to be unlikely, or helping a system deal with the consequences of energy
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companies going under. that does appear to be the most likely option at the moment, that we will see some kind of loan mechanism put into place, backed by the government which will be an incentive to the more resilient energy companies to take over the customers that would otherwise be left without a supplier went smaller and more vulnerable energy companies go out of business. thank you. joining me now isjonathan atkinson who is the director of carbon coup in greater manchester who advises and advocates to reduce the use of carbon energy in homes and communities. thank you forjoining us. how do you see this current situation? weill. thank you forjoining us. how do you see this current situation?— see this current situation? well, i heard the prime _ see this current situation? well, i heard the prime minister- see this current situation? well, i | heard the prime minister speaking see this current situation? well, i i heard the prime minister speaking at the top of the hour and he was talking about a short—term crisis but for many of us in the energy system, this has been a long—term issue and something that has been coming for a long time. uniquely, the uk is overexposed to the use of gas compared to other european
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countries, in particular we use a lot of gas and heating homes and in heavy industry so we really need to tackle the root causes there which is our long—term dependency on gas. how would you see the options? as, how would you see the options? number of people over the weekend having talking about investing in renewables and new clean energy and i think that is something we need to look at. more than 30% of our gas comes from overseas and we need to be generating clean power here. but something people are not talking about is the amount of gas we use in our homes and for many years now we have been talking about reducing that through insulation, energy efficiency and heat pumps. unfortunately, the government is a bit absent on this. we have no domestic energy efficiency plan at the moment. the building decarbonisation strategy is pending and the green homes grant scheme that was launched last year has crashed and burned and widely
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criticised. the government needs to invest in renewables but also energy efficiency. invest in renewables but also energy efficien . ., , efficiency. that is something the government _ efficiency. that is something the government is _ efficiency. that is something the government is actively _ efficiency. that is something the government is actively looking l efficiency. that is something the | government is actively looking at. none of these issues aren't new. how much has been done over the years to support that sort of retrofitting and energy efficiency in people's homes? ., ., , and energy efficiency in people's homes? i, i, , i, homes? unfortunately, over the ears, homes? unfortunately, over the years. due _ homes? unfortunately, over the years. due to — homes? unfortunately, over the years, due to lobbying _ homes? unfortunately, over the years, due to lobbying from - homes? unfortunately, over the l years, due to lobbying from some homes? unfortunately, over the - years, due to lobbying from some of the existing players, less and less has taken place. many people remember david cameron and his references to cutting the green clap in 2013 but that was due to an industry lobbying there that schemes like equal and the green deal failed. the number of insulation measures going into homes has been reduced by 95% since 2012. it is an issue that is widely understood within the industry as needing action, but it is pending and it is
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left to groups like ourselves to cover that, to do small scale projects to show what is possible. the new economics foundation recently argued that hundred billion invested in 9 million retrofitted homes will save each household is £550 per year on their energy bills. that is the kind of thing we need to do to reduce our dependency on gas. thank you forjoining us. pfizer has this morning said the vaccine has reduced a robust immune response in five to 11—year—olds. the drug company behind vaccine sense clinical trial results showed the jab safe well tolerated by children in the age range. they say they will submit their data to make trade bodies in the eu, united states and around the world as soon as possible and that comes on the day that the vaccine roll—out for 12 to 15—year—olds begins in england and scotland. in the latest research on
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the younger age group, they say there has been an increase in the number of covid cases in that age group of over 57 that is why they believe there is a need for the vaccine in that age group as well. —— in that age group of over fives. you're watching bbc news... a murder investigation has been launched after four people were found dead at a house in derbyshire. police were called to a property in killamarsh near sheffield yesterday after concerns were raised about the people living there. a man has been arrested and police say they're not looking for anyone else in connection with the deaths. the outwood academy city school in sheffield confirmed it was closed following the "tragic incident" involving three of its students. our news correspondent danny savage is in killamarsh in derbyshire for us. that is very upsetting to hear. tell us what you can about what has happened here.— happened here. there is still a really heavy — happened here. there is still a really heavy police _ happened here. there is still a really heavy police presence i happened here. there is still a i really heavy police presence here this morning in killamarsh. they were called about half past seven
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yesterday morning when they discovered for bodys in the house we believe there behind us. you can see the police tent covering the front garden of that semi detached house which stands on the edge of a park, and the family or quite well known. they have lived there about half a year or so and you can see other white forensic transit vans from the forensic investigation officers who are working inside the property. lots and lots of police vehicles around this neighbourhood with lots of people looking on, quite shocked about what happened. we know or understand that it was an adult woman and three children whose bodies were found here. we understand that two of the children or a brother and sister. their fatherjason bennett was here this morning paying tribute to them saying his heart had been broken into a million pieces by what happened and he left flowers behind us with messages on tojohn and gracie. john was 13 years old, lacey
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was 11 years old. he described her as a tick—tock queen and the message he left for her on the florist and a sonjohn had his kind heart. we are not sure about the identity of the third child but there are reports which haven't been confirmed by detectives yet that that third child was here on a sleepover on saturday night. i'm related to the other two children, that child was a friend of one of the two other dead children in the house. their identity has not yet been given. we are expecting detectives to give more information later this afternoon. but we have seen the grandparents of lacey and john come down a little while ago and they were dreadfully upset but they did stop to talk to us very briefly about how dreadful the situation they were finding themselves in and your heart went out as they talked to us about finding out yesterday evening what had happened and the brought sunflowers down. just an awful event. four bodies found in this
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house. a woman and three children. a man is under arrest, a man was arrested very quickly after the bodies were discovered and she is held in police custody. we are expecting more from detectives as the afternoon goes on.— the headlines on bbc news... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least six people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's 0lly foster. england's netballers are in new zealand for a three match series. they've been beaten in the opener in the last hour, it was really tight, right up to the final quarter, the roses fighting back to level the game in christchurch at 38—all but the world champions were too
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good in the end, winning 48—42. they ran away with it a bit. after this series, england head to australia for a series there, all vital preparation ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. the chief executive of the pakistan cricket board says the situation they are in is �*gut—wrenching'. new zealand pulled out of their tour of the country because of a security threat last week despite pakistan's assurances of safety. england's men's and women's teams are due to travel to rawalpindi in the next few weeks and the ecb are expected to make a decision on that tour this week. it would be england's first visit to pakistan since 2005 — and was arranged to show gratitude to pakistan after their test side toured the uk last summer, despite the covid—19 pandemic. this is going to cost us millions of dollars. this has severely affected us from the cricket credibility perspective and has set us back.
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we certainly hope that england will be touring and that will be announced later on today. we certainly believe they should be coming and we hope they will be coming. the chelsea manager thomas tuchel said his team was sloppy, lacking energy and the right attitude, but that was only describing their first half at spurs, before turning the game around with three second half goals to go joint top of the premier league. n'golo kante came off the bench at half—time to spark the revival, thiago silva put them ahead, kante doubled the lead with a deflected effort before antonio rudiger fired in the third in stoppage time. chelsea have an identical record to liverpool and manchester united also have 13 points. five games into the season, will those be the three main title rivals? everybody will get better. i don't think we see the top teams at the highest level. the preseason was unique. there are and there will be national breaks. i don't think that we see the big
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teams on the highest level. but don't get me wrong, we are competitive and it is absolutely necessary that we get better. the first half is proof of that. everybody will get better. i am pretty sure. they did look very good yesterday. that is on the spot for now. more on the website. reaction to the weekend, go to the gulf pages and we get some build—up to the ryder cup that starts in the us on friday. i will have an update about half past one after the one o'clock news. the world health organization has appointed the former prime minister, gordon brown, an ambassador for global health financing. mr brown has said he wants to avoid a situation where rich countries are throwing away millions of doses of covid vaccines, which are past their use—by dates, while the poorest countries are desperate for supplies. speaking this morning — mr brown said — �*it�*s in our interests in britain that they are vaccinated because the disease will spread in africa, it will mutate
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and there will be new variants. "there are still millions of vaccines left over and we've got to get them to the rest of the world, otherwise they are going to pass their use—by date and expire, and be of no use to anybody, and all of us hate waste." edwin ikhuoria is the executive director for africa of the one campaign, which aims to end extreme poverty and preventable disease by 2030. thank you very much forjoining us. where is it, where our things in terms of richer countries sending vaccines to poorer countries because britain has committed to donating 100 million vaccines to lower income countries by nextjune. so 100 million vaccines to lower income countries by next june.— countries by next june. so far, the commitments _ countries by next june. so far, the commitments that _ countries by next june. so far, the commitments that the _ countries by next june. so far, the commitments that the rich - countries by next june. so far, the l commitments that the rich countries have made to sending their excess doses to the rest of the world has only been about 20% of that commitment has been shipped. he
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leaves a lot of gap in terms of access to these vaccines to low income countries who are looking forward to receiving them. i think one of the biggest challenges is when they have the money to buy, they still can't even get access because they are very far back in the queue to get these vaccines. the sooner that rich countries begin to spread and share what they have an excess, the better for all of spread and share what they have an excess, the betterfor all of us globally to end this pandemic. it is still a very terrible situation right now. it still a very terrible situation right nova— still a very terrible situation riahtnow. , , i right now. it has been said since the beginning — right now. it has been said since the beginning of— right now. it has been said since the beginning of the _ right now. it has been said since the beginning of the pandemic l right now. it has been said since i the beginning of the pandemic that africa wasn't... the impact hasn't been as bad in africa as elsewhere. what is the latest on the picture in africa? ,i, i africa? indeed, when the pandemic started it was _ africa? indeed, when the pandemic started it was expected _ africa? indeed, when the pandemic started it was expected that - africa? indeed, when the pandemic started it was expected that people j started it was expected that people would be dying on the streets because of the very fragile health system and weak health system in dealing with this kind of pandemic, when we saw the numbers coming from the richer countries, but we haven't seen that kind of overwhelming
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health emergencies as we expected. but right now over 8 million infections are on the continent with over 200,000 deaths. that is still huge and significant, notjust compute the rest of the world, it may not be as heavy as expected, but more importantly it really is that the pandemic continues to affect countries, in the social and economic space as well. the social fiscal conditions... governments are spending in excess of the revenues. this is getting worse. whole sectors are closing down because of the very low economic activities and that is why everybody is looking... the top of every african policymaker as let us get out of the situation. as long as people are not getting access to these vaccines and the pandemic belongs, we will continue to see this very huge economic and social impacts as well as the health impact
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that we are currently experiencing on the continent.— on the continent. currently the vaccine statistic _ on the continent. currently the vaccine statistic for _ on the continent. currently the vaccine statistic for the - on the continent. currently the vaccine statistic for the whole l on the continent. currently the. vaccine statistic for the whole of africa from £1.2 billion scratching people is just a 3.2% have africa from £1.2 billion scratching people isjust a 3.2% have been fully vaccinated. you think that with the economy. tell us a bit more about how it is impacting. i am assuming you are meaning because of lockdowns on issues like that, are you? lockdowns on issues like that, are ou? , , , i, lockdowns on issues like that, are ou? , ,i, i, , lockdowns on issues like that, are ou? i, , , you? yes, beyond lockdowns 'ust aeneral you? yes, beyond lockdowns 'ust general economic i you? yes, beyond lockdowns 'ust general economic activities. h you? yes, beyond lockdownsjust. general economic activities. travel has been restricted, hotels are working at low capacities. the low in economic activities are just too much. but even as we speak hundreds of people are dying every day across the continent. now we are seeing reduction in daily infections but beyond that is the number of deaths every day. lockdowns, but more
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importantly economics are not able to operate at full capacity is. the fiscal position of many african governments is really so weak that to stimulate the economy and to get african countries to come back, we couldn't do that like the way it was donein couldn't do that like the way it was done in rich countries with billions of dollars spent, we are not seen the same thing on the african continent and that is a situation we are in right now. unless this pandemic gets over and this things get back to normal, we will continue to see that each economy followed of this health crisis. and that is what we are emphasising. access to vaccines is still the surest way we know to get out of this pandemic. just looking at the figures, when you mentioned 80 million cases, 200,000 deaths, are you talking about across the whole of the continent of africa? if that is so, are you seeing this as more of an economic issue than a health issue? every single death is significant
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and critical, but the fear, the panic that comes from opening up, the policy response, the toll it has taken on policy—making itself, it is the top agenda for many african governments because things are not normal. the state of the pandemic is affecting notjust they have. people are dying every day, 200,000 deaths is a 200,000 needless deaths if they can get access to the vaccines. this is the challenge we are having. it is the challenge we are having. it is a health challenge and an economic challenge and so we don't want to de—emphasise every part of that. the question is how we can get out of the situation and if we can, we should do all we can to get out of this situation. that is the key message we're trying to pass across. what do you want happen now? rich countries what do you want happen now? iii c'i countries should... i am what do you want happen now? i c'i countries should... i am trying to
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look for the right word not to sound too dramatic, but countries are beginning to give poster loses two people that are beginning to give booster doses. they are giving booster doses. they are giving booster doses. they are giving booster doses to healthy adults. we are not in the same world. it is like giving grants to the kids a billion years to go to schools where the poorer people do not even have access to education. that is what it sounds like. it is amazing that this kind of policy response is what we are getting at a national level. we should be having a global response that should end the pandemic internationally. the main message here is that rich countries cannot think... this pandemic will prolong as long as there is no global response and we ended everywhere to begin condemned it in our own countries. it is understandable refocus on our countries but unless people think of this globally and
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pandemic globally, then we can reduce the chance of variants showing up and then the immunity we have for the current vaccine becomes useless. rich countries should be doing everything they can. the us is currently organising a summit on vaccine responses. right now that should be giving us an opportunity to do the most they can do to get these vaccines everywhere it is needed to get this whole world out of this pandemic situation. if we don't do that,...— don't do that,... thank you very much for _ don't do that,... thank you very much forjoining _ don't do that,... thank you very much forjoining us. _ there's been a shooting at a university in western russia — and six people are reported to have been killed. the incident happened at perm state university in the urals — where a young man reportedly opened fire inside the university building. police wounded and detained the attacker, who's believed to be a student. a seven—year—old boy reported missing from his home in scotland since sunday evening has been found.
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east ayrshire police post an update saying he had been found safe and well and thanking people for their help in the search. a police helicopter, marine and dock units and scottish fire and rescue service what a support unit had all been involved in looking for him. now it's time for a look at the weather. we are making a gentle transition into autumn at the moment. the nights are getting longer. we have the equinox this wednesday and then officially that is our astronomical start to autumn. for the next few days, there is a lot of warm sunshine to come so if you're set summer is hanging on. we have a weatherfront you're set summer is hanging on. we have a weather front this afternoon that could bring sharper showers. another fun trying to push on to the north—west of scotland. there will be showers here as well. but more in the cloud and strong winds but elsewhere warm sunshine, temperatures in the high teens or even lower 20s. we look to tuesday after some early morning mist and
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fog in the east clears, a lot of sunshine across the uk. a little bit busier to west and north—west. 0ne busier to west and north—west. one or two showers for western scotland but a lot of fine weather and once across the board, generally not a bad start to autumn. wednesday, things deteriorate thanks to a weather front getting into scotland and northern ireland before the end of the week, it looks like we will pump some fine weather up from the south and cling on to some rain for the next few days. —— warmer weather. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. we have got to try and fix it as fast as we can and make sure we have the supplies we want and make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we will have to do everything we can. a murder investigation is launched launched after four
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people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least six people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. millions of older and vulnerable people will be contacted to arrange their coronavirus booster shots from today — it comes as 12—15 year olds begin receiving their first dose in some parts of england and scotland. a major volcanic eruption is forcing villagers from their homes in the canary islands. this is the moment a house was engulfed by lava. domination at the emmy awards for the crown — it bags best drama — 0livia coleman is named best actess for her portrayal of the queen on a big night of british success. a leading football agent, who used to represent raheem sterling, has broken football association rules by signing under—age players, according to evidence seen by bbc panorama. aidy ward, who owns
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colossal sports management, also asked sterling to speak to a 15—year—old via video call, as part of an attempt by ward to sign him. the fa prohibits agents approaching players before they are in their 16th year. rory carson has this report. aidy ward is one of the most high—profile agents in football. we've spoken to a player who says he was approached by ward when he was just 12 years old, in breach of fa rules. foday nabay was born in sierra leone and moved to england with his mum when he was six. hejoined birmingham city academy and was picked for the england youth team. soon after, aidy ward got in touch. what did they say? just, like, how many teams wanted me to go to them. and why i should, like, why i should go. that is when my head...
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it started getting into my head a bit. aidy ward says he has never been foday�*s agent but panorama has obtained evidence that appears to contradict his claim. email correspondance shows ward was involved in negotiations to move foday, then 1a, to fulham, with agency fees if the transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being way more than my contract. i was happy with what i got. i did not move there for the money and that, but when i got to look at it i thought, wait, that is not right. foday says when he found out about the agency fees, he told fulham he would only sign if they were not paid. fa rules ban agents profiting from the transfer of underage players. fulham fc say it had not paid or agreed to pay mr ward in relation to foday�*s registration with the club. foday completed the transfer
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in 2013, but was released five years later. he blames mr ward for a move he was never happy with. i was young and did not know much about football, my mum doesn't know anything about football. i thought it was just normal. we have also obtained evidence that ward approached other underage players. 0ne document describes a meeting at this london restaurant between ward, a 15—year—old boy and his mother. aidy ward asked his famous client raheem sterling, a minority shareholder in colossal, to speak via video call to the boy in a bid by mr ward to attract the young player to his agency. sterling's lawyers told panorama says that as an england international he feels a responsibility to speak to aspiring players, but not about agents or financial issues and he supports fa rules to protect young players. raheem sterling dropped aidy ward as his agent late last year. ward is under investigation
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by the fa and says he cannot comment under respect for that process. you can see more on that story in panorama — football's broken dreams, tonight on bbc one at 8.30pm. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to urge her iranian counterpart to release british nationals being held in the country, when they meet in new york later. about a dozen western dual nationals are detained in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. caroline hawley�*s report contains some distressing images. elika ashoori makes macaroons and cakes for a living, treats for other people's celebrations, but her own wedding is on hold, her whole life consumed by her father's arrest. i have to always throw myself
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into my work to not think about it too much because it drives me crazy. he was never political. he was a mechanical engineer with a love of astronomy. throughout his entire life he has put me and my brother first. but in august in 2017, while visiting his elderly mother in tehran, anoosheh ashoori was thrown into iran's notorious evin jail, one of a dozen westerners being held in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. their families describe them as hostages being used by iranian authorities for political and financial leverage with the west. evin is notorious for being horrific. each room is shared by 15—20 people. they have rats and cockroaches all the time. he was interrogated very, very heavily. they threatened to hurt us throughout the interrogations. they told my dad that they knew where we lived, where we worked, what pets we had. my dad was saying, "i have nothing to confess to you." twice he tried to take his own life because he thought that if he was out of the equation, then they would not be able to hurt us.
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last month, cctv footage from inside evin hacked into and leaked. former inmates say it shows the outside world just a small glimpse of what the jail is like. elika fears her father will not get out until the iran and uk strike a bargain for his release. i mean, he is 67 now and he has been there forfour years, for having done nothing. who will be answerable to that? elika's father always supported everything she did. the nature of my business is constantly to talk to people about weddings, birthdays and to be excited for them. and that is why it was very difficult at first for me to do myjob. i didn't want to make things for happy people, as horrible as it sounds. now i use my business and i use my cakes to focus on people's happiness because it is kind of like a beam of hope.
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in her head she keeps painting the ultimate cake, the one she will make to eventually welcome him home. caroline hawley, bbc news. spain's prime minister has told residents of la palma in the canary islands that their safety is guaranteed after a volcano erupted there for the first time in 50 years. pedro sanchez postponed a trip to the un in new york to go to the island where villages have been evacuated and homes destroyed. courtney bembridge has more. for the first time in half a century, the cumbre vieja volcano erupted — with fountains of molten rock shooting hundreds of metres into the sky, and incandescent orange rivers flowing down the hillside. the island has been on high alert for the past week because of a huge increase in tremors — and thousands of people were told to leave their homes. the eruption started in the afternoon — plumes of smoke could be seen
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from across the island, and eyewitnesses described hearing a loud explosion. the noise coming from the volcano — it sounds like — i don't know — 20 fighterjets taking off right now, and it's extremely loud. i don't know how to explain it. it was powerful. powerful. to feel a sudden explosion like that. i could not imagine it would be so sudden. roads were quickly cut off. then as night fell, rivers of lava edging down the hillside reaching homes. the prime minister prime minister pedro sanchez has arrived in la palma after postponing his trip to new york for the united nations' general assembly this week.
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translation: we are very mindful of the fires that can break out of these eruptions, so have we deployed not just the civil guard and fire fighters, but also the military and emergency unit. i want to recognise the work that the red cross are doing, feeding and looking after those who have been forced from their homes. experts say it's not clear how long the eruption will last, and it's going to be an anxious wait for residents. courtney bembridge, bbc news. this a monument dedicated to all the dutch victims of the holocaust has opened in amsterdam. it lists 102,000 jewish people killed by the nazis — as well as more than 200 sinti and roma. tim allman reports. the holocaust was a crime committed in so many places, with so many victims. more than 100,000 of them, are named here. the first such memorial in the netherlands dedicated to a dark chapter in the country's history. translation: this monument confronts us with the criminal _ murder of thousands, murdered for no other reason
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than their identity. in doing so, the monument also demands accountability. accountability early as to whether more should be accountability as to whether more should be done during the war years to save those who were murdered. the netherlands was occupied much of the second world war with three quarters of the country's jewish population were killed, most by the nazis, but some by local collaborators, a difficult legacy to deal with and the king met with some of the survivors, seated next to the walls where the victims' names were inscribed. translation: i thought it was emotional. i just saw the name of a friend of mine, not anne frank
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or anyone famous, but a friend of mine and i found it hard to read. i knew she was dead of course. i still have a picture of her at home. as one survivor put it, this monument is a tribute that can never be erased and a warning that can never be forgotten. tim allman, bbc news. folic acid is to be added to flour across the uk, to reduce the risk of life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. the government said the move could prevent up to 200 birth defects every year. the new rules will only apply to non—wholemeal wheat flour, with gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour exempt. kate steele is the chief executive of the charity shine, which campaigns for families affected by spina bifida, earlier she told me about the difficulties around making sure women get enough folic acid. there are lots of unplanned pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message — pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message we _ pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message we really _ pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message we really need - pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message we really need to - pregnancies across the uk. but also, the message we really need to be i the message we really need to be getting across as folic acid supplements need to be taken at least eight weeks prior to pregnancy, not once a woman is
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pregnant. so it is a really important decision that the governments has taken today to get folic acid into flour, to help build up folic acid into flour, to help build up those levels that women need. it's been a big night for british talent at the emmys. the crown won seven awards, including best drama. josh o'connor and olivia colman took home trophies for their portrayals of prince charles and the queen, respectively. there were also prizes for kate winslet , for mare of easttown , and michaela coel, for i may destroy you. sophie long reports. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you!
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brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare of easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. 0h! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. olivia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh!
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i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh o'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. the headlines on bbc news... crisis talks on soaring gas prices — as the government considers propping up struggling energy firms. a murder investigation is launched launched after four people are found dead at a house in derbyshire. a gunman has opened fire inside a university in the russian city of perm, killing at least six people before being detained. several other people have been injured in the attack. thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university
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over the next few weeks. most courses will be offering a mixture of face—to—face and online learning. here's our education correspondent elaine dunkley who's in bolton. 10,000 students are going to be welcomed onto campus here in bolton and it is freshers' week, that rite of passage where you make friends, socialise, you find out about your course. last year, the pandemic meant there was huge disruption and a lot of events were cancelled, lectures weren't happening. that has all changed now. the full university experience. let's speak to some freshers. we have got hugo here. welcome to university. what are you looking forward to? i am looking forward to socialising again, making new friends. reading more books in the library. how much of a decision was it to come here? you saw what happened last year with disruption to student life. it was a big decision
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because i wanted to come to university. usually when you go to university, you want to have friends and be around people, socialise more and when you are behind a computer, you don't have that. so you are looking forward to getting started? exactly, yes. making lots of friends. going to lectures. it is your second year. how difficult was last year? it is like freshers for you as well. quite difficult last year. a lot of online learning. but not really getting to see any friends. it was difficult last year, yes. in terms of freshers' week, what are you looking forward to? seeing my friends again. it has made me appreciate what i did not have last year and i am just glad to be back. joining me now we have professor george holmes, the vice chancellor. what reassurances have you got for students who are starting now? we saw disruption last year. what can you offer students? we are very much open for business. the whole university sector,
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but certainly here in bolton. you can see by the lively movement on campus today. the opportunities to study on campus but if you miss a session, you can pick it up online. we are not relying on online learning. it does give someone who might ultimately have to isolate, the reassurance they can catch up on a course work. we have got all the measures on campus they give the reassurance, from the bikes you can take to get into to commute, to the scanners and the track and trace on the desk so we can quickly identify if someone does need to isolate on the year. the key message is the more students are vaccinated, double vaccinate, the better we all are on campus, the safer the whole country is. you have a vaccination bus own site. we want to make it easy for students. there is a test centre to test regularly and we had the vaccination bus here to make sure they can get free access straightaway. if we start to see a spike in covid cases, is there a
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back—up plan? yes, we have many back—up plans. we are used to this at the university of bolton. we have been pretty good through the pandemic. we have got them checked out by public health england and also by the department for education. we can go for a range of scenarios if we need to. at this stage, it is looking good for students, which is great. fantastic. kim, you did online learning last year. tell me how you found it. there were lots of benefits for you. although it was challenging and not having the face—to—face and missing friends, it really benefited me. i am a mature student with children. it helped me. a lot of child care close down so i could still continue my studies and not give them up because of childcare issues. yes, it has benefited me doing it online. how do you feel first day back? we have seen students coming through, socialising, meeting up? it is good to be back. face—to—face learning is better. online has
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helped but i do prefer to be face—to—face. i helped but i do prefer to be face-to-face._ helped but i do prefer to be face-to-face. i, i, i, , face-to-face. i am glad to be back. you are all— face-to-face. i am glad to be back. you are all off— face-to-face. i am glad to be back. you are all off to _ face-to-face. i am glad to be back. you are all off to lectures _ face-to-face. i am glad to be back. you are all off to lectures and - you are all off to lectures and inductions. lots of events across the country for a freshers' week and for students. there is still caution around university campuses. but the general feeling around university campuses. but the generalfeeling is around university campuses. but the general feeling is a around university campuses. but the generalfeeling is a lot around university campuses. but the general feeling is a lot of the students are glad to get the experience back again. breaking news. we have heard the business secretary is going to be making a statement on the gas industry in the commons at 3:30pm. he has been holding talks over the weekend with industry bosses and the talks have continued this morning. he is going to be updating the comment at 3:30pm. some other breaking news to bring you. the birth of a royal baby. his statement has been put out. they are delighted to announce the safe arrival of their daughter on saturday the 18th of september at
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18 minutes to midnight at the westminster hospital in london. the baby weighed £6 and two ounces. the bb's baby weighed £6 and two ounces. the bb�*s grandparents and great pam parents that my grandparents have been informed and are happy about the news. —— the parents and grandparents have been informed. if they have got a name at the moment, they have got a name at the moment, they are not sharing it with us at this point. that is the queen's 12th this point. that is the queen's12th great—grandchild. a doctorfor great—grandchild. a doctor for princess great—grandchild. a doctorfor princess beatrice. —— mackie daughter. for the first time in more than a century, the chelsea flower show is being held in september, which means dahlias, pumpkins and autumnal colours will replace the usual spring and summer blooms. members of the british royalfamily and celebrities will get the first glimpse of the show, before it opens to the public tomorrow.
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the finishing touches, a finalflourish, the pressure to get itjust right. chelsea is looking autumnal. the change in date this year means late—summer flowers like asters and dahlias are in their prime. and a september show gives designers a chance to display a warmer and grassier look. here, it's all about the trees. david dodd has designed the queen's green canopy garden to celebrate next year's platinum jubilee. we've got a field maple here and the field maple just gives the most spectacular yellow colour. and you can see it is already starting to turn now. it sits on the largest plot at chelsea. 21 trees have been planted with grassland, hay bales and a wildflower meadow. if everyone can get behind the campaign and plant a tree, we can make a huge impact and a huge
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difference to the environment. and you've got to think about what trees give us. and when i was asked to do it, i got very excited, because i'm a bit of a tree hugger. and just finally, do you think the queen would like this garden? i certainly hope so. i might be off to the tower if she doesn't. the autumnal look is everywhere, with a focus on harvest fruit and vegetables. an autumn chelsea will have a different feel and a different mood. but the show also hopes to capture that love of gardening and the outdoors that many of us discovered during lockdowns. giant window boxes in the cop26 garden to mark the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year. the message — even if you don't have a garden, planting small flowers and shrubs can help combat the effects of climate change. and a tribute to nursing in the florence nightingale garden, marking 200 years since her birth. there are medicinal flowers here with a focus on wellbeing. and late—summer foxgloves — her favourite flower — ready to plant.
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some special guests got an early viewing, but these nurses will also be able to enjoy the garden after the flower show, when it's moved to st thomas' hospital in london. florence nightingale was very much a forward—thinking nurse. a lot of what we do today is very much embedded in what she taught us — nursing at the forefront, and, you know, that's where we still are. it's a privilege. i think, for a lot of nurses, i think they'll be overwhelmed by it, if i'm really honest, and they'll be really proud to see someone saying thank you for all the hard work they've done. a chelsea flower show in september has brought its challenges for everyone involved. it's likely to be a one—off chance to enjoy the unfamiliar sights an autumn show brings. daniella relph, bbc news, chelsea.
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now for a time for a look at the weather. autumn is now slowly creeping in across the uk. the leaves are picking up a little bit. some early morning mist and fog to be found in places. in the days ahead, a lot of sunshine and still some notable warmth to the sunshine. it doesn't look like the story could change to a more lively autumnal picture towards the end of the week. through monday and tuesday, this area of high pressure through the southwest is trying to dominate. light winds for many. the tale of the weather front will bring showers into eastern england in the short term. the weakening weather front into the north—west overnight. hardly any rain in association with it. there will be some mist and fog across eastern england. elsewhere, patchy cloud. a mild and fine night on the whole. for a tuesday, the high pressure is more dominant on
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our pressure chart. the isobars are quite squeezed together. a breezy day across northern ireland and scotland. cloud around here. a lot of sunshine to come. early morning mist and fog clearing. temperatures up mist and fog clearing. temperatures up to 20 or 21 celsius. some showers into western scotland. wendy still for western scotland —— make it windier. initially, heavy rain. the front weekends as it slides south during the course of the day. strong winds across western scotland. rain for northern england and ireland. weddings nay to make wednesday as the equinox. —— wednesday as the equinox. it is the start to autumn. the stronger winds affect all parts
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of the uk. some weather fronts tucking in as well. perhaps the greatest risk of showers in some places. by the end of the week, the strengthening wind, we have already experienced that in scotland and northern ireland. the gust strengths here. still some warmth to come to the south.
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crisis talks this lunchtime over the soaring price of gas. the business secretary is meeting energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust. now the market has shot up, they really are between a rock and a hard place, but there are fundamental problems in the energy market. we'll bring you the latest on how the crisis is affecting you. also this lunchtime... a dad says he is broken, after his 11—year—old daughter and 13—year—old son were found dead alongside another child and a mum. a murder investigation has begun. the first 12 to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. a volcano erupts on a spanish holiday island in the canaries. cheering. and british talent wins multiple honours at the emmy tv awards last night.

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